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The Western advance. [volume] (Worthington, Minn.) 1872-1874, August 15, 1874, Image 3

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PUBLISHED WEEKLY, AT
WORTUINOTON, NOBLES COUNTY, MINN.
Twin Two Hollars per year, invariably in ad
vance. Alt orders will receive, prompt attention.
communications intended for publication must
be accompanied by Hie real name and address of
w«to as a guaranty of good faith—not nee
•iiarily for publication.
ADVERTISING RATES.
Oa Inch throe weeks, «r.00, tliree mouths, W.OO
Hire* inches 3 weeks, 5.00, 8.00
rive inches," 6.00, 10.00
Special rates given lor larger advertiscments
Iteftiting notices, first week 10 cents a line sub
••qiieiit insertions 5 cents a line each week.
A S O N I
EGUT.AR COMMUNICATIONS of Fraterni
ty Lodge, No. l«i|. A. H. & A. M. at Masonic
-Ai/fc. Hall in Wortlunetoii on tlie
1st and 3d Mondays hi each
month.
In each month.
A. C. O S S O N W.-. M.
S. Ed. ClIANDLEK, SCC.
ItRGUT.AK O N O A
TIONS of Living Arch Chap
ter,U. D.,R.-. A.-. M.\ at Ma
sonic Hall on the 1st Tucaday
A. ROBINSON, M.
I. IV. PCftFER. Act'gSec.
CRAFT, M. 1.,
E. IT.-.W.
[:wt]
BUSINESS CARDS.
HA SKS.
BANK OF WORTHINGTON.
ELIIIU SMITH, Banker. A. M. SMITH, Cashier.
INTEREST PAI FOKTIM E DEPOSITS.
Drafts Bought and Sold. Special attention giv
en to collection^.
Office Hours from 9 to 12 a. in. and from 1 to 4
o'clock, p. 111.
nFFIf'rus.
A. A. PARSONS,
JUSTICE
OF THE PEACE, Real Estate and 1
Collccti!!-.,' Agent.
HEKSEY. MINN. [!»y
B. W WOOLSTENCROFT,
S
AH orders for surveying thankfully received
»nd promptly executed. Office with Shuck &
BooksUvvr, Worthington, Nobles Co. Minn.
taut]
A TTORNE VS.
B. SOUI.E,
tl NisELLOR ATT. W
And Nottry Public. Otllce on Tenth Street, in
the Davis Block. Prompt attention given to con
veyancing. [271v.
J. S. SHUCK,
O E AT LAV,, I5e.il r«tat* and eol
lfpiing aeeut, would respectfully tender his
•eivices to the people of this and adjoiningeouu
tles, and holies, bj prunim attention to business,
and fair and honest dealings, to merit a bliaie ot
public patronage.
B. N. CARRIER,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
AND
CLERK OF DIST. COURT.
All business left with him will receive prompt
aUenii-tt.
OlTlee on ^tii Street opposite tlie Park.
C. TI. I»::N
Atf at Law.
c. r. (,ooii\ow,
Notary Public.
Benton & Goodnow,
Att'ys & Counielars at Law,
REAL ESTATE,
I N USANCE AND
C(ELECTION AGEXTS.
Pur'P'Mlar attention paid to business before
the local and geueiai Laud Offices.
3H] Worthington, Minnesota.
PHVMITAXS.
'd'UYSlCIAN A- SURGEON.
Special attention pi'en Surgery and the
treatment m" IVni.ili Diseases hating had eight
years' cxt.eiieiice.
OF I-'It E—At residence, corner of Fourth Ave
nue and Eleventh street, Worthington, Minnes
ota.
[44-ly.
PHarvard
jrnEJ^
HYSICIAN A N .suite EON, Graduate of
University. I uited States Examin
ing Surgeon for Pensions. Office at Darber &
Lawrence1*, Worthiugtnu Minn.
GEO. O. MOORE,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON,
Graduate or Ann Arbor, Michigan. Residence
on loth sheet below the public hall, otllce at
the Colony Dm stoic, opposite the Worthing
ton Hotel, WorthiiiKton, .Minn.
Will attend promtlhj /o all Culh.dny or
ui'jht. [-"ly-
HOTELS.
THIRD AVENUE UO'lEL,
C. B. LOVELESS Proprietor.
Worthington, Minn.
OKABENA HOUSE,
C. P- STOUGH, Proprietor.
WOKTH1NGTON, MINN,
On Ninth Street, between Second & Third avc.
W0RTHIMGT0N HOTEL.
The Largest and Best-Appointed.
Hotel in •Southwestern Min
nesota.
J. AMES, Prop. GEO. AMZS, Clerk.
a to farmers and teamsters as low as
any house in town. Large barn accommoda
tions. Stage ofliee for thedfferent stasje lines.
WOUTII1XGTON, MINN.
[IjM]
MISCEL LA NEO US.
DENTISTRY.
DENTA
BOOMS of E. BEDFORD are on 10th
Street, opposite puhlic square, and will 1KJ
open the last week In each mouth. Work insur
ed live years. [:7y
SliDDLE AND HARNESS SHOP.
II. JOHNSON, Dealer in Saddlery Hard-
a
ware, Trunks, Valises, etc. Harness always
on hand, and made to order. Kcpniring neatly
done. Shop on Ninth Street, Wortliiugton, Minn.
33 ly.
E A E S A E A E N
SOULE & LANGDON,
Dealers In Real Estate,
Homesteads, Preemptions
and Town Property Bought and Sold.
Worthington, August 31.
& A. UILDRETH,
Has Opened a
S A I N S A O O N
en Tenth Street, opposite the Worthington Ho
tel, where hel«i prepared to wait upon tlie public
in anything pertaining to Ids Hue.
Th« patronage of tlie public solicited.
ADDRESS.
All letters addressed to Miller, Hum
iston & Company, Worthington, Nobles
county, Minnesota, will lie promptly
answered, and full information given
concerning the National Colony.
Colony Maps for sale at the ADVANCE
Olnce.
LOCAL.
JWORTHINGTQN, MINN., AUGUST 15, 1874.
CHURCH DIRECTORY.
MfiTnomsT EPISCOPAL.—Rev. J. W. Lewis,
pastor, services every Sabbath, morning at
10:30 Sabbath School at 2:30 p. "Worthing
tou Fraying Band." Sabbath evening at 7 o'clock.
Pray meeting Thursday evening at 7 o'clock.
PHESBYTEKIAN.—Services in the west room on
first Door of Miller Block. Sunday School at 12
o'cloekeach Sabbath. Rev.W.P.Jackson, Pastor.
to CONGREGATIONAL.—Services morning
and evening. Sunday School immediately after
the morning service. Praver meeting Thursday
evening. Kible Class every Monday evening at
8 o'clock at the Church. Rev. C. C. Foote, pas
tor.
Ladies1 Union Prayer Meeting every Tuesday
ternnon oVloelr.
afternoon aif'-UZ
$% o'clock
TESTAMENTS FOR SABBATH SCHOOLS.
The Nobles County BibleSociety will
furnish Testaments to Sabbath Schools
throughout the county, 011 application
of Superintendents.
A. P. MILLER, Secretary.
The Ladies' Prayer Meeting will be
held on next Tuesday afternoon at the
residence of Mrs. J. C. Clarke.
Mr. Stough, of the Okabena House,
offers the hotel for stile or rent. He
will give possession by September 1st
if desired. The ill health of his wife
compels him to change business.
We invite attention to tlie advertise
ment of the County Commissioners of
fering $25 for tlie conviction of anyone
who may illegally burn tire prairie.—
Now let us have an association to aid
the Commissioners in making the ap
prehension and conviction sure.
Several car loads of fruit passed
through here a few days since from
California.
The Jackson Republic laments the
absence of anything fresh and green to
eat. Here, on tlie railroad, we are hav
ing vegetables and fruits of nearly .ill
kinds.
Tlie fust load of new wheat was sent
to town on Monday last from the
Ocheeda farm of Miller, llumiston &
Co. New wheat is now arriving in
considerable quantity from Rock coun
ty.
"We acknowledge the, receipt of anoth
er bucket of ice-cream and some fine
California pours from S. A. Davis.—
Pears and i*'C-cream are almost as good
as peaches and cream.
Will Labium treated the town a few
evenings since to a cornet solo played
from somewhere out on tlie lake. Dis
tance lent enchantment to tlie sound,
and we hope Will will do so again.
II. D. llumiston has a single Mam
moth Squash vine in Itis lot which cov
ers an area of about 1:2 by 20 feet.—
There are three squashes on this vine
which arc growing at a prodigious rate.
O of lir.s a 1-5 to I S
in in in in
the past few dtiys it has increased in di
ameter at the rate of two inches a day
by actual measurement.
We have received the first number of
the Educational News, published month
ly by lladley Brothers, Chicago, and
Geo. M. Gage, St. Raul, at 75 cents a
year. It is issued in quarto form, is
neatly printed and illustrated, and con
tains much matter of interest to ed
ucators.
Subscribers to the AIVAXCE should
rememl er that since the first of July
all newspapers sent to actual subscrib
ers go free of postage within the coun
ty. In cases where postage has been
collected fer the current quarter, it
will be refunded.
INDEPENDENT SCHOOL DISTRICT.
At the School Meeting held on Wed
nesday night last, tlie independent dis
trict was carried, there being but four
votes in the negative. An election of
a School Board is next in order, and by
the fall term Worthington will have
laid the foundation of a first class pub
lic school. Whatever difference of ('pin
ion there may be upon other matters,
there should be but one as to our
schools. They should be made first
class, and this can only be dona uiun
the independent district plan.
THE GRAIN YIELD.
We are gratified to learn that the
grain yield is turning out better than
expected. Captain Miner, of the Ochee
da Farm of Miller, llumiston &
has been threshing during the past
week and the yield 59 remarkable for a
grasshopper year. On ISA- acres of oats
the yield was 638 bushels, or nearly 49
bushels to the acre. On 28 acres of
Iloosac wheat, the yield was GO
O bush-
els or about 2H bushels to the acre.—
Tlie Iloosac weighs 61 pounds to the
bushel, and the Osaka 63.
MINOR ARRIVALS.
A boy settler arrived recently at the
residence of Mr. Dawley, who lives a
few miles southeast of Bigelow. As
Mr. D. lives just across the Iowa line,
wre suppose this settler "won't count"
for Bigelow as against Hersey.
Another settler arrived on Thursday
night at the residence of Major Thur
ber north of town. Boy—9lbs—florid
complexion—Democrat.
Correspondents will please remember
the rule to write on one side of the pa
per only. The reasons for this requir
ment are "too numerous to mention."
(Besides we can't use the paper for
wrappers when it is written on
both sides.)
PERSONALS.
Miss Chesebro, of Syracuse, N. Y., is
spending a few weeks in the Colony, the
guest of Mrs. C. B. Loveless.
L. D. Horton, of New Milford, Illi
nois, has been on a visit to his son in
Seward township. Ha expresses him
self as well pleased with the country.
The St. Paul Press, speaking of the
State Fair, says:
Prof. K. Humiston, of Worthing
ton, has consented to deliver the
ad-So
dress, and judging from the gentle
man's reputation it will be a Valuable
document to the farmers in every sec
tion of the State of Minnesota,
MINNESOTA FLOUR.
"We have frequently alluded to the
fact that the new process flour manu
factured in Minnesota is leading the
markets of the country, and that flour
ing mills are multiplying rapidly
throughout the State. The Minneapolis
Tribune in a recent issue says:
The flour manufactured from Minnes
ota spring wheat by the new process,
peculiar co our manufacturers, stands
at the head of the market commanding
from one to two dollars more per bar
rel in New York than any other flour.
Of course this fact is a very great in
ducement for millers to go into the bus
iness here, and consequently our capac
ity for manufacturing has been nearly
doubled within a year.
One of the best of these new process
mills is located right herein Worthing
ton. A gentleman who recently arriv
ed here from New York says thai l^e
conversed with the flour dealers in New
York who have been selling the best
brands from our Okabena Mills, and
they informed him that no better flour
was ever sold in the city. Their only
difficulty as to this brand of flour was
that they could not get enough of it.—
So the Sioux City Hour merchants pro
nounce the Okabena brand the best ev
er seen in Sioux Cit3T.
GRAHAM BREAD.
We invite attention to a very sensi
ble letter from a lady of Elk township,
If the letter does not have the desired time to accept tlie Judge's invitation to
•effect of securing a ration of "Graham"'! take a ride out to the "Rock." We
among the supplies distributed, we
hope it will call general attention to
the subject of eating more Graham
bread, the sweetest, most wholsome
and altogether the best bread that can
be eaten.
BURNING HAY.
Our correspondent from Lorain gives
his exi»erience in burning hay. He
has burned "slew" hay almost exclu
sively for over a year, and finds it a very
easy way of economizing. Let others
do likewise and in a few years they
will be like the Illinois and Iowa prai
rie farmers, rich enough to buy fuel and
also to buy out any ordinary eastern
farmer. Some don't like to "come to
it,'1 while others don't like the "name"
of burning hay. Just as though hay
isn't as respectable as wood or coal,
and cleaner than the latter. Both
wood and hay grow out of the same
good green earth, and are given by the
same bountiful Hand. The prairies
are now waving with minature forests.
Let every man who feels delicate
about burning hay, imagine that each
stalk of grass is si small tree, and then
go in with a mower and lay up his win
ter wood."
Genenus I. A al, living near Marshall,
had two horses stolen recently. The
Prairie Schooner describes the horses
as follows: "One, a small five year
old sorrel mare, with white spot in the
forehead, and with letter "N branded
on one shoulder. The other is a two
year old bay colt, stallion, of common
size, mane and tail clipped some time
ago,—no other marks." A liberal re
ward is offered for the delivery to the
owner of one or both of these anima's,
or for ini'oimatioii that will lead to
their recovei y. Mr. Aal is a poor man
and can ill alloid to lose his property.
An exchiinge says that""a lady who
cultivates a rose in her apartments,
will find by planting an onion in the
same pot, the fragrance of the rose
will be increased a hundred.per cent.—
Why this is so, is more than we can
say, but it is certainly a fact."
A car-shoe has been invented by L.
B. Stilsou, the design of which is to
hold a train to the track in case of a
displaced or broken rail. A test was
made recently near Minneapolis which
gave the greatest satisfaction. A num
ber of railroad men witnessed the test
and say that the shoe will do all that
is claimed for it.
IF.t-VTED— TO TRADE,
One yoke of excellent steers, five
a or a
E re of A A N E
Co.,Trip
office, or AT. M. Grav. Hansom.
Township maps for sale at the AD-streets,
VANCE otlice.
"WESTWARD nor
to Sinvx Falls—Beautiful Farms
Wheat—Peat—Rock County—Ir«7
Icy Sprimjs—Fine Views—Sioux Falls
—Mannijircnt Wheat Country—Trib
utary to Worthinrjton.
We announced last week the arrival
of Mr. M. W. Carlisle, from Chilli
cothe, Ohio, who is here looking with
reference to engaging in the Milling bu
siness. Mr. C. wishing to see some
thing of the wheat region tributary to
Worthington, a trip to Sioux Falls was
proposed and carried unanimously.—
Accordingly a party consisting of Mr.
Carlisle, Mr. C. Z. Sutton, Mr. Chas.
Dunning and the editor of the A
VANCE, set out on Monday with a good
team and a carriage from Shell's.—
The weather was fine, the roads in good
condition, the country beautiful with
the harvest, and the trip was both
pleasant and profitable.
For five or six miles west of town we
saw beautiful fields of wheat in the
shock. From this on to the county
line, the ravages of the grasshoppers
were more apparent than on any part
of the route to Sioux Falls. In places
the corn was eaten down almost to the
ground, and in others fields were strip
ped of blades.
At the Kanaranzi we noticed a quan
tity of peat drying, and at the farm
houses beyond we saw the farmers were
using peat. A farmer near tha county
line informed us that the farmers in
that neighborhood were taking out peat
for their winter fuel. We made in
quiry at Luverne and learned that a
great many farmers in Rock county ex
pect to burn peat the coming winter.
the peat agitation has had a good.
effect and
farmers.
are turning these ?I|fif'o
C„.F™ ~,V„
I 4 *. ii
surface coal mines account.
we again struck the region of fair
crops and saw on either side of the
road some beautiful farms, which
showed that they had been thoroughly
cultivated. We came in full view of
the Rock river valley above and below
Luverne, just before night fall and had
the finest view on the trip with the ex
ception of the view at the Big Sioux.—
The Luverne people had gotten up one
of their finest sunsets for the occasion,
and as we descended into the valley the
sky seemed to be vieing with the earth
in an elaborate effort to draw out all
the admiration in our party.
At Luverne we met a number of ac
quaintances and learned that the wheat
crop is fair, better, in fact, than expec
ted. Farmers were busy threshing and
the average yield, it was thought,
would lc fifteen bushels. Tlie grass
hopper did not injure Rock county se
riously, and we are informed that prob
ably no one would be compelled to ask
I for relief. We judge that Rock county
1 is all that has beep claimed for it as a
wheat count}'. We saw no hikes nor
sloughs there, and consequently less
grass land than in this county, but
everywhere we saw magnificent reach
es of wheat laud. "While at Luverne
we called on Mr. Jenkins, of the Her
ald, Mr. Hartley, Judge Crosby and
others, and we regret that we had not
hope before long to make another visit
and take in this elevation, which, if
we are correctly informed, is an out
crop of the Old fled Sandstone, which
rises to a considerable height above the
river, and forms a rocky wall along the
bluff for some distance. The rocks
are visible from the road five or six
miles this side of Luverne. We found
a good hotel and several good business
houses in Luverne, and the promise of
a thriving county-seat.
Beyond Luverne there are many
beautiful farms and we saw a great
deal of wheat in the shock. In some
places we noticed that all the heads
had been eaten off on some of the
Shocks, and on inquiry learned that the
gophers had eaten the wheat after it
had been shocked.
Soon after entering Dakota we reach
ed Valley Springs. Here we were well
received by Mr. Wood, the oiiginator
of the Valley Spring Settlement, and a
thoroughly Intelligent and wide-awake
gentleman who gave up the manage
ment of a New York railroad for the
peaceful pursuit of agriculture under
the invigorating skies of Dakota. The
place takes its name from several
springs of clear cold water which flow
from the bank of Beaver Creek. The
valley here is beautiful and from the
height on which Mr. Wood lives some
forty farms can be counted. On our
return we stopped over night with Mr.
Stone, also a New Yorker, at Valley
Springs, and had a capital breakfast of
prarie chickens which our party had
shot the day before. Of course it is
unneccessary to explain to any one ac
quainted with the persons comprising
the party that these chickens were
killed in Dakota, where the law don't
apply. Nobody would suspect any one
of our party of shooting a prairie
chicken, contrary to the law notwith
standing, except in self-defense.
Tli.e iew from the hill this side of
Sioux Iliver and the one from the oth
er side just after reaching the top of
the bluIf, are the finest views we have
seen in the Northwest. As we neared
Sioux Falls we saw a number of farms
which already seemed to have had years
of cultivation.
•Sioux Falls has a fiiie location on the
Sioux Iliver and is one of the brightest
and sprightlicst towns on the frontier.
Some of the store-rooms are large and
fitted up in city .style and the hotel is a
very neat and well-kept house. Of
course we could not avoid comparison,
and we estimated that the buildings in
Sioux Falls, if sold at public auction,
would sell for about one-lmlf as much
as the buildings in Worthington. We
saw no fences nor trees planted on the
nor improvements of that kind.
We visited the falls which are certain
ly worth visiting as a great natural
wonder. The Fulls are formed by an
upheaval or out-crop of the same Old
lied Sandstone, and the rocks are in
sections, as though dressed and built
np by hand. There are three or four
falls, the whole distance being, Ave be
lieve, about 110 feet. At this season
of the year, there is very little water
but in the Spring tlie volume must be
considerable. We have no doubt that
in time these falls will be utilized and
will furnish considerable power for
manufacturing, but it will require a
large outlay of money to make them
available. We called at the Para
graph oftlce, on our way to the Falls,
and found Ed. Dillabough, formerly of
the ADVANCE, in charge. We regret
that we had not time to call and seethe
the Independent, and we promise to do
better next time.
We returnei more than everimpress
with the beauty and fertility of the
magnificent country tributary to Wor
thington. With a good pike from here
to Sioux Falls, Worthington in a few
years would be another lied Wing as a
wheat market. As a county we shpuld
prefer our own to either Rock or Min
nehaha county, Dakota, because it has
the elements for a more varied agricul
ture. We have an abundance of wa
ter and grass land, which they have
not, and hence we must excel in stock,
while three-fourths of our county is as
well adapted to wheat as the counties
named.
We regret that we have not space to
give the incidents of ths trip, but that
would take a volume. The world (the
N. Y. World,) would not contain the
books which might be written giving
the jokes, the incidents aud the experi
ences of the trip. We can only sa.y to
W
0
to
a a a
8 away frc business, make up a
par
*ty
Within six or eight miles of Luverne. west."
of
f? six and "go
CORRESPONDENCE.
FROM SEWARD.
SEWARD, August 11,1872.
EDITOR ADVANCE: Isaiah Williams
has harvested about thirty acres of
grain, and a few others have harvested
from ten acres downward, averaging
ail the way from four to twelve bushels
per acre. This of course is in conse
quence of the grasshopper raids. For
this little crop it was hard to get hands
as a a re a a a in in
other sections. So you see Seward men
are trying to "help themselves." Hay
is going up fast. Provisions down to
the bottom shelf, but our spirits are as
good as ever. With a little good for
tune and our own muscle, Seward will
yet become the most noted township
for fine farms of any in the State. You
may call this boasting, but time will
tell.
Little plowing done for want of
rain. A. T.
FROM LORAIN.
LOUAIN TOWNSHIP, Aug. 10, '74.
EDITOR ADVANCE: I wish to en-
courage people throughout this county,
to burn hay, for something of the kind
must be don?. I am aware that many
do burn it, but there are many who
think they would rather leave than be
compelled to burn hay.
The reason for this is they do not un
derstand how to burn it. I will give
yoa my experience. Perhaps some may
profit by it. "Drowning men will catch
at strawrs." We have something much
stronger and better to cling to, ih hay,
as a substitute for coal and wood,- and
which will bear us up on the waves and
land us safely through this dark hour.
"The darkest hour is just before day,"
so let us hope for a dawning into a
brighter future.
My experience is about as follows: I
began about one year ago. Have a
-coal stove, which is best suited to burn
ing hay. Fed the stove in front with
loose bundles. Kept stirring and
punching. Had a "terrible time of it."
The consequence was the stove was
covered with ashes victuals were too
highly seasoned sometimes. After ex
perimenting awhile began to make im
provements and soon found it a com
plete success. Will now tell you how
we managed it. At present we are just
as well satisfied as though we had soft
wood Take the long hay, a good hand
ful, (not upland,) twist it tight, by be-inThe
ginning in the center aud twisting and
joining together till ends meet then
fasten. Twelve of these bundles will
cook a meal nicely also bake beautiful
brown bread. Keep the fire place clean.
Do not stir it much. Keep the flues
clear in front. Tlie hay will melt down
into a hot coal. Take off a stove cover
when you feed. One should have a
building for the purpose iu winter.—
Have a load or two always on hand
make the bundles there. By so doing
you will have a clean house stud a peace
ful home. D. F.
passed and our people have commenced
in or a W
have been favored with one or two
soaking rains lately which put the
ground in good condition for plowing.
All in this neighborhood are satisfied
with the result of this year's labor,
and are thankful that they have been
permitted to gather enough grain to keep
the "wolf* from their doors until such
Wme as the God of the Universe shall
bless their labors with a bountiful har
vest. Though their losses by the 'hop
per invasions are keenly felt, they raise
universal cry of "Xever Despair !"and
with brave hearts and e:iger hands will
battle on until success crowns their
efforts. Even tha women (bless
'em stty they will content themselves
with last year's fashions, cook with hay
tires and wear brogans before they will
surrender their prairie homes to the de
spoilers of our crops! As a proof of
their integrity to the interests of this
County, the farmers of this Township
will put a much greater breadth of
land in grain next spring than ever be
fore.
The Rmsom Sunday School is now
held alternately at the residences of II.
It. Gray, Hiram Toms and Thomas
.Shepherd, so as best to accomodate
a in
Miss Alice Ford, of Iowa City, is
visiting her sister, Mrs. Toms. Miss
F. is a teacher and has sought the
in-Famil,y
vigorating atmosphere of the National
Colony to spend vacation. Of course
she likes it. MET
FROM ELK.
ELK TOWNSHIP, August 11,1874.
Eo. ADVATSX'E: Very much has been
said concerning the quantity of sup
plies which will probably be needed by
destitute in the southwest, but it
seems to me the quality should be ta
ken into consideration. Of course lux
uries will be out of the question, but is
the common grade of white Hour and
fat pork the most judicious food for
people who will be for one whole year
forced to live almost entirely upon
"bread aloneV" I am not a vegetarian
I believe with Dr. Holland in the in
spiration of juicy beefsteak and good
coffee, and I have a sentimental fond
ness for snowy buiscuit and golden
loaves, but, a fact acknowledged by all
intelligent persons now, Graham con
tains more nutriment than the bolted
flour, and if people most live almost
entirely upon bread, why not furnish
that which does the most good for the
least money? Our physicians will agree
that much of the sickness in this local
ity last year was owing to a diet of
bread and pork and the lack of vegeta
bles and fruit. There are many who
might think themselves abused if only
furnished unbolted flour, but I am
sure that when they have once tried it
in any of the various ways in which it
may be made so delicious, thev would
never more wish to be without this
most neccessary article of food. Some,
who have already learned its value,
grind the wheat themselves, in a coffee
mill. This operation is very slow aud
laborious, although a neighbor of mine
prepared some the other afternoon for
tea and baked her "gems," and they
icere gems indeed, the very lightest and
sweetest I have ever tasted.
Instead of pork I would furnish dried
apples, if only enough that each fami
ly might have sauce once a week. Near
ly everybody on the prairie owns a cow,
and with plenty of milk and butter, a
little sauce, Graham bread, gems, or
pudding, and this fine invigorating
air, there will be no danger of trouble
some diseases, and with another spring
that you or I can re-organize the whole
system of alms-giving, but I do think
it would be expedient for somebody to
look into the matter, and have just a
faint hope that this little seed may
lodge somewhere in good ground.
E N S E T, aged 18 months.
CICELY.
OBITUARY.
DIED.—At Worthington, on Friday morninpr,
August 7, 1S74, of brain disease, SUSIE GEK
TRCIJE, infant daughter of W 11. and Lll.LlE L.
SPECIAL NOTICES.
MOOKE & SMITH'S Ice-Cream has now arrived
at perfection. Go there aiuji partake.
lee-Cream and Confectionery and Frigid Soda
Water at MOOKE & SMITH'S.
A splendid lot of Glycerine Soap at
MOOKE & SMITH'S.
MOOUE & SMITH now have on hand the largest
stock of Drugs, Paints and Medicines ever
brought into Xohles County.
A new #.100 PIANO for *W Warranted six
years. CHAS. F. HUMISTON. [38
The Smith AMElilCAft ORGANS for sale
381 by CHAS. F. HUMISTON.
WORTHINGTON MARKETS.
7"C 80
5,00 8,00
8.) i»0
45?g 50
2,50 $ 3,00
3.H)
WHEA
FLOUIt $1 bbl.
COKN %T bushel
OATS
HAY IP ton
BBANS, WHITE, bush
BITTTEK
KGGSfldoz ..
UHOCKK1ES-COKFEE [email protected] TE A 50 (H 1,00
FINISHING 3,1,(X)@40,00
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS.
HOTEL FOR SALE OR RENT.
Okabena House located on Ninth Street,
Worthington, is offered for sale or rent. Pos
session will be given by September 1st if desired.
I'he bouse has a good run ot patronage, and
good stabling for teams. A compelled to
change business on account of the ill-health of
my wife. For particulars address.
v. V. STOUGH.
BURNING THE PRAIRIE.
$25 REWARD.
THEw
FROM RANSOM.
BAXSOM, Aug. 13, '74.
EDITOR ADVAXCE: The harvest has
Commissioners of Nobles County will pay
E E E W for such
infoi illation as will load to the apprehension and
com jetton of any p.-ison or persons who may
wilfully or eare!essl\, bvan means, set the to
the grass on the praii le itliin the county dm in
this Autumn, and allowing the same to'run lie
youd hisown promises contrary to the statutes
of Minnesota. By order of Commissioners,
WM. M. BEAK,
August L, 1S71.—49-3m. Auditor.
"WE
Aii
Our Neighbors"
Is the latest and raciest woik by
Harriet Beeclier Stowo,
Author of L'uele Tom's Cabin," "Th Minis
ter's Wooing," My Wife and I,"
And other powerful stoiies, eaeii the literary
sensation of its period and this story promises
a like genuine and wfiolesmni sensation. It
bears directly on social topics of interest,
bracing the romance of youthful companion
ships, the brightness of happy home-life, the
spicy complications of neighborhood associa
tions, and such follies and profound domestic
miseries as have led to the wide-spread Tei,u»r
anco movement of the hy.
Mrs. Stowe is now in the prime of that genius
which wrote "Uncle Tom." ripened ly e.us ol
study and observation. Her n»velsaie immense
ly popular, Uncle Tom's Cabin alone out-sell
ing by hundreds of thousands any edition of any
original work ever published—.sire the Uihle.—
Her book two years ago, My W ife and I," out
sold every contemporary. Such a pure and en
nobling story as "W and Our Neighbor?"
should be read in every home. This attractive
Serial is just beginning exclusirefy in the
Weekly Family Newspaper, the
Christian Union
IIEXRY WARD BEECHElt,
EDITOR.
In religions matters this paper is Evangelical
and Uhsectarian in political affairs, independ
ent and outspoken. It contains the best article*,
and both short and serial stories, from the fore
most wiiters it aims to maintain the highest
standard in Religion. Literature, l'«etry, Art,
Music Science, News, Politics, Household ami
Affairs, with Stories, Rhymes, Puzzles
for the Children, etc. Nothing is spared to
a it a O E TE Newspaper for Uie Famll /,
pure, attractive, wide-awake, up with the times.
and inspired with essential Christianity—a jour
nal Interesting to every one iu the household,
young or old. It is
A MARVEL OF CHEAPNESS.
*S~For less than one cent a day, it gives every
xneelz reading matter enough to fill an ordinary
*1.25 book of over 300 pafajj^ and in a year 5J
such volumes i., e„ sistif fa'c dollars' woitho
matter To each is thus annually presented
A COMPLETE LIBRARY.
The paper's form, 21 pages, large 4to, pasted
and trimmed, commends it to all who are tired
of tlie old-fashioned blanket sheets."
The well-earned popularity of this paper is
now such that of its class it has the
Largest Circulation In the World.
and has readers by hundreds of thousands.
As ILLUSTIUTED Nt'WBEit, containing the
opening diaptersl.of Mrs. Stowe's admirable
story, will be
SENT FREE
to every new and renewing Subscriber.
If you are not already a Subscriber, send at
once and secure it under the now offered
I a
The paper may be had either with or without
the altiactive premiums ottered: VIA, the
CHRISTIAN UNION, One Year,
ONLY $3 00.
Ou, with premium pair French Oleographs,
Our Boys," (size, ll\i:i% inches eneh.)
charming iu design and execution,
mounted, sized, varnished, ready for
flaming. Delivered Free *3 00
OK. with large piemium, French Oil Chro
nio, "Th Lord is lliseii,"
it
beautiful
Cross and Flower-piece, which sells iu art
Stores for *5 00,
1V^\H%
inches,)
mounted, sized, varnished, ready for
framing, Delivered Free W 50
SrrjcrwFN* COPIES sent free by mail on receipt
of ten cents. 4&"Money must be sent by Postal
Money Order, Check, Draft, or Registered Let
ter. Otfiervfte it nt t/,i sorter's risk. Ad
dress J. n. & Publishers,
27 P.uU P!.ic", New Yoik.
SOMETHING NEW!
Farmer's Supply Store
S W E.TTCJSf,
HAVING RENTED THE
SOUTH ROOM
IN
METHODIST BLOCX
DESIRES
to say to the public that be is now
ua^Pur^Ii-P11
0
sur-P'y them with a FUi,
General Merchandise,
FOR
CASH OR PRODUCE.
My Stock consists of
DRY GOODS,
CLOTHING,
HATS AND CArS,
IS
15
SUGAK, (Coffee A )[email protected]: Ex. Vldd 13
Brown V) SVKl'l" 05 1,00 KICK ^12l4
SALT fi bbl. u.rg
riiovisIONtf—roK (mess) ft bbl, 24,00«828,(10
HAMS 18c SHOULDEKS 10 11
BACON ltjc LAKD 16® 17c 1). APL'S 12 S15
PEACHES 12 lo
COAL ft ton fi,Ttt(^8,0t
LUMBER—Common ft m. [email protected],tM
BOOTS AND SHOES,
SHELF CUTLERY* AND NAIL^,
GROCERIES OF ALE KINDS
CANNED FRUITS,
DRIED FRUITS.
Farmers and others will find it to their interesC
to call and examine my STOCK A N PRICKS
before purchasing elsewheriv.
ALL KINDS OFTRODUCE TAK
EN IN EXCHANGE FOR
GOODS,
B. W. LYON.
Worthington, Minn., July IS, 1ST! [1\\4~.
State Normal School.
MANKATO, MINX.
1. FAT.T. TERM commences August 20.1ST!.
2. Pupils must in. at least tifteen years of ace.
H. Applicant- for admission to the'Normal De
partment will he examined in Spelling, Reading,
Writing,Oeography. crammaran Arithmetic.
4. Tuition free to those who pledge to te.i"!t
twovearsi the Common Schools ot the M.ite.
All ot tiers win be charged EIGHT DOLI.AK.-4
\'VM N-.liM.
.". Special facilities for those who wish lo learn
how to teach.
For further information apply to the Princi
pal. D. JOHN,
40—1w* Mankato, Minn.
NOTICES OF CONTEST.
"V"otiee. U. S. Land Office, Worthington,
1 1 Minn., August I. 1*7!.
Complaint ha\m in-cn enterrd nt this ofliee by
Charles Dana .ig.ui.-t Willi.uu os.s for alnn
doiiin liomes|i-,id I'.st 1 No. nijsi, d.ilod
•luiy £M. 1*7',. upiri 1 ].• s\,i section 20, town
ship lti-f._raime41. NnMi -Cimuiy, Minnesota,
w:th.i\ to the ca-icei:.«iioii 01 said entiy
the s.ii.l parties 'i-e beien summoned to anpe'ar
at this ofliee on the 14th. day of November! 1*74,
at It) o'clock .1. in., to respond aud furnish •. ,u
mony coneerninu said alleged abandonment.
MONS GUINAOElt, Register.
4S] J. 15. WAKEFIELD, Receiver.
LEGAL. ADVERTISEMENTS.
PR OB A TE NO TICE.
STAT
E OF MINNESOTA,
COUNTY OF NU5LES,
In Probate Court.
In the matter of the estate of Oliver Rnitt. ,ie
ceased. On reading and liiing the Petition
Wm. S. Stockdale, setting forth the ani.iiit
personal estate that has come to his hai"i- •,
the disposition thereof t! :.si iut of debtsout
standing against said dec. •!. aud a descrip
tion of all the real estate 01 which said deceased
died sei/ed. and the cmidilion and value of tlie
resjiecUxe poittons thereof and praying that
licHi.se be to him Kranleri to sHl I,.»ts ']0 and 11
ol lilock 1-of the \illageol' WoiUiington of said
county and State. ^Atid it appearing, by said
Petition, that there fs notsufficient personal es
tate in the hands of said Wm. S. Stockdale to
pay .siid debts, and thai it is necessary in order
to pay tlie same, to sell all of said real estale.
It is therefore ordered that all persons interest
ed in said estale, appear before the Judge of this
Court on the-fth day of Sc)rtember, A. D. 1«74,
at 2 o'clock p. in., at tlie Probate office in Wor
thington in said County, then and there to show
cause (if any I here he) why license should not bn
granted to said Win. s. Stockdale to sell said real
estate according to the prayer of said petition.
And it is further ordered, That a copy of this
order shall be published for four successive
weeks prior to said day of hearing, the last of
which publications shail be at least, fourteen
days belore said day ol hearing, in tlie Western
Advancv a weekly uewspa|er printed and pub
lished :tt Worthington in said county, and per
sonal^ served on all p-rsons interested in said
estate, residing in said county, at least fourteen
days before said day of Iu aring.
15y the Con.I.
BY
J. CKAFT, Judge of Probate.
Dated this 3*th day of Julv, 1874.—47 7w.
SHERIFF'S SALE.
virtue of an Execution, issued out of the
District Court, for the H^th Ju.lici it District
in and for the County ot Nobles and State of
Minnesota, upon a jrdgnieut issued and docket
ed in said Comt on the third day of March, A
D. 1^74. in a ccu.uu action wherein Isaac N. Sa
ter is l'l.itiitiil', and 0. C. Ooodn«»w, Defendant,
in favor of said Plaintiff, and against said De
fendant, for the sum of Seven Hundred and
Eighteen Dollars and Tw Cents, (*718 02.) I
have on the rtnth day of July, A. D. 1874, levied
upon all the 1 iglit, title and interest of the said
Defendant, C. C. Ooodnow, to the following de
scribed real estate, to-wit: 24 feet front on Tenth
Street, commencing 78 feet from tlie corner ot
said Tenth Street and Third Avenue thence on
a line parallel with said Third Avenue 48 feet to
an established alley: thence along said alley 24
feet: thence on a line parallel with Third Ave
ntfe to said Tenth Street: thence on a line with
said Tenth Street to thcnlaeeof beginning, being
a i»ait of lots 8 and it iu Block 8 iu the Village Ol
Worthington, County or Nobles, and State Of
Minnesota, being a piece of land 24 by 48 feet,
and the building thereon known as the Post Of
fice Ihiilding, and will sell the same, or so much
thereof as may be necessary to satisfy
a
eutioii and costs, at the ofliee of the County Au
ditor, in the village of Woithington, iu the Coun
ty and State aforesaid, Ou S'l-wlay the 2Sth.
ilny of August, A. D., 1874, at 2 o'clock p. m., of
that day.
Dated July 9th, A D. 1874.
C. W. BULLIS,
44-6W.1 Sheriff of Nobles County, Mian.
Two desirable Farms near :Vorthing
ton for sale. AIFO House to rent. Ap
ply to WM* S. STOCKDALB-

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