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Watertown republican. [volume] (Watertown, Wis.) 1860-1906, December 26, 1900, Image 2

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THEWATERTOWN REPUBLICAN
By G. W. NORRIS.
' WISCONSIN.
i WEEK Hill
All the News of the Past Seven
Days Condensed.
HOME AND FOREIGN ITEMS
News of the Industrial Field, Personal
and Political Items, Happenings
at Home and Abroad.
THE NEWS FROM ALL THE WORLD
CONGRESSIONAL
The Hay-Pauncefote treaty was again
discussed in the senate on the 18th in execu
tive session. No business of consequence
was transacted in open session The house
devoted the day to District of Columbia
business.
In the senate on the 19th 71 private pen
sion bills were passed, including two giving
pensions of SSO a month to the widows of
Gen. John A. McClernand and Gen. John M.
Palmer. The urgent deficiency bill was
passed without debate. A resolution
■was passed authorizing President McKinley
to appoint Congressman Boutelle (Me.)
captain on retired list of the navy In the
house the time was occupied with District
of Columbia matters.
By a vote of 55 to IS the senate on the
20th ratified the Hay-Pauncefote treaty.
It makes the United Stales independent
of all powers except Great Britain in main
taining neutrality of the isthmian canal
In the house the Indian and the military
academy appropriation bills were passed.
The former carried $9,036,526 and the latter
{700,151. A bill was introduced increasing
the vice president’s salary to $25,000 and
cabinet members to $15,000. Mr. Hopkins
presented the report of the census commit
tee on reapportionment, providing for 357
members.
DOMESTIC.
The third of the colored men impli
cated in the murder of Hollie Simon
at Rockport, Ind., John Eolla, was
hanged by a mob at Booneville.
The Chicago city council passed a
resolution prohibiting prize fights and
boxing bouts.
Justice Henry R. Beekman, of the
supreme court, dropped dead at his
home in New York, aged 55 years.
Burglars robbed the bank of Cash
ion, Okla., of $3,400.
The National Civic Federation's in
dustrial arbitration conference began
in Chicago.
Fitzsimmons definitely stated that
he never would en’er the prize ring
again.
In Washington arguments in the
cases involving the constitutional
status of the “colonies’’ of the United
States were brought before the su
preme court.
East Tennessee, Virginia and North
Carolina were shaken by earthquake.
The visible supply of grain in the
United States on the 17th was; Wheat.
61,082,000 bushels; corn, 8,138.000 bush
els; oats, 9,987,000 bushels; rye, 1.290,-
OOt) bushels; barley, 3.482.000 bushels.
Fire destroyed the big plant of the
Brown Hoisting and Conveying Machine
company in Cleveland, 0.. the loss being
$500,000."
By a unanimous vote the citizens of
Sing Sing, N. Y., voted tc petition the
legislature to change the name of the
village from Sing Sing to Ossining.
A collision between freight trains
at South Milwaukee, Wis., killed three
men.
Threats of Eldorado (Xan.) women
to lynch Jessie Morrison, charged with
murder, led to the placing of a strong
guard around the prisoner.
Albert Metzeger, at Hopewell, Pa.,
leading a double life, shot and killed an
actress and committed suicide.
The safe of Dicks & Sally, at Sally,
S. C., was blown open with dynamite
and robbed of $7,000 in cash.
Two negroes robbed and burned a
trading boat at Arcadia. Miss., after
killing the owner, his wife and baby.
Gold & Co.’s bank at Albee, S. D., was
robbed of $1,500 by burglars.
The safe in the Citizen’s bank at Hope,
Ind., was blown open by robbers, who
secured SIB,OOO and escaped.
Policeman Grady shot and instantly
killed John, alias “Red” Corbett, a no
torious Chicago criminal.
John D. Rockefeller’s Christmas pres
ent to the University of Chicago is sl,-
500,000. making his total gifts thus far
$9,202,374.
Impressive watchnight services in
Methodist churches throughout the
country will mark the end of the cen
tury.
President McKinley made the fol
lowing appointments: John C. A.
Leishman, minister to Turkey; Ar
thur S. Hardy, minister to Switzer
land, and Charles S. Francis, minister
to Greece, Eoumania and Servia.
Fred Norton, a youth at Unadilla,
X. Y., has lost the sight of both eyes
as a result of excessive smoking of ci
garettes.
The National Civic Federation con
ference at its closing session in Chi
cago issued an appeal for pacific coun
sel between emploi’er and employe
and appointed a committee to pro
mote conciliation.
Attorney General Griggs argued be
fore the supreme court that the con
stitution did not follow the flag into
Porto Rico and the Philippines.
The sxigar factories and the chicory
factories in Bay City have paid out
$587,924 in wages during the past two
months.
Elijah C. Bliss, aged SO, died at
Bloomington. One of his children is
Leonard Bliss, the giant known to
showmen as “Baby” Bliss.
George Kittleson was killed by an
electric car near Emery, lowa. He had
started for home while intoxicated,
and went to sleep on the track. He was
30 years of age, and unmarried-
Gor. Pingree, of Michigan, signal
ized the close of his term by a unique
dinner in the state house at Lansing.
Edward Cudahy, Jr.. 15 years old,
son of Millionaire Edward Cudahy,
who was abducted from his home in
Omaha, was secretly returned after
30 hours upon payment of a ransom of
$25,000.
Three tramps were killed in the
wreck of a Big Four freight train near
Muncie, Ind,
Atorney General Griggs concluded
his argument before the supreme court
against the contention that the consti
tutionalready applies to the “colonies.”
W. H. Durr, former theatrical man
ager, shot and killed himself in an un
dertakers’ rooms in Chicago.
F. C. Burns, a wealthy ranchman,
and Staunch Burns and Woody Litch
field were killed by a landslide near
Chadron, Neb.
Secretary of the Navy John D. Long
has purchased a site for a residence
at Colorado Springs, Col.
Efforts of trainmen to settle the
strike of the Santa Fe telegraphers
have failed.
Two negroes who robbed and burned
a tradirg boat at Arcadia, Miss., after
killing Thomas Thompson, the owner,
and his wife and baby, were lynched by
a mob.
After a separation of two years John
Snyder, a butcher in La Salle, 111., went
to Chicago and fatally shot his wife
and killed himself.
A report of engineers submitted to
congress 4ivors a ] 4-foot channel from
Lake Michigan to St. Louis.
Physicians say grip is epidemic in
Chicago.
H. K. Wieser, a bank teller at York,
Pa., is said to be $20,000 short.
The residence of Mrs. David Hewitt
at Bradford, Pa., was destroyed by
fire and she and her mother, Mrs. Mar
garet O’Kee.fe, .aged 86 years, were
burned to death.
Edward A. Cudahy, the Omaha pack
er, who paid $25,000 for ransom of his
15-year-old son, has offered $25,000 re
ward for the apprehension of the ab
ductors.
C. H. Aldrich made the closing argu
ment in the Porto Rico case before the
supreme court, contending if the new
colonies are not American they are
Spanish.
President Dolphin, of the Order of
Railway Telegraphers, says the strike
will continue on the Santa Fe,
Railroads will miake a strong effort
to have congress pass a law permitting
pooling of contracts.
An unsuccessful attempt was made
to rob the; state treasury at Lincoln,
Neb.
A mirage resulting from unusual
atmospheric conditions caused the
Michigan shore to be seen in Chicago.
Secretary of War Root has approved
the selection of two farm near Des
Moines, la., as the site for anew army
post.
Positive evidence has been secured
that Joe Rolla, one of the colored men
lynched at Booneville, Ind., was inno
cent of the crime charged.
A medical board in Cuba has disl
- that yellow fever is spread by
mosquitoes.
A negro named Lewis was hanged
by a mob at Gullport, Miss., for the
murder of W. E. Richardson.
PERSONAL, AND POLITICAL.
David H. Nichols, lieutenant gov
ernor of Colorado from 1893 to 1895,
died near Boulder, aged 74 years.
Rev. Cyrus A. Bartol. for over 50 years
pastor of the West chtirch (Unitarian)
at Boston. Mass., is dead, aged 87 rears.
Dr. Charles Sabin Taft, who was the
first surgeon to reach President Lin
coln’s side when he was shot down in
Ford’s theater, died at Mount Vernon,
N. Y.
Justice George C. Ludlow, of the su
preme court of New Jersey. and govern
or of the state in 1880, died in New
Brunswick, aged 70 years.
Mrs. Katherine Spaith, aged 108
years, died at Lancaster, Pa.
Robert E. Neilson. 40 years old, at one
time world’s champion on the old high
bicycle, died in Boston.
The official vote of Minnesota shows
a plurality of 77.560 for McKinley and
2.254 for Van Sant, republican, for gov
eimor.
Official returns of the November elec
tion give McKinley 7,220,707 votes;
Bryan, 6,357,481.
Grover Cleveland advises the demo
crats not to attempt reorganization,
but to return to their old "faith and
“give the rank and file a chance.”
Congressman John J. Lentz (dem.),
defeated for reelection in the Twelfth
Ohio district by a narrow margin, has
given notice of contest.
FOREIGN.
On the east coast of Vancouver is
land the steamer Alpha foundered and
the captain and eight of the crew were
drowned.
The Boers again cut their way
through the British lines at Enubirt
nek, capturing two guns and killing
15 men.
Insurgents in Panay burned the vil
lage of Cabatman. The first political
party under American rule is forming
at Manila.
A movement is on foot in Kurdistan
and Armenia to throw off the Turkish
yoke.
Lieut. Evans and men of the Forty
fourth infantry routed the Filipinos
in Cebu.
Lord Salisbury in a speech in Lon
don took a gloomy view of the situa
tion in South Africa.
The loss of life by the wrecking of
the German training ship Gneisenau
at Malaga is placed at 35, instead of
100, as first reported.
The United States yielded to Great
Britain’s demand that the powers’
joint terms for China shall not be “ir
revocable.”
Gen. MacArthur issued a warning to
Filipinos that the laws of war will be
strictly observed.
Envoys of all the powers in Peking
met and agreed on every point in the
China terms.
The Morocco government has paid
the claim of $5,000 made by the United
States for the murder of Marcus
Eszagui.
Gen. Knox has abandoned his pur
suit of Gen. DeWet and was seeking
to' stem the Boer invasion of Cape Col
ony and Natal.
Moslems killed 200 Christians in cen
tral Turkey.
United States troops have traversed
all the trails in many northern Luzon
provinces, driving out the insurgents.
The Boer invaders in the north of
Cape Colony are reported to have occu
pied Colesburg.
Spain wants to sell to the United
StatesCagayanisland and other islands
of the Philippine group.
The Kn edit el furniture factory at
Hanover, Ont., was destroyed by tire,
the loss being .$500,000,.
A dispatch to a London paper says
Germans shot 60 Chinese soldiers and
took 200 prisoners in Lung Ching.
Carl Becker, a famous German his
torical painter, died in Berlin, aged
SO years.
LATER,
Both houses of congress adjourned
on the 21st until January 3 without
transacting any business.
The schooner Jennie Hall sank in a
gale south of Cape Henry, the captain
and two seamen being drowned.
The Taft commission ordered future
laws for the Philippines to be in Eng
lish.
In a. shooting affray near Tallahas
see, Fla,, State Senator W. C. Rouse
and Edgar Nims were killed.
The American national bank of Bal
timore, Md., has been placed in the
hands of a receiver.
Roger Wolcott, governor of Massachu
setts in 1896, 1597 and 1898, died in
Boston, aged 53 years.
Tammany, in deference to crusaders,
ordered all gambling and pool rooms
in New York city closed.
The British foreign office reports
that the Chinese terras have been
signed by all the powers.
Dr. Richard A. Wise, member of con
gress from the Norfolk (Va.) district,
died at Williamsburg.
“John Owens,” the murderer of
James F. Hogue, was hanged at Paris,
111. He said he was a son of T. H. Wol
sam, living in Tennessee, near Middle
boro, Ky.
A bill introducing the jury system
in Porto Rico has passed both houses.
Kruger is confident, despite slights,
that some government will mediate in
the South African war.
The telegraphers’ strike on the Santa
Fe road has been called off.
Mrs. William P. Frye, wife of the
president,pro tem. of the senate, died
suddenly at the Hamilton hotel in
Washington.
Immigration to the United States for
the calendar year will reach 400.000.
A boiler explosion at Sneedville,
Tenn.. killed W illiam Edwards, Pleas
ant Trent, Jesse Mahan and Lee Gor
don.
A son of Louis Tonhose. of Judd. la.,
has been kidnaped and it is believed he
is held for ransom.
Ex-Congressman John H. Brewer died
at his home in Trenton, N. J. He was
a warm personal friend of President
McKinley, with whom he served in
congress.
Several vessels were wrecked and
three sailors lost in a gale on the At
lantic coast.
The Boer invasion of Cape Colony is
causing alarm in England. More troops
are to be sent to South Africa from
Great Britain and the colonies to
crush the burghers.
MINOR NEWS ITEMS.
The killed and wounded in London’s
streets during the year 1899 numbered
9,891.
William Marconi, the inventor of
wireless telegraphy, is only 25 years
of age.
In Mississippi the number of land
owners among the colored people is
steadily growing.
The American Forestry association
wants the government to buy the Cal
ifornia big tree tracts.
Andrew Carnegie will make Chat
tanooga. Tenn., a Christmas present
of a $50,000 public library*.
The American Expansion league has
asked Gov, Theodore Roosevelt to
serve as one of its officers.
Orders from Washington forbid the
sailing of transports from San Fran
cisco on Sunday hereafter.
Erie railroad interests are reported
to have gained control of a large
share of the anthracite coal business.
The first train has been run through,
the Great Northern tunnel in the Cas
cade mountains. The tunnel is 13,200
feet long.
In the new Missouri legislature 52
out of the 174 members are lawyers.
Only two of the members are manu
facturers.
It has been figured out that the
United States produces 2,220 pounds
of grain for each inhabitant; Eng
land, 360 pounds.
The Cramp Shipbuilding company
of Philadelphia is negotiating for
plants so as to be able to construct
complete battleships.
The vessels built in the United
States and officially numbered from
June 30, 1900, to November 30, 1900,
were 495, of 149,963 gross tons.
In the absence of a law enforcing
the death penalty the governor of
Kansas is puzzled what to do with 40
persons sentenced to be hanged.
Under the patronage of the United
States Philippine commission an ex
periment farm will be started some
200 miles from Manila, where the
growth of all sorts of seeds and plants
from this country will be tested.
Old St. Joseph, one of the largest
cities in Florida in the eighteenth cen
tury, but long since extinct, is to Le
reestablished. Surveyors are now en
gaged in replatting the town site. A
new people will build a city on the
ruins of the former old Spanish city.
HE PAYS IT IN GOLD.
Mr. Cudahy Complies with Terms
of Son’s Abductors.
Drives to a Lonely Spot with ling
Containing: $123,000, and the Ras
cals Return the Lad to
His Home.
Omaha, Neb., Dec. 21. —There is re
joicing in the home of Edward Cudahy,
the wealthy packing house owner and
capitalist of this city. Edward Cudahy,
Jr., who was kidnaped Tuesday even
ing, after being held for 36 hours for a
ransom of $25,000 in gold, which the
young man’s father unhesitatingly
paid, has been returned to his family
and the boy* and his parents are receiv
ing congratulations from relatives and
friends throughout the country. Mr.
and Airs. Cudahy feel that they have
cause for relief, not only over the re
turn of their youthful son, but also be
cause one or possibly more of their
EDWARD CUDAHY, JR.
daughters were not included in the con
spiracy which has caused them so much
anxiety and grief, as a statement of
the conspirators, overheard by the lad
while he was in their power, indicates
that they had been attempting for a
month to secure possession of one of his
sisters. Air. Cudahy has been very reti
cent throughout the affair, and up to
Thursday afternoon refused absolutely
to talk, either of the kidnaping or the
payment of the ransom and return of
his son. All information given to the
public has been through his attorney,
Afelville Sears, and the statements of
the latter have been vert* guarded.
Letters from the Abductors.
At nine o'clock Wednesday morning
a horseman rode past the Cudahy man
sion on Thirty-eighth street and threw
a. letter into the lawn. A servant noted
the action and, securing the letter,
found it contained the information that
Eddie Cudahy had been kidnaped, was
safe and was being held for a ransom.
Three hours later Air. Cudahy received
through the mails a second communica
-tion, detailing the conditions under
which the lad would be surrendered to
his father. Among the conditions
named was one that Air. Cudahy should
deposit $25,000 in gold coin in a place
indicated, about five miles north of the
city, on a lonely road leading up the
bank of the Alissouri river. Air. Cud
ahy called into consultation the chief
of police and his friends and discussed
plans looking to the capture of the
gang when they should make an ap
pearance at the point of rendezvous
named in the letter. The great strain
on the family, however, caused Air.
Cudahy to abandon all idea of captur
ing the men into whose power was the
life of his son. and decided to at once
comply with all the demands of the ban
dits.
A Father’s Lonely Ride.
In order to do this, absolute secrecy
was necessary, and a trusted messenger
was dispatched to the bank to secure
the gold. Air. Cudahy held himself in
readiness and shortly* after supper he
entered a light road buggy*, and after
securing the money* started out entire
ly alone for the place of meeting the
kidnapers. To identify himself he
had attached to the dashboard of his
buggy a red lantern, which was one of
the conditions of the letter. Air. Cud
ahy drove north on the Sherman avenue
road to a point about five miles from
the city, where he found, near the road,
a white lantern suspended from a short
stake driven in the ground. This sig
nal he had been watching for it being
named as the place for leaving the
money*. The location of the lantern was
near the river bank, but when Air. Cud
ahy* arrived nobody* was in sight. He at
once alighted, placed the bag of gold
conveniently* near the stake and, with
out waiting for developments, secured
the horse’s reins and returned to the
city, without hearing a sound.
They Keep Their Word.
That the bandits were near the spot
and at once secured the valuable pack
age cannot be doubted, for about one
o’clock Thursday* morning the young
boy* ran breathless up to the door of
his father’s home and rang the bell for
admission.
Offers Big - Reward.
Late Thursday* night Air. Cudahy an
nounced he would pay $25,000 reward
for the apprehension of the abductors
of his son, $5,00€ for one and $15,000 for
two of them.
Cats Down Its Force.
Houghton, Alich., Dec. 21. —The Calu
me . and Hecla mine has made large re
ductions in its force during the last 90
days. Local estimates of from 1,200 co
1,500 men let out are probably too high,
but it is believed that the force of the
mine has been reduced by* nearly 1,000.
Famous Painter Dead*.
Berlin. Dec. 21, —Prof. Carl Becker,
the German historical painter, whose
eightieth birthday was celebrated De
cember IS, and who was then the re
cipient of a congratulatory address
from the Berlin academy* of arts, died
Thursday of influenza.
READY TO INSURE ROYALTY.
No Discrimination in American Com*
panics Is Made Against
Potentates.
In a cable dispatch printed hero
recently it was stated that some in
surance companies in Europe were
refusing- to accept risks on the lives
of reigning- potentates of the old
world, owing particularly to the men
ace of anarchist violence, which had
been brought pointedly before the
view of insurance company officers
by the tragic death of King Humbert
of Italy. According to the cable ad
vices, one company which found itself
compelled to pay $600,000, the value of
a policy on Humbert’s life, recently
refused to accept a risk on the life of
Alexander of Servia, who sought a
policy for 10,000,000 francs. The cable
dispatch intimated that insurance
companies doing business abroad had
no more use for royal patrons who
might desire to insure their own lives,
says an eastern exchange.
Inquiry among officers of some of
the insurance companies of the Unit
ed States which do a large foreign
business developed the fact that there
is no discrimination against royal
applicants for insurance in the Amer
ican companies. Each application for
a policy of insurance in American
companie is received and acted upon
on its cwn merits, without regard
for the accidental fact that the ap
plicant is a royal personage.
“There is no discrimination against
kings,” a high officer of one of the
largest companies said. “We do not
boycott those seated upon a throne.’*
He said that the danger from an
archists might be considered in con
nection with an application for insur
ance, but that it would be considered
exactly in the light of certain quali
fications of various applicants in
classes familiar in this country; that
it would be considered among the
moral hazards, but that merely in
itself it would not operate to bring
about the rejection of the applicant.
The occupations of various applicants
for insurance carry with them vary
ing moral risks, which are taken into
consideration by the insurance com
panies. The moral risks of certain
kingships would probably be reflect
ed in the premiums exacted in the
case of accepted kingly applicants,
but the accident of royal birth or
regal place would not, American in
surance men say, deprive a potentate
of the privileges of insurance which
he would enjoy if a private citizen of
any of several w-alks of life.
UTILIZATION OF FURNACE GAS
Waste Product in Prussia, to Be Used
in Running: Big: Elec
tric Motors.
Vice Consul General Hanauer, of
Frankfort, writes, November 3, 1900,
as follows: On October 30, 25 repre
sentatives of the largest iron works
in France and Belgium visited the
Horde Mining and Rolling Mills as
sociation, at Horde, near Dortmund,
Prussia, to inspect the electrical cen
tral station for utilizing the gas com
ing from the months of furnaces.
This new method is considered one
of the wonders of modern technics.
The plant, when fully completed, will
have a force of 6,400 horsepower. At
present, three twin motors of the
Oechelhauser system are run this
furnace gas to produce an electric
current for supplying power and light
for the Hermann rolling mills. A
fourth motor of 600 horse-power and
four others of 1,000 horse-power each
are now in process of construction to
serve like purposes.
A Wonderful Old Lady.
Lord Rosebery’s mother, the duch
ess of Cleveland, is a wonderful old
lady. Though she is in her eighty-first
year she is full of energy and is a de
lightful companion. The London King
mentions, as an illustration of her ac
tivity that she did not indulge her love
for travel until she was over 70 years
of age, and since then she has made
many a journey, including a tour to In
dia. the West Indies and British South
Africa. The duchess was married o
the late duke of Cleveland in 1854, three
years after the death of Lord Dalmeny,
Lord Rosebery’s father.
THE MARKETS.
New York, Dec. 22.
LIVE STOCK—Steers $4 00 @ 5 00
Hogs 4 90 (oi 5 20
Sheep 2 25 4 00
FLOUR—Winter Straights... 340 (a 305
Minnesota. Patents 3 90 (u> 4 3o
WHEAT—No. 2 Red 76%(0)
May 78%(o) 79
CORN—No. 2 45%@ 46%
May 42 (y) 42%
OATS—No. 2 27%@ 27%
BUTTER—Creamery 17 0 25
Factory -
CHEESE 12
EGGS 20 # 2b
CHICAGO.
CATTLE—Prime Steers $5 85 @ 6 10
Texas Steers 4 10 (jo) 4 90
Stockers 2 25 (g) 3 30
Feeders 340 @405
Bulls 2 10 @ 4 30
HOGS—Light 4 65 (cv 4 92%
Rough Packing 4 6o @4 82%
SHEEP 3 30 0 4 25
BUTTER—Creamery 15 @ 23%
Dairy 1° @ 20
EGGS 15 @ 21
POTATOES (per bu.) 36 @ 4o
PORK—January 12 27%@12 37%
LA.RD —January 6 87%@ 6 90
RlßS—January 4... 6 32%@ 635
GRAlN—Wheat, December.. 69%@ 70
Corn, December 38 @ 40%
Oats, December 21%@ 21%
Rye, No. 2 45 @ 45%
Barley, Good 52 @ 56
MILWAUKEE..
GR-AlN—Wheat, No. 1 Nor’n $ 72 @ 73
Oats, No. 2 25%@ 26
Rye, No. 1 51 @ 51%
Barley, No. 2 60 @ 60%
KANSAS CITY.
GRAlN—Wheat, May $ 66 @ 66%
Corn, May 34 @ 34%
Oats, No. 2 White 24%(5t) 25
Rye, No. 2 46 @ 46%
ST. LOUIS.
CATTLE—Native Steers $3 25 @ 550
Texas Steers 340 @ 4 £0
HOGS—Packers’ 4 80 0 4 90
Butchers’ 4 90 @ 4 95
SHEEP —Native Muttons 3 50 @ 4 25
OMAHA.
CATTLE—Native Steers $4 20 0 5 40
Cows and Heifers 3 00 (fi 4 00
Stockers and Feeders 3 00 @ 4 50
HOGS—Mixed 4 80 @ 4 82%
SHEEP—Westerns 3 65 @ 3 90
Fire a Shot 20 Miles.
The United States will fire a thousand
pound shot twenty miles which will be a.
record breaker for the distance. The gun
from which it is to be fired will be a mar
vel of American ingenuity, and workman
ship. Another marvel of American ingenui
ty is Hostetler’s Stomach Bitters. For fifty
years it has been the only medicine to cure
constipation, indigestion, dyspepsia, bilious
ness and by its direct action on the kidneysl
- rheumatism.
Our notion of a brave girl is a girl who
keeps right on spending two hours a day
curling her hair after her heart is broken
and she has nothing to live for. —Detroit
Journal.
How’s This?
We offer One Hundred Dollars Reward
for any case of Catarrh that cannot be cured
by Hall's Catarrh Cure.
F. J. Cheney & Cos., Props., Toledo, O.
We, the undersigned, have known F. J.
Cheney for the last 15 years, and believe him
perfectly honorable in all business transac
tions and financially able to carry out any
obligations made by their firm.
West & Truax, Wholesale Druggists, To
ledo, O.
W aiding, Kinnan & Marvin, Wholesale'
Druggists, Toledo, O.
Hall s Catarrh Cure is tak_n internally,
acting directly upon the blood and mucous
surfaces of the system. Price 75c. per bot
tle. Sold by all Druggists. Testimonial®
free.
Hall’s Family Pills are the best.
A woman’s faith in her husband is built:
on a solid rock if a visit from her mother
for three weeks fails to shake it. —Atchison
Globe,
Best for the Bowels.
bo matter what ails you, headache to a
cancer, you will never get well until your
bowels are put right. Cascarets help nature,,
cure you without a gripe or pain, produo
easy natural movements, cost you just 10
cents to start getting your health back.
Cascarets Candy Cathartic, the genuine, put
up in metal boxes, every tablet has C. C. C.
stamped on it. Beware of imitations.
Fair Helen—“l hear you have a secret.”
Fair Grace —“Well, I did have one, but it.
wouldn’t keep.”—Syracuse Herald.
Excursion Sleepers Via M., K. & T. Ryv
Weekly Excursion Sleepers leave St. Louis,
via Katy Flyer (M. K. & T. Ry.) every Tues
day at 8:16 p. m. for San Antonio, Los An
geles and San Francisco.
Weekly Excursion Sleepers leave Kansas-
City via the M. K. & T. Ry, every Saturday
at 9:05 p. m. for San Antonio, Los Angeles,
and San Francisco.
He that will not look before must look
behind.—Gaelic.
Try Graln-O! Try Grain-O!
Ask your grocer to-day to show you a pack
age of GRAIN-O, the new food drink that
takes the place of coffee. The children may
drink it without injury as well as the adult.,
All who try it, like it. GRAIN-0 has that
rich seal brown of Mocha or Java, but it is
made from pure grains, and the most delicate
stomach receives it w-ithout distress, i the
price of coffee. 15c. and 25cts. per package.
Sold by all grocers.
The Commercial Instinct.
Mamma —Tommy, do stop that noise. If
you’ll only be good I’ll give you a penny.
Tommy—No; I w r ant a nickel.
“Why, you little rascal, you were quite sat
isfied to be good yesterday for a penny.”
“I know, but that was a bargain day.”—
Philadelphia Press.
They Wouldn’t Rip.
“What do you call these?” he asked at the
breakfast table.
“Flannel cakes,” replied the wife of his
bosom.
“Flannel? They made a mistake and sold
you corduroy this time.” —Baltimore Ameri
can.
Her Pointed View.
Chappie (blase) —Don’t you think society
is an empty thing 1 ?
Miss Fuller —I think there are lot? of
empty things in society.—Cincinnati En
quirer.
From Bryan’s Own City.
Comes a Startling Story. An Open
Letter that will Cause a Sensation.
Lincoln, Neb., Dec. 24, 1900 (Special),.
—At No. 2J.15 O Street, this city, is the
B. & M. Wall Paper House. “B. & M.”
are theinicial letters of the proprietors,
Mr. A. C. Bonsor, and Mr. O. E. Myers-
The senior partner, Mr. Bonsor, is a
well known and highly respected citi
zen, and no one has ever doubled his
truthfulness. It- is, therefore, the pro
nounced opinion in Lincoln and the
State generally, that the significant and
very strong statements made in Mr.
Bonsor’s letter will go unchallenged..
After explaining his willingness that
the matter be given the fullest possible
publicity in the public interest, Mr.
Bonsor proceeds.
I have suffered untold misery and
pain for over ten years. My kidneys
were diseased. I tried many so-called
remedies, but they did me no good. I,
saw an advertisement of Dodd’s Kidney
Pills, and I bought some, and com
menced to use them at once. I had not
been taking them three days before L
began to improve. For years I had
not had one good night’s sleep, and be
fore the first box of the Dodd’s Kidney
Pills were all used, I could sleep all
nigjit without pains. lam now com
pletely cured, and have not a pain or
ache left. I cannot recommend Dodd’s
Kidney Pills too highly, for they are*
unexcelled as a kidney remedy.
Yours truly, A. C. BONSOR,
No. 2115 O Street,
Lincoln, Neb.
Dodd’s Kidney Pills always cure,-
50c. a box. All dealers.
It Cures Coughs Colds, Croup, Sore Throat, Influ
enza, Whooping Cough, Bronchitis and Asthma.
A certain cure for Consumption in first stages,
and a sure relief in advanced stages. Use at once.
Tou will see the excellent effect after taking the
first dose. Sold by dealers everywhere. Pricey
26 and 50 cents jer bottle.

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