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Weekly journal-miner. [volume] (Prescott, Ariz.) 1908-1929, March 20, 1918, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85032923/1918-03-20/ed-1/seq-1/

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Weekly Journal -Miner
PIONEER PAPER OF ARIZONA
PRESCOTT.
ARIZONA, WEDNESDAY MORNING, MARCH 20, 1918.
FIFTY-FOURTH YEAR
HOLLAND IS
HOI OVER
SEIZURE
OF SHIPS
NZ 1R-GERMAN NATION
FE2LS U. S. IS TAKING
ADVANTAGE OF A SO
CALLED RULE OF IN
TERNATIONAL LAW TO
PERPETRATE ACT OF
VIOLENCE UPON IT.
By Associated Presn.
THE HAGUE, March 18. It is
impossible for Holland to give an
affirmative answer to the Entente
proposals concerning Dutch ships,
says the Xieuwe Courant.
"It is an act of violence," it adds,
"to which we arc subjected by the
rulers of the ocean and nothing
makes us so bitter as the attempt
being made to base it on the so
called rule of international law the
antiquated Angary law which is in
no wise applicable here.''
Take Over Shipping Today
WASHINGTON, March 18.
Preparation for taking over the
Dutch mprrliant- sliins in Amcnnn
ports tomorrow, was completed to-
night While the government ex
pected to momentarily receive from
London the Dutch reply to the British-American
ultimatum, officials said
tficy had ha3 no intimation as to
what the reply would be, or whether
it would accept the Allies' demand
for the transfer of the Dutch tonnage
now in American and British waters,
or whether it would endeavor to open
further parley in an effort to satisfy
both the Allies and Germany. It is
plainly indicated that the latter cotirst
will not find favor here.
TRIBUTE PI TO
By Associated Press.
KWmk-ITJ.FA' Ireland March
, ,
18. "From the grave of John Red-!
mond, there is a great lesson to be
learned by the British," said John
Dillon, making his first appearance
as Chairman of the Irish Nationalist
party. "Redmond faced misunder
standing and horrible calumny in en
deavoring to conciliate the Irish and
British people. Had the English
ministers been honorable men, stood
by him and imitated his statesman
ship, Ireland today, instead of being
an embarrassment to England, would
be a source of strength and support"
FIGHT ENDS IN
By Associated Press.
MILWAUKEE, March 18. Last
appeals were made tonight by can
didates of all parties seeking nomina
tions for United States senator at the
primary election tomorrow. Interest
centers chiefly in the nominations of
the Republican and Democratic par
ties. Congressman Irvcn L. Lcnrool
with a loyalty slogan, is opposed to
James Thomas. The latter is looked
upon as a Lafollcttc candidate.
NOTED MAN DEAD
DENVER, Mhrcli 18. William
Cook E. Daniels, millionaire dry
goods merchant of Denver, traveler
and explorer, died in Buenos Aires
today, according to a cablegram re
ceived here. Mr. Daniels served in
the Spanish-American war as major
under General Lawton. He was 47
years of age. ,
MEMORYOFLATE
JOHN REDMOND
SENATORIAL
WISCONSIN
Explosion In
French Plant
Kills Sixteen
By Associated Press.
il'AKlS. -March 155. two very vio
lent explosions in a factory at La
Courncuvc, north of Paris, caused
the deaths of 16 persons and the in
jury of a large number, mostly
slightly, according to an official an
nouncement. The cause of the ex
plosion has not yet been definitely
determined. La Courneuvc is seven
kilometers from the Cathedral of
Notre Dame, in the direction of St
Denis.
American Red Cross and army am
bulances were among the first at the
scene of the explosion. A large fleet
of ambulances kept at the. American
hospital at Neuilly for emergency pur
poses started for the scene within a
few minutes after the explosion with
two men on each car. Officers of the
hospital staff supervised the removal
of the injured.
A number of wounded were carried
to hospitals in motor trucks of the
American army.
(Survivors declare the accident was
due to a man dropping a box of per
cussion fuses which set off a box of
grenades.
Most of the workmen, realizing the
danger, escaped with more or less se
vere injuries.
Nearly 1000 persons are shelterless
as the result of damage to their
homes. The American Red Cross,
co-operating with the perfecture of
the Seine and the local authorities, is
providing for them.
SCHOOL BUYS
(From Tuesday's Daily.)
The sale, of War Savings Stamps
among the pupils of the Washington
school in this city keeps up at a
merry clip, and according to a re
port issued yesterday, stamps to the
amount of $1,182.05 have been taken
up by the youngsters who attend this
institution. Practically every child
in the school has begun the practice
of saving his pennies and investing
in the little securities, and the fol
lowing table will give the amount of
the sales in each grade or depart
ment: Teacher W. S. S. Lib. Bonds
Payne ? 203.50 $ 400.00
Fortson 63.75 250.00
Macbeth 45.50 ......
Butler 272.50
400.00
483.00
150.00
650.00
900.00
150.00
Rodgers ,
Drake
Emerson
McDonald j.
58.25
78.25
65.75
94.25
Sadelmirc 106.30
Dexter 82.50 1,350.00
Laing 73.75 1,500.00
Lucbkc
38.50
$1,182.05 $4233.00
Total
PAPERS COME HIGH
IN LAND OF DUTCH
AMSTERDAM, March 15. News
papers in Holland again became 15
per cent dearer with the beginning
of the year following earlier in
creases of 35 per cent. The explana
tion given is that paper is four times.
and printing ink five times dearer
than before the war, and news gath
ering is also much more expensive.
A large number of native news
papers in the colonies have ceased
publication through lack of paper and
general inability to pay their way.
The Sin Po, a Malay paper published
at Mcdan, Sumatra, says that al
though it is running at a loss of $50
a day, it will not raise its price, "be
cause we know our friends are none
too well off these hard times."
NEW DRAFT PLAN
WASHINGTON, March 1& Rep
resentative Shallenbcrger of Ne
braska, a Democratic member of the
house military committee, sought to
interest President Wilson tonight in
a plan for basing future army draft
mmtnc on till trtnl rmctrntinn Tinrl
iur muiiiiug cicuu: on vuiumccr
quotas. He said afterward he hoped
at a conference tomorrow to induce
the war department to acquiesce in
the quota proposal but did not ap
pear hopeful as to the outlook for the
remainder of the plan.
THE WASH N N
MANYW.S.S.
BIG DRIVE IN
THE WEST
BY HONS
A BLUF
U. S. MILITARY MEN DE
CLARE ENEMY WILL
NOT TAKE OFFENSIVE
UNLESS FORCED INTO
IT; FACTS ON WHICH
OPINION IS BASED ARE
NOT MADE KNOWN.
By Associated Press.
AMSTERDAM, March 18.
"I have strong hope that Field
Marshal von Hindenburg will
soon win for us complete victory
on the western front," reads a
message sent by Emperor Wil
liam to the Pomranian provincial
council, as quoted in the Lokal
Anziegcr of Berlin.
Think It Big Bluff
WASHINGTON, March 18. Ger
many's threat of a great spring offciK
sive on the western front no longer
impresses American military men.
Tn its weekly review today, the war
department records the conclusion
that the enemy, in spite of hts vast
preparations, will not tale the offen
sive unless forced into it. This con
firms the opinion many officers have
expressed for weeks, in the face of
official forecasts to the contrary from
both sides of the Atlantic
"While hostile preparations for an
offensive in the west are not slacken
ing," the review says, "it is becoming
more evident that the enemy will
launch the offensive only if com
pelled to do so by the exigencies of
The general strategic situation."
The nature of the information upon
which the opinion is based is not dis
closed. It is noted that fresh Ger
man divisions have arrived on the
western front and the German lines
are said to be approaching the point
in density to which it will be impos
sible to add without choking com
munication lines and hampering free
moving of units. Apparently, how
ever, this concentration has come to
be regarded as a defensive, not an
offensive- movement.
Much of the statement is devoted
to the activities of American troops
now engaged on five separate fronts,
one of the sectors lying close to the
Swiss border. The official communi
que, however, adds nothing to re
cently published press reports of the
raids and trench fighting in which
the Americans have been involved.
T
E
Hy Auoelatod Press.
WASHINGTON, March 18. Fur
ther light was thrown on the German
scheme to extend permanent con
trol over the Russian Baltic prov
inces by an official dispatch from
France. The dispatch says that von
Kuchmann, foreign minister, had
elaborated a grand diplomatic
scheme, which, without direct annexa
tions, reserved to Germany's protec
torate Courland and' Lituania, aban
doning Poland to Austria. Luden-
dorfTs opposition caused the failure
of the plan, but the military adminis
tration tried seriously to put it into
execution m the territories now
under German influence.
Casualty List Has
Forty-four Names
Oy Associated Press.
WASHINGTON, March IS.
Forty-four names appear in today's
casualty lists, including that of Cap
tain James E. Miller, either killed in
action or missing. Eight were killed
in action, six died from wounds,
twelve from disease, and one from ae
cident. Five were severely wounded,
eleven slightly.
ON
it SLAV
PR V N 1
UN
DEI
Belgians Are
Again On The
Battle Front
By Associated Press.
ON THE BRITISH FRONT IN
FLANDERS, March 18. The im
portant coast sector of the western
front which, for a considerable time
has been held by the French has
been taken over by the Belgians.
That King Albert's new army has
been able to assume this additional
burden speaks highly for the condi
tion of this comparatively small right
ing machine which has battled so
valiantly from the beginning. On a
recent visit to the Belgian front the
correspondent learned that the Bel
fians had effected a great improve
ment in their organization during the
'winter months, and certainly the
morale of troops and officers seems
at the highest pitch.
Lieut. Col. De Ceyninck, the min
ister of war, informed the correspon
dent that it sometimes had been diffi
cult to restrain the Belgian soldiers
until the proper moment for action.
The war minister seemed to reflect
the general voice of the army when
he said:
"Whenever the call comes we shall
"be waiting to respond with every
atom of strength we have."
TO
BE SELECTED
EXEMPTION BOARD AN
NOUNCES THAT 30 MEN
WILL BE CALLED AND
ONE-HALF OF THEM EN
TRAINED FOR FUNSTON.
The local exemption board yester
day evening announced the list of
names of the 30 registrants, from
which number the required 15 men
will be chosen at the end of next
week for the trip to Camp Funston
as Yavapai county's quota of the
first increment of the second draft.
All of the 30 men will be called
upon to appear at the board offices
in this city on or about March 29th,
all prepared to make the trip. By
a system of elimination, the details
of which the board refuses to make
public, one-half of the men will be
let out, leaving the required number
for the trip to the camp. The exact i
date of entrainment and departure is
not known by the board, specific in
structions on this point being ex
pected shortly from Adjutant Gen
eral Harris.
The names of the 30 called to re
port are the following:
Newton T. Sherman, Prescott,
Ariz.
H. T. Hill, Dewey, Ariz.
Luka Rakicb, Jerome, Ariz.
Clarence T. Smith, Tombstone,
Thomas Chavez, Cornville, Ariz.
Joe Campbell, Los Angeles, Calif.
Manuel Casauz, Seligman, Ariz.
Asa M. Newborn, Clarkdale, Ariz.
Eric T. Cox, Camp Verde, Ariz.
Ramella Francisco, Humboldt,
Ariz.
Eliazar Encinas, Prescott, Ariz.
Tenney Roe, Clarkdale, Ariz.
Geo. W. Clay, Dewey, Ariz.
Clark C. Roberts, Camp Verde,
Ariz.
Ralph O. Roland, Prescott, Ariz.
Kenneth G. Zeiger, Clarkdale,
Ariz.
Lena Sapha, Bakersfield, Calif.
Bert L. Brown, Seligman, Ariz.
Clinton L. King, Lake Linden,
Mich.
Jas Sheeham, Prescott, Ariz.
Pat Gerrity, Prescott, Ariz.
Bernard Leavitt, Prescott, Ariz.
Yee Wing Chong, Prescott, Ariz.
Edward Bramwell, Los Angeles,
Calif.
Leo L. Dickerson, Simmons, Ariz.
Juan Salazar, Mayer, Ariz.
Howard Kilgore, Woegufka, Ala.
Gordan Murray, Chicago, I1L
Eugene Little, East Bakersfield,
Calif.
Elia Dozet, Jerome, Ariz.
HUNS REPULSED
PARIS, March 18. Attacks by the
German storm troops in the region of
Nieuport, Dixmude, and Merckem,
gained them a footing at some points,
but all were expelled by counter-attacks,
says the Belgian official statement
DRAFT
OUOTA
N OT NEK
D
LINES
RESULTS OF GERMAN
.f
The upper photograph shows a view
tnwkPfl hv thn hnmha ilrnnrwwl htr tho
i ,i
noorer section of Paris. The lower
dropped on the dormitory of a children's
vacated In time by the 200 children, and
SPY 0
ing Is a mass of wreckage. If the children had not been removed doubtless
every one of them would have been killed.
0
T IN 1EATTIGHT
E IS NOT !
By Associated Press
"WASHINGTON, March 18.
Western senators renewed their fight
for a higher guaranteed wheat price
today, citing the ability of the farm
ers to make more money growing
other cereals, the shortage, and the
increased cost of farm labor, and the
vital necessity of insuring an ade
quate crop. The debate, was on Sena
tor Gore's proposaKto increase the
price of the 191S cAdP to $2.50 a
bushel. A two-third's majority is re
quired for action arid the advocates
of the bill arc not hopeful of mus
tering the votes when the test comes
off tomorrow probably. Senator Nel
son of Minnesota, -admitted that
wheat price fixing was an abject fail
ure, and advocated an open market.
Neglects Duty And
Loses Commission
By Associated Press.
WASHINGTON. March 18. De
spite Secretary Baker's expressed
view that dismissal from service was
not heavy enough penalty for army
medical officers convicted of neglect
ing their soldier patients, an army
court martial today declined to im
pose a more severe sentence on Lieu
tenant John G. Dwycr, tried for giv
ing improper attention to a private
at Camp Funston.
BORAH ON-WAR AIMS
WASHINGTON, March IS.
Speaking in the senate today on
American war aims. Senator Borah
of Idaho, emphasized the point that
the United States is not engaged
merely in a war between nations,
but that the conflict has at stake the
principles of Republican form of gov
ernment. The policies of Frederick
the Great, and the policies of Wash
ington are contending for supremacy
on the battle fronts of Europe he
said. To fail to settle it finally and
conclusively now is to fail to settle
the sublimcst duty that has fallen on
our country. If we fail the world
will become a military camp, he said.
PROBABLE
ME N 1H
AIR RAIDS OVER PARIS
IB
of several of the houses which were
Rermnnc Thoco nlnnoe nf "mllUn-t-'
. .v . - ,i . ...
nhotozrnnh 'shows the results of hnmhi
hospltnl, which fortunately had been
none were injured there. The build
GRIP HELD
ON
BY ALLIES
By Associated Press.
As the Allied world has day after
day read the official reports from the
war offices, hoping some inkling of
the real situation would present it
self, the realization has come home
that the American, French, British
and Portuguese troops are maintain
ing control over the front running
from the North sea to Switzerland.
Artillery fire is growing in intensity,
but the Allies have held their own
in raiding parties everywhere. In the
enemy trenches the heavy guns are
battering the American sectors, but
American guns are replying with good
effect. Excellent weather for thei
past few days has given our airmen J
an opportunity to take pictures back
of eneniv lines.
By Associated Press.
'WASHINGTON, March 18. The
general debate on the war finance
corporation bill, designed to help fin
ance the needed industries during
the war, will end at 12:10 tomorrow
afternoon under an agreement
adopted by the house. Majority
Leader Kitchin is hopeful of a final
vote by tomorrow night, although
other leaders predict a determined
tight over the amendments.
BEWARE THE HUN
NEW YORK, March IS. A cable
dispatch to the All-Russian congress
urging that body not to deal with
Germany and pledging the support
of the American people was sent to
Moscow today by the American As
sociation of Foreign Language News
papers. The message was first sub
mitted to President Wilson.
N
FRONT
ACTION EXPECTED
I SHORTLY ON WAR
i FINANCL BILL
I By Associated Press.
By Associated Press.
WITH THE AMERICAN ARMlY
IN FRANCE, March 18. American
intelligence officers reported evi
dence leading to the conclusion that
an enemy spy may be at work within
the lines northwest of Toul. Early
this morning an' American sentry saw
flashes of a signal light from a win
dow facing in the direction of the
enemy lines. He fired through the
window and dashed into the house,
but failed to find anyone.
Four hours earlier important tele
phone wires within the American
lines were found to have been cut.
An American patrol last night en
tered the enemy trenches at one end
of the sector and penetrated them
for some distance without difficulty.
Much available information was
gathered. As they were about to
return, they established contact with
the enemy, who opened fire with a
machine gun. The Americans jumped
to a safe position and hurled gren
ades at the enemy gunners, silencing
the gun.
Returning to the American side of
No Man's Land, the Americans
! brought with them a German rifle
breech, protected by a metallic cov
ering over the muzzle and a snap
clip cover, both of which operate
quickly and efficiently. Officers de
clared it was the best thing of the
kind they had ever seen for protect-
I ing rifles. The mechanism was turned
over to the intelligence department
with a recommendation that the at
tachment be furnished the American
"""I"- .... ,
rtnoilicr patrol on inc Diner cnu.
of the sector rrrorteiL. thatthc en-
c,n nrsl ,lnc wasneia strongly.
I While the raiders were inspecting the
German positions, the enemy fired
upon them several times with rifles
and machine guns, which arc unusual
at that point.
BIG BOOZE BILL
IS
BY
SUPERVISORS REFUSE TO
PAY THIEL DETECTIVE
AGENCY OVER 4,000 FOR
ALLEGED SERVICES; AC
TION TO BE BROUGHT.
At yesterday's meeting of the
board of supervisors the "bootlegger
bill," presented by H. D. Dowell, rep
resenting the Thiel Detective Agency
of Los Angeles, for a sum over $4,
000, was flatly disallowed. The offi
cial action taken was based on
grounds that the account was not
authorized, although the claim bore
the endorsement of County Attorney
E. J. Mitchell and Sheriff J. F.
Young.
In refusing to meet this alleged
obligation against Yavapai county,
the board of supervisors maintain
that the charges are not only exces
sive, but that there is no statute to
warrant this claim being audited,
consequently until Superior Court ae
tion is taken to compel payment, the
Thiel agency must wait for its coin.
This large sum demanded from"
this county grows out of Sheriff
Young hiring last year, without au
thority from the supervisors, several
so-called detectives, numbering ap
proximately ten, furnished by the
Thiel agency of Los Angeles, for run
ning down bootleggers. These offi
cers were hired without sanction or
approval of the supervisors, and also
without any per diem remuneration
being stipulated, hence the disallow
ance of the bill, which it is claimed,
is exorbitant and illegal.
The alleged services cover a per
iod of several months last year in
bringing in Thiel officers for hunting
down bootleggers, all cases being
covered in the demand made for pay
ment of services alleged to have been
rendered. It is understood that Mr.
Dowell will take the matter before
the Superior court at once.
METAL MARKET
NEW YORK. March IS. Lead,
dull, $7.25 to $7.60. Spelter dull, spot
East St. Louis delivery, $7.25 to $7.55.
Silver 87 cents.
DISALLOWED
mm

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