OCR Interpretation


Weekly journal-miner. [volume] (Prescott, Ariz.) 1908-1929, August 04, 1915, Image 1

Image and text provided by Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records; Phoenix, AZ

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85032923/1915-08-04/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

.vet
Weekly Journal -Miner
PIONEER PAPER OF ARIZONA
PRESCOTT, ARIZONA, WEDNESDAY MORNING, AUGUST 4, 1915.
FIFTY-SECOND YEAR
PL ES 10
NOTES ARE
Soon To Be Given
Out For Publication
ALL DEAL WITH RIGHTS
OF NEUTRALS IN. WAR
TIMES; CAPERTON
PACIFYING HAITI.
IS
By Associated Press.
WASHINGTON, lAug. 2. Three
notes from Great Britain and one
from Germany, all dealing with the
commercial rights of neutrals in war
times arc before Lansing tonight. Ar
rangements arc being made for their
publication simultaneously in Europe
and America in accordance with dip
lomatic etiquette. The British notes
will probably be given out for publi
cation Wednesday morning and the
German note the following day.
The German note continues the
discussion of the sinking of the Am
erican ship Frye. The British notes
all deal with the blockade of the
Allies and the treatment of neutral
commerce as it affcctSj the German
Allies.
Arranging Peace Conference.
WASHINGTON, Aug. 2. Rcar
Admifal Capcrton cabled from Port
Au Prince that he is co-operating
with prominent natives of Haiti to se
cure the restoration of the govern
ment. A commission of Haitians and
an American officer has been sent to
Cape Haitien. where the Bobo revo
lution originated, to disarm the na
tives and bring the rival, political
leaders to Port Au Prince for a gen
eral peace conference. A guard for
the FrcnCli legation landed from the
French cruiser Descartes at 7 o'clock
this morning.
o
E
AT
OF
SIGNIFICANT INSCRIPT
IONS ARE REMOVED
FROM CASKET AND
FLORAL PIECE.
NEW YORK, Aug. 2. An enorm
ous crowd attended the fuueral of
Charles Becker, who was executed
for the murder of Herman Rosenthal.
When the procession entered the
cemetery a uniformed attendant re
moved the inscription "Sacrificed to
Politics" from the floral cross, the
largest floral tribute.
The police earlier induced Mrs.
Becker to remove the casket plate
blaming Governor Whitman for the
death of her husband.
Before the body was taken to the
church friends gathered at the house j
to pay their last respects. 1'olicc re
serves formed them in a line half a
mile long. Many policemen of all
ranks were in the line.
o
VILLA TROOPS REVOLT
DOUGLAS, Aug. 2. It became
known tonight from authentic sources
that the Villa troops garrisoning Pal
omas. Ascension and Casas Grandes
in the State of Chihuahua had re
volted recently and declared for Car
ranza. WEATHER FORECAST
For Arizona. "Fair."
SENT 10
LANSING
III!
FUNERAL
FOR DATA
in k
DEPARTMENT
CITY COUNCIL INTEREST
ED IN CHIEF TILTON'S
PLAN TO EQUIP FORDS
TO FIGHT FLAMES.
(From Tuesday's Daily.)
The city council at its meeting last
night decided to have Chief Bert Til-
ton furnish they with information
and data regarding the installation of
an auto fire department, ..instead of
the present horse, hay and grain sys
tem, as it was termed. This question
was brought up some time ago by
Chief Tilton and the action of the
council in asking for details gives
promise of an auto fire department
for this city.
Tilton's plan is to purchase two
Fords and equip them to carry hose
and other fire-fighting apparatus. It
is his contention that it will save
both money for the city and add to
the efficiency of the department. The
horses, which arc at present in use.
cost yearly about $900 for care and
feed. This amount would almost buy
and equip the gas fire department.
On August 15th the city council
will meet as a board of equalization
to adjust the assessments made on
city prop'erty by the city assessor.
The city treasurer's reports for June
and July were as follows: Cash on
hand June 30. $22,650.64; received
during July $3,201,63; expenditures,
$5,811.73; cash oir hand July 31,
$20,040.54.- - "
Chief of Police Robert Robbins re
ported 25 arrests for the month of
June, the sale of two dog licenses,
fines on impounded stock $20. and
the sale of an impounded horse for
$42. The owner of the horse is un
known and $37 awaits him at the
city hall if he appears for it. For
the month of July, Robbins reported
the arrest of 31 persons and $16 col-
ccted as fines on impounded stock.
City Recorder F. C. Whisman for
the month of June had 25 cases one of
which was discharged, another sen-
ence suspended and in 23 bonds
amounting to $lla were forfeited.
For July Whisman reported 31 cases.
two of which were suspended, one
committed and bonds amounting to
$140 forfeited in the other 28.
Dr. H. T. Southworth, city health
officer, reported three births and
nine deaths for the month xf June.
R. N. Morrcll, foreman of the
water department, reported for the
month of June that 11,401,254 gallons
of water had been disbursed, water
billed out amounted to $3,263.80 and
the expenses of the department were
$1,500.78.
o
BACK TO BERLIN
BERLIN, Aug. 2. The German
empress after traveling through East
Prussia with tfce crown princess, left
Koenigsburg for Berlin.
o
Steamer Goes On
Reef In Dense Fog
By Associated Press.
SAN FRANCISCO, Aug. 2. The
steamship Georgian floated off the
rocks of Duxbury reef where she
went ashore in a dense fog early to
day. Tugs responding to a wireless
for help pulled her off. The damage,
f any, was not ascertained. She was
bound here.
AUSTRIANS LOSE HEAVILY
GENEVA, Aug. 2 A dispatch from
Innsbruck, Austria, says that terrific
fighting is in progress northwest of
Warsaw, and that north of Lublin the
Russians are fighting a powerful rear
guard action. In this vicinity the
Austrians have lost 40,000 men in the
last 48 hours. The dispatches say
that south of Cholm there have been
constant counter-attacks and that the
Austrians have not advanced since
Saturday. East of Ivangorod the
Austro-Gcrmans advanced 40 miles in
four days.
o
SILVER
NEW YORK, Aug. 2. Silver, unquoted.
Three Americas Are
Decide Fate Of Mexico
At Coming Conference
By Associated Press.
WASHINGTON, Aug. 2. The
United States has decided to ask the
co-operation of South and Central
America in the next step to restore
peace in Mexico. The ambassadors
of Argentina, Brazil and Chile and
the ministers from Rolivia, Uruguay
and Guatemala have been asked to
confer with Secretary Lansing next
Thursday.
While the state department has
characterized the coming conference
as an informal one, the sentiment has
been growing among American of
ficials that the next step in the Mexi
can situation should be one which
would meet the approval of the world
and should be taken in concert with
the nations of Central and South
GLOBE, Aug. 2. Undismayed by
their failure to carry their point in
the last state election, opponents of
capital punishment are now in Globe
circulating a petition that is so clev-'
crly worded that a number of per-1
sons arc reported to have signed it i
without realizing that it is directed at
the death penalty in this state.
Leroy Ladd, formerly of Globe and ',
now secretary to the governor, is re-1
ported to have circulated part of the
petitions throughout the State aud i
others were said to have been in the j
hands of Ed. Layton, a former Globe i
man who is now a guard at the state j
prison at Florence. Layton was in I
Globe recently and is quoted as hav-!
ing asked a number of acquaintances
to sign the petition. I
One of the men who arc at present
handling the petitions here told a
local business man that he was re-1
ceiying six cents for each name he '
obtained on the book. He failed to,
say where the money is coming from
and at the present time that consti- -tutes
a mystery although it is believ- f
ed that Ladd sent the papers here t
from Phoenix. It is not stated
whether he or someone else guaran-1
teed the commission to the workers.
TO BE RELEASED
BY GERMANS
By Associated Press.
BERLIN. Aug. 2. Harris L. Wil-
son, of Portland. Ore., and Washing-
ton, clerk of the American consulate j
here, who was arrested a week ago'
on a charge by the German authori-
tics of assisting a British subject in
securing an American passport in or
der to escape from Germany, will be
released tomorrow at the request of
the American government and sent
to the United States.
MITTAU TAKEN
BERLIN, Aug. 2. It was officially
announced here this afternoon that
the Germans have occupied Mittau,
the capital of the Russian province
of Courland, 25 miles southeast of
Riga.
LITTLE DAISY GOING UP
LOS ANGELES. Auc 2. United
Verde Extension high, closing at
?6.50.
SOURCE OF COIN
FOR CRUSADE
A MYSTERY
GLERK
America, even if in the last event, the
trend
should be toward, military ac-'
tion. y
At this stage, howevcrj it is not be
lieved that military onerations arc
being contemplated as tjic next step.
South and Central America have been
keeping closely informed as to the
situation. In fact the Brazilian min
ister at Mexico City has been the
source to whom the United States has
turned the last 16 months for the
care and interests of Americans and
foreigners in the distressed capital.
It is known that if the situation
necessitated an armed force to open
the railroad to Mexico City for the
protection of the legations or non
combatants, or if armed occupation
became necessary as a prelude to the
restoration of order, South and Ccn-
tral America would probably receive
and welcome an invitation to share
Daschund And
English Bull In
Death Struggle
i TUCSON, Aug. 2. Whether or
j not they fell out over questions
; involved in the present European
I war, or some local personal dif
ference they could not adjust, has
not been fully determined, but
Mutt, the English bull, and Mar
garet, the German daschuud, both
belonging to William J.i Bryan,
Jr., became involved iTi'a -rather
serious disagreement at Dr. Am
brosy's hospital Monday, and
but for the timely appearance of
the caretaker, who acted as medi
ator, the Englishman would have
made tamale meat of the Ger
man. Of course that part of it
was only a dog fight, but that it
could have larger significance is
-a matter for wise ones to ponder.
If tli ere is a family in America
today that should be a peaceable
one, it is the Bryan family, and
that Mutt and Margaret should
! have gotten angered and begun a
real scrap is a mystery, unless it
was to foreshadow coming histor
I ical events, and that it is a bit of
real proplicsy is believed by many,
I At any 'rate let us hope it is
i a prophesy, and that the mcdi
j ator will soon appear to bring
j peace to the warring nations of
Europe and that England and
i Germany across the seas will soon
t be as strong frieuds as they were
' before the war began.
I o
' Money To Make j
Corn Crop Movel
i
By Associated Press,
i WASHINGTON, Aug. 2. Prelim-!
' inary plans, designed to make avail-1
able the resources of the Federal re-'
serve system in the annual fall move-1
mcnt of crops, have been worked out '
by the Federal reserve board. Writ-I
ing to the 12 regional banks, the
board pointed out in a letter, made !
public, how the members of the sys- j
tern may help finance the crop move-1
ment.
fi f f
'
Without Wamin&
7
By Associated Press.
BREST, France, Aug. 2 The Brit
ish steamship Clintonia was shelled
and sunk Sunday morning by a Ger
man submarine. Eleven men were
killed on the vessel and 15 injured.
The survivors say they were attacked
without warning.
WELL TREATED
ROME, Aug. 2 The Stefani News
Agency says that prisoners taken by
the Italian forces number 17,000 in
cluding 380 officers. These come
from all- parts of Austria-Hungary.
While under the surveillance of the
Italian troops the prisoners are under
the direct command of their own of-
ficcrs, and the rations arc the same
as those served the Italian soldiers.
To
I in the work of the United States.
Villa Grows Defiant.
EL PASO, Aug. 2. The confisca
tion of the property of merchants in
I Villi lrritnr,. o n .1 ,-..: f
six of 42 Mexican merchants impris
oned by the northern leader after a
conference in which unsuccessful ef
forts were made to raise .a forced
raise ,a
loan, were reported by arrivals from
Chihuahua, where the conference was
held. Villa is alleged to have said:
"The American government can go
to hell, if it does not like my actions."
The Villa commander at Juarez, who
is said to have attended the confer
ence, denied the statements. He said
no merchant had been expelled, but
because of the exorbitant speculation
in stocks that some of the merchants
purchased with an allowance of 15
per cent profit.
I
By Associated Press.
CHICAGO, Aug. 2. A conflict be
tween the department of commerce
and States Attorney Hoync arose
during the investigation of the steam
er Eastland disaster because Federal
steamboat inspectors Reid and Eck-
liffe,- who gave the Eastland her last
license were brought handcuffed to
gcthcr before Secretary Redficld. A
deputy sheriff removed their hand
cuffs. Rcdfield said if the treatment
continued he would start a fight for
jurisdiction over them.
Redficld announced that an cquilib
rium test would lie made of all pas
senger steamers on the Great Lakes
and the work of steamboat inspectors
for the last 15 years will be investi
gated. The Western Electric Company
plant resumed operations today for
the first time since the Eastland dis
aster. A revised list shows 838 iden
tified dead, two unidentified' dead and
140 missing. All but two of the
missing have been accounted for as
dead.
COPPER
NEW YORK, Aug. 2.
lytic, $18.50 to $19.
Electro-
FACTORY AT
IT
HUDSON, N. Y., Ang. 2. Three
were killed and eight injured, one
perhaps fatally, when the power
plant of the Knickerbocker Cement
Company at Greenport sank today
into quicksand.
Three acres of ground suddenly
sank 30 feet. The plant will not be
able to resume operations for several
months. The employes numbered
from GOO to 700. .
o
GOETHALS SUMMONED
PANAMA, Aug. 2. Just before
leaving on board the steamer Pas
tores for New York on a vacation.
Major General Goethals received in
structions to appear at Washington
immediately instead of beginning his
vacation. Goethals said that while
he had no direct information he was
informed indirectly that his presence
was desired to confer with the auth
orities regarding army reorganiza
tion, particularly in reference to the
strength, disposition and housing of
troops in the canal zone.
CONFLICT ARISES
IN EASTLAND
INOUIRY
11
F
ALILJMIS
HK ALL
BEFORE REPORTING THIS
MORNING THEY WILL
HAVE BEEN LOCKED UP
89 HOURS.
(From Tuesday's Daily.)
Records of recent years regarding
long deliberations by juries are being
smashed by the Benito Alto jury
which before it will possibly report
this morning will be out 89 hours,
Alto is charged with having solicited
a bribe from the Birch Brothers.
The jury was locked up at 5:30
o'clock last Friday night and late last
night was put to bed after another
day of argument and disagreement
In the long and weary session which
they have faced they have reported
twice and each time it has been the
same, "no verdict." The first time it
was Saturday about noon and they
reported that they could not agree,
Judge smith gave them written in
structions and told them to try and
come to some agreement. They were
returned to the jury room and did not
ask to report all day Sunday. Mon
day about 11 o'clock a ray of hope
that they had probably reached an
agreement and that his fate had been
decided one way or the other must
have been felt by Benito Alto for the
jury asked to be taken before Judge
Smith again. When they reached
the court room at 2 o'clock after all
the attorneys had been found, it was
the same story, Foreman A. G. Oliver
saying: Your Honor, it is impossible
for the jury to agree upon a ver
dict." Judge Smith gave them fur
ther instructions and told them to
deliberate on the question again and
bring in a verdict. They were then
turned over to Bailiff Tom McMahon
and taken back to their cramped
quarters to fight probably for an
other 24 hours.
The only case that is remembered
by old-timers to have equaled this
case is that of Mat Black, who was
tried for murder. This was in the
90's when Buckcy O'Neil was sheriff.
The jury was out three days and four
nights.
More recently was the Leonard
White case in which the jury was
out about 43 hours. White was on
trial for the murder of a goathcrdcr
and he was found not guilty. This
case occurred about two years ago
next September.
In the recent Bracken liquor selling
case in which the first jury disagreed
the 12 men were out over 50 hours.
From the three preceding cases it
looks favorable for Alto as in the
first two in which the juries were out
for a long period the defendants were
acquitted while in the last the jury
disagreed. Rumor around town yes
terday were the same as those of
Saturday in which it was claimed
that the jury stood 10 to 2 for con
viction. French Are After
Wireless Station
By Associated Press.
TRENTON, Aug. 2. Vice-Chan-
ccllor Stevens denied the application
of the German corporation for a
postponement of hearing of the suit
by a French corporation to coippcl
the German concern to carry out an
alleged contract to dispose of its wire-
ess station at Tuckcrton, N. J.. to a
rench corporation.
LARGE PRISONER LIST
BERLIN, Aug. 2. The war min
istry furnishes the following figures
for the first year of the warr "The
German-Austrian army occupies 29,
000 square milometers in Belgium.
21,000 in France, 130,000 in Russia,
and 10,000 in French Alsace. Prison
ers taken in Galicia and now in Ger
many number 939,869; men captured
last week and on their way to the
camps, 120,000; prisoners in Austria,
636.543. Total, 1,695,412.
o
CARRANZA VICTORY
VERA CRUZ, Aug. 2. Carranza
announced a constitutionalist victory
at Torreon.
DARING FEA'
DV DDITIOU
ui uniiion
MARMORA
Creep Under Guns
Of Turk Capital
TOPEDOES LAUNCHED AT
LIGHTERS IN GOLDEN
HORN AND RAILROAD IS
BOMBARDED.
By Associated Press.
LONDON, Aug. 2. While the
Austro-Gcrmans continue Jo tighten
the wings of their great eastern bat
tlcfront with success at both extremi
ties, including the occupation of Mit
au in the north and further progress
beyond Cholm in southeast Poland,
the situation before Warsaw proper
remains unchanged and obscure.
The western theatre has furnished
nothing to alter the situation and it
remained for the British navy to furn
ish an unexpected contribution to the
day's news with the sinking of a
German destroyer off the German
coast by a submarine and a strange
assortment of performances by an
othex British undersea .bpat-Operating
in the sea of Marmora. The craft not
only crept so close to Constantinople
as to launch torpedoes at the lighters
in the Golden Horn, presumably
awaiting munitions from the arsenal,
but with guns bombarded for a time
and tied up the railway skirting the
Asiatic coast, delaying a troop train
and causing havoc among ammunition
stores.
German Submarine Destroyed.
PETROGRAD, Aug. 2 An official
communication tonight says a British
submarine sank a large German
transport in the Baltic.
TO
E
STOCKHOLDERS SEE WAY
OUT OF DIFFICULTIES
IN WHICH STEAMSHIP
CONCERN IS ENMESHED.
By Associated Press.
NEW YORK, Aug 2. The stock
holders' committee of the Interna
tional Mercantile Marine Company,
which went into the hands of a re
ceiver April 3rd. proposed a plan of
reorganization, the reduction of the
capitalization about $86,000,000 and
an assessment of $2.50 per share on
the common and preferred stock It
adopted it is the intention to organize
a new company" and take over the
vessels. The company is a holding
concern for the White Star, Ameri
can. Red Star. Atlantic Transport,
Dominion and Leyland lines.
o
AFTER BLACK FIEND
ARBUCKLE, Cal., Aug. 2. The
sheriffs of Colusa. Glenn and Yolo
counties, assisted by large posses and
bloodhounds, arc scouring the foot
hills west of here in an effort to find
Sam Johnson, alleged to have Sun
day wounded, probably fatally, Rich
ard Lindsay, when the latter endeav
ored to protect his aunt, Mrs. Mike
Blevins, the bride of a wealthy sheep
man, from the negro. The shooting
occurred on a lonely ranch. The
woman finally drove off the negro.
There is talk of lynching if Johnson
is caught.
N SEA 0
0
RE-ORGAN Z
1A

xml | txt