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The Manitowoc tribune. [volume] (Manitowoc, Wis.) 1866-1878, May 03, 1877, Image 1

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the tribune.
Ed. Borcherdtj Editor & Pub.
OFFICE, Corner Yorfc and Main Sts.
IYEUROVtS, $2.00 IPIEXR 'S'IELA.IFI
JOB POINTING.
The Tribunk Office is the only one in the City
run by steam power, and has the largest and
best appointed Job Printing Department. Par
ticular attention paid to orders for fine work.
C. E. ESTABROOK,
Attorney and counselor at law.
Office, corner Eighth and Quay Streets,
South Side, near the Post Office.
NASH & SCHMITZ,
Attorneys and councelors at law.
Office over Platt’s store, corner of York
and Ninth streets. Collections promptly atten
ded to.
H. G. & W. J. TURNER,
Attorneys at law, office on stii
Street, South . -wer Kcehlers store, Man
itowoc, Wisconsin.
WHITE & FORREST,
Attorneys at law office on sth
street. South side, opposite Schuetto’s Store.
J. D. MARKHAAI,
Attorney and counselor at law.
Office, corner of Bth and Quay streets.
Manitowoc Wisconsin,
H. CUAKLEY, M. D„
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON. TENDERS
h ! s professional sen-ices to the people of the
City and County of Manitowoc. Office on York
street, between Eighth and Ninth., where night
calls will he attended to.
R. K. PAINE, AI. D.,
Homoeopathic piiy'sician, surgeon
and Accouchcr. late resident Physician at
the Hahnemann Hospital, Chicago, has perman
tlv located at Manitowoc. Office in Plumb’s
building, comer of Ruffalo and Eighth Streets.
Office Hours {* ££ to BP. M.
Diseases of the eye and car treated.
DENTISTRY.
TAR. A. J. PATCHEN. DENTIST. OFFICE
I / in Sherman’s now building, on Bth Street,
Manitowoc Wis.
£ '■/'"'Teeth extracted without pain.
CHARLES HOYEIh
Merchant tailoring estabush
meut, on Btii street, near south end of
Bridge. The tailoring department is complete,
ami contains a large assortment of fashionable
cloths and Gent’s furnishing goods constantly
on hand. Please call and examine before pur
chasing elsewhere.
FRED. SEEGER,
Offers t • his friends and the pdb
lic generally, a choice selection of Fresh
Meats, Salt Pork and Beef, Smoked Beef and
Hams, Shoulders, Sausages, Tallow and Lard at
the luwest rates. Market on Commercial Street.
S. SANDERSON,
Manufacturer and dealer in
Boots, Shoes, Leather, &e., Sic. Shop on
Buffalo street, near the comer of Eighth. Re
pairing neatly and promptly executed.
AIRS. E. KERN,
T'ORK STREET. MANITOWOC. WHS., DEAL
-1 <r in Dry Goods, Groceries, Crockery, Fan
cy Goods, Glass ware. Boots and Shoes, Ready
made Clothing, Paper Hangings, Hats, Caps.
Toys, Children Carriages, Live Geese Feathers,
Bird Cages, Kerosene Oil and Lamps. Stc., &c.
A share of public pat ronage is solicited.
A. B. AIELENDL
I PHOTOGRAPHER, EIGHTH ST., WHITE’S
new block. Manitowoc, Wis., is prepared to
take Photographs or Tintypes of every size and
in the latest style of the art. All negatives re
touched. Call and examine specimens and
prices. Copying and enlarging old pictures a
specialty. I keep constantly on hand a large
assortment of frames for the trade.
GUSTAV FEHRS,
VUATCIIMAKKK AND JEWELER. OFFERS
t* nis services for repairing all kinds of Clocks
and'Watches. Has a tine and well selected as
sortment id the latest and best stylos of Clocks,
American, English and Swiss Watches, as also
oi Gold and Plated Jewelry, at his new Brick
Store on Bth strcet.South side, one door south of
Krcmer’s, Manitowoc.
F. RANSCH,
JEWELER AND PHOTOGRAPHER. ALL
• f kinds of work in the line of my business
promptly attended to, and warranted to give
satisfaction. I have just received a Wing & Orns
bey’s Multiplying CAMERA OBSCUItA, with
which I can take small pictures of the finest or
der, for one dollar per dozen. Photographs taken
of all sizes. Albums and Frames constantly on
hand. Y’ork Street.
NEW BARBER SHOP,
TYIEGEL Ik HERMANN, PROPRIETORS,
J > Eight Street, near Commercial. We cor
dially invite our friends and the public general
ly to give us a call.
CHAS. KARNOFSKY.
f I'HE OLD ORIGINAL BARBER AND H ATR
-1 1 rosser. Manitowoc, Wis. Corner Eighth
and Commercial streets. Keeps constantly on
hand a well assorted stock of Neck-ties, Collars,
Hair-oils and Perfumery.
FRANZ & TREAT,
TAW AND ABSTRACT OFFICE, FRANZ
i Block, South Eighth street, Manitowoc,
Wis. Collections promptly attended to.
NEW HARDWARE STORE.
-\f SCHAUS. DEALER IN STOVES, TIN
1 a . and Hardware. Platt’s Block, York Street.
Trices very low. Repairing promptly attended
to. Patronage solicited.
WILLIAM RAHR,
-|>REWER AND MALTSTER.CORNER SIXTH
1) and Washington streets. South side. The
highest cash price paid for Barley.
MANITOWOC
M XRBLE WORKS
AISTID STONE YARD,
JOHN MENDLIK & CO.
Cor. 9th and Chicago Streets.
M. KETTEMHOFEN’S
NORTHWESTERN HOUSE,
FRANKLIN and NINTH-SIS., MANITOWOC.
Travelers will liere find the best accommodations
Sample rooms attached.
BOLEN & SULLIVAN,
DEALERS IN
Dry Goous, Groceries, Notions
GENERAL MERCHANDISE.
Bth Str.,BETWEEN YORK A COMMERCIAL,
MANITOWOC. WIS.
We are agents for ami keep on hand the
Domestic Papar Fashions.
Patterns scat by mail to any address,
VINEGAR MANUFACTORY
THE BEST KIND OF
Pure White Wise Mm
manufactured and sold by the barrel at the
LOWEST MARKET PRICE
—BY—
.A.. IMI. RICHTER,
Bth St., SOUTH SIDE, MANITOWOG.WIS.
F. C. BUERSTATTE,
DEALER IN
DRUGS AND MEDICINES,
CHEMICALS, &c.,
CORNER EIGHTH and JAY STS
MANITOWOC, WISCONSIN.
' physician's Prescriptions Carefully Coicponuded
£1 )t iUmxtomoc ®rikme.
VOLUME XXIV.
A SEEING JREERAIN.
BY C. F. ADAMS.
Bright on the hill-sides set against the sun
The glad grass ripples to the west wind’s feet;
Bright in the orchards buds are long begun—
Blossoms and bursting leafage freshly sweet;
Daylight hath stood to hear the linnet sing :
Nay, sweety nay , sweet, this is no little thing.
Hark ! for the birds seem like to burst their throats
In sheer glad-heartedncss for earth grown
bright;
Hark ! from each pasture-land and close there floats
Antiphonal outpouring of delight;
Such is the latter gladness of the spring :
Nay, sweet, nag, sweet, this is no little thing.
Hard by cool shallows of the sapphire sea
Bright-breasted sea-swifts flash above white foam;
Have they no word of hope or fear for thee—
Hope, that thy happy heart become Love’s home
Fear, lest to far-off lands he soon take wing ?
Say, sweet, nay, street, this is no little thing.
Store not,’’ they say, “ for any land unknown ;
Gather around thee all things fair and sweet—
Blossoms of love and music softly blown—
Colors to deck thy dainty breast and feet;
Still Change shall find thee, still Death’s kisses
cling.”
Nay, sweet, nay, sweet, this is no little thing.
The year’s youth and thy youth meet face to face
’Mid odorous breath of flowers and cuckoo-call;
Love’s passionate whispers fill each interspace,
Love’s passionate kisses on thine eyelids fall;
Hearts unto hearts responsive roundels sing :
Nay, sweet, nay, sweet, this is no little *hing.
Perchance, one day far hence, thy soul shall say,
“ Ah, for that green isle in life’s grievous sea!”
And thy tired, tear-dimmed eyes shall look away
Back past regret, and wrong, and agony ;
Back past deep snows and drear winds wander
ing ;
Back to the loves anti laughter of life’s spring ;
Nay, sweet, nay, street, this is no little thing.
— Appleton's Journal for May.
THE FATAL Q UAltliEL.
“ But I say you shall not!”
“ Anil I say I will !”
The speakers were husband and wife.
The former leaned on the mantel-piece,
and frowned angrily, looting down at
the latter as he spoke. Tiie wife, still
sitting by the tea-table, for that meal
had just been finished, did not glance
up as she answered, but went on talking
to her lap-dog in terms of fond endear
ment, and feeding it with sugar.
Yes; they were husband and wife.
Seven years before, Carrie Dayton, just
18, freshly freed from the trammels of
boarding-school, had launched forth into
society, with a head full of romantic
ideas oi love and marriage. There she
had met with Harry Aylmer. To her
he seemed almost a god—so far superior
to all others, that very speedily she
found herself thinking more of him than
of any other admirer, and listening with
beating pulses to his manly tones. He
was verging toward his 30th year, and
was already somewhat world-worn, for,
being wealthy, he had not been confined
to the dull routine of a business life, but
had roamed the world at large, travel
ing to all lands, tasting every cup of
pleasure ; but he he was still very hand
some, and his manners in society were
perfect. Men had envied him—worn j
had loved him—and this man had grown
weary of it ail.
But, under the proud, cold smile was
hidden a warm heart, somewhat crusted
over with selfishness, it is true, but it
was there. And, when he met Caroline
Dayton, he felt that he had encountered
his fate. To him there was something
irresistible in her bright freshness and
beauty, and in the winning gayety of her
artless manners. Then the polished
marble of her fair skin ; the golden curls
that foil around her shoulders; the
bright blue eyes, full of light—these all
possessed rare attraction for this man,
whose heart had been so long untouched.
Day after day had found him at her
side, putting forth eveiy effort to make
himself agreeable. So, after a few brief
months, they were married, and went
forth to tread life's journey together.
They traveled awhile; and the young
bride, delighted V'th the new scenes
opened up before her, was hardly con
scious of the fact that his will, not her
wish, guided and controlled all their
movements. It was very sweet to obey
one whom she loved so fondly. At last
they settled in a home of their own,
replete with every comfort and luxury—
and life began in earnest.
Now came the crisis. From early
childhood, Harry Aylmer had shown
himself possessed of an iron will, stem and
unyielding. Carrie, too, had a will of
her own. For the first few months of
marriage it was very pleasant for her to
have him will for her—and gracefully
she yielded; but at length the reins
were drawn too tiglit, the intense selfish
ness of the husband became apparent
even to Carrie—and there began to grow
up a spirit of rebellion on her part, a
desire to judge for herself sometimes,
and to act accordingly. Matters grew
from bad to worse. This opposition of
wills, occurring only at long intervals at
first, became frequent at last; both re
gretting it in cooler moments, yet neither
confessing it to the other; he thinking she
ought to trust his judgment entirely, she
carrying ever in her heart a souse of in
justice done her.
Those pleasant little courtesies which
serve to keep love burning brightly on
the domestic altar were, by degrees, ut
terly neglected, and the lamp of love
grew dim. After the lapse of some three
years, however, a beautiful babe lay on
its mother's bosom ; a bright, wee flower,
with its amber rings of hair, its pure,
white skin, and heavenly blue eyes—a
very miniature of the mother who bore
it. Reconciliation ensued, not spoken,
but tacitly agreed upon. Husband and
wife seemed drawn together by the little
gol leu link, and while the little angel
. gladdened their home happiness re
mained.
But a hitter time came, which should
have served to unite those si v< red hearts
more closely. Tiie child sickened and
died. When the stricken parents bowed
over their dead, each mentally resolved
to be all in all to each other, that no
shadow should come between them, but
the lips spoke not of the resolve made
in their own strength—pride kept them
silent.
As the months passed on, the old spirit
revived in each; and now, after a few
years of wedded life, behold the pair
whom “ God had joined together” in al
most constant enmity—each heart hard
ened and cold, never a loving word or
caress, only silence or upbraiding.
So matters stood at the time our story
opened. The handsome room, with its
rich furniture, looked very inviting.
Nothing was lacking that taste could de
sire, or wealth supply. But the light
from the glowing lire fell upon the fair
face of the wife, where discontent lay
like a dark shadow, while the red lip
curled in apparent contempt or indiffer
ence. A heavy frowji darkened the hus
band’s brow; the firm set of the lips, and
the curve of the dilated nostril, showed
his excessive auger.
Mr. and Mrs. Aylmer had been ashed
to an evening party, and both had ex
pected to go. But the husband had
come home out of humor, which he pro
ceeded to vent on his wufe, concluding
by saying he should not go to the party.
Mrs. Aylmer, vexed at his manner even
more than at his werdo, had replied tart
ly that she should go without him.
‘ ‘ The invitation has been accepted;
we have no good reason for staying
away, and I, for one, intend to go.”
“But I say you shall not!” said the
husband, pushing his chair angrily back
from the tea-table, standing up, taking a
turn across the floor, and then going to
the mantel-piece, where he stood, as we
have described, looking gloomily dowm
on his wife.
“And I say l will!” was the retort, as
the speaker turned away from the table,
but retained her seat, and began to fon
dle her lap-dog.
This was too much for the husband.
The cool indifference cut him to the
heart. With a smothered oath he flung
himself out of the loom, put on his hat
in the hall, and went off to his club.
When the outer door was heard bang
ing after him, Mrs. Aylmer rose from
her chair, an angry light in her eye.
“I only half meant it,” she said;
“but now I will go. If he had only
asked me to remain kindly ; if he had
said he was even ill or tired; if he had
smiled on me, I would have stayed at
home. But I will not be ordered !”
Never had she dressed with more care.
Never had she looked more beautiful
than when she entered her carriage to
go to the ball.
After a couple of hours the husband
came home, for by this time his anger
was over, and he felt rather ashamed of
himself. His rage returned, however,
when he found that Mrs. Aylmer had
really gone, for he had persuaded him
self that, after all, she would remain.
“How dare she defy me thus ?” he
cried, angrily.
But, after awhile, came calmer
thoughts. His mind began to wander
over past years. He dreamed of the
bright maiden he had wooed so perse
veringly, and who came to him in all her
young beauty. The stern face softened
as the sweet vision came up before him.
He thought of the golden head that had
nestled on his breast, of the blue eyes
that had brightened at his approach, of
the warm kisses that had melted away
the ice that had crusted around his
heart. He remembered how submissive
she had been until he had driven her to
rebellion by his exacting selfishness.
Then came to him the memory of their
child, and of the happy hours they had
spent watching its unfolding beauties.
His heart yearned for the mother of his
babe. Memory, with her busy fingers,
had unlocked the chambers of his heart,
and her softening influence was doing its
work.
He began to see at last how he had
wronged and injured the wife he.should
have cherished. He sprang from his
seat, mid walked rapidly to and fro.
“This shall be so no longer!” he
cried. “I will beg her forgiveness; I
will win back my darling’s love. She
shall lie on my heart, as in the olden
time, "
The hour grew late, and he began to
wonder why she did not return. Open
ing the door, he looked into the deserted
street. A strange dread stole over him,
for nearer and nearer came the sound of
wheels driven rapidly. Hastening down,
as the carriage reached the door, he was
confronted by a man who sprang out,
exclaiming, breathlessly, “Mr. Aylmer,
if you would see your wife alive, come
with me!” And, forcing the terror-
I stricken husband into the vehicle, they
were hurried away.
Ret’.iruiug from the party, Caroline
Aylmer sat alone in her carriage, nut
thinking of the gay scene she had left,
] but of her unhappy married life. She
: was taking to herself much blame that
! she had not been more submissive and
more forbearing, and wondering if it
were too late to undo the evil Tender
thoughts of the husband, once so dear,
were stealing into her heart. Suddenly
; there came a sound of men running; the
; cry of “ Fire !’’ the whirr of the engine;
| the rear and plunge of horses; the inef
fectual efforts of the driver to control
them; then she was thrown violently for
ward, and all was darkness.
When the repentant husband reached
the side of his wife, death had sealed
her eyes. Someone had lifted her
| fair form, and oorue it into the
; nearest house; but medical aid was
useless—the vital spark had fled. The
( injury was internal, and not a blemish
broke the pure white surface of her mar
ble face.
Caroline Aylmer had never looked
lovelier than now, when she lay there
in her gala robes. Het dress of pale
MANITOWOC, WISCONSIN, THURSDAY, MAY 3, 1877.
blue silk, with its frost-work of lace
and pearls, only made more pallid
the rounded form, lately so full
of life and health. She had passed
away without pain, and very placid
was the sweet face, fast growing cold in
death.
Words cannot picture that strong
man’s agony. He dung himself beside
the body, and his voice grew hoarse
with pleading for one more look, one
single word of forgiveness. Alas ! none
came.
Years afterward, a grave was dug by
stranger hands in a far-distant land.
None there knew that the lonely, bro
ken-hearted man, whose last resting
place it was, when alive, had borne the
name of Harry Aylmer, and had spent
his dayt, ever since that terrible night,
in vain remorse for that fatal quarrel.
OKE OF BOWIE’S Dir EES.
At the appointed hour all parties were
on the ground, Bowie, as usual, very
cool, the Spaniard very furious and ex
cited. The Spaniard’s second won the
choice of position, which gave the second
of Bowie the word. They were to stand
back to back, rifles perpendicular, up
ward or downward—to wheel, at the
word. Here arose an instance of genius
over routine. In the army the maneu
vers are intended for regularity before
time; but, iu such cases as this, regu
larity was of no moment, but time was
everything. When the Spaniard heard
the word to “ wheel,” he, of course, exe
cuted it in true military style, in three
motions,” but BoWic—whose whole life
had been spent iu depending upon him
self, not regulating his movements by
those of others, who hjd been compelled,
in his warfare against Indians or in pro
curing game, to take every position, ex
ecuted every change of body necessary
for the occasion to insure success—in
stead of wheeling, as the Spaniard was
doing, simply turned the body from the
hips, or on the hips, holding the feet
firm, which, of course, brought him
arounu quicker than his antagonist, and
enabled Bowie to fire first, and to drive
his ball through the brain of his antago
nist. This Bowie said anybody could do
if they only possessed the requisite qual
ity—nerve.— Wilkes' Spirit of the
Times.
EDO VERBS FOR SUBSCRIBERS.
“A wise son maketh a glad father,”
and a prompt-paying subscriber causeth
an editor to laugh.
“Folly is a joy that is destitute of
wisdom,” but a delinquent subscriber
causeth suffering in the house of a news
paper maker.
“11l the ways of a man arc clean in i
his own eyes,” except the way the delin
quent subscriber hath in not paying for
his newspaper.
“ Better is a little with righteousness”
than a thousand subscribers who fail to
pay what they owe.
“A just weight and balance are the
Lord’s,” but that which is due on your
newspaper is the publisher’s thereof.
“ Better is the poor man who walketh
in integrity” and payeth his subscrip
tion, than the rich man who continually
telleth the “ devil ” to call again.
‘ * Judgments are prepared for scom
ers, stripes for the backs of fools,” and
everlasting punishment for him who pay
eth not for his newspaper.
“Hope deferred maketh the heart
sick,” is a proverb sadly realized by the
publisher who sendeth out bills.
“A righteous man hateth lying,” j
hence an editor waxeth wroth against
the subscriber who promises to call and
settle to-morrow, yetcalleth not to settle.
HOW MRS. If A IKS BOOKS.
Mrs. Hayes is of medium height and
square-built. Her head and features
j are large. So is her waist, and her
hands and feet are in proportion. She
has a magnificent suit of hair. It is so
heavy and black, and is dressed so
smoothly, that in the daytime it looks
dark and precise iu contrast with her
clear olive complexion. The most prom
inent feature of her face is the mouth,
which is large (the jaw is as broad as a
man's) and conspicuously filled with
strong white teeth. The lips are par
ticularly firm and full, with the jaw in
dicating decision of character and an
ardent temperament. The forehead is
broad and smooth, and the eyebrows are
regular. The eyes are large, but deeply
set, and are of that peculiar gray which
does not mean a twilight depth of blue,
or an azure light of gray. They are a
decided gray, admitting of all the steel
tints, from that of cold metal to the
gleam and glitter of the polished ore.
In the glow of intense feeling such as
| animated her on Inauguration day and
i at her first public reception, her eyes
I looked as black as night, and they had a
: luster such as is rarely seen. She made
no effort to conceal her delight.—Cin
cinnati Commercial.
IS SEARCH OF •• U.AXDKERCIIERS."
“Got any pockethankerchers?” said a
small, soiled boy, with the chief part of
his wardrobe hanging from his shoulder
by one suspender, and a bundle of news
papers under his arm.
The shopkeeper stared for a mom nt,
but hard times have made even small
purchasers desirable, and he answi red
blandly :
“ Here you are, sonny; all linen, 15
cents.”
The young merchant cast a scornful
look at him, and said :
“I wonder at ye r showin’ them cotton
si( vsto a gen deman. I want suthin in
fancy silk, with a chance for my mo-nog
ram iu the comer. Where’s there a fiust
class dry-goods house ’round here, young
feller ?”
And lie got out of the door just in ad
vance of a shower of yardstick., and
B'issors.— Boston Commercial Bulletin.
FARM AM) HOME.
Farm Itukhiffs.
The general cause why hens do not set
on their eggs quietly, but are fidgety,
and break their eggs, is that they are in
fested with lice. Use carbolic acid about
neSt and hen-hottseg.
A liberal use of printer’s ink has made
many fortunes, while it has blasted the
prospects of many demagogues. But it
is recommended as a preventive of the
ravages of the banker worm. Wind a
stiff paper round the trees, and smear it
with printer’s ink. It is far better than
tar. No worm can cross it, and it docs
not harden ns quick as tar.
Some planters practice the following
plan for providing their tables withsw r eet
cbfti earlief than it can be raised by the
ordinary methods: They plant the seed
in inverted sods, and keep the young
plants under glass until the season is far
enough advanced to make transplanting
safe. The sods are cut into squares, so
that the transplanting does not disturb
the roots.
jt is Said to be a good plan in trans
planting tomato, cabbage, cantaloup, or
any other tender plant from the hot-bed,
dr froiil one place to another, to prepare
a vessel filled with manure-water and
rich soil, about the consistency of thin
mush; with this the roots of the plant may
be well coated, and then set in a hole
made with a round piece of wood or dib
ble. After being rather firmly planted
they should be moistened again with
manure-water ;
Tiie sooner work is begun in the gar
den the better it will be for those who are
compelled to practice economy the pres
ent year. A good garden is one-half the
battle for the subsistence of a family.
These should be looked to now, as the
weather gives a good opportunity, and
the hired man, mechanic, or others who
have a little patch upon which to plant
potatoes, beans, cabbages, etc., can raise
enough to save a good many dollars dur
ing the next year.
A well-known vegetal ile-grower in
England tells the Gardener's Chronicle
that he partly escapes “the potato dis
ease ” by planting the late Varieties first
and the early ones last. By this plan he
says he gets the late sorts into growth
earlier, and consequently they ripen
earlier; while the earlier or quicker
growing tubers are in no way injured by
being planted a month later than usual.
Both pops are thus ripe before the crit
ical period arrives.
Keeping Walks Clean.— lt often re
quires i vast amount of hard labor to
keep v .ilks clean from grass and weeds
by using a hoe. We have known fine
salt to be sown bountifully along drives
and walks, and we have sometimes made
use of it on oUr own grounds to keep all
vegetable growth down. The use of a
hoe is objectionable in walks and drives,
as it is desirable to keep the surface as
compact as practicable. Salt will kill
grass of every species, and nearly all
sorts of weeds, besidess keeping the
grounds as clean as dirt. More than
this, the lame and the lazy can scatter
salt, and thus keep the walks clean, when
they would not do it with a hoe.
J. C. Weston, of Bangor, Me, says
that after a trial of twenty years he finds
the following method of raising peas in
a small garden the most profitable and
satisfactory: “ A warm, sheltered situa
tion is selected, and trenches are dug
about a foot and a half wide and three
feet apart; the bottom is filled with old
manure, which is covered with loam.
The soil being light, he then sows the
peas and covers them six _nch.es deep
with soil. After the first hoeing the
sticks are inserted for their support. The
manure imparts great vigor to the plants,
and the depth of covering prevents the
effects of drought and furnishes peas for
nearly a month.”
Domestic Economy.
To Wash Calicoes that May Fade.—
Put a teaspoonful of sugar of lead into
a pailful of water, and soak the dress
fifteen minutes before washing.
To Sponge Black Worsted Dresses.
—Sponge on the right side with a strong
tea made of fig leaves, and iron on the
wrong side. This process restores crisp
ness to alpaca, bombazine, etc.
Lemon Pie. —lnside of one lemon,
except the seeds, chopped with half a
cupful of raisins. Add two table-spoon
fuls of flour, a cupful of sugar, and cup
of water. Bake with two crusts.
Plain Cold Cake.— Sour milk, soda,
a pinch of salt, two or three table-spoon
fuls molasses, and Indian meal to make
a thin batter. No eggs or shortening is
needed, if the meal is not too fine. Bake
in a quick oven.
Baked Custard.— Beat four eggs and
two table-spoonfuls sugar thoroughly,
and stir into one quart boiling milk;
pour into cups, grate nutmeg over the
top, and bake ten or twelve minutes in a
hot oven. To be eaten cold.
Kentucky Potatoes. — Take raw po
tatoes, pare and slice very thin ; place
them in a pudding-dish ; cover well with
milk ; add pepper and salt, and bake
until nicely browned ; do not put them
in water after tin y have been sliced.
Ginger Pudding.— One cup not quite
full of suet, two cups of bread-crumbs
two tea spoonfuls of powdered ginger ;
mix with warm treacle. Butter a mold
or basin, put in the pudding, and bake
for two or three hours ; or, if preferred,
steam it in place of baking.
Pudding Sauce, — One cupful sugar,
one egg, tcaspoonfnl extract vanilla,
saltspoonful of salt, beaten to a froth ;
stir in one wineglassfnl 1 wailing water;
then set over boiling water five to ten
minutes, stirred often ; or omit the
vanilla, and pnt in wine or brandy
and boiling water. Thi recipe is for
live persons.
Streaked Butter. —The eausc of
streaked butter is the imperfect working
of the butter after it is salted. Salt in
butter sets the color, or deepens and
brightens it; so, if the salt is v orked
into the butter and not so fully worked
as to salt every part, then the fresh but-,
ter retains the color it had when it came
from the chitrU, and the salted butter
grows so much darker that it is decided
ly streaked. The remedy is to work the
streaked butter more thoroughly.
A Simple Mosquito Trap. —While vis
iting at the house of a friend, I was one
morning surprised to see one of the ladies
of the household going through the bed
rooms with a short pole about the length
of a broom-handle, to which was at
tached the cover of a mustard box, with
a small quantity of kerosene oil within.
This, whenever a mosquito appeared on
the ceiling, was applied, and it fell a vie- !
tim immediately, in its efforts to escape,
into the oil. —Rural Neiv Yorker.
n oM. in sf j in.l n e.
Matilda Joslyu Gage, Chairman of the
Executive Committee of the National
Woman Suffrage Association, has issued
the following circular:
The tenth annual convention of the
National Woman Suffrage Association
will be held in Masonic hall, corner
Sixth avenue and Twenty-third street.
New York, May 24, 1877. The nation
has entered upon its second century of
existence, leaving one-half its citizens
political slaves. While the form of our
Government declares woman’s demands
to be 1-ighteolls and Jttst, man’s legisla
tion still holds her unenfranchised. As
in law is found the security of rights,
and as woman has been denied the con
structive rights of the Declaration and
constitution, she must seek recognition
in specific law, by amendment to the con
stitution of the United States. The
great effort Of the National Suffrage As
sociation this year wall be for a sixteenth
amendment which shall specifically de
clare woman’s right to the ballot. The
right of petition is woman’s only recog
nized method of influencing legislation ;
rt million names to the Forty-fifth Con
gress would have a great moral influence
upon Congress and the nation. The
United States already has three classes
of voters, the black man, naturalized
male citizens, and amnestied rebels; each
of these has a right to the ballot under
United States authority. Though by de
cision of the Supreme Court in case of
"Virginia L. Miner, of Missouri, all wo
men were remanded to the States, yet, as
the national Government has power to
invest with the ballot in the above in
stances, it has like power to enfranchise
women. Let us therefore meet and dis
cuss the best methods of attaining this
great object. All contributions to this
convention should be sent to Ellen C.
Sargent, No. 1,733 Dc Sales street,
Washington, D. C. Letters should be
addressed to Mrs. Gage, Fayetteville,
N. Y.
STRUCK A RORAKZA.
A Decatur street grocer took a sugar
cured bam from its yellow overcoat the
other day, stuffed the canvas with saw
dust, and hung it temptingly before his
door as a sign.
Yesterday Short-Legged Jim came
along, and, seeing the decoy, remem
bered that the old ’omau was out of
moat, and concluded he’d appropriate
what he termed the “big bonanza.”
Watching his chance he soon had the
yellow fraud under his arm, making for
home.
“ Old ’oman, hyar's a ham o’ meat I
fetched yer,” he said, as he deposited his
jjrize.
“ Look hyar, nigger, whar in the name
ob de Lord did yer fotch up wid all dat
ham.”
“As’ mo no quischuns an’ I’ll tell no
lies,” said Jim, evasively.
“Well, it duz look sorter like ole
times ter see so much meat as dis in er
house. Clar to grashus dat man Hayes
ain’t no slouch on a Prcsumdunt—am
lie, Jim?”
1 ‘ Shet yer fly-trap, ole ’oman ; wot
de debbil you know ’bout Hayes ?
Fotch me dem scissors an’ le’s sample
| dis ham.”
The scissors cut two or three stitches,
! and the sawdust began to pour out.
1 There were two dark faces made darker
\ by the revelation, and it flashed through
' Jim’s mind that he hadn't struck a big
■ bonanza after all.
“ See hyar, Jim, ’pears ter me dat ef I
! couldn't steal a shore-uuff ham 1
i wouldn’t steal a bag ob sawdus’ !”
Then Jim went down town, fully
I satisfied that “All’s not gold that glit
| ters.”— Exchange.
THE TEI- ETHOSE J.\ J{ (RI-INGTON.
They have a telephone up at Mr.
Mardigan’s, out on North hill, and one
j evening last week, after they had been
j amusing themselves with it in the par
lor, it was left on with all its connec
tions. Young Mr. Posonby called to see
Miss Arcthusia that evening. They had
I been sitting silent for some time, and
| young Mr. Posonby had just taken her
; hand and said, with a soft, tender, im
j pessioned intonation, “Arethnsia, each
glittering star that gems the lambient
sky, each golden-circled, soft-eyed houri
of the—” and just then the telephone
spoke up, in the big bass voice of old
Mr. Mardigan: “By jocks, Maria. I’m
about tired of sleeping in a night shirt
ripped iiom the tail to the back of the
neck, that hangs on a fellow Ike a pin
| afore. I’ve spoke about this often
enough, and, if there ain’t enough women
around here to mend one night shirt,
I’m going to sleep in a coffee-sack.”—
Hawk-Eye.
NUMBER 3.
hJINS ai yj> fritz.
Hans and Fritz were two Deutschcrs who lived bide
by side,
Rem<io frr*u tbc world, its deceit and its pride ;
With their pretzel* iul beer the spare moments
were spent,
And the fruits of their labor were x>racc .and
content.
Hans purchased a horse of a neighbor one day,
.And lacking a part of the geld—as they say—
Made a call upon Fritz to solicit a loan,
To help him to pay for his beautiful roan.
Fritz kindly consented the money to lend.
And gave the required amount to his friend ;
Remarking—his own simple language to quote—
u Derbups it vas bedder ve make us a note.”
The note was drawn up in tU Ir primitive way—
“l, Hans, gets from Fritz ferity tollars to-day”—
When the question arose, the note l>eing made,
“ Vich von holds dot baper until it vas baid ?”
“ You geeps dot,” says Fritz, “ und den you vill
know
You owes me dot money.” Says Hans: il Dot ish so ;
Dot makes me rcmcrapers I half dot to bay,
Und I prings you dcr note und dcr money some day.’
A month had expired when Hans, as agreed,
Paid back the amount, and from debt he was freed
Says Fritz, “ Now dot settles us.” Hans replies,
“ Yaw;
Now’ who dakes dot baper scoordings by law 7”
“I geeps dot, now, aind’t it?” says Fritz; “den,
you see,
I alvays remempers you baid dot to me.”
Says Hans, “ Dot ish so, it vos now shust so blain
Dot I knows vot to do ven I porrows again.”
—Appleton'h Journal for May .
PLEASANTRIES,
If you hate your neighbor study
geometry and the prevailing winds. You
can thell tell just where to place your
ash-barrel.
Miss Elizabeth Errety, of St. Cloud,
Minn., has fallen heir to a milliou-dollar
estate in England. “ Give us Ldb-
Errety or give us death.”
Another dam broke loose in Oregon
because they removed the little bear cub
from its mamma’s cage against her wish
es. No lives lost, but a bear escape.
Daee to do right,
Dare to be true—
Kick at your mother-in-law
If she kicks you.
When a woman leans out of a third
stoi'y back window, and calls another
woman an “unmitigated flea,” it too
often lays the foundation of an everlast
ing enmity.
The Leavenworth Times sums up a
breach-of-promise suit in two headlines,
thus : “An injured woman sues her de
ceiver for $50,000, ahd he runs 49,950
behind the ticket.”
Hebe, fix up the constitution so that a
man will hare the privilege of shooting
the fellow who asks for a light from his
25-cent Havana, and hands back the
stub of a penny-grab.
A New York editor says “ profanity is
less common than it used to be. ” From
Which we infer that he is less troubled
with bores aiid bills from his washer
woman than formerly.
‘ 1 How to get rid of a cold ”is being
discussed by the country papers. Put a
little nitro-glycei'iUe up your nose, then
hit it with a sledge hammer, and the cold
will never trouble you again.
They never use a bulletin board on a
Worcester paper. They merely take the
insole out of the editor’s slipper and hang
it out of the second-story window against
the sidewalk and chalk their dispatches
on that.
The Woman's Journal Toes occasion
ally get in a good argument in favor of
the superiority of 'woman, anil cites as a
fact that a woman can pin on a man’s
collar the first time trying, when the
very same pin, if engineered by the
hands of a man, would double up and
turn backward to stick in his thumb.
“ Often, often,” says Mrs. Yan Cott,
“ even now the devil comes to me and
tempts me to evil thoughts.” Well, it’s
natural; she isn’t to blame for it. When
she stands on the platform in the blaze
of the chandelier, and a scrawny sinner
lopes up the center aisle, she can’t help
saying softly to herself ; ‘ ‘ If —I—looked
—like —that—woman—l’d —pad. ”
An old Comstockcr, being reproached
by his prospective mother-in-law that he
was much too old for her daughter, that
he was even bald-headed, replied:
“ Madam, my baldness is no indication
of age—it runs in the family. In fact,
madam,” said he, in a sudden gush of
confidence, “ I was born bald-headed !”
Roger M. Sherman was arguing a
case, and made a point which the Judge
did not at once sec. “Mr. Sherman,”
said he, “ I would thank you to state the
point so that I can understand you.”
Bowing politely, Sherman replied, in his
blandest manner, “Your Honor is rot
probably aware of the task you are im
posing on me.”
now cos's uMPTioy it eg ax.
Theodore Parker was descended from
: a family of sturdy farmers. Tliey were
I healthy and strong and long-lived. On
I the mother’s . side, also, the ancestral
| health had been equally vigorous. Many
of the ancestors on both sides lived to
be eighty or ninety years. But of his
; own family, nine of the brothers and sis
ters, including himself, died of consump
tion, and that fatal disease prevailed in
other branches of the family of the same
generation.
He ascribed the origin of the disease
| to the location of the family homestead.
It was built on a hillside, and the ground
above, below and around it was wet and
spongy from heavy frosts on the hill.
Below the house was a meadow of spongy
peat, from two to fifteen feet in depth.
This meadow was wot all through the
year, its neighborhood damp and chilly,
and even in the daytime fogs would often
rise from it and reach to the house. Mr.
Parker thought that the dampness
from the meadow sowed the seeds of
consumption in the family, and that even
those timt moved to healthy locations
carried the disease with them.
THE TRIBUNE.
ADVERTISING SCALE.
ONE INCH SPACE MAKES A SQUARE.
Space] 1 w 2 w 3 w 4 w 3 m 6 in lyr
1 Square . 100 150 "175 2(W 300 500 800
2 Squares. 150 250 250 350 500 800 12 00
3 Squares. 200 300 400 500 700 1200 15 00
4 Squares. 300 450 500 050 1000 1500 IS 50
% Column. 500 COO 700 SOO 1200 1850 25 (HI
*s Column. COO 800 900 1000 1500 2500 37 50
V, Column. 750 1100 1300 1500 1850 3000 45 00
1 Column. 1000 1500.1700,2000,3000 4500 ; 80 00
Business notices 10 cents per line. When con
tinued more than one week, half of the above
rates for each subsequent week.
C. HAVERLAND,
DEALER IN
Wines, Liquors and Cigars,
EIGHTH STREET, NORTH SIDE.
Free Lunch every morning- My Billiard Table*
are among tho best in the city. The patronage of
the public is respectfully solicited.
CHAS. BOCK,
DEALER IS
GENERAL MERCHANDISE,
Eighth. Street,
Uan7s Manitowoc, Wis.
Goods Miered to all Paris of tie City
Interest at the rate often per cent will le charged
on all goods Bold alter this date, unless paid with
in 60 days.
J. C. FILHOLM,
MERCHANT TAILOR,
Shop on York St., Opposite F. Cams
A CHOICE LOT OF
CLOTHS AND CASSMERES,
always on band, suitable for Mens’and Boys’ Cloud
ing, and at prices to suit the times. Am prepared
to get up all kinds of Garments and Suits at
VIEIRA PRICES.
fl3L.Remember the place—opposite the Big Hat.
CLIPPER CITY
MARBLE WORKS.
JOHN NESPOR,
Monnments, HeaJstones and Vases.
All work in Marble neatly executed. Stone
Cutting of every' description done to order-
Yard, Cor. Bth and Chicago Sts.,
MANITOWOC, HIS.
NEW PLANING MILL,
O IF
H.GEEVE&BRO
WASHINGTON STUEET,
MANITOWOC. WISCONSIN.
COHSTTIR/^CTS
Taken for building Houses or mU-
Inc Repairs. All kimlsof
Carpenter and Joiner Jt'ork
DONB ON SHORT NOTICE.
HUBB ARD & NOBLE
MANUFACTURERS OF
WACOM SLEIGH STOCK,
Reedsville, - Manitowoc Cos.
H. F. HUBBARD. U- NOBLE
Cigar Factory,
AUG. GEHBE,
MANUFACTURER OP AND
DEALER IN CIGARS
EIGHTH-SI., North Side, MANITOWOC, WIS.
TOBACCO OF ALL GRADES AND PRICES AND
SMOKERS’ ARTICLES
CONSTANTLY ON HAND.
FIRST NATIONAL BANK.
—OF—
MANITOWOC, : WIS.
This bank organized under the provisions of tho
National Banking Law with a paid up
CAPITAL OF $50,000,
and privilege to increase to 8100,000.
Will buy and sell DRAFTS on the principal citie
of the Union.
Will buy and sell DRAFTS on Great Britain, Ire
ami, Norway, Denmark, or the Continent of Europe,
at New York rates and in sums to suit thtfur•
chasers.
Will sell
PASSAGE TICKET
per Sail or Steam from and to any Port in Europe at
New York rates.
Will purchase UNITED STATES BONDS and keep
constant!y on hand and for sale at market rates, full
supply of all descriptions.
Will convert United States 7-30 Notes into f Al
Bonds, and cash Interest Coupons FREE OF
CHARGE.
Will collect BOUNTIES, PENSIONS and other
claims against the U. S. Government.
Will purchase GOLD SILVER and UNCURRENT
MONEY at highest market rates.
Will receive deposits and allow interest by special
atrreement. _
C. C. BARNES, President*
CIIAS. LULING, Cashier.
CLIPPER CITY
CARRIAGE WORKS
TILLSON <Sc SHIMEK,
MANUFACTURERS OF
CARRIAGES AND SLEIGHS.
CORNER 7th and BUFFALO STS.,
MANITOWOC, s WISCONSIN.
Manufacture and keep constantly on hand, for sale
at reasonable prices, an assortment of
PORTLANDS, SWELL SIDES,
—AND—
jTJLAIPIEIR/S.
Repairing of Carriages and Sleighs done ia a man
£3r that will prove satisfactory. delo*l2m
1 P. S. Tillsox. SaiMi*.

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