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The Western advance. [volume] (Worthington, Minn.) 1872-1874, August 15, 1874, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85033535/1874-08-15/ed-1/seq-2/

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jHUfitrru th a nee.
Term* $3.00 a Year, $1.00 for Six Months.
SATURDAY, AUGUST 15, 1874.
Every parent whose son Is away at school,
should supply him with a newspaper. I well re
member what a marked difference there was
between those of my schoolmates who had, and
those who had not, access to newspapers. Oth
er tiling!* being equal, the Hist were always de
cidedly superior to the last in debate, composi
tion and general intelligence.—Daniel Webster.
Republican Ticket.
For Congress.
MARK II, DrXNELL
Of Steele C'ountv.
Bishop Whitehouse, who became best
known to newspaper readers by liis con
troversy with Mr. Clieeny, died at Chi
cago on the 10th. lie was a man of pro
found and varied knowledge and was a
devout churchman.
The last Congress seems to have had
a spite at the newspapers. It inflicted
upon every newspaper publisher then uis
since of pre-paying postage by the pound
on all newspapers sent through the mails
and besides passed what is called the
"gag law" whereby a newspaper pub
lisher may be arrested and carried to
the District of Columbia to be tried for
alleged illegal publication.
Adjudant General BukeiTof Iowa,
writes Commissioner liurdett, of the
General Land Office, representing
great suffering among the homestead
settlers in the Northwestern counties
of that State, owing to the visitation
of grasshoppers, and setting forth
the hardship of requiring settlers
to go sometimes 50 and sometimes 200
miles to make final proof occupancy of
their farms at the local land offices.—
He suggests that hereafter local land
officers be required to visit county sweats
on certain days and take depositions in
order to save settlers the expense they
can ill afford. Commissioner Burdett
is disposed to grant the relief asked for
and is inclined to rule in this partic
ular case that settlers bo allowed, if
they prefer, to make their depositions
before the Clerk of the Court of
record at the countv seats.
BEECIIERTILTON.
The long-expected statements of
Beecher and of Moulton have been pub
lished. We see nothing in them to
change the views heretofore expressed
viz: (1,) that the Christian world must
consider Beecher innocent of the main
charge until proven guilty in a court
of jjstice and, (2,) that Tilton and
others, including Moulton, have en
tered into a conspiracy to ruin Beech
er.
GRASSHOPPERS.
In Minnesota, Iowa, Nebraska, Kan
sas, Missouri and Wisconsin, the grass
hopper has, during the last ninety days,
been demonstrating his capacity for
the destruction of crops.
In the neighborhood of St. Joseph,
Missouri, these pc&ta have been exceed
ingly disastrous to all soits of fruit
in many instances they have eaten all
the meat off the peach pits.
Near Marysville and Waterville,
Kansas, the ravages of the grasshop
pers have been general and sweeping as
corn and all manner of vegetables.
North, and immediately in the neigh
borhood of DesMoins, Iowa, the wing
ed scourge has been doing incalculable
damage.
In Nebraska, about Blue River and
the Platte, at Fort Kearney, the devas
tation of cornfields was complete and
irreparable. But the wheat crop in
that State has been unusually large.
The grasshoppers took everything in
the Republican Valley, Nebraska, and
a large portion of the settlers cannot
get through the coining winter without
aid. In some cases families are even
now in actual want of the necessaries
of life, and it is proposed in Omaha to
take up collections next Sunday in all
the churches for the needy ones.
Northern Illinois has Buffered more
from drouth than has Northwestern
Iowa from the grasshoppers. In Win
nebago County the drouth has made a
complete wreck of the crops—some
grain not being cut at all. The pas
tures are bare, and fanners had to cut
their grain for the straw to feed stock,
and that was almost worthless.
Sunday, July 26, Northwestern Kan
sas was visited by a vast army of Grass
hoppers, and by Monday night follow
ing nine-tenths of the corn of that part
of the State was destroyed. One far
mer whohadsix hundred acres, said they
destroyed more corn for him in twenty
four hours than five thousand head of
cattle could in the same time. The de
struction of young fruit trees has been
very great. Great destruction to all
vegetables potatoes, though, will not
1)6 a complete failure as they were
nearly ripe when tho hoppers came.—
The extent of the territory which this
army covered is estimated to be about
oue hundred miles north and south by
one hundred and sixty miles east and
west. Tho hoppers came from the
north, remained four days and left for
the south. But few of them deposited
*Bffs.
WORSE THAN MINNESOTA.
The Prairie Schooner says that M. E.
Wilcox has returned to Marshall from
trip to Wisconsin and Illinois, and is
convinceifahat the fanners of this part
of Minnesota have better prospects for
crops than those of many sections which
he visited. In southern Wisconsin the
chinch bug has well nigh destroyed the
crop of wheat and is now greatly dam
Aging the com. An old farmer of Wal
worth Comity told Mr. Wilcox that he
did not believe the wheat crop in that
county this year would average over
live bushels per acre in consequence of
the ravages of the chinch bug. In
northern Illinois it was little better
eppesially about Freeport.
RED WING AS A WHEAT MARKET.
The Red Wing Republican says.:
During the past few days we have
figured up thg amount of wheat, flour
and barley shipped from Red Wing of
the crop of last year, and find a remark
able increase in wheat and flour over
the report madeoneyear ago. We ascer
tain the total shipments of wheat, and
flour reduced to wtieat, equaled the im
mense sum of 2,418,622 bushels. Last
yearieports showed the largest exports
ever made from this market, and larger,
too, so far as is known, than from any
other primary market on the globe,
namely, 1,515,830 bushels yet the in
crease of the last crop harvested was so
vast that it exceeds that amount 902,
795 bushels. The amount of flourtnan
ufactured has nearly doubled, being
this year 66,073 barrels, against 39,344
barrels reported one year ago.
Several of the richest counties in the
State are tributary to Red *Wi ig, and
grain is carried a distance of fifty miles.
But the" region tributary to Red Wing
is not as large as the region tributary
to Worthington. We predict that in
a few years Worthington will rank
among the first of the primary grain
markets.
Donnelly suggests, as a means of re
lieving the grasshopper district, that
the counties issue bonds and the State
guarantee their payment, to build a
railroad west from Winnebago City to
Worthington, and also roads north and
south. This would give employment
to men needing aid, and in the future
some railroad company would purchase
the improvements.
Whereupon the Blue Earth City Post
tells Mr. Donnelly that but for his op-tain
position, and that of others of his like,
a railroad would now have been in pro
cess of construction from Mankato to
Iowa. The Post sajs:
We want no more talk of this kind
from such a source, when last winter
he aided, by his voice and vote, in curs
ing this country at least for a number
of years, doing it a greater injury, in
finitely, by far than has been produced
by the grasshopper scourge, doing all he
could and succeeding in what he at
tempted to do in preventing the build
ing of new railroads he not even gave
his assent to the bill introduced in
the Senate by Hon. S. P. Child (from
this place) favoring the building of
this north and south road.
It is too late now, Mr. Donnelly, to
undo the great wrong that you helped
to perpetiate on thissufferiiigcouimun
ity, and it only remains now for you in
your official capacity the Senate next
winter to stop your war upon railroads,
and second in every way the building
up of the State of Minnesota, and this
part in particular, and help to give us
a railroad. Do so and the people will
rise and bless you.
SPUING AND FALL WHEAT.
Nothing is more surprising to people
from the winter wheat regions, on com
ing to Minnesota, than to find whiter
bread made from Spring wheat than
that to which they had been accus
tomed made from winter wheat. As to
the relative prices of Spring and Fall
wheat, the St. Louis JJanocrat says:
Many of our dealers in Spring wheat
are, as the saj ing is, '-up a stump," re
specting the future course of prices.—
Especially is this true of the operators
on the Call Hoard. It lias been usual
to make at least from fifteen to twenty
dive cents difference between the price
of a bushel of No. 2 S| ring and No. 2
Fall in favor of the latter article. But
now the "purifying process'' of mak
ing Hour from Spring wheat has about
annulled the difference in the price and
left the buyers of each in a sea of un
comfortable doubt as to what the rela
tive intrinsic value of each really is.—
In Chicago, No. 2 Spring is bringing
the same mouev as No. 2 Fill is in St.
Louis, yet the St. Louis buyers of fall
would not take Spring upon equal
terms with the Fall, and the Chicago
buyers of Spring will pav no more for
Fall than for Spring. So there rests
this anomalous case at present. In the
meantime, it is more than likely that
orders for liberal purchases of wheat
from Ohio, Michigan, Richmond and
Baltimore will be sent to this market
soon, and that outside competition will
have the effect of determining the rel
ative value between equal grades of
Fall and Spring.
SUBSTITUTE FOR COAL.
Anything relating to fuel is of inter
est to the settlers on the prairie. We
find in an exchange the following in re
lation to a substitute for coal, which if
true and practicable, may help many
portions of the west to solve the fuel
problem:
It was stated a short time ago that a
Belgian peasant had made the extraor
dinary discovery that earth, coal and
sodo, mixed together, would burn as
well as, if not better than, any other
combustible. The fact lias since then
been proved beyond a doubt. The
I arisian paper, the Moniteur, has gone
so far as to make the experiment at its
printing office. A correspondent of
the Journal of the Society of Arts has
also tested the compound with the most
satisfactory results. The mixture was
made as follows: To 15 pounds of
mold were added 3 pounds of powdered
coal also one pint of a solution of com
mon washing-soda? Avater, one pint
soda, one ounce. The mass was work
ed up after the fashion of morter and
then made up into balls about the size
of a large orange. Half a dozen balls
in the wet state were put on a coal-flre
which was not burning very brightly.
In a short time the moisture was driv
en oft and the balls became red
hot,edlycrop
giving out a strong heat, and apparent
ly burning slowly without falling to
pieces, the soda no doubt acting as a
flux. The balls, on being touched with
a poker, broke into lumps, which burnt
like cinders, yielding afire clear at the
top. It was observed that after the
moisture was driven off the balls burnt
without smoke. The ash was appar
ently of a heavy character, different
from coal-ash.
The St. Paul Press says of the nar-left
row-guage:
The nai row-guage system for minor
railroads is growing in popularity.—
Virginia and North Carolina are busi
ly engaged in building narrow guage
roads now through their almost inac
cessible in6untains, and many more of
them are needed, and, if well managed
would pay. Even a Massachusetts
road in prospect has voted to lay thethus
narrow instead of the broad guage.—
Experience has but served to confirm
the advantages claimed for the cheap
road for all except trunk lines.
The Mankato Review says the grass
hoppers are hatching about Lake Crys
tal, and it is hoped that most of the
eggs will hatch this fall.
PROTEST AGAINST REDUCED RATES.
We stated in a former issue that Gen.
Bishop had protested against any re
duction of rates on this line of road.—
He accompanies this protest with a
statement of the earnings of the St.
Paul & Sioux City and Sioux City &
St. Paul roads, showing that at the old
rates there was a deficit for the six
months ending June 30th, 1874, of near
ly $150,000. The St. Paul Press, in
commenting upon these facts, says:
Now here is a clear and conclusive
demonstration that the revenues of the
company at previously existing rates
were wholly inadequate to its impera
tive necessites, and that any reduction
of their rates would prove a cruel
and oppressive burden, which would
imperil the solvency of the com
panies. The net earnings of the St.
Paul & Sioux City Company for the six
months ending June 30, 1874, were$32,
542.90, while the interest for the half
year was $82,947.82, leaving a deficit of
$50,405.13. which the stockholders had
to pay out of their personal resources.
The net earnings of the Sioux City &
St. Paul road for the same period were
$17,054,54, while the interest on itsfun
ded debt, and its rents &c, amounted
to $112,115.93, leaving a deficit of $95,
061.29, which the stockholders had to
make good out of their own pockets.—
The total deficit on both roads for the
six months ending June 30th last, was
$145,466.42, or at the rate of over $290,
000 per year, which the stockholders
were obliged to pay from their private
resources, in addition to much larger
sums in previous years to prevent the
road^ from going into bankruptcy.—
Moreover, these heavy drains year after
year upon the personal resources of the
stockholders in their struggle to main
the roads and avert the disastrous
consequences to themselves and the
State wli ich would result from the bank
ruptcy of their corporations, have ex
hausted the ability of the resident
stockholders, and the patience of those
living abroad. It is of vital importance
to these roads, vital to their solvency,
vital to their ability to maintain them
as competing lines, that they have an
immediate increase of revenue, and
this increase they have been hoping for,
and counting on till the grasshopper
plague came first to sweep away a large*
proportion of the crops along the roads,
and right on the back of this disaster
come the Railroad Commissioners, as
relentless and merciless as the locusts,
to crush them down with an arbitrary
reduction of their tariffs—a reduction
which no one asked for, which is based
on no principle of reason or common
sense or common justice, but is a mere
arbitrary edict promulgated in super
cilious contempt of all lese for purely
political effect.
STATE TEMPERANCE CONVENTION.
The third annual convention of the
State Temperance Union of Minnesota
will be held in the city of Red Wing,
beginning on Tuesday, September 1st,
at 7J- o'clock p. M., and will continue
over Wednesday and Thursday. Tues
day evening session will be spent in
prayer and conference. Churches, Sun
day Schools, Unions, Good Templar
Lodges, or any other organization de
siring to be represented are entitled to
two delegates each, who should bring
certificates of election. Pastors and
their wives are ex-officio members of
the convention, as well as those who
hold certificates of membership in the
State Temperance Union. The people
of Red Wing will furnish entertain
ment to all delegates and members of
the covention. Let notifications of
intention to be present be sent before
August 20th/ to T. B. McCord, Red
Wing, Minn. Compliance with this
request is very necessary, in order to
facilitate the work of the committee on
entertainment. Full programmes will
be sent out soon by the agent. We de
sire to make this the grandest temper
ance rally ever held in Minnesota. Let.
pastors and others see to it that an
early election is had for delegates.
If any reduction in railroad or steam
boat fares can be obtained, due notice
will be given.
The music will be in charge of the
Hutchinson Family.
J. GUILFORD,
A. J. MEACIIAM.
A. HARMOX,
A. LAWRENCE,
W. W. SATTERLEE.
State Central Committee.
(Local and State papers please copy.)
THE JACKSON REPUBLIC REBUKED.
A resident of Jackson county sends
us the following letter
EDITOR ADVANCE: I see a recent
issue of the Jackson Republic accuses
the Worthington Advance of "wilfully
misrepresenting*' the crop prospect in
Nobles county this season. I refer the
Advance to the enclosed article, taken
from the Jackson Republic one year
ago, I think, in July or August. How
does it compare with our crops last
year? Our Saviour said to the accu
sers of the woman brought to him,
"lie that is without sin among you let
him first cast a stone at her." Now,
if our misfortunes and real wants
in Jackson county, or the southern
part of it, could have been set forth
last fall and winter in the light they
are being shown now, there would have
been less suffering among the needy
ones. But when it is reported, "work
is plenty for those that wisli to labor,"
aedthata man in "traveling ten or
twelve miles from Jackson last fall
could not hear of any one suffering,"
can one be surprised that the Commit
tee at Heron Lake received more than
at Jackson
A RESIDENT OF JACKSON CO.
The following is the article referred
to in the above letter
AN ERROR.—The Agricultural De
pal tment at Washington has undoubt
been misinformed in regard to
the prospects of Jackson county.
in its monthly report it says:
"Grasshoppers have ruined the crops
so that grain enough will not be raised
the county for home necessities."—
Instead of such being the case Jack
son county will average a larger crop
of grain this year by many thousand
bushels than last year, and of a much
better quality. The damage done by
the grasshoppers is confined to a few
localities, and though many suffered
severely by their ravages, yet those
unharmed are good enough to
make up somewhat, while in many
parts of the county the crop was nev
er better. Oats wove not damaged
much by the pests and will "pan out"
well and corn will be a good crop where
the seed was well put in. Let our de
partment reporters use a little more
care in their statements if possible.
We are ashamed of the Republic for
"wilfully misrepresenting" things.
But as the Republic will soon have to
suspend for want of patronage we for
bear to be severe.
The Council Bluffs Nonpariel says
that^20 Russian Germans have return
ed from the neighborhood of Lincoln,
Nebraska, declaring that the climate is
too hot for them. They are coming
north ward.
Barber & Lawrence,
REELING that it is their duty to bear their
.. snare of the hardships caused by the destruc
tion of the crops
OFFER THEIR GOOD
S
FOB
THE NEXT THIRTY DAYS, FOR
CASH ONLY,
At the following prices ami discounts
All dollar patent medicines 85c
AH 50c do do 45c
AU2oc do do 22c
AH Dollar School Books 90c
A oOc do 45c
AH 25c do 22e
Boiled Linseed Oil, per gal. 1 30c
Raw Unseed Oil, per gal. 1 25c
Turpentine 95c
Tartaric Acid 85c
Cream of Tartar, chemically pure 50c
ream of Tartar, commercial 40c
Castor Oil, commercial, per pt. 50c
Cantor Oil, dark, per pt. 35c
Lard oil, per gallon, 1 10c
Lngine oil, per gallon, 1 00c
Knuiue oil, per gallon, 80c
Spirits Nitre, per oz. 5c
Aqua ammonia, per oz. 5c
Laudanum, per oz. 10c
I'aregoiic, peroz. 5c
Camphor (jinm,peroz. 5c
Ami all other Drugs in proportion.
J'rom this date our customers will please take
notice that we SELL ONLY EOK CASH. Don't
ask us for credit as we shall lie compelled to re
fuse it, a. every man's good sense must tell him
that the credit system, under the present pros
pects, is only another name for certain ruin and
the beggery of our families. "Chaiity should
begin at Home."
Worthington, July 10, 1874—44tf.
GROCERIES
FREE OF CHARGE
Orders for Groceries left at my store will re
ceiveprompt attention, ami the goods will be de
livered AT ANY PLACE DESIGNATED KKEE
OF CHARGE. We invite all our friends to come
and test our stock of Grocciies and Provisions
for themselves, and be convinced we are selling
them at bottom prices.
We intend to sell only the nest or everything
in our line—and at the same time only ask mod
erate pi iocs.
We quote the prices of a few staple goods:
Brown Sugar, impounds, O O
Yellow C. 8 1 00
Coffee A. (white) 8 00
Standard 7 1 00
Molasses fl gallon, 70
Molasses Syrup $i 20
Teas, Coffees, aud other goods at correspond
ing prices.
Groceries and Provisions given in exchange
for Country Produce.
38tf]
C.C.LUCKEY.
HO!
For the Spring Trade.
We are now prepared to receive orders
for
Seeders,
Harrows,
Cultivators,
Persons desiring any or these goods willfindour
stock complete.
*»*Also Stores, Tin and Hardware,
At Panic Prices,
at the Colony Store.
IIUMISTON STOCKDALE.
LIST OF
Lands & Town Lots
IN THE
COUNTY OF NOBLES
AND
STATE OF MINNESOTA
UPON WHICH
Taxes are Delinquent
And Unpaid
ON THE
Fird Day of An gad, 1874,
FOR THEYEAIt 1872.
STATE
OF MINNESOTA,
COUNTY OF NOBLES,
ss
DISTltlCT COI'KT.
SrXTH JlDlCIAL DlSTKICT, $
The State of Minnesota, to all persons or
corporations, who have or claim any estate,
right, title or interest In, claim to." or lien
upon any of the several pioctsor parcels of land
in the list hereto attached, dest'iliied
The list of Taxes upon real estate which appear
from the records ami papers in the office of the
County Auditor of the County of Nobles, to have
become delinquent in the year 1872. and all prior
years, and which have not been in any manner
Paid into the Treasury of said Countv having
been filed as required by law in the office of the
Clerk of Court, in tin* County or Nobles, of which
list that hereto attached is a copy.
Therefore you, and each of von, are hereby re
quired to tile in the ollicc of said clerk within
twenty (20) days after the last publication of this
notice, your answer in iting, setting forth any
objection or defence you mav have to the Taxes
or any pan thereof, or the penalties or interest
thereon, upon anv piece or parcel of land
described in said list, into or on which you
have or claim any estate, light, title, interest,
claim or lien, and in default thereof, judgment
will be entered against such piece or parcel of
land, for the taxes on said list appearing against
it, and for all penalties, interest ami costs.
Signed, B. N. CARKIEli, Clerk
of the Dist. Court in the County of Nobles.
GRAHAM LAKES.
(Township 101, Range 39.)
a
a 52
rt
~3 9 5 5
ma. ***0^-*fS3*5
S-« S 3 _:
3 fci «n •3
A
I— 1 1
o. V? 5
Stephen Howell nw'4 28 1(30 1015 1 42 15 11 72
Morton Richmond s]Z
sexA 28 80 515 72 13 02
WORTHINGTON VILLAGE.
Dodge, Weldon & Co. 8 6 2 03 28 15
Aikin Miner, part lot 18
124
9
Loop and Wood
John Larson
Foster
A. E. Wood
John Larson
C. C. I'urdy
Thomas Dormnn
F. S. Wetlierbee
C. B. Loveless
244
2 9.0 40 15 3 48
2 93 40 15 3 48
9 40 132 15 10 87
2 00 28 15 2 44
01 9 15 85
2 00 2S 15 2 44
2 00 28 15 2 44
200 28 15 2 44
28 1-5 2 44
28 15 2 44
9 86 1S9 15 1140
2 92 45 15 3 52
200 28 15 244
25
3
8
8
10
11
12
9 12
6 17
2 21
200
200
I hereby certify that the above contains a true
list of taxes delinquent and unpaid as found on
the books In my offlce lor the year 1872, together
with the costs and interest that have accrued
thereon up to the present time
WM. M. BEAR,
4«-3wJ Auditor of Nobles County.
DR. O. O. MOORB. CAPT. J. W. 8UTTH.
Colony Drug Store!
Cor. lOth St. & 3d Ave.,
Worthington, Minnesota,
Opposite "Worthington Hotel.
With thanks for furors In the past, desire
to remind the good people of Worthington and
surrounding country that We are here, ready at
all times to serve them with goods as low as they
can be round in Southern Minnesota.
DRUG DEPARTMENT.
We have a full stock or fresh and reliable
DRUGS—all standard Patent Medicines—Chemi
cals, Paints, Oils, Dye Stuff", Window Glass,
Putty, Druggists' Sundries, Notions, r#rfnmtry,
Ti ilet and Fancy Soaps.
Prescriptions Carefully
pounded.
IS NOW PREPARED TO OFFER A
Complete Assortment of
General Merchandise,
Cotnsising in part of
STAr-LE AND FANCY
DRY GOODS,
GROCERIES,
NOTIONS, etc.
The Best Goods always on hand at
THE LOWEST LTV1XG PVICES.
Choice Tobaccos and Cigars.
Terms Strictly Cash, on
Delivery.
Bigelow, June 2% 1»71.—[42
LUMBER,
LATH,
a
SHINGLES.
Constantly on hand.
OFFICE—At Store. YAltlV-Corner Ninth St.
and First Avenue.
Bigelow Minn.
S. 0. MORSE.
Photography
HUNTING TUX CO.,
General Photographers,
Removed from 53 East Third Street,
TO THE GROUND FLOOR AT
|3\J
8Tm
PAUL'
^nviir.
THE LARGEST,
MOST COMFLETE, AND
MOST ELEGANT
Establishment of the Kind
in the West.
Wholesale & Retail
DEALERS IN
Stereoscopic Views, Frames, Stere
oscopes, & &o.
EVERY KIND OF TICTURE known to the
Art executed in the very hest manner possible
and warranted to give PERFECT SATISFAC
TION.
SEITDFOR CATALOGUE. VISI
TORS ALWAYS WELCOME.
15—3H1.
x. *cr.
Com-
STATIONERY DEPARTMENT.
School Books, Blank Books, Gift and Toy
Rooks, Letter Paper, Foolscap, Legal Cap, Bill
Paper, Plain aud Fancy Note Paper, Iui'ial Pa
per, Envelopes in great variety. Pencils, Tens,
Pen-Holders, Inks.
GROCER DEPARTMENT.
A full line of Family Groceries, Wooden Ware
new stock of Stone Ware.
Best brands or Cigars—and full line ofsmokers'
Material.
Lamps and Lamp Goods.
A large variety of Lamps and Fixtures. Eight
kinds of Chimneys.
We have but one price, and that as low as the
lowest, and, with our experience, we feel war
ranted in saying that we can make it an object
tor you to give us a liberal share or your patron
age.
Articles not in stock will be furnished on short
notice.
M00RE & SMITH.
March 21, 1874.
Plows, etc.
Having Refitted and Furnished
HIS STORE,
AT
Bigelow, Minn.,
JTCBXt*
At his
Lumber Yard in Worthington,
has constantly-on hand
A Large and Varied Assortment of Pine
Lumber.
Spirit Lake Stage-Line.
DOTY
& LAMBERT, having secured the car
rying of the mails from Spirit Lake to Wor
tliinglon, will run as follows:
Leave Spirit Lake at 7 o'clock on Monday
morning, and arrive at Worthington at 6 o'clock
p. m.
Returning, leave Worthtngton on Tuesday
morning at 7 o'clock, and arrive at Spirit Lake at
6 o'clock, p. m.
Any business entrusted to our care will be
promptly and faithfully attended to. Passengers
carried at reasonable rates. [-U-ly-
THE NATIONAL COLONY
LOCATEDaINanSOUTHWESTERN
Minnesot Northwestern Io
wa.
Twelve Townships
ow
Rich Prairie Land
In Nobles County, Minnesota.
Soil and Climate
The CREAM OF THE PRAIRIES
ami the GARDEN OF THE STATE.
The Climate of the Mountains and th«
Soil of the River IJottoais.
Government Lands.
Several Townships of GOVERXM EXT
LAND in the County STILL VA
CANT.
RAILROADS.
TRailroadswhicoh
ie«e land are the Sioux City & St. Paul
runs daily trains to both
citien.
Towns and Villages..
Three THRIVING VILLAGES
ing up in the Colony.
Worthington tho Business, Railroad,
Social, and Educational Centre of a
large extent of country.
XIXE COUXTIES XOW TRAD
IXGAT WOHTIUXGTOX.
FARMING.
A FARMING POPULATION of ser
eral thousand now on the lands and
the County RAPIDLY FILLING
UP.
axai3Rzx»x::E«.^.aro3S.
The National Colony is organized up
on a TEMPERANCE RASIS. No IN
TOXICATING BEVERAGES sold in
the County.
EDUCATION.
Good PUBLIC SCHOOLS and a SEM
INARY OF LEARNING now in
operation at Worthington.
Advantages.
FERTILE SOIL,
CONVENIENT MARKETS,
HEALTHFUL CLIMATE,
CHRISTIAN SOCIETY.
Superior Mail, Railroad, School, Church
and other Privileges.
NO AGUE,
NO CONSUMPTION,
NO LIQUOR TRAFFIC,
NO DESPERADOES,
NO INDIANS.
RAPID INCREASE IN THE VALUE OF
LAND ASSURED.
Send stamp for copy of the National Colony
JOURNAL, giving full particulars, to
MILLER, HUMIST0N & CO.,
Worthington, NobU$ OauntVr MinnuoU.
ARRIVAL AND DEPARTURE Of MAIL*
ABBOTS.
Eastern (dally) 5 p. m.
Southern 9:43 a.m.
Western—La Verne, Sioux Falls, Mon
days, Wednesdays and Fridays at p. n.
Spirit Lake Monday 6 p.m.
Jackson, Tuesday and Friday 6 p. m.
Lake Shetek, Saturday «p. m.
DBPABT8.
Eastern (daily) 9:42 a. m.
Southern 5 p. m.
Western—Ln Verne and Sfoux Falls,
Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday 7 a. m.
Spirit Lake. Tuesday 7 a m,
Jacksnn, Wednesday and Saturday 7a.ni,
Lake Shetek, Friday 7 a.m.
All mails close 20 minutes before departure.
Office hours from 7 a. m. to 7 p. m.—Sundays,
from 12 m. to 1 p. m.
C. C, GOODNOW, P. M.
St. Paul I Sioux City
AND
Sioux City & Saint Paul R.R.
TIME CARD.
Goinff West.
Leave St. Paul at 8.00 a.
Worthington, at 5.00 p.
Arrive at Sioux City, at 9.30 p.
Going East.
Leave Sfcmx City at 5.30 a.
Worthfngton, at 9.42 a.
Arrive at St. l'.wil, at 7.00 p.
1,500,000 ACRES
PRAIRI E & MEADOW LANDS,
Situated in Southwestern Minnesota and North
western Iowa,
FOR SALE
at moderate prices with easy terms of payment.
ALSO TOWN LOTS,
in towns at rain ad stations. I.aiid bonds of the
8hnu City and St. Vawl Itaflroad to be taken at
p»r in exchange for land within their limits.
For particulars address "I-and Department
st. p. & s. c. and a. e. & at. r. it. u. Co., st.raui
Minn.
A WEEKLY NEWSPAPER PUB
LISHED EVERY SATURDAY
AT
Worthington, Minnesota.
The ADTAXCE IS the regularly Issued county
paper, and the only newspaper published In No
bles county. To persons abroad who contem
plate coming to the National Colony, the Ar
VAXCE will prove or great value, as it 111 chron
icle from week to week every step in the progress
of the Colony, and will give besides a great quan
tify of valuable Information concerning the
prali ies of the West.
DEPARTMENTS.
FARMER'S DEPARTifEXT.
Special prominence will be given to all ques
tions aJTeeting the interests of the farmers, ami
to agricultural topics. An account of every farn*
ill the county will be given. Correspondence
solicited from farmers. Write facts and obser
vations upon fanning matters, aud the editor
will put them in sliape for fta? press. Particular
attention will be given to the subject of Tre*
Cull ure, as one of vital Banm-tance to this part of
the West.
LAXD DEPARTMENT.
Reliable information will be given concerning
the securing of Government Land. Letters of
inquiry as to the homestead and tree-claim laws
will be promptly and correctly answered through
Hie paper, and all the decisions of the General
Land Office whkh can be obtained will be pub
lished.
COLONY DEPARTMENT.
The ADVANCE, as intimated above, will be a
map and history of the National Colony. All
questions relating to the soil, climate, and other
natural advantage*, and to the development of
Southwestern Minnesota, will be faithfully an
swered.
NEWS AND LOCAL..
The ADVAKCE will give a general summary of
the news of the world, but its aim will be to be
come a flrst-class local newspaper, devoted espe
cially to home news and home interests. Corres
pondence from the different townships and from
the several comities tributary to Worthington
solicited.
:NXSI O
JOB-WORK
NEATLY AND PROMPTLY
Executed at the
Advance Office,
CARDS,
BLAXKS,
CIRCULARS,
POSTERS,
BILL-HEADS,
LETTER-HEADS.
TEBM8-$2 a year $1 for six
months 50 cents for three months, in
advance.
Address
A S O a
Worthington, Uinnuot*. 1

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