OCR Interpretation


People's voice. (Wellington, Kan.) 1890-1917, June 01, 1899, Image 6

Image and text provided by Kansas State Historical Society; Topeka, KS

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85032801/1899-06-01/ed-1/seq-6/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

NO FESTIVALS.
Admiral Dewey wants no Recep
tions or Entertainments.
He is Coming Home to Rest and not to Adver.
tlse Himself No Demonstrations for Him
will Please the Sensible Old Admiral.
Admiral Dewey, at 1 1 r j K'n yet
terday, in on an Intel view said:
"Nobody is uioie suo;b;e of 111?
kindness of the peoi h wlin li r- ex
landed i n vital ion-, u I do nut aim
for entertainment. My health wih
not stand it at pre;eiii. Two week
of perfect quiet ought to make a new
mm of me.
"I have the greatest enthusiasm a?
to the future of the Philippines. I
hope to see America's possessions the
key to oriental commerce and civili
zation. The brains of our great coun
try will develop the untold agricul
tural and mineral richness of the
islands. We must never sell them.
Such an action will bririi.' on another
great war. We will never part with
the Phillipines, I am sure, and la
future years the idea that auyuLe
should have seriously suggested it will
be one of the curiosities of history.
"The insurrection is broken. There
will be no more iiard battles, and the
new era for the islands that was tern
porarily delayed by the rising will
soon begin. Agoioajdo and his gen
eral m us, be captured and then the
very semblance of an insurrection will
oasf.
"TlitOlympia will go home leisurely.
I want all my officers and men to get
the greatest benetlt of all the stops
we make. We will pick our places
with this in mind. They have earned
a rest by a year of steady duty with
out respite. While I am glad to be
going home, I cinnot say good bye to
Manila without regrets. There have
heen many pleasant occurrences
during the months of harassing re sponsibilities
and we will not forget
them."
A dispatch from Hong Kong yester
day, reads: Admiral Dewey shows
great improvement already, Install
ed spaciously at the Peak hotel, with
lofty windows that catch every mouth
fulof wind from the sea, he is losing
much of 'he languor which he wore
when he landed from his blistered
cruiser. It was rest that he needed
rest and cooler air. He is getting
both. Society at the Peak is well
bred. There are no disturbing factors
there. It is here hat the English
officers and their wives, the govern;
ment officials, the rich merchants and
distinguished travelers take refuge
inca the heat and noise of the town.
They all feel a deep interest in the
hero of Manila bay, but they respect
his desire for quiet. He has already
become one of themselves. With the
ease of a polished man of the world,
he dropped into his place in the little
community that really resembles a
house party at an English country
residence. Strangers to that commun
ity cannot intrude upon him, how
ever. The government detectives see
to that. So do the detectives hired
by Consul General Wildman. So do
the swarms of Chinese servants.
If the Filipino junta ever meant
more than bluster by Its hints of
assassination, it has been entirely
cowed by the British police. Howard
Bray, the English confederate of the
insurgents,has been suddenly stricken
dumb. So have his American fellow
schemers. These people received
brusque warning from the authorities
that if they did not behave them
selves they would be treated to a
dizzy surprise. The Filipinos them
selves were similarly cautioned and
they are under close surveillance.
At dusk today when the sea breeze
set in, Admiral Dewey took a walk
along the bluff with Consul Wildman
and they remained out for half an
hour. The victor's bearing was alert
and his voice vigorous.
14 Evil Dispositions
Are Early Shown."
Just so evil in the blood
comes out in shape of scrof
ula, pimples, etc., in children
and young people. Taken in
time it can be eradicated by
using Hood's Sarsaparilla.
In older people, the sftcrmath
of irregular living shows it
self in bilious conditions, a
heavy head, a foul mouth,
a general bad feeling.
It is the blood, the impure blood,
friends, which is the real cause. Purify
that with Hood's Sarsaparilla and
happiness will reign in your Emily,
BlOOd Poison-" I lived in a bed of tire
for years owing to blood poisoning that fol
lowed small pox. It broke out all eve r my
body, itching intensely. Tried doctors and
hospitals in vain. I tr.Vd Hint's Suapa
rilla. It helped. I kept at it and was en
tirely cured. I could go on the housetops
and shout about it." Mrs. J. T. Williams,
Caraondale, Pa.
Scrofula Sores -" My hahy at two
months had scrofula sores on cheek and
arm. Local applications and physicians'
medicine did little or no good. Hood's vr
saparilla cured him permanently. He is
now four, with smooth fair skiii.'' Mrs.
S. S. Wrotex, Fannington, Del.
3
Hwtf P ilirI! ; tliejimi-irr;tat'p ami
swamp land sived them from destruc
tion LawtOD returning, leaving with
MacAilhur on the front regular
troops to replace volunteers."
Manila, May 2i. (11:20 a.m.)-A
scout from the party of American
troops encountered a body of insur
gents at Santa Uila and -.lie Ameri
cans being reinforced by Brigadier
General Punston with the South
Dakota regiment A lieutenant ami
live men of the American force were
wounded and ten of the insurgent
were killed and several captured.
General Hughes, who Ins been ap
pointed to relieve Colonel Smith as
governor of the Visa) an district, Will
be succeeded as provost marshal bj
Brigadier General Wiilston, who
recently arrived here io command of
the troops ol the Sixth artillery.
The Wet Season is Bad.
A dispatch to the New York Herald
from Manila says: General Lawton
is at Malolos with practically his
entire command. He is withdrawing
to the railroad, as the region is diffi
cult to hold during the rainy season.
The roads will be impassible in a few
days. As supply basts, small garri
sons will control the navigation at
points on the rivers Rio Grande, Bag
bag and San Fernando.
Washington, D. C, May 25.-General
Otis has forwarded the following
dispatch to the war department- "On
23d instant, Third infantry, return
ing to Baliuag from San Miguel, were
attacked morning, noon and evening
by a large force of enemy, suffering in
casualties two men killed and thir
teen wounded: enemy repulsed leav
ing many killed, large number
wounded aud prisoners. Yesterday
enemy appeared in vicinity of San
Fernando; attacked -by Kansas and
Montana regiments, which suffered
slight loss. Enemy driven through
rice fields, leaviog fifty dead, thirty
eight wounded and twenty-eight
prisoners; fifty rifles and other prop
erty captured; their retreat thrown
Short oi Men.
Manila, May 26, 7.40 p.m. Tht
events of the past week have eniplu
sized the need of a much larger army
here wi'.hout which, according to the
best authorities in Manila, It woulu
be attempting the impossible to
expect to establish American suprem
acy in the Phillppine.islands. Most of
the recent fighting has been in terri
tory which the Americans had swept
but which they had been compelled
to abandon because they could not
spare troops to hold it.
The forces commanded by Generals
Mac Arthur and Lawton held two im
portant lines of cemmunication and
commerce, the railroad to. San Fer
nando and the Rio Grande. But
much of the country they have swept,
including scores of the smaller townp,
and some of the larger ones, have
been left uncovered, simply for want
of men to hold them, and the insur
gents haTe returned and are occupy
ing the towns the Americans aban
doued aud are camping in the jungles
and woods outside others, on the
watcu for chances to harass the garri-
ocs and attack scouting parties ot
detached companies with greatei
forces. This is the kind of warfare
they prefer to regular battles.
It appears that the Filipinos who
attacked the Third regiment betweeL
San Miguel and Baliuag were part of
Pio dei Pilar's army. They came
from the south across the mountains.
presumably to meet a wagon train
which Gen. Lawton expected along the
road. They also planned to capture
several large detachments and were
placed in ambush at different points,
tiring from the jungle at a distance ol
200 yards and gave ths Americans one
of the hardest tights experienced Id
the campaign. The Filipinos lost
more heavily than the Americans in
all the recent encounters. The insur
gent generals take the loss of arms
more to heart than they do the loss of
men,
Foreigners who have arrived here
from the insurgents country, under
the recent order of expulsion, say the
cemeteries in all the towns are filled
with fresh graves. A majority of the
Filipinos wounded die because tht
insurgent hospitals are inadequate,
medicines are scares and they have
few surgeons except Spanish captives
who have been impressed.
Anent the death of the infant child of Mr.
and Mrs. J. B. Warren.l
To little crib Is empty now,
The little clothM laid by;
A mother's hope, a father's joy.
In Daath's cold urns doth lie.
Go, little plljr!m. to thy hme,
On yonder blissful short;
We miss thee here, but soon will come
Where thou hut gone before.
J. B. War rex.
Bears the
Signature
af
IN M los Hut jyars I
Aerea of Aeilr Machinery. I
The Greater America Exposition at
Omaha this year will present many
novel exhibits from the islands of the
sea recently acquired by the United
States. NatiTe tribes and their primi
tive habitations will be transplanted.
Many curious exhibits are being col-1
teoted, the first collection of the kind '
to be shown in the United State. The
Omaha show will run largely to live ;
exhibits, which term comprehends
moving exhibits calculated to attract I
popular interest in their operation. For
all inch exhibits space in the Eirv- j
sition will be free. This feature is to '
be carried to creater lengths than ever !
before. The ijreat structure erected by 1
the Oinalm Exposition last year have
been pure riase-1 and will be filled with
live exhibits, showing the process of
manufaetr.Tv in many lineR of industry.
Althongh the Greater America Ex- 1
position Company has been organ-
ized but a mouth or two, the Bureau j
of Exhibits is flooded with appli
cations for space. It is only a mat
BSC of selection. Mr. I. N. ' Simpson,
Who has just been appointed superin- j
tendent of the Bureau of Exhibits, is
now w the east negotiating with some
of the great manufacturing aud indus
trial concerns which have applied for
space in which to operate their exhibits.
Inasmuch as the buildings are ready
to receive exhibits, these negotiations
are proving most successful, as Mr.
Simpson has booked many attractive
exhibits which will occupy all available
space.
The increasing prosperity which pre
vails throughout the midwest is re
panted as sufficient guaranty that the
RARE DISPLAY AT OMAHA
Distinguishing Feature of the
Greater America Exposition.
EXTENSIVE COLONIAL EXHIBIT!
Popular Dtilre For Information ( .. ra
tag Our Mew Innnlar Poaaeedoni la-
diiri W-lilRion Ofltalali to See That
the Meta at Omaha Thta Tear U Com
plete In Eierythlng Will Open July 1.
The wi-A spread popular desire for
Jaforniatiou e m-erning the inhabitants,
products huiI industries of the islands
of the fea lecmtly acquired by the
United States is soon to be met.
Eeorttaiyoi W;ir Alger has expressed
a willingness to co-operate w ith the
managers of the Greater America
Expofltion at Oni?ha and will have
the officers of army transports instructed
to cany objects of interest intended for
the Exposition from the ports of our new
insular possessions. The war depart
ment has already furnished transporta
tion to the agents of the Exposition who
are collecting exhibits. Transports
leave Manila every week or two and in
some cases they are without cargoes.
One of these vessels will be utilized to
SPRUANCE LEADS-
OTHERS TRY TO FOLLOW.
1IIL1
1
$5,00
rm.
11191 j?
HHUPjffWAf
eight or ten millions of people within a
radios of 50) miles of Om:iha will at
tend this great colonial exhibit in large
numbers. The railroads thronghout
that territory have expressed a willing
ness to distribute advertising matter
broadcast. The new Exposition Com
pany is amply supplied with capital and
there is every assvaaOB that the ulti
mate success this year will equal if not
exceed the wonderful record made by
the exposition of 18i8. There will be
many spectacular attractions and State
Exhibits. The gates will open July 1
and close November L
NATIVE bwaLPflSI
Fill WORSTED SUITS.
$6,50
Luzon'
The Midway.
The Midway streets of the Greater
America Exposition at Omaha this year
will teem with unique attractions. As
was true of the exposition of 1898 this
section of the forthcoming show will
prove to be the mo.-t powerful magnet
on the grounds. Concessionaires have
already paid in thousands of dollars as
first payment money and nearly a hun
dred applications are now on file await
ing acceptance by the managers. These
if accepted would net the exposition
about $f0,000. The Midway this year,
however, will be far different in all par
ticulars from that of a year ago, as. in
deed, will be the entire Exposition. It
is a new deal all around.
OMAHA'S NEW EXPOSITION.
President MlllcrTalks of the Glories of the
Fair That Is Be Held This Year.
The New York Snn contains an in
terview with Dr. George L. Miller, pres
ident of the Greater America Exposi
tion, in which among other things he
says:
"Yon are aware of the great success
of Omaha's Trans-Mississippi and In
ternational Exposition. From the pres
ident of the United States down to the
humblest visitor who was there last
year all will tell you that not only as an
exhibition, but in a financial success, it
had no parallel in the history of the
country. And it was done in the face of
all sorts of difficulties, arising in a want
of confidence, in enterprise aud in a feel
ing that it would be impossible to or
ganize 6uch an exposition in that see
tion of the country. It is true that it
has paid every dollar at par and has a
surplus in the treasury to meet con
tingent liabilities.
"The two words 'Greater America'
mean that we propose to represent in
the coming Exposition all new acquisi
tions of territory we have made through
the war with Spain and by annexation,
as in the case of Hawaii. We propose
to produce on the Exposition grounds
and in the splendid buildings, which
are in perfect order at Omaha, repre
sentatives of these races, their huts,
products, weapons and everything that
represent them as peoples. We pro
pose, moreover, to repeat the Indian
congress, which was a great attraction
last year, by gathering representatives
of all tribes hitherto hostile to each
other and arrangementa have been made
to have this doue with the sanction and
aid of the commissioner of Indian af
fairs. To these will be added many
other features, including a horse show.
Agricilture and horticulture will be
represented in a way that will equal
anything in that" line anywhere in the
country heretofore. What we seek now
is to draw the attention of the manufac
turing interests to this great, growing
center in the west and I wish to invite
the people in this section of the country
I to Decome better acquainted with west
! era people and come among them with
! their magnificent machinery and show
them how it is operated."
carry implements of agriculture, native
pn du( ts of the Philippine sskads, bam
boo and fibre mattrials, wtupous of
war and cv n Filipino families, the do
ire of tii Ex frftio&inajif'p rj being ta
hring shout KrO families from the FTiii
Ippines end set them up in imive huts
npontbe ExpositloBi graanda. Inhab
itants and objects of other Mauds will
also be rxhibitf d at tbie Exposition.
Secretary of Agrfcclina Wilson
pledged himself aud his department to
do everything possible to expedite the
gathering of thrse exhibits. "What
evt r 1 as been collected," said Secretary
Wilson, "is at the disposal of the
Cr a!cr America Exposition, and I will
SO notify our people not only in the
Philippines, but in the West Indies
also."
Observers at the weather bureau
stations throughout Cuba and Porto
liico will be expected to act as agents
of the Exposition in the further collec
tion of articles illustrating the products,
industries and peoples of thoso islands.
The Er-.osition at Omaha will open
Jny 1 i . continue until the first day
r; Ft. v ruber. The buildings aud
BiT.i m rl- Exposition of 1808 have
I U 1 sud the landscapes are
:m d into tropical gardens
1 ' . v ut and beauty. The large
Wiilie mn ures will be tinted and dec
crated !u barmoay with the tropical
folutge, pUnt life and flora which will
abound not only thronghout the beauti
ful bin ff tract at the eastern portion of
the grounds, but also on either side of
the lagoon in the grand court. The gen
eral aspect of the grounds ib to be wholly
different from that of last year while
the diversified exhibits from the sea
islands will afford a rare attraction, the
like of which has never before been pre
sented in the United States.
S I HI
til 111 In MM
iMJ.UU 111 JHi UU,
Ferris JtitiuMMi mt Win. L ooker of
Oxord sp.pt Panda? in the city.
John Brown of 'jH'dwell, was a
visitor In ttie city i-'ui.d iy.
Mrs. Wra. Gallonp of Oxford is ser
iously ill at the Whited hotel. She
came here about, ten davs ago on a
visit to Mrs. Whited.
The twelfth anntnl state c mven
'ion of the ChrlvlUn Endeavor union
will b held in Wich'ta June 7.
8 and 0
Claude Whitfield Irlerraptied from
Alva. 0 T . to Hiney Glam mn SaUr
rt.j lltai i heav jr wind there Frida
rtfyltl
h.o
Alv
re I
niraofd 'I great many
ern Co ion a.: vices from
tliat no rlnrruue wa!
H I li- ! oriu passed eas'
if a v .
The D'OSOrratie c antf centra1
'ir- i; at r merlin tht-
dtj Tl u -d.i-. adopted the Crawford
uHtntt priman si.t.-m and fixed the
d't it li Mi..g the prim rles for
June 24 tW .'ate of the Popu'im pri
mwi s Th-tw . reform parties will
fii-r this re.ir ;. jn the put. The
n"minees of b-t'i parties will be
printed rtn ne tfr-kt
Our Stock is now Complete with th. best Assortment of
Clothing ever Carried in the Town. Ou- Motto, as osoaL
TOP Quality -BOTTOM Prioas.
Civs us a Call.
CLEM SPRUANCE.
Newlmplem'nt Store
First door North of the Racket. Don't buy until you
see our goods and get our prices.
Full Line UUGGIES and WAGONS.
BROWN & HACK1TE Y
The Best
Is the Santa F-. The iiverago tempera
ture duriiif i he jouroey is less than
that for the same period at your home.
Summer Route Tbentlie car' re cmf"rtabif.
tlfcue is scarcely noticeable. Pullman
TO Cell If Om lei Pa'ace and tourist suepeis and free chal
cars on all California trains.
T. E. PURDT,
AsreaL
Discovered by a Woman.
Another areat discovery has beei.
made, aod that too, by a lady in this
country. ''Disease fastened iu
clutches upon her and for seven years
she withstood its severest tests, but
tier vital organs were undermined an J
death seemed imminent. For three
months she couched incessantly, aod
could not sleep. She finally discovered
a way tor recovery, by purchasing of us
i bottle of Dr. King's New Discovery
for consumption, and was so much
relieved on taking first dose, that she
slept all night; and with two bottles,
hai been absolutely cured. Her name
is Mrs. Luther Lutz." Thus writes
W. C. Hamnick SiCo., of Shelby, N.C.
Trial bottles free at F. B. Snyder's
drug store. Regular size 50c and II.
Every bottle guiiranteed. 4
Advertisers
Who have triednit, say the Voice
reaches the buyer.
Advance and Garr Scott
Threshers, Parson Self
Feedcas. Ktissell wind stackers.
E. R. DeYOE, Agt.
Deafaess Canaot be Cored
by Incal application as the? cannot reach
the diseased portion of toe ear. There Is
only ooe war to cure deafness, and that it
by constitutional remedies. Deafness la
caused by tin Inflamed condition of the mu
cuos lining- of the Xustarhlan Tube. Wben
ibis tube gits Inti-inu'd you bavea rumbling
eound or imperfect hearing, and when It la
entirely cl-d deafness Is the result, and
unlets tbe ii.thimmatlcn can be taken out
mid this tube restored to It rormal condi
tion, hearing will be destroyed forevar; nrae
cases out of ten are caused by catarrh, which
is notblna; but an Inflamed condition of tbe
mucous hit' ICS!
We will give One Hundred Dollars for any
caae of Deafness (caused by catarrh) that
cannot be cured by Hall's Catarrh Cure,
Send for circulars, tree.
f. . CHtHfffV A Co.. Toledo, O.
Sold by Druggists. 75c.
Hall's Family I'ills are th best
Riaans Tabules: one gives relief.
Ripana Tabules cure biHoasnesa.
lipans Tabules: gentle cathartic
EaWarpSaaWHBJP
tbe moat noted Blackhawk and Pblre stallion
ownedby Frank Tute of Oxford will stand
tnissea-o i at the Illin. Ub irn In Wellington.
He Ism large ;o purpose horse weighing
about lauu louuas; a sure cult getter; nice
style.
TBKMS: Flht d r to Insure allying
eoU; ffi.Oj fr the season; f4 00 for r Ingle -er-I
e. in be handled b W. 8. Longmun.
CalNnd sc.- the b rs- whether you use him
or M
FRANK TATE.
CASTOR I A
For Infants and Children.
Tbe Kind You Have Always Bought
Bears the
Signature o
I I O YD
Dr. Leoflhartft's
ANTI-PILL
Nervoua HU. Action notfollowej
7 NerrwuDcbfttj. Dowbttt? Try HI
Mis Ella Kendr'c's of the County
High school, spent Sunday with
parents at South Haven,

xml | txt