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The Western advance. [volume] (Worthington, Minn.) 1872-1874, April 11, 1874, Image 2

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Terms $1.00 a Year, $1.00 for Six Months.
SATURDAY. APRIL 11,1874.
The law passed to extend the time
for payment of tuxes on personal prop
erty, applies to the following counties
Jackson, Cottonwood, Murray, Nobles,
Rock, Watonwan. Redwood, Lyon and
Lac qui Parle. The time is extended
to the first day of November next.
THE FENCINQ-IN LA W.
The fencing-in, law makes some im
portant changes in the old law. About
one-half the counties of the State are
exempted from the operation of the
new law and hence the old law applies
there. The law is amended as to theJackson
following counties, so that cattle, hor-
a
A writer in the Spirit Lake Beacon
asks whether the unfortunate settlers
there is puie air, good health, and a
lionaires The settler vh
seed fion the lelie
so Than he would bePETER
to bonow enough hu roini *"|J
STATE NEWS.
Spring valley and Albert Lea have
voted no license.
Mankato glories in having seven
miles of improved streets and twenty
miles of sidewalks.
The Southern Minnesota Railroad
Company have issued meal checks, pay
able at the car, which does away with
all swindling of landlords by brakes
men, or of brakesmen by landlords.
NEIGHBORHOOD NEWS.
Dell Rapids is to have a ferry-boat.
Considerable building is to be done
in Spirit Lake this season.
The junior editor of the Spirit Lake
Beacon is building a residence, and this
if ground for suspecting him of matri
monial designs.
The Heron Lake correspondent of the
Republic says 3,000 bushels of
wheat have arrived there for distribu
tion in Jackson County. Also that the
ses and other animals are trespassers
ou the lands of another, at all times creeks in that vicinity are high.
and seasons, and without regard to fen-1 The Rock County Herald Says that
ces, and no provision is made to allow' Dr. Vary is preparing to erect a mill at
them, by vote, to modify the law: Lu Verne, and expects to be ready to
Dodge, Goodhue, Lac qui Parle, Lyon, grind by the first of August.
Martin, Steele, Wabasha and Yellow The Spirit Lake Beacon says: The
Medicine. county contains at present over 2,0001 Lodge under its influence. If any evi
The following counties have power »h"Wtants, nearly all of whom are na- deuce was wanting to prove it a hum
»tn «.«.i»i tnwn HiM.tinri
The
f.Sfcf-
a 1
.. .. ,. „,,, ., learn that about three hundred fami
Dakota, Faribault, I illmore, reebom,
Hennepin, Houston, Jackson, Le Suer, cate in the western part of this and the
Mower, Murray, Nicollet, Nobles, Olm- eastern part of Cottonwood County in
sted, Pipestone, Ramsey, Renville,
a.fe.w,
Rice, Rock, Scott, Sevens, Waseca, tai Lake for tli
Washington, Watonwan, and the ten families until they can become located
western townships of Winona county, comfortably upon" their farms.
WHO~ARE PATPERN Madelia Times learns that Mr.
G-
a
njv
lamity no less great, though longer and "Is-
u^n
2'HEWINOX A & ST. RAIL ROAD. ThevToledo Commercial says the
Considerable complaintr is made of the praying womenthe
can be
Agains the Winon a & St. Peter Rail- heard throughout the city. One saloon
road because in February trains were keeper said he count not stand "Rock
tak off and the country beond Newof
Ulin left to be supplied by wagon.
The excuse is that the road has been
blockaded by snow and that it has not
been possible to keep it open. The St.
Taul Press says that the road need not
have remained blockaded forty-eight
hours. This is probably correct, for the
Sioux City & St. Paul has been blocka
ded only twice during the past v»ntei,
and never more than two running days
at a time, or three days including
Sunday. The Press sa\s justly of the
Sioux City & St. Paul road:
tween „s and harvest. I
The Sioux City railroad, officered by
kindhearted and efficient men, recogni
zed tins claim upon it winter before
last, and operated the road at a loss of
more than $100,000. Had the trains on
the Sioux City railroad been withdrawn,
who could calculate tLe suffering it
would have caused?
We have been visited by the grass
hopper, and have had some destitution
among settlers, but we stilllwlieve that
there is no more highly-favored frontier
Sioux City & Paul railroad.
A writer in the Western Rural, who
has been to Colorado, says it is no place
for a poor man. He says
For a stock country it can't Vie leat.
I saw, in my rambles, thousands of cat
tle, and never saw one in poor condi
tion. There are some as pretty little
farms south of Colorado Springs as
any one would wish to set
would say to fanners, don't go to Colo-,
for it is the worst place in the world
for a poor man.
But Minnesota a State for poor
men. This Mate abounds in examples
of men who came here with just enough
to bring them here, and who, in a few
years, were in independent circrmstan
eea, They took claims or bought land,
worked for others for a while, gradual
ly brought their land under cultivation,
and one or two good crops made them
independent. One good wheat crop in
.Minnesota puts a poor man on his feet,
and two puts him ahead for life.
Narrow Gauge Railroads are a#sum.
ing great importance as tributaries
the main or trunk lines, It might be
supposed that a narrow gauge car would
not carry much grain, but it is stated
at 185 bushels of wheat have been
'^shipped ou one of them. Five cords of
green wood have been loaded, while
seven to ten tons in weight can be car
iied. Tlie Iowa Eastern nnrrnwgaiigeI
of a friend to twle him ove the bar be-!songe re 1 Th*Ja»ns in work I
0
,ie Lo
t,i live born. We have withm borders bug it is furnished by the National
to call special town meetings and pass neat and comfortable Grange, which has just discovered that
a by-law allowing stock to run at large school houses, and there is not a com
in the daytime, between the first day niunity in the State where a more lively
of April and the fifteenth day of Octo- »t«est is manifested in education."
ber: Blue Earth, Carver, Cottonwood,
7*
W
We also hear the rumor
that barracks are to be erected Moun
accomodatioatof
Butterfield, will farm his large
»»that county this year,
on the frontier, whose crops have lieeu Eatherville, I«wa, has a case of in-against
destroved by the grasshoppers, are to' fantieide. A Norwegian girl gave
to looked upon ati paupers The wri- j'irth to achild on the prairie and left
ter answers it himself and does it cor- perish.
rectly, when he says that they aie no' «°»x i« expects the Southern trolledhydesigningpoliticians.it will
more paupers than those who" suffered Minnesota Railroad along that way in result in incalculable good to the farm
by the Chicago and Uo.-ton tires. The '«7. ere. We have no doubt that the isola
world poured out its money freely to' It is said that a good quality of coal tion, the selfishness and the loneliness
relieve these stricken cities, and a ca-
more quiet in its opera'ion, has fallen! Commissioners of Murray Coun-1 elevation of the farming class. The
upon many of the settlers of the West.
l-v
This is no new experience in the West. County Attorney. Governor Davis these, and if the Grangers will ot at
Scarcely anew State has been sett I dismissed the charges, as Mr. Harris tempt to do too much, and will steer
that did not, during its e^rly settle- was guilty only of error of judgment.
ment require at some time from this is casse for removal, every officer complish a great reform. In all other
the oliier and richer parts of the coun- the country may be removed at once. pursuits there is association, cotnbina
try. Kansas has several times txperi-
l"
fiom the older po.tions of the it*-, I i,lir ladies -is tliev chine into a s-iloon
ought to be no inoie asha ,,e«l of doing
enced famine. Let the settler take and now of St. Paul, has been held to and this is what makes the business
heart. He is still better olf than the appear before the United States Distiict' the industrial classes so powerful,
noorofthe luge cities, thousands of Court in June, charged with forging That good old farmer, Horace Greeley,
"whom are now out of implement, and the name of Mrs. Inman, of Cotton who, notwithstanding his theories and
living in unhealthy looiiia with stai va- wood County, a pension draft. supposed \aganes, did more tor fann
tion staring them in tlie face. Here
,:ulifs
H*a
good harvest only a few mouths off. terviewed one saloon keeper. when neighborhoods would combine
X't-u. Will -itv IWIU- vi'iuiiiirr /-ivoii
I and go in bunds from farm to farm to
!e\\ lOlivCliy IS nOW SeiHlinu CllCll- a in
tarn om the W,* .*!.« f..r aid to! £Lte Zwfh» *, ?Tr'rTT'"
„„,„„...» :t^ ..,„.,. ,. I,,. i5, ii woula tlius be hiitlicient lor a neii iibor
suppoit it* po«u, who li\e wiLlun a said to be the most rem.uka le .*
stoliwhearnu
ti «»fitlH mlStave,itotliH
stone tuow ot the palace, o. m. event of the kind since the days of Pen-
aiiepia tecost
Ages." It kept "singing itself all
the time."
A temperance revival is going on at
Austin, Minn. All classes are engaged
and eight saloon keepers have been
prosecuted.
The N. Y. Christian Advocate says:
"A fiiend. who has careful'y* counted
up the results of the Woman's temper
ance movement thus far, gives us the
following figures: Thirty-seven cities
and towns entirely freed from the liquor
traffic 1,761 liquor saloons in Ohio,
Indiana, and Illinois closed and 800
liquor sellers not only reformed, but
hopefully converted to Christ! Com
ment is unnecessary.
JO URN A LISTIC ITEMS.
A half interest in the Owatouna Jour
nal is offered for sale.
The Grange Advance, published at
Red Wing, is one of the best and most
thoroughly edited weekly papers in the
State.
region than that nenetrated by the Hsliere claim to have now one of the
best printing houses in the State.
The Mankato Reviuc has ordered a
steam engine to drive its presses.
The Rochester Record, and Union,
have been consolidated, and the pub-
Kenton rejoices over tlie latest egg
monstrosity. The Republican says it is
nine-and-one-qnarter inches in circum
ference and "was laid on our table by
Dr. Rogers." If there is any Doctor
Hut 11 Rogers in this neighborhood who ean
a
rado, unless you have plenty of capital, „„,. *..,i,i„ ,.,., 1, •,•
or a good to of cattle to start with,
as large eggs as that, whether on
tal)1^
we will pay him
fifty cents a dozen for all he can lay26144
this Summer.
Some little children in Huron county.
Ohio, recently undertook to play with
a loaded gun and one little girl had her
brains blowed out. The paper justly
says that "it ougnt to be made a crim
inal offence to leave loaded fire arms
within reach of children."
It is estimated that $1,000,000 will
not cover the losses in cattle, horses and
sheep frozen to death in California
during the past winter.
The Chicago Tribunt says that first
class carpenters in that city who were
employed a year ago sit $3 per day are
now glad to get $1.50 ier day and that
this decline in the cost of labor runs
through the whole scale of employ
ment.
The Worthington Advance felicitates
ltav\f
railroad has given great satisfaction to ague nor ardent spirits in that commu
ople living .11 the district trav- •,!»-,, No oliieeti'm to HIP tPPtnt-ili«m
eisedbyit. The FaVmersbmg Grange
because they neither engage in
1 1 0 t0 ,i
uf Iowa recently passed resolutions hut the idea of prohibiting an innocent
commendatory of Hie narrow gauge iittle spree with the shakes is a trifle
fystcui, too radical,— Winona Re publican,
FARMERS] DEPARTMENT.
A FARMER .VS. THE GRANGES.
A* farmer, writing to the Winona
Republican against the Granges, gives
his brother farmers some plain talk.
He says
But why are farmers as well as oth
ers so generally disappointed
First—Inexperience. Many who came
West to farm have to learn by experi
once and lose much while they are
learning.
Second—Getting in debt too much—
too much interest to pay.
Third—Some have signed notes for
their friends, and have had others'
debts to pay beside their own. This is
bad.
Fourth—Some farmers are not very
healthy and cannot work very hard.
Fifth—Some are lazy.
Sixth—Some are intemperate.
Seventh.—Some are spendthrifts.
Then speaking of the war on the rail
roads, he says
A moment's reflection will convince
any sane man that without the rail
roads the farmers of Minnesota would
be ruined. Wnat would our grain be
worth if we had no rail oad or steam
boat monopolies to take it to market
But this railroad monopoly humbug
has had its day, and accomplished its
object. Thousands luve joned the
all kinds of~
,Siiy.S:*
W
Jir
expected to lo-
Transportation Companies
are necessary to the farmer's success and
that they are no enemies to railroads awl
canals. Wonderful declaration W"at
will those Grangers say who shouted
"Anti-Monopoly''till they were hoarse,
and talked anti-monoply till they be
lieved they would be better off without
any railroads The evil effects of the
insane war against railroads may be
said seen Woik on railroads is stopped
bonds area drug in the market few
wish to buy projected railroads dead,
a panic induced, and thousands thrown
out of em pi ymeiit who now must
cease to consume our products and be
come producers. All these things are
the farmers.
Nevertheless, the Grange movement
is undoubtedly in the right direction,
and if properly managed and not con-
found 18 miles from Dell Rap-. of farm life have been the great ditticul-
w*.v
preferred charges against S. R. liar-! Grange movement tends to overcome
a
"»Vilson, formerly of Windom tion, and to some extent co-operation,
Lu Verne we"organiz-' ers than any man in America, hoped to
temperance crusade and have in-, seethe day ot co-op rative farming,
tew mil- i» hood, and land would not be mortgag-
it
advancement and
of the politicians, they will ac-
e(1 t(J mwMwry I a
vest, instead of being a stormy cape
At loledo, some one asked the pray-1 ..,,•,,. tl( *.„.„.„,. «•...,.„ i,u ^......L
W W
"toWlXmfp
W a HOrt
S?^ "*"™»S*™
to
"shoulbde,
I 0 W I W
controluthh countrye,
™n™"1 ,,1.°W'
it
b1Sheartily=encouraged.
1,074 car loads of pine lumber weie
received in Sioux City, from Minnesota,
during the year 1873.
N E W ADVERTISEMENT.
United States Mail.
JViiKnxrEeoT-A..
POST OFFICE DEPAKTMENT,
WASHINGTON, Match 31,1874.
No. 2bll8Frnm Weaver, by Smithiield and Lyon,
to Millville, 27 miles and back, once a
week,
l^eave Weaver Friday at 7 a in
Arrive at Millville bv in
Leave Millville S.ituVda at 7 a
Anivc at Weaver by 6 m.
26128 From Forestville, by Carimona, to Preston,
miles ami back, three times a week.
Leave Forestville lucbday, lhuisda, and
Saturday at a m.
Arrive at Preston by 12 ni
Leave i'reston Tuesday, Thursday, and
Saturday at 1 in
An ive at Forestville by 4
26134 From 1'reston to Isciioui-'.s, 3 miles and
back, six tunes a week.
Leave Preston Daily, except Sunday, at 8
a in
Leave bast Claremout Saturday at 10 a in
Arrivee
a
teetotalisni
WaMojJUtfiulavm:t
a bv 12
Leav Wasioj a a 2
An ive at Last Claiemout by 4
From Dodge City by Merton and Fllvvood,
toovvatonna, 12miles and back, once a"
Leave Dodge City Friday at 12 I
\riIve at Owatouna oy "ip in
Leave Owatouna Fi iday at 3.30
An ive at Dodge City by 0.J0
26148 From Moscow to K.rt.Station, 3 miles and
baek, once a week.
Schedule to make connection with mal
rains.
26187 From Elysian, by Marysburg *nd Lake 26359 From Wells, by Minsfie'd. SLite LI
ShakojK-e, equal to 26 miles and iack,
twice a week.
Schedule to be satisfactory to the Depart-,
meut.
26204 From Holden to Keuyon, 6 miles and back,
twice a week.
Leave Holden Wednesday and Saturday at
1 in
Arrive at Kenyon by 3 in
Leave Kenyon Wednesday and Saturday
at 5 in
Arrive at Holden by 7
26815 From Rush City, by Burnettevllle, (Wis.),'
and Anderson, to Grantsburg, 2u% miles
and back, once a week.
Leave P.ush City Tuesday at 6 a
Arrive at Grantsburg by 12 in:
esda
J/eave grantsburg Tuesday at 1 m:
Arrive at Kush City bv 8pm
Proposal* Invited for twice-a-week service.
26226 From Excelsior to Eden Prairie,6miles »nd
back, 6 times a week.
Leave Excelsior dally, except Sundae, at 10
am
Arrive at Eden Prairieat 12
Leve Eden Prairie dally, except Sunday,
ft* 1 |D
An ve at Excelsior by 3 m:
26228 From Wayzata, by Llnz, to Leigbton, 13
miles and back, once a week.
Leave Wayzata Saturday at 1 in
Aruve at l*ighton by 5
Leave Leigiitun Satuiday at 6 a in
An Ive at ayzata by \l
Proposals invited to embrace Parker's
Lake.
26229 From Maple Plain to Saint Bonlfacius, 9
miles and back, once a week.
Leave Alaple Plain Friday at 9 am
Aruve at halnt Bonlfacius by 12
Leave isaint Bonlfacius Friday at 1
Aruve at Maple Plain by 4
26233 From Bluomiueton, by lJiclineld and
Minneapolis, 13 miles and back, three
times a week.
Leave Bloomiugtou Monday, Wednesday
and Friday at 8 a
Aruve at Minneapolis by 12 m:
Leave Minneapolis Monday, Wednesday,
and fcndayatlpin
Arrive at Bloomlngton by 5 m.
26238 From Lake Towu to Chaska, 6 miles and
back, once a week.
Leave Lake Town Saturday at 10 am
Arrive at Chatka bv 12
Leave Chaska Saturday at 1 in
Arrive at Lake Town by 3 in.
26242 From (Jlencoe, by Sumter, Lake Addie.
Collins, Swansea, Palmyra, and Birch
Colley, to Beaver Falls, 60 miles and
Back, once a week.
Leave Olencoe Monday at 7 am
Arrive at Beaver Falls next day at 4
Leave Beaver Falls Wednesday at 7 am
Arrive at Gleneoe next day at 4 in.
26266 From Saint Cloud, by Brock way. North
Prairie, Two lUv-rs, Pike Kapids, and
Green Prairie, to Fort Bipley, 52 miles
and back, once a week.
Schedule to be satisfactory to the Depart
ment.
Piopoals invited for twice-a-week service.
26277 From Litchtield, bv Manamtah and Koro
ni.s, to Payiie-ivllle, 26 miles and back,
three times a week.
Leave Litchfield Monday, Wednesday, and
Friday at 7 a in:
Arrive at Payuesviile by 5
Leave Pa\ne»ville Tuesday, Thursday, and
Saturday at 7 a in
Arrive at Litchfield by 5 m.
26232 From Atwater, by Harrison and Green
Lake, to New London, 18 miles and back,
twice a wve
Leave Atwater Tuesday and Friday at 6
am
Armve at New London by 12
Leave New London Tuesday and Friday at
1 in
Arrive at Atwater 7 in.
26293 From Leaf Valley, by Miltona, to Alexan
dua, 2U miies and back, once a week.
Leave Leaf alley Satmda at 6 a in
Arrive at Alexandria by 12 in
Leave Alexandria satui day at 1
Arrive at Leaf Valley by 7 in.
2i)298 From Clitherall, Battle Lake, Blooming
Grove and Aurdale, to Feigns Falls,,3D
miles and back, once a week.
Leave Clitherall Monday at 7 a in
Arrive at Fergus Falls by 7 am
Leave Fergus Falls Tuesday at 7 a
Arrive at Clitherall by 7 in.
26302 From liichwoud to Detroit City, 11 miles
and baek, once a week.
Leave ftichwood Satuiday at 8 a
Airive at Detroit City b'l2 in
Leave Detiou ity satuiday at 1
An ive at lueliwood by 5 in.
26336 From l)u Luth, 1 Bea\er Bay, Grand Mau
ra!-. Saxton (n. o.), and Grand Portage,
to l'igeou ltiver, 16o miles and back,
once a week.
Leave Du Luth every Thursday at 7 a in
Arrive at Beaver Bay next Satui day by
in
Leave Beaver Bay every Mnoday at 7 a
An ive at Du Luth next Wednesday by 6
ni
Leave Beaver B.iy every Monday at 7 a
Arrive at Pigeon Bay next .Saturday at 12
in
°other,Landoun-
combine and hel each
less
itt0assumes
Leave Pigeon Bay every Monday at 7 a
Arrive at Beaver Bay next Saturday by
\i ni.
26344 From Lake Benton to Flandreau, 25 miles
and back, mice a week.
Leave Lake Benton Friday at S a in
Auive at FIa I'dlea I j» in
Leave Flamlieau Thuisdu at 8 a
Anne.it Lake Benton bv 0 in.
26345 From Lake Benton to Medary, 27 miles and
back, once a week.
Leave Lake Benton Monday at Sam
Arrive at Medar 1 4 in
Leave Medai.v 1 uesda .it ha in
Aruve at Lake Benton 1 4 in.
26346 From Cnlledonia to Brownsville, 14 miles
and back, three times a week.
Leave Caledonia Tue.-day, Thursday, and
ts.ii vii l.vy at 2
Ai me at BiownsviUe by 6p
Leave Biowusvilie I uesd.tv, Thuisday, and
saturdav at 7 a m:
Aruve at Caledonia bv 11 a in.
26047 From Chatlield to Foin.tain, 9 miles and
back, six times a week.
ave Chatlield dailv, except Sunday, at 7
a in:
An ive at Fountain by 10 a in
Leave Fountain daily, except Sunday, at 1
m:
Aiiive at Chatlield by 4 lit.
Close connection to be made with eastern
and western mail trains.
26348 From White Kaith, to Audubon, 22 miles
and baek, thiee times a week.
Leave White Earth Tuesday, Tliursdav and
satuiday at 9 a in
Arrive at Audulxin by 3 pin
Leave Audubon Manday, Wednesday, and
l-'i iday at ii a m:
Arrive it White Earth by 3 in.
26.540 Fioin Blue Earth Cii\, bv Emerald and
Ibush Cieek, to Bank's, 2 miles and back,
twice a week.
Leave Blue L.oth City Monday and Fri
day at 7
A
in:
TKOPOSALS will be received at the Contract
Office of this Department until 3 o'clock in. of
May 'Mil, 1874, (to lie decided by June lOlli.) for
carying the mails ot Ihe li.ited states Irom
Jul 1st, 1S74, to June 30, 1875, on the following
routes in the state of Minnesota, and the sehed
uleol departures and ai rivals herein specihed, 26362 Fr Winneluno City, by Elo, Pleasant
Arrive at Banks iy 2 in:
Leave Banks Tuesday and Saturday at 7
a m:
An ive at Blue Earth ity by 2 m.
26350 Fioni Swansea, Lake Side and Co-mos,
to Lake Lillian, 26 miles and back, once
.1 week
Leave Swansea Tuesday at 7 a
Arrive at Lake Lillian by 6p
Leave Lake l.iiluu Wednesday at7 a
Arrive .it Swansea bj 6 m.
26351 From Alexandi ia, Moe. to Hermon,
milev and back, once a week.
Leave Alexand' ii Mond ly at 7 a
An ive at Heiinan next day 6pm
Leave lleimon Wednesday at 7 a m:
Ai» ive at Alexandria next day by m.
Mound, Hope, Antrim, and South
Brai.cii, to saint James, 30 miles and
baek. once a week.
Leave Winnebairo City Friday at 7 a in
An ive at saint James bj 7 in:
Leave Saint James Satin day at 7 am
An ive at Winnebago City by pin.
2i'3o3 From Wabasha to Alm.i, ten miles and
baek, '.K times a vveok. by steamboat,
dm injr season of navigation.
Schedule to be satisfactory to the Depart
ment.
2G354 From Warlena to Parker's Praliie, 30 miles
and baek, tvvie* a week.
Leave Wadena Tuesday and Fiiday at 7
a m:
Arrive at Parker's Prairie by i' in:
Leave Parkers Praiile Wednesday and
Saturday at 7 a in
An ive at Wadena by 6
An ive at Isenour's by 0 a in
1-eave I*enour's dailv, except Sunday, at 10 263oo From Lake Johanna, by ttilchrist and An
a in
dei-MMi, to Glenwood, 22 miles and back,
Arrive at Preston bv 11 am once a week.
Close conuetion to be made with the mall-1 Leave Lak- Johanna Wednesday at 8 a
trains east and west. An Ive at Glenn nod by 5 in
Proposals for set vice twice daily invited.
26143 Fiom East Claremout to Wasioja, 6 miles
and back, one a week.
Lea ve Glenwood Thursday at 8 a
An ive at Lake Johanna by .' m.
26356 From Eden Lake to Cold Spring City, 12
miles and baek. once a week.
Leave Eden Lakt- Fi id iv at S a in
An ive at Cold Spring Citv by 12 in
Leave Cold Spring city Frid ly at 1
An ive at Eden Lake by 5 m.
Washington i, toMiint. Peter, 22 miles and Hartland, to Noitnvvood. 35 mis
rwn»e iai w*.plr.. ,_ ._
twicp week
Schedule to be satisfactory to the Depart
ment.
2618s From Jordan, by Helena, Saint Benedict,
Praha, Heidelberg, Saint lluheilus, and
Kavenstream, to Jordan, euual.to2u miles .v-ocn «r _»•.! ..
and baek once a week 2d360 From Worthington to Shetek 3o miles and
Leave Jord'on Saturday at 6a in iJ?»» VvIIS A .„ .„
Arrive at Jordan by 7 pin
fj I a 0
and back, three timo- a week.
Schedule satisfactory to the Department.
26358 From Saint Peter to Xorseland, 10 miles
and baek, once a week.
Leave Saint Peter Saturdav at 9 a in
An ive at Norseland by 12 in
Leave Norseland Saturday at 1pm
Arrive at Saint Peter by 4 in.
in«» and
mile and
back, onc:e- a week.
Leave Wells Friday at 6 a
Arrive at Xortlivvood by 7 in
Leave Northwood Saturday at 6 a
Arrive at Wells by 7 m.
a,
«,-
xvl"*'1*
Proposals invite ton tw icte a week iT™e JhLf1WSaturdan?bIt1
26190 From Shakopee,d by Sain Mary's,service.
Lvdia
Cedar Lake, plum Cieek, NVvv Market,
Suel (u. o.). Laslieen, and Maple Ulen, to 26361 From Fairmount by Amber, Tenhasse
ton a 7
1
I-eave Shetek a 7 a in
A W at Worthingto 7
Lake Belt, and Dunnell, to Estherville,
32 miles and back, twice a week
Leave Fairmoui.t Tuesd and Thursday
at 7 a in
Arrive at Ksthervllle by 7pm
Leave Estherville Wednesday and Friday
at 7 a m:
Arrive at Fairmount by 7 m.
From Blooming Prairie, to Geneva, 13
miles and bacK, once a week.
Leave Blooming Prairie Saturday at 8 am
Arrive at Geneva by 12
Leave Geneva Saturday at 1
Arrive at Blooming Praiile by 5 m.
26363 From Blooming Prarie to Dodge Centre, 21
miles and back, nee a week.
Leave Blooming Prairie Thuisday .t6a
THENATIONALCOLONY
OCATED I N SOUTHWESTERN
Minnesota ax.d Northwestern Io-
I wa.
Tw^elve To^wnships of
Rich Prairie Land
In Nobles County, Minnesota.
Soil and Climate
The CREAM O TH E PRAIRIES
and the GARDEN OF TH E STATE.
The Climate of the Mountains and the
Soil of the River Bottoms.
Government Lands.
Several Townships of GOVERNMENT
A N in the County SsTILL VA
CANT.
he«se lands are on the Sioux Citv & St. Paul
Towns and Villages.
Three THRIVING VILLAGES grow
ing up in the Colony.
Worthington the Business, Railroad,
Social, and Educational Centre of a
large extent of country.
TRADB.
NINE COVXTIES NOW TRAD
ING AT WORTHINGTON.
A FARMING POPULATION of sev
eral thousand now on tlie lands and
the County RAPIDLY FILLING
UP.
The National Colony is organized up
on a TEMPERANCE BASIS. No IN
TOXICATING BEVERAGES sold in
the County.
EDUCATION.
Good PUBLIC SCHOOLS and a SEM
INAR OF LEARNING now in
operation at Worthington.
Advantages.
FERTILE SOIL,
pm:
in.
CONVENIENT MARKETS,
HEALTHFU CLIMATE,
CHRISTIAN SOCIETY.
Superior Mail, Railroad, School, Church
and other Privileges.
NO AGUE,
NO CONSUMPTION,
NO LIQUOR TRAFFIC,
NO DESPERADOES,
NO INDIANS.
RAPID INCREASE IN THE VALUE OF
LAND ASSURED.
Send stamp for eopy of the National Colony
JOURNAL, giving full particulars, to
MIL' ER, HUMISTON & CO.,
Worthington, Nobles Count/'. Minnesota.
Murch, W74.
o^»-*'ve^aJv*^ *\r^^2a*n*'t^t'&*'*'**"***:i','*ir~- -^'.C£^t*'^***?%,£^w*^^l'*?^^:,K'**' "*$i
td^- BiilWers Take Notice. «J£l
Lumber,
Lath,
A Large and Varied Assortment of Pine
Lumber,
O O S
I N S
FOB YOUTH OF BOTH SEXES,
AT WORTHINGTON, NOBLES CO. MINN.
ON THE ST. PA UL & SIOUX CITV
RAILWAY.
Hailroad which runs daily trains to both Methodist Episcopal Church, and as auxiliary to
cities.
Humhne University. It will be conducted in
the most cajtho ic spirit: the object being to unite
liberal culture with the precepts and spiritof tlie
TO COMMENCE ON WEDNESDAY, NO
VEMBER 19th, 1873.
This institution is announced in accordance
with the declaration of the founders of the Na
tional Colony, that tlie early establishment of a
seminary of learning, on a liberal basis, at some
favorable point, was part of their plan.
It has been judged advisable to put the enter
prise under denominational control: it is, accord
ingly, introduced under the patronage of the
Cluistian system.
The Seminary building, now known as the
Methodist Church Block, is spacious and attract
ive, and admirably located. It fronts on the
Public Square, in Wurthington, within a short
distance of WestOkabena Lake.
It is intended to make theSeminary an honor
to the State—the equal ot any similar institution
in the West. The board ot instruction is already
large and embraces, in an unusual degree, both
the expeiience and abi'itj essential to success.
As occasion demands it will be enlarged and
nothing shall be vv am ing to the completeness of
the several depaitments.
The contemplated course of study will cover a
period of three years the design being to pie
pare students for a collegiate course, or to quali
fy tliem to enjraKe successfully in business pur
suits. Pieparatoiy classes, liowewr, will be
oi nied, especially for the first six months, dui ing
winch lime, it may be piesumed, many will be
unpiepaied for the regular coin so.
While the school in itself will be unequivocally
Cluistian, it possesses, also, the external advan
tages of location in a community not only highfy
intelligent and moral, but unciirst by the liquor
trailc. This nefarious trade, theprolific sumce
of poverty and ciinie, is, by law, utteily exclud
ed fnun Xobles county. No thoughtful parent or
guardian will under-estimate the importance of
tliiynost significant fact.
Prof. Ilumision takes charge of a department
with which he has been long and honorably con
nected, and brings vvilh him, asagi.tt to the in
stitution, philosophical and chemical apparatus
worth six hundred and fifty dollars.
PKICK9 OF TLITIOV—In older to extend as far
as possibb-, the benefits of the institution, to those
who desire it, and to meet the stiingeney of the
times, tuition, for the first six months, will be but
*S.0O per quarter. This charge will be uniform
for all studies except instrumental music, French
and ornamental needle woik.
The First Quarter will begin, as already an
nounced, Xov. 19th, 1873, and end Feb. 5th, 18T4.
The Second Quarter will begin on the 6th of Feb.
1874, and end on the Vpiil 6h, n-74. Exercises
will be suspended during the Holidays.
Address all communications in regard to th
Seminary to B. II. CHEVEH, Worthington, Xobles
Co., Minnesota.
BOAKIUNO.—Students can, during the coming
winter, be accommodated in piivate families on
reasonable terms. Immediate efforts will also be
made to provide for any students who may pre
fer to board themselves. As soon as the success
of the institution is assured, a lwardinghou.se
will be added to our present accommodations".
BOARD OF ISSTKLCTOKS.
B. H. CltEvr.it, A. M., Principal.
Mental and Moral Science.
R. F. Hi'Mia-roN, A. M.,
Natural Science.
CHAS. T. in NMNG, B. A.,
Greek, J.atin and Mathematics.
CHA9. H. BAUI.OWS,
Book-keeping and Penmanship.
MART H. CHEVER,
Instrumental Music—Piano and Organ
O.AKA J. CKAFT,
French.
J. CRAFT, M. D.,
Vocal Culture.
EVE REIT P. FREEMAN,
LATE REGISTER LAN OFFICE,
Jackson, Minn.,
Will for the present remain at Jackson and at
tend to Land Oflice business to contested and
anneal cases arising under the Pre-Emptlon or
Homestead Laws and to all branches of legal
business pertaining thereto. Patents promptly
secured on entries. Retaining Fee expected be
fore advice is given or legal assistance rendered.
I&'lsoans negotiated jor parties desiring to
enter land.
DAN! SHELL
Is prepared at all times to furnish the public with
good Livery outfits, at his
Livery, Feed and Sale Stable,
Worthington, Minn.,
Good care is always given teams leftin his keep
ing.
ADDRESS.
All letters addressed to Miller, Hum
iston & Company, Worthington, Nobles
county, Minnesota, will be promptly
answered, and full information given
concerning the National Colony.
1^uv*Zc*'
J. 8. BHDCK,
Shingles.
At his
Lumber Yard in Worthington,
has constantly on hand
O I N S
S A S
and everything usually kept by en
terprising lumber dealers.
Yard Near Shell's Stable,
WORTHINGTON, MINNESOTA
Lumber from J. Dean & Co 8 Mills, Minneapo is.
WOR THING TON SEMINAR
?*«*^v™&!*W$mg^(g^^^£&t&f£j!i
AtVy at Law.
H. D. BOOKSTAVML
Notary Public.
WESTERN HOME
Real Estate, Loan & In
surance Agency,
Worthington, Minnesota.
SHUCK & BOOKSTAVER.
49* We have established an Agency for buy*
4V ing and selling real estate, both town and
country, and our arrangements will insnr*
*Wus
Unsurpassed Facilities
49* both in selling land or providingpurchasers
49* with the most desirable bargains in
Both Wild and Improved Lands
HAVE you Land For Sale?
49* If you have land for sale in ten, twenty,
49-forty, eighty and hundred and sixty acr«
49- tracts, apply at our agency. We offer the
49* most sure channel for disposal of the same,
49*and all information regarding claims put in
49* our bauds will be most strictly confidential,
49* as it is our purpose to conduct an entirely
49* legitimate business.
49* Our large correspondence will enable us
49* to find cash purchasers more certainly than
49* any other agency.
Qo you want a Home?
49* If you want to purchase land for a home,
49* or if you wish to buy land for speculation,
49* we offer you most choice selections at terms
49* to suit. Our lands are
(^"Unsurpassed for Richness,
in a country
Unsurpassed for Ilealthfulness,
and in a community
^•Unsurpassed for Intelligence,
and we offer bargains
•fiT Unsurpassed for Variety.
Homesteads and Preemptions located In No
bles and adjoining counties upon application.
Special attention given to Land Office business
to contested and appeal cases arising under the
Preemption and Homestead Laws.
Insurance effected in first-class companies.
Money to loan ou approved real estate securi
ty.
Conveyances promptly and neatly done.
Fuil particulars, with map, sent on receipt of
•Scent stamp.
TEED & BAKER,
General Dealers in
Ready-Made and Custom
CLOTHING,
Have received their
Stock of WINTER Goods
IIEA O VERCOA TS,
Wool Yarns, Home-Made Socks,
Ladles' and Gents'
FUE GOODS,
From Alaska Mink to the Finest or the Cheapest
Kinds and Giades,
Buck Gloves and, Mittens,
A Full Line of
Gents' Underwear, &c.
Clothing made to order, by a first-class workman
FIRST-CLASS. PERMAMENT.
PLUMB & CO'S
a
AT WOTHIMiTON.
SPECIALTY
Hardy varieties of Fruit for Minnesota,
Evergreens,
Ornamental Trees,
Flowering Bulbs,
and a
Small Fruits in Abundance
Anything and everything in the Nursory line can
be had at very low rates by calling at til©
Nursery or addressing,
PLUMB & CO.,
31 Worthington. Minn.
J. C. & M. J. Plumb, Chas. M. & G. M. Plumb
Milton. Wis. Worthington.
WORTHINGTON NURSERY.
J. H. BOWERMAN & CO.
Have on hand, and for Sale all the hardy varie
ties of APALK TREES, EVERGREENS and
ORNAMENTA TREES.
Flowering Plants and Bulbs in large quanti
ties, also a full line of small Fruits of every de
sci iption, suitable for tins market.
The aboveNurseryStockisof Minnesota growth.
Prices low, and warranted as represented. Call
and see our stock before purchasing elsewhere.
Catalogues and information furnished on ap
plication.
Reserve your orders for, or until called on by
HENRY DUNHAM.
Agent.
REFERENCES.
T. B. Clement, President First National Bank.
Faribault, Minn.
Uf 0RTHINGT0N HARNESS SHOP
J. H. JOHNSON, Prop'r.
Manufacturer of Saddles, Harness, Bridles, Col
lars, Halters, Lines, and dealer in Whips,
Whip-stocks,Lashes.Horse Blank
ets, Curry combs, Brushes,
Hames.Bitts.Buck-
s. Snaps Thread, Wax, etc TRUNKS and
•^VALISES alway6on hand. «9-Repair
Ing done cheap and in the best man
ner. Give me a call.
J. S. STONE,
Boot and Shoe Store.
For Boots & Shoes and Neat Fits. On Fourth
Avenue, west side of the Park, W^thington
Minn. Work Warranted.
O. BIGELOW,
Proprietor of
MEAT MARKET,
Opposite Worthington House Stables,
WORTHINGTON. MINX,

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