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Weekly journal-miner. [volume] (Prescott, Ariz.) 1908-1929, April 19, 1922, Image 1

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UNIVERSITY READING.
ROOM
ARIZONA WEATHER
faETAt MARKETS
Bar silver:
Foreign 65?c
Domestic -. S9c
Copper Steady.
Elec. spot.-. 12J4c; later r13c
1' ' ' 1
PIONEER PAPER OF ARIZONA
$ - '
Russo-German Treaty Appals Ally Leaders At Genoa Conference
WIND. HAIL
PLAY HAVOC
OHIO RIVER B
-
Crowd Watches Tom Mix Play
ers Stage Part of "Gun Fan
ners" on Granite Street, Typi
cal of the Old West.
Prescott Frontier days has nothing
on the Tom Mix company ror power
to attract small boys and others. The
juvenile population of the city, and
a good share of adult citizens,
crowded South Granite street yester
day when Mix and his actors were
filming scenes in that portion of the
old town which still retains its wild
and woolly looks for. Mix's Prescott
made picture, the working-title of
which is "The Gun-Fanner."
If, when you are walking along
the streets of downtown Los Ange
les, a hatless young man dashes
madly up the street, closely follow
ed by a well-dressed young woman
in determined and full pursuit, you
do not join the chase and shout
"Stop thief!" Not at all. You as
sume a bored air, and say "It's the
movies! Six times out of twelve you
may be wrong, and what is taking
place in front of your eyes may be a
sure-enough daylight robbery; but
you are an Angeleno, and ascribe all
extraordinary excitement to the film
companies.
This was not so ,in Prescott yes
terday. It was "the movies" right
enough, and everyone knew it; but a
big-sized lot of interest was attached
to the proceedings.
Director Sedgwick had the com
pany mounted and riding through
some of the scenes whije the camera
clicked and the "audience" that had
not seen the cranks turning since
Mix was here two years ago thor
oughly enjoyed, the work.
FUNERAL SERVICES
Funeral services for Mrs. Lucrana
Sanders, widow of the late Irvin
Sanders and one of the true pioneers
of this city and county, will be held
at Ruffner's mortuary chapel at 1:30
o'clock this afternoon. The remains
were brought Jto Prescott yesterday
by Ernest Sanders, son of the de
ceased, with whom his mother had
made her home for the past seven
or eight years in San Bernardino,
Calif. Mrs. Sanders died at the ad
vanced age of 81,. Her remains will
be interred in the old family burial
ground in Miller valley.
Irvin Sanders and his wife were
among tne earnest seiners oi i.us
district. The husband was engaged
in teaming and freighting in and out
of Prescott during the settlement of
the city and troubled times of the
Indian attacks. An idea of their
status as pioneers may be gained
from the fact that Ernest Sanders,
their son, who left Prescott 20 years
ago, found few people here yester
day with whom he had been ac
quainted in the old days.
COTTON MARKET
(Associated Press Night Wire)
NEW YORK, April 17. Cotton
closed at $18.05.
FILM SCENES IN
OLD TOWN ST.
LIGHTNI NGLSPIIRIfliiR RflRin
THROUGHOUT
ASIN STATES
(Associated Preps Night Wire)
CHICAGO, April 17. Twelve
persons are known to have been
killed, more than 100 injured, and
thousands made homeless by torna
does and floods which swept over
the central west today.
Tornadoes were reported in a
score of Illinois and Indiana towns.
Homes were demolished, telephone
and telegraph service to the
stricken districts crippled and live
stock killed.
Throughout the area from Ohio
on the east to Kansas and Nebras
ka on the west, heavy rains swelled
streams already cut of their banks,
and inundated thousands of acres
of rich farm lands in addition to
vast tracts already under water.
SNOW AND SLEET
While snow and sleet covered
Colorado, Kansas and Nebraska,
Missouri and Iowa were pelted
with heavy halstorms which smash
ed windows and damaged crops.
Several inches of snow were re
ported from Denver.
The storm was believed to have
been the same which lashed sev
eral towns in northeast Kansas
Sunday night, killing several per
sons, then jumping over Missouri
to reappear early today in south
em Illinois. At Irvington, the
twister swept a path 23 miles long
and 150 yards wide through the
center of the village, killing several
persons.
More than half of the homes in
the community were destroyed.
ILLINOIS TOVN WIPED OUT
Plainville, 111., was almost oblit
erated. After visiting many Illinois
towns the tornado jumped into In
diana, striking Hedrick, a small
village in the western part of the
state. Two hours later, before the
residents had time to recover, a
second tornado caused several
deaths and heavy property dam
age. RED CROSS RUSHES AID
Aid for the storm and flood vic
tims in Illinois, Indiana and Mis
souri was rushed tonight by . the
central division of the Red Cross
in answer to frantic appeals from
the stricken districts. All residents
of the town of Naples, 111., have
been driven from their homes by
the rising waters, according to re
ports received today, and most of
them have taken refuge in tents
on a hillside.
Fifty tents have been sent to
Cairo and conveyed to the north
ern section of the city, where many
homes are submerged. Prisoners
in the city jail helped set up- the
tents for the sufferers.
6 KILLED IN INDIANA
ALEXANDRIA, Ind., April 17.
Six persons were killed near
here this evening when a tornado
swept the northern part of Madi
son county.
The storm struck Alexandria,
Orestes and Summitville, and was
a part of the tornado that cut a
wide path across Indiana late to
day. ELECTRICAL STORM BREAKS
INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. April 17.
A series of electric and wind
storms passed over Indiana today,
leaving damaged farms and iso
lated villages in their wake.
Communication in the state is
difficult Washouts have caused
delayed or suspended service on
many interurban and steam rail
way lines and telegrapli and tele
phone service is seriously crippled.
The loss at Wheeling and Gas-
PRESCOTT JOURNAL-MINER, WEDNESDAY MORNING, APRIL 19, 1922
M8GE PROOFS
illST BE GIB
(Associated Press Night Wire)
WASHINGTON, D. C, April 17.
Secretary Mellon today called on
the Plate Printer, official organ of
the plate printers' union, employes
at the bureau of engraving and print
ing, to furnish him immediately with
any evidence upon which that publi
cation had based its statements that
the country was flooded with mil
lions of counterfeit bank notes,
bonds, war saving and other stamps,
war bonds and coupons. Any such
evidence, he added, would be investi
gated at once.
The Plate Printer recently publish
ed an article criticizing what it de
clared was a flood of counterfeit
with the recent reorganization of the
bureau by President Harding, involv
ng the removal of Director James
Wilmeth and other officials. 1
In a letter to Frank J. Coleman,
editor and business manager of the
Plate Printer, Mr. Mellon said that j
'statements of this sort reflecting as
Ihey do'npoif the government bonds!
in the hands of investors are calcu
lated to cause widespread uneasiness
upon the part of such holders and at
the same time, if uncontradicted,
might tend to injure the credit and
standing with the public of the se
curities of the government."
FORTUNE FOR KIN
(Associated Press Night Wire)
RICHMOND, Va., April 17.
Frederick N. Jones, Miss Amada
Jones and Miss Maggie Jones, all of
Richmond, stand a chance to win a
fortune running into millions byliti
gation now pending in the courts of
New Mexico, according to two law
yers who left here today for Dcm-
ing, New Mexico, to represent the !
three claimants who will contest the
will of their brother, Walter II.
Jones, who died in February 1920.
The brother, the attorneys say, left
vast estates in the west, and many
thousands of dollars in cash, part of
which money is in banks here.
WHERE TIME IS NOT
(Associated Press)
SCUTARI, Albania, March 19. (By
Mail) Calendars and clocks are lux
uries in Albania. The untutored
peasantry know only three periods of
time morning, noon and night, and
two seasons of the year, winter and
summer. Days and dates are Sans
krit to them. Nor have they any
conception of distances. When a
traveler asks an "Albanian the dis
tance of one point from another, he
never answers, in miles or kilometers
but "It is half a day, it is two days.
it is a week." When an Albanian
makes an appointment, he is -consid
ered to have kept it if he comes
within two or three hours of the
time set.
ton, northeast of here, is reported
to be heavy, although no lives are
believed to be lost.
"DEAD" BOYS FOUND IN
TREE DODGING FLOOD
BEARDSTOWN, 111., April 17.
Mourned for hours as the first to
lose their lives in the flood which
has held this city in its grip for two
weeks, Grover Dodds, 22, of Beards
town, and J. L. Lower, Jr., a farmer,
were rescued tonight from a treetop
in which they had clung four hours
after their boat capsized. They were
nearly exhausted from exposure.
jCALL TROOPS WHEN
CM TROOPS WHEN
FIRE PLIGES CM
(Associated Press Night Wirf)
POCOMOKE CITY, Md., April
17. With ten acres in the heart of
this city burned over, causing an esti
mated property damage of more than
$2,000,000, Governor Ritchie tonight.
ordered a company of the First regi
ment Maryland National Guard to
proceed here at once to protect prop
erty which escaped the flames.
Tonight the town is in darkness.
Wires are d6wn. The heart of the
business section is in ruins. Both
banks have been destroyed and in
addition to business structures 50
himes fell prey to the flames. Com
miinication with the outside world jcials documents the suggestion that
has been established by tapping' Semenoff intended to go to Paris to
wires on the outskirts. . meet the Grand Duke Nicholas to
Realizing that after nightfall there
would be no means to illuminate the
streets, Mfayor Cull telephoned to
governor Ritchie for troops.
FIRE IN BELFAST
(Associated Press Night Wire)
BELFAST, Apr. 17 Seven house's
were burned tonight, in -Antigua
street in the old ParS district. Fire
men were kept busy in their efforts
to nut out the fires. There also was
; .,.
and two men were wounded.
BURCH TRIAL SLOW
(Associated Press 'Night Wire)
LOS ANGELES, 'April 17. But'
little headway was made today in se-1
lection of a jury to try A. C. Burch
for the murder of J. Belton Kennedy
here last August. Two peremptory
... , i.ii
challenges each were used today by
the prosecution and defense. Twelve
challenges remain unused,
tu ,ip
1 ll" uc
fense has eight and the prosecution
four.
MINE ENGINEER DIES
(Associated Press Night Wire)
DENVER, Colo., April 17. Geo.
Clinlrtn Pin1,ir nrnmincnt milliner
. , .
engineer, died of pneumonia here to-1
day. He had been connected with
the Anaconda Copper Mining com-
. r . 1 ! , "if . .' ,... I
jjaii- cti uiiai rein:,, :uuiu.t iui apt
eral 3-ears and also had spent consid
erable time in China and the Philip
pines. SANTA FE'S REVENUES
(Associated Press Night Wire)
NEW YORK, April 17. Total
operation revenues of the Atchison,
Topeka & Santa Fe railway for 1921
amounted to $228,925,070. a decrease
of $25,323,982 from the previous
year as shown by the detailed reports
issued today.
SEAPLANE WITH BIG LOAD MAKES RECORD ON
RUN FROM FLORIDA TO NEW YORK IN 9 HOURS
(Associated Press Night Wire)
NEW YORK, April 17. Flying at
an average spee'd of 130 miles an
hour through three storms, a sea
plane carrying a total load of 1,600
pounds, today made a flight from
Palm Beach, Fla., to New York, a!
OLD DOMINION POURS COPPER FOR FIRST
TIE SINCE SHUTDOWN; USE SMALL FORCE
(Associated Press Night Wire) I
GOLBE, Ariz., April 17. The Old
Dominion company at noon today
put in operation one unit of its smel
ter and tonight for the first time
since general suspension of mining,
copper was poured in this plant.
Only a few additional mcn have
INER
kmm M
(Associated Press Night Wire)
WASHINGTON, Aoril 17. An
pearing before the senate labor com
mittee today in connection with its
inquiry into the Siberian activities of
Gen. Gregorc Scmenoff, now under
civil arrest in New York, Commis
sioner General Husband, of the bur
eau of immigration, told how the an-ti-bolshevist
leader had been per
mitted to enter the United States at
Seattle after landing at Vancouver
from a steamer he had boarded in
China, and submitted through offi-
lay plans for a revolution against
the soviet.
SELL GERMAN ASSESTS
(Associated Press)
SYDNEY, N. S. W., April 15.
Properties in' New Guinea, formerly
owned by Germany and valued at
between 3,500,000" aiid 6.000.000
will be sold outright by tender and!
lne Purcnasc money will De credit- J
i ed to the German government to
j by the expropriation board in charge
of the properties.
A SUNDAY MANAGER
(Associated Pressi
ST. LOUIS, April 15. Burt E. j
Shotten, a former outfielder, is being
I ', ' "u"b.
I successful as one-seventh manager of
I , c . . v . , b
' . "'S, iNat,onals-
Jt ui
i r iri 1 j a. t i..t
UIIY TO (OH IMPERILED B
WITH Ml INACTION OF
BR I I II EBELmUL.nU'
111 i
arumus, uuci nut uircti nis ciuu court today when William H. Ander
on Sundays and does not attend thc;son state superintendent of the
games, bo bhotton lor the past two
seasons has been the Sunday man
ager. The one-day-a-week pilot has a bet-
! ter percentage than Rickey for the
! last two years, having
' '
winning
j r "ntage f f- wIiereas that of,
Rickey is only .511
COMPULSORY VOTING BILL
(Associated Press)
LONDON, March 30, (By Mail)
A bill seeking to compel all regis
tered voters to go to the polls on
election days has been introduced in
the house of commons.
If no reasonable excuse is offered
for not voting, the fine for the first I
offence is a sum not exceeding 10
shillings. For a second offense the
fine would be one pound or seven
days imprisonment.
distance of 1,210 miles, in 9 hours
and 56 minutes.
One stop was made at Southport,
N. C, after taking off at Plm Beach.
1 : r 1 iiri. tt c
Clifford Webster, U. S. marine corps!
aviator, piloted the plane and is said
to have established a record.
been employed and the smelter is
being worked by men transferred
from other departments. No plans (Associated Press Night Wire) ! crafts. David Helt, president of the
have yet been decided upon for set-1 WASHINGTON, D. C, April 17. Brotherhood of Signalmen, today be
ting in .motion other units of the I Two marine officers and a private fore the railroad labor board pointed
smelter nor for increasing the pro- were killed at Quantico, Va., when out that men in the organization he
duction of metal which under the' two airplanes in' battle practice represented were receiving 10 cents
present program will amount to locked wings in the air and plunged an hour less than those outside rail
about 800,000 pounds a month. to the ground. . "(road employment.
LIFE OF
PRESCOTT TO GET
1922 CONVENTION
irnrI 1111 III IF!" i
OF FARM BUREAUS!
' (Associated Press Night Wire) ,hat convened conference decided
PHOENIX, April 17Prescott ;t01gllt t0 have a committee of ex
has been selected as the 1922 meet- pcrts examine this treaty .tomorrow
ing place of the Arizona State morn'mS to determine whether it
Farm Bureau Federation, to be :confllcts with the Cannes resolution
held July 12, 13, 14. One of the !or the treat-v of Versailles,
chief objects will be to perfect or- j Subsequently the convening! powers
ganization of a central farm agency ' will meet with Poland, Czechoslo
to be established in Phoenix as a vakia, Rumania and Jugoslavia to as
medium for the dissemination of certain the views of the lesser pow
information of value to the 'various ;ers and deal with the report of the
co-operative marketing organiza- .experts.
tions of the state. Directors at a
meeting here Saturday afternoon
approved tentative organization
plans.
(Associated Press Night wire)
TEW YORK Aoril 17 Tohn L
-cvv iuai, pru i. jomi l.
! Sutherland, a newspaperman, was
tneid in mu,uuu Dan tor a nigner
I .
Anti-Saloon League, had him arrest
ed on a charge of writing a letter
threatening the prohibition worker's
life.
Sutherland admitted he wrote the
j etter j,ut sa;(j ne nad no intention of
fulfilling the threat of death. The
letter read:
If your words and actions hence-
Hf in rtTiTH
111 bbU UbH I II
IUI U9t!l
INT IMIIFI
forth are not silent and if you do not.ones do Ilot want t0 sit on the same
take your place quietly in the great
body of American citizenship, wc
mean to kill you without the slight
est compunction."
PERSONAL VISIT BI
TOM MIX TO WHIPPLE
A visit by Tom Mix and his com
pany to Fort Whipple on National
Hospital day, May 12, if they are
here at that time, will be requested
by the chamber of commerce through
Dr. C. E. Yount, who has been ap
pointed by the hospitalization and
sanatoria committees to interview the
manager of Mix's company with that
lend in view. If Tom Mix and Ins
I outfit will not be in Prescott onjly there are stormy times ahead.
Hospital day, it is probable that thcyl
I '.t i 1 i . . .1. frt - '
will be glad toappear at the fort at
an earlier date.
I A large eagerness to see the fa-
jmous film star and performer of
'dangerous stunts in western films,
; exists among the patients at the hos
fpital, where nearly 700 men will
irreet Tom Mix with real enthusiasm.
i Officials of the chamber of commerce
onfident that the .actor will be
found ready to accede to the request.
. .
tli.rr LttLn ,njuni.iiD)3 i
l TnnT AMI? fPAOTIAT TTP0
(Furnished by the U. S. Weather
Bureau and the Associated Press.)
Tuesday and Wednesday General
ly fair; rising temperature.
Prcscctt Temperatures, April 17
8 a.m. ...2S 12 m. a-4 5p.m SO
FIFTY-NINTH YEAR
AMA
SIGNATO
(Associated Pres.. Night Wire)
ur.4ia, ;pni i-iiic signing oi
la treaty between Germany and Rus
isia which nulifics the Brest-Litovsk
; treaty and re-establishes full diplo
matic relations between these two
countries on a basis of equality has
j caused profound astonishment and
resentment among the allied delega-
, lions. The ministers of the powers
The British
and French dele
gates declared tonight that they
considered the signature of the
. treaty ja. disloyal aet."Apparently
,it may imperil the- conference.
r-IlftjJsiJfeu "At 'the' signing of the
treaty which took place at Rapallp
yesterday was unknown to the allied
leaders when Lloyd George, Barthou,
Schanzer and Theunys met this
afternoon to consider the reply
which the Russians might make the
conditions imposed on that country
jbut as soon as the delegates learned
of the treaty their program :as
'changed and the situation which is
considered extremely grave was fully
discussed.
WON'T SIT WITH THE
SLAVS AND TEUTONS
M. Barthou, head of the French
delegation, is seeking further instruc
tions from Paris and declared he
would not sit beside Russians in
semi-official meetings while M. Col
rat, French undersecretary of state,
speaking to the correspondents, said:
'"I have taken all necessary meas
ures to cancel the meeting of the
! third commission over which I nre-
L;de as tlC menibers of the present
commission as the Germans and
Russians."
ACTION STUNS DELEGATES
OF ALLIED, POWERS
The action of the Germans .and
Russians had an almost stunning ef
fect on the allies.
Premier Lloyd George said he
knew these countries had been nego
tiating for months but was not aware
they had signed a treaty.
The situation is so critical that the
most prominent delegates arc reserv
ing opinion until after the experts
examine the new document which is
generally regarded in allied circles as
an infringment on the Genoa agenda
as it has to do with reparations and
effects existing treaties. The French
have insisted that neither of these
things should be discussed and clear-
SICNALM1 ASK FO
WAGE ADJUST
(Associated Press Night Wire)
CHICAGO, April 17. Presenting
f;S"r intended to prove that signal-
mcn employed by railroads. were re-
Iceiving less than men employed in
! similar Unes of work in the building
" -
ECONOMIC
MEET
ZING
RIES
MENTS
0
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