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Wood County reporter. [volume] (Grand Rapids [i.e. Wisconsin Rapids], Wis.) 1857-1923, December 28, 1922, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85033078/1922-12-28/ed-1/seq-2/

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Established Nov. 28, 1857.
A. L. FONTAINE, Owner and Pub
lisher.
$2.00 a Year, Strictly in Advance.
Prices for adverti.s ng and job work
made known on application at the of
fice.
Entered at the postoffice at Wiscon
sin Rapids, Wisconsin, as second class
matter.
THURSDAY, DEC. 28, 1922
“Sell Your Hammer and Buy a Horn”
AMERICA COMMITS
TRADE SUICIDE
Perhaps the most serious reflection
on American intelligence is the fact
that from the formation of our nation
to the present day we have spent nine
tenths of our time in convincing our
own people that imported goods are
better than those of our own manufac
ture.
In Great Britain and other countries
the words Made” stand as the
guarantee of excellence. With us the
mystic word “Imported” is used by al
most every merchandiser in the land
to convince the customer that if real
worth be desired then the imported
article must be bought.
Neither loyalty, tariff nor common
sense, nor anything else has served to
stem this tide of boosting for the for
eigner at the expense of the American.
Naturally the tendency has been to
cause the American manufacturer to
live up, or rather, down, to his repu
tation and produce in many cases,
goods not quite up to the standard of
those that come to us from foreign
lands.
The American can manufacture the
best quality goods in the world if he
sets himself to the task, no matter
what the line; but in china ware he
knows, we think of Limoges or Dres
den; in pottery we think of Lincoln
shire; in cutlery we dream only of
Sheffield; our linens remind us only
of Nottingha'm or Belfast
Always we are told that the import
ed article ranks first. If we had been
hired, each one of us, to strangle A
merican production, we could not have
made a better job of it. We have be
come obsessed with the thought of
foreign superiority.
If the American people will respond
to the battle cry of “Home-Made,
and the American manufacturer will
answer the call, it will give us a more
constructive loyalty than ten thousand
Fourth of July orations, and do more
to solving our economic problems than
anything else one can conceive.
LET EUROPE PAY UP
Why the public does not rise on its
haunches and burst into a roar of
laughter that would echo around
the world when suggestions are made
that Uncle Sam should cancel the war
debts of European countries, passeth
understanding.
Last year the easy Americans paid
Germany $960,000,000 foi* worthless
marks. As fast as the German print
ing presses could turn out the finan
cial junk, good American dollars were
poured into Germany to bring them
to the ‘land of the free”—and easy.
In addition to this stupendous folly
American tourists spent in Germany
$750,000,000, which foots up just a
bout 13 per cent of the entire war
debt. And the end is not yet. And
Germany is only one of the-many Eu
ropean countries that get the dollars.
American money is even now turn
ing the wheels of European industry.
American brains are working to help
solve the European national problems.
This year American children will
play with German-made toys almost
to the exclusion of those of American
manufacture.
Summed up, America stands today
the world’s greatest easy mark. Tho.'
charged with being a nation of dol
lar worshippers, we find ourselves the
easy victims of every shrewd Europe
an trickster and governmental pi*opa
gandist.
It is time we put an end to serious
consideration of debt repudiation.
Now is the time to talk real strict
accountability.
Let Washington announce that Eu
rope to the last nation, must pay her
debts, and to the last farthing.
LET JUSTICE DICTATE
JUDICIAL NOMINATIONS
The storm of protest caused by the
nomination of Pierce Butler, corpora
tion attorney of St. Paul, to be Asso
ciate Justice of the United States Su
preme Court, as outlined in an inti
mate article written exclusively for
this paper by Edward Percy Howard,
a close student of national affairs,
clearly shows the growing evil effect
of tarring the judiciary with the po
litical brush. Unquestionably, unless
some way be found to check the re
actionary tenrency both in judicial ap
pointments and in judicial decisions,
the country will soon find itself ready
for revolt, not at the hands of labor
agitators and economic dsturbers, but
at the hands of the plain, forward -
looking Americans who love impar
tial justice and appreciate fair play.
Whatever merit there may be in the
attack on Butler may be open to ar
gument, but plainly his legal training
with importunate corporate interests
is not calculated to have developed in
him the judicial mind.
The first reform in our judiciary
might well come in recognition of the
principle of civil service to'-which this
country is committed. No man should
be raised to the dignity of the United
Slates Supreme Court until he has
Greatest Of Them All
x\:'\\ <WE /AOST POPULAR MEMeeR.
, \\ > OF THIS PA/AOUS FA/AIUT
WE R,e vv\ \\ - \ & WITH us AGAlN
=C>taini-V \ N\ \
kAO TO HAVE * \ \ jl j // /V.a.
TOU W.TH J ' ... \s\\ ''l j Ul ff/,
demonstrated his breadth of mind and
proved his judicial ability. Nomina
tions for the Supreme Court should
come from the United States Circuit
Courts or some other United States
Courts, perhaps even from the Su
preme Courts of the several states.
Such a practice would raise the stan
dard of the lower coui’ts in addition
to further safeguarding the rights of
the people. At present the lower
courts offer little to attract the ablest
of attorneys. The salaries are incon
sequential, and if, plus this, promo
tion is to be denied, if men who have
served faithfully and efficiently are to
be set aside at the behest of political
hucksters who in turn are dominated
by corporation powers behind the
throne, then contempt for the judici
ary will soon reach the danger point.
Such appointments as Butlers will
cause a demand for the people to elect
their judges, and with a right to re
call them.
FARM BLOC FOR
FORD FERTILIZER
While President Harding is strain
ing every nerve to obtain a subsidy
for shipping, the Farm Bloc in Con
gress has definitely decided to back
the Henry Ford proposal to lease and
operate the fertilizing plants at Mus
cle Shoals, Alabama,
Those back of the Muscle Shoals
movement plainly indicate their con
viction that the quick and cheap man
ufacture of fertilizer is of more fun
damental importance to the Ameri
can farmer than the establishing oT
an American merchant marine, desir
able as that may be as a builder of
trade.
The Muscle Shoals bill will be back
ed in connection with a bill providing
for an intermediate form of credt
running from six months to three
years.
There is marked opposition to the
leasing of Muscle Shoals to the Mich
igan millionaire, the objectors con
•tonding that the government sell it
all, provides certain capital for the en
terprise for a long period of time and
at low interest, and obtains no guaran
tees from the purchaser.
% lt is absurd to suppose that Ford
proposes to invest his millions in an
enterprise and then let it stagnate.
The best guai-antee the farmers feel
they have is the fact that Mr. Ford
is nearing his sixtieth year and that
his only reward now can come in hon
or and in service, and not in the ac
cumulation of additional wealth.
The development of Muscle Snoals
would mean the rejuvenation of the
entire southern territory. It would
be of incalculable benefit to all farm
ers. Whatever may be said against
it, surely it seems wiser to get action
than for Congress to fritter -away 1
more years in haggling while the
great enterprise with its multitudin
ous buildings and vast machinery rots '
on the ground.
Perhaps if we had a few more Hen
ry Ford offers the disgraceful specta
cle of the liquidation of our many war
camps might have been spared us.
More power to the Farm Bloc.
There will be anew story to tell when
some of these gentlemen address Con
gress.
SLEEP, BABY, SLEEP—
BY JOHN D., JR.
John D. Rockefeller, Jr., has again
laid down the laws of good c’tizenship.
Save your pennies, he says; don’t run
an automobile unless you can, afford
it, don’t have a phonograph unless
you have money for “such luxuries,’’
work eight hours a day conscientious
ly, obey the authorities, don’t violate
the speed laws—except possibly dur
ing working hours—and respect pro
hibition.
Thus the young millionaire revamps
the reactionary rules of life laid down
by the rich for the poor for ages, the
recipe that has spread the spirit of
socialism further than anything else
in the world.
Young Rockefeller is possessed of
so much wealth he cannot count it.
Certainly he never worked and pro
duced it. Doubtless its beginning
rests on “thrift and saving” by his
father, but it has swollen to count
less millions without his work.
The youthful Croesus says thought
of a six-hour workday is puerile. Nat
urally the man whose bursting baitk
account is swelled every minute by
picking off a percentage of the produc
tion of countless thousands of men is
not enthusiastic about cutting down
their hours of work. Every little bit
helps.
His allusion to the phonograph as
a luxury harks back to the dark ages.
The phonograph has saved the san
ity of thousands of lonely women on
the farms and given joy to millions
of men and women from whose sweat
the Rockefeller millions have sprung.
Mr. Rockefeller’s Bible class doubt
less sits with mouths agape but the
public Bible class, consisting of more
than a hundred million people, will
be more deeply interested if the young
man will tell them how the farmer
and the miner and other useful work
ers in the world can get a just return
from their labor, and how the people
can prevent the amassing of fabulous
fortunes by those who don’t work for
them.
Having thus expressed ourselves
lowa Girls Win Trip Abroad
and Kathryn Boli-
Thev Saf demon - *£ JB '
ifiunchctles
|| I^vM A. MATTHEWS
DEMOCRATIC CHURCH
You are frequently presented with
the statement that the church is com
posed of classes. There was never a
greater falsehood uttered. The most
democratic institution on earth is the
church.
The Bible says that we are all in
cluded under sin. There isn’t any
man who is not classified as a sin
ner.
Some may lie about it and ssty
they are not sinners and some may
lie about it and say there is no such
thing as sin. But both of those
statements are infallible proofs of the
existence of sin and of the fact that
we are all included under sin. That
is democratic.
Those who are saved are saved by
Christ; therefore all Christians, re
gardless of their name, are sinners
will the spendthrift possessors of talk
ing machines now turn on that charm
ing record entitled, “Sleep, Baby.
Sleep.”
o
CUT THIS OUT;
IT IS WORTH MONEY
Cut out this slip, enclose it with
5c to Foley & Cos., 2835 Sheffield Ave.,
Chicago, 111., writing your name and
address clearly. You will -receive in
return a trial package containing Fo
ley’s Honey and Tar Compound, for
coughs, colds and croup, Foley Kid
ney pills and Foley Cathartic Tablets.
Sold Everywhere.
HEARD AT ONE OF
THE RAILROAD STATIONS
The other day as E. F. Gilmaster,
the genial transfer man, was loading
some sacks of mail, a young lady
walked up to him and asked him, “Are
you the baggage man?”
“No, Lady,” he replied, “You’ll find
him at the other end of-the platform.
Just look for the homeliest man a
round. That’s him.”
She turned away, and as she went
in the direction indicated she was
heard to remark, “Oh, I thought I had
found him.”*
saved by grace and all Christians are
under grace. That is democratic.
There is only one qualification for
joining the church; namely, belief in
Christ.
The rich and the poor, the high and
the low, the learned and the ignorant,
the wise and the foolish, the good and
the bad, the pretty and the ugly, are
all members of the church.
Christ is the Saviour of all. And
we meet in the common place to wor
ship Jesus Christ. There is a com
mon worship and a common prayer.
The man in overalls and the man in
broadcloth, the woman in satin and
scrub-woman in her apron, can
sit m the same pew T , sing the same
hymn, repeat the same prayer and
worship the same Christ who died to
save all.
The most democratic institution on
earth is the Chufch of Jesus Christ.
THE BAD CITIZENSHIP OF GOOD
CITIZENS
The country is not suffering from
bad citizens. No country e-ver suf
fered from such. Our country is suf
fering from the had citizenship of
good citizens. Communities, states,
and nations have no better govern
ment than the negligent citizen pro
duces. The responsibility for bad gov
ernment rests upon the negligent Cit
izen, the absentee from the ballot box
and the man who is dodging his civic
duty.
The business man and the banker
use every possible means to escape
jury duty. They are traitors to good
government. You hear business and
professional men say they are not in
terested in politics. They are unde
sirable citizens. It is impossible for a
taxpayer, a home owner, an honest
man, to stay out of politics. Because
of his neglect to perform his duty he
increases the taxes of all the people.
What is politics? It is the science
of government. The science of good
government.
Then every man, woman and child
oxight to be forced to study the science
of government. And every man ought
to be a practical, common sense, per
sistent, courageous, everlasting poli
tician. W 7 hen men get so pious, so
good, and so busy that they cannot
afford to perform their plain political
and civic duties they become a curse
to society, a menace to government,
a burden to the taxpayer and a blight
on citizenship.
The average non-active man is a
consummate coward, and it is his in
famous cowardice that has plunged
this country into nnumerable errors.
Out of the cowardice of such men we
have filled the legislatures and the
Congress of the United States with
spneless men; consequently we legis
late under the whip lash of a party
master or we fail to legislate because
of timidity and cowardice.
The common public is unrepresent
ed and suffers untold burdens because
of the bad citizenship of good citizens.
THE CURSE OF GAMBLING
Have you sometimes wondered at
the spirit of extravagance which ap
pears to have taken possession of the
people? It is one of the results of
the gambling wave that has swept
over this country.
The desire to gamble seems to have
entered every breast.
The evil of gambling is seen ev->
ery where.
Its dirty fingers have stained nearly
every garment.
It has invaded the church socials
and has stained the very robes and
liveries of heaven.
The fiends who gambled on the Sa
viour’s garments are still polluting
the aisles of the church with their
dirty feet and nimble fingers. Raf
fles, lotteries, games of chance have
polluted certain religious circles and
have become the social features of
clubs, societies and organizatons.
This gambling spirit has ruined the
youth’s ambitions, and has caused
thousands of girls to sell their all.
Homes have been sacrificed and
beautiful parlors have been turned in
to dens of vice at the suggestion of
the avaricious beast —the gambler.
There was never a greater curse
sweeping a land than the gambling
spirit. It has turned cigar stand, res
tauiant, club table, and places of a
musement into gambling centers.
Men disregard city, state and na
tional statutes to ply their game, to
throw their dice, and to gratify their
desire to get something for nothing.
Thousands of young men are in
the penitentiary today at the dictation
of this awful curse.
Is there no way to stop it?
Can’t the business men call their
girls into their offices and talk to them
about honesty and frugality?
Is it not possible for the ministers
GRANDCHILD HAD
A CROUPY COUGH
“My grandchild could get no relief
whatever from a very bad cough,”
writes Peter Landis, Meyersdale, Pa.,
“until I gave him Foley’s Honey and
Tar. ” Coughs, colds, croup, throat,
chest and bronchial irritations quickly
relieved with Foley’s Honey and Tan.
Sold Everywhere.
A sunny face is worth more than
money.
CATARRH
OF THE STOMACH
rpflOU CANT ENJOY Uf£
LnJ with a tore, sour, bloated atom*
ach. Food does not nourish.
Instead it is a source of misery, causing
pains, belching, dizziness and head*
aches.
9 The person with a bad stomach
should be satisfied with nothing- less
than permanent, lasting relief.
9 The right remedy will act upon the
hsiags of the stomach, enrich the blood,
aid in casting out the catarrhal poisons
and strengthen every bodily function.
i| The large number of people who
have successfully used Dr. Hartman’s
famous medicine, recommended for all
catarrhal conditions, offer the strongest
possible endorsement for
Pe-ru-nA
IN SERVICE FIFTY YEARS
TABLETS OR LIQUID
SOLD EVERYWHERE
of the country to preach against this
evil; the Sunday School to teach the
danger of such a practice; the courts
to enforce rigid penalties, and thereby
bring America to see this awful men
ace?
The gambling curse is costing this
nation hundreds of thousands of dol
lars every year.
Rev. Matthews r.eems to have for
gotten how little good a talk to the
office girls would do if given by busi
ness men whose wives are spending
so much of their time at their bridge
clubs and other gambling parties.
Furthermore, his little sermonette
would have been more effective and
consistent had he wound up with a
different note than the wail about the
hundreds of thousands of dollars it
costs the nation to gamble. All those
hundreds of thousands are worth far
less than the soul of one boy or girl.
Mr. Matthews knows this. It is part
of his profession to know it. Why
weep so pathetically about the dol
lars ?—Editor.
Christian Science Church
Sunday Service—lo:4s A. M.
Lesson Subject—“ Sacrament.”
Wednesday evening. Testimonial
meeting 7:45 o’clock.
WISCONSIN RAPIDS MARKETS
Selling Prices
Victoria, per bbl.. $8.40
PXillsbury, per bbl 8.80
Rye, per bbl 6.40
Beans, per cwt 9.00
Barley, per bbl 9.00
Shelled corn, per cwt 1.70
Middlings, per cwt. 1.55
Dry Onions, per bu. 1.25
Peas, per cwt., 8.00
Bran, per cwt 1_ 1.45
Corumeal, per cwt. 1.80
Feed, 80-lb. sack 1.45
Buckwheat flour, per bbl. 10.00
Hay, per tonl_*. $12.00 to $13.00
Buying Prices
Wheat No. 1 , 1,60
Oats, per bu. .40
Rye grain, per bu .72
Potatoes, per cwt .50
Live Hogs, per cwt. to 7.25
Dressed Hogs, per cwt. __8.50 to 9.50
Live Beef, per cwt $2.50 to $7.00
Dressed Veal, per cwt. __6.00 to 11.00
Dressed Beef per cwt. __5.00 to 10.00
Live Hens, per lb. : 12 to 14
Spring chickens, per lb 18c to 22c
Eggs, per dozi, fresh 50
Butter, per lb. .44
“Tomorrow” is Too Often Too
Late.
Buy it in Wisconsin Rapids.
fMENTHOLATUMI
■brings refreshing m
K relief from tor* m
■ taring nervous#
If You Ship Us Your^^^k
HfDES - FURS A
nSKnSP 1
I KU. DIRECT with the LARGEST an! OLDEST U
I UIM1 „, HOUSE in the west. m
\ HIGHEST PRICES and IMMEDIATE CASH #
A RETURNS. #
W Wri, lor price list, tags and full information ■
—■m
Jiche?
When you’re suffering from
headache,
backacke,
toothache,
neuralgia,
or pain from any other cause, try
Dr. Miles Anti-Pain Pills
One or two and the pain stops
Contain no habit-forming drugs
Have you tried Dr. Wiles' Nervine?
Aah your Drug gilt
Tfce circlet it more tbu a Brassiere. It’a
Seli-Adjutii{, and simply slips orer
Ike bead, clasps at the waist and under'
arm, and smooths oat Bfij lines.
If year dealer can '# get it, tend actual
""et measure, name, addreme and
$l. 00, We‘ll tend the Circlet pre
paid Size* 34 to 43.
Nemo Hygienic-Fashion Institute
120 East 16th St., Now York, Don’t M
Our Photos
SSaeaaiafeaaaaagSxßbaaSiS
are true to nature
and show you just
as- you are, with
every facial expres
sion faithfully por
trayed.
W. A. DRUMB
‘'The Photo Man”
Over Model Drug Store
WISCONSIN RAPIDS, WfS.
OOOOQftOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
o JOHN BEAVER o
o Doctor of Chirtpractic o
o Palmer Graduate. Lady Attendant o
o Grand and Third Aves. _Phone 537 o
o Over Sam Church Drug Store o
o WISCONSIN RAPIDS, WIS. o
000000000000000000000
ATTORNEYS
GOGGINS, BRAZEAU &
GOGGINS
Attorneys-at-Law
Second Floor, MacKinnon Block
WISCONSIN RAPIDS. WISCONSIN
D. D. CONWAY
Attomey-at-Law
Over First National Bank
WISCONSIN RAPIDS, WISCONSIN
B. M. VAUGHAN
Attorney-at-Law
Wood County National Bank Building
WISCONSIN RAPIDS, WISCONSIN
PHYSICIANS & SURGEONS
DR. W. G. MERRILL
Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat
Glasses Fitted
Second Floor First Natl. Bank Bldg.
Phone Office Cos—Residence 82
WISCONSIN RAPIDS, WISCONSIN
DR. W. M. RUCKLE
Eye, Ear, Nose Specialist
Second Floor Wood Cos Realty Bldg.
WISCONSIN RAPIDS, WISCONSIN
DR. J. K. GOODRICH
Osteopath
Second Floor Old Johnson & Hill Bldg
WISCONSIN RAPIDS, WISCONSIN
DENTISTS
DR. D. A. TELFER, D. S.
Wood County Realty Cos. Bldg.
Second Floor
Wisconsin rapids, Wisconsin
INSURANCE
GEO. N. WOOD
Real Estate—lnsurance
Phone 372. Commercial Hotel
WISCONSIN RAPIDS, WISCONSIN
R. M. GIBSON
Insurance
Room 8, MacKinnon Block
WISCONSIN itAPIDS, WISCONSIN
J. G. HAMILTON
Insurance
Second Floor Wood Cos. Natl. Bank
WISCONSIN RAPIDS, WISCONSIN
COAL DEALERS
BOSSERT COAL CO.
Dealers in Coal and Wood
Seventh Avenue South
WISCONSIN RAPIDS, WISCONSIN
DALY ICE & COAL CO.
Love Street, East Sida
WISCONSIN RAPIDS, WISCONSIN
. ■
J. R. RAGAN
Licensed Embalmer and Undertaker.
Phones; House 69; Store 813;
John Ernser, House Phone 485
WISCONSIN RAPIDS, WISCONSIN
ORSON P. COCHRAN
Piano Tuner
Best work guaranteed. . Call tele
phone 233, or call at the house, Kruger
St Wheelan Flat, First St. N.
WISCONSIN RAPIDS, WISCONSIN
W.C. WEIRICK, D. C.
Chiropractor
Wood Block (over P. O.) Tel. \%2
WISCONSIN RAPIDS, WISCONSIN
AUTO TRIM SHOP
R. F. Sweet, Prop.
Opposite Henke Grocery Company
Second Street North
WISCONSIN RAPIDS, WISCONSIN
EAST SIDE POOL HALL
Frank W'heelan, Prop.
Billiards
WISCONSIN RAPIDS, WISCONSIN
ARCHITECTS
L. A. DeGUERE—
Post Office Building
Second Floor
WISCONSIN RAPIDS, WISCONSIN

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