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Public ledger. [volume] (Memphis, Tenn.) 1865-1893, May 13, 1868, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85033673/1868-05-13/ed-1/seq-1/

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PUBLIC DIRECTORY.
ArtTIONI'F.HM. ,
A. 8. Levy Co., kM heonnd.
P. 1.. Lieroe t Co., .ale. "I Dry Qooda'.Cl.to
iui, boots, llaU,.Ui 310 Mm.
HATlia).
M.JIeeted Vapour Haiu., 69 Admit. ,
BOOK KTORKN.
0. V. Chsnibe.lin Co., 1V7 Main, Job print
ing, blank booka, tto.
BOOTH AND SHOES.
William Miller, Jl Main
W. U. Kenmday Co., Mala.
llOAIINti.
Mn. J. 0. Owta. " toond.
CARRIAUKN. BTJUUI Kft, ETC.
Woodruff Co., Main.
(LOTHIXU AND ilKNTS' I'lBNISU
I.VU C100I.B.
Sproule Motown, ml Mala, under Wor
ihaui Homo.
tOXFI.CTIOSERS.
Aucuit Barton, Poplar and Fourth.
COMMIMNIO HKRC1IANTM.
Vn, K. Yealutan, Produce, flour, Canned
Gondi, Tobacco, etc.. 11 Monroe.
Kirt and, Pollard k t o., SAll Front.
DENTIST.
Dr. J. 0. Harris 217 be- ond.
DOCTORS.
Dr. W. T. Bailey office lol Matnj re.ld.nc
In Chelae.
ItOTY'ft WASHINO MACIUJIEa.
Wheeler, Pioti ana Co.. H-'O Main.
DBrOOIHTS.
Rohert Battlar, M Main. ..,..
II. C. bteever, corner beoond and Madison.
DBT UOODN.
Southern Palaoe-flowell. Wood k Co., SSJ
M'n OROCERM.
John K. Lytl 4 Co., 143 Foplar.
page A Co.. 18. Poplar.
IIAIRDRENHING SALOONS.
The Garibaldi, 67 Jefferson: P. Ingignlrl,
Proprietors Joseph Llpari, Foreman.
HARDWARE.
Allison Brothora. 270 front.
OrfiH Bro. 4 Co.,8U Front.
II. Weltor4 Co.. 13 and 1& f ".
MoCoinh. 4 Co., S224 and 324 Main.
HIDES AND LEATHER.'
Philter A Co., Adamn. bet. Front and Wator.
HOTELS. '',.,
Central Hotol, f Adamai tfardwtek, Haight
it Patterson Pro'rs. 4 :
INSIRAXCE.
St. Louis Mutual Liio, MoMahon 4 Otu. 43
"cJJin"-. Mb In.. C... Sl Main, M. J.
Wick. Pri-i'ti W. K. Boyle, Sec y.
Vredcnburgh 4 Sylvester, 21 ! Madison.
Desoto Ins. and Trust Co.. 42 Madison; J.O.
Lonsdale. Sec'y ; W. M. F arring .Pree't.
II. A. Littleton A Co., Asenov. ;2 Mad'.oo.
People's Insurance Company. 18 Madison.
Speed 4 Carpenter, agent Conn. Mutual
Life, 4" Madison.
ji stices or the peace.
Michael Foley, 1!4 Main, up ilaira.
Walter Stanley; Navy Yard.
Patrick Sherry, t Adams, up stairs.
LAWYERS.
Adami 4 GHsann. 114 Main, up stairs.
LITEBT STABLES.
J. A. Forrest, 42 Adams.
Joe Feligman. 68 Union, corner Third.
. C. H. Bracket! 4 Co.. 8 1 and S3 Second.
MEATS AND VEGETABLES.
68 Jeilerson it. markei-the but of all kindi.
MILLINEBY OOODS.
Vance A C .. wholesale, I6l Main.
MEMPHIS STEAM DTEIWG.
B. A. Uollonbarg A U.,212 Baal and 20 Seo-
md' MERCHANT TAILOBS.
Murray iudgely. 31 Maduon.
PBODCCE AND COMMISSION.'
Black, Camron 4 Co., 24t) Front.
PIANO DEALERS. ,
Leopold Gotp I. agent. Knali a, 375 Main.
PICT V RE GALLERIES.
W. E. Craver, 2lJ(l M in, Clrk's Marble Bl k.
SEED STORE.
E.G. Craig 4 Co., Main. v
SEWIKG MACHINES.
Singer Manufacturing Company, 2i& Main.
H.overABakere.St IMjn.
Star t-huttle Company. M Second.
Wheeler ft Wilaon's high, at premium Lock
stitch Sawing Machine, 2sfl ecoud.
SHOE FINDINGS, HIDES, ETC.
Sohnbler 4 Co.. 7 Adu. . .
TEMPEBANCE.
Department deputy, bona of Temperance,
X. II. Cocka, 2Vfri Mam.
TOBACCONISTS.
Thurmond, Km tor 4 Co., 7 Monroe.
I'NDERTAKERS.
Flaherty A Wa.eh, ill beooad.
WALL PAPER, ETC.
Marcua Jones. 2MA second.
J.Uiieshaber, 37 Main.
WATCHES AND JEWELRY.
H. Seehanaeu, H45econd.
WHOLESALE GROCERS AND COT
XON f ACTORS.
Toof. Phillipa 4 Co., 26o Front, corner Court,
Grocers, Cotton i'aotor. and CommiBiion Mer
chants. WOOD AND WILLOW WAKE.
Cickena A Co., !0 Main.
BBUtU CUAPhL tMiXrHUIoi).CWB,
licrnanuo ana tiiououBvr".
15
AKNAKIi A BAHNUM, SCHOOL FUR
., nkln UlllllA. n I1HHI I TBDl. if
TLAPP VANCE A AN1)EK80. ATl'Otl
C nlys-at-Law. Selden Building. 16 MadUon
treet. Memphif. Xenn.
Kj Second and Adama st.. Rer. Dr. White.
c
-,L.i.ruiT. MKTHODIST CHURCH, 17
Union atreei. kbt. j. x. v. ), y
c
1UR1ST1AN CHUKCH. COR. LINDKN
and Mulberry atreentyeurw
c
0N REttATION A'L UN ION CHURCH.
Union atreet, oet. imm u ij-vw
c
0N0RK(iATI0N BKN EMKTH IISRA-
Kill l Q, COr, nWUUH uu ihtiiiu.
.. t pi, p u L- anvrc.RTAW
j Church. Court at., bet. Second and Third.
EAN 4 CO. WM..MAND lJ8' POPLAR
street, dealers in Grooenea, Teaa, etc.
TICKINSON. WILLIAMS CO. COTTON
I J Factors. 20 rront urecv.
FHlRSTlETHODIST CHURCH. SECOND
atreet, near roniax.
THIRST BAPTIST CHURCH, SECOND
Bt.. rear A'laina. Rev. A. B Miller.
THIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. COR.
of Poelar and Third streets
F- Tannery, joseph. practical
plumber, Oal nd Steam Pipe 1 itter, 53
Jonerson street
IRACE CHURCH ItSHlSUUf AM,
I t n.ndn afreet, bet. Pontotoc and Vance.
H
AY'S COAL COMPANY BEST PITTS-
bur Coal. 2( main airem.
IT
TRNANDO INSURANCE COMPANY
KSslVLEVY A CO., DRY GOODS, Etc.,
Main atreet.
TAMES4R00SA,MANLFUTl''rie-no yr
f I Farm and Spripg Wagons, MJfa?!L!ih
ADAMK ANNA. FORTUNE-TKLLbK.
Tin. ft3 flayoao atreet.
M
cCAFFBFY A C0KNEUU8, UNDER-
j n av 7 I r. a
a.u. QisA Q ' flftn n at rant
Tlf EMPHIS 4 0HI0 R
lV 1 of Main street.
EM PHIS 4 OHIO RAILROAD DEPOT.
M" (KIRK 4 WKSTriNPrR ANCR AG'TS,
N. W. eorMain and Madiaon sa.
TllCiKKtTED. BURKE, ATTORNEY AT
J La and Solicitor In Bankruptcy. Office,
jjp .irmirthniiae. cr. Ueion ard Second ata.
ViAINT STORK. PAINTERS' MATERI
I als. McDonal4C.44Jonroeat.
1
"0LICK rOM MlhSIONERS OFlTlClt. 0.
44 WalSnn rirmr- m
IrrsTOFFICK. COR. JEFFERSON AND
a . . U tS IAaitiiataV
9
"TACKEN BT'SH. C. PEALF.R IN SASH.
Dnnra nn minra ,! rromn
OYSTER, TBEZEVANT A CO., AUC-
tioneer. zr rwnn airecv.
B- TjSSELL'S PRIVATE MEDICAL DIS
penaarr. 40 and 42 Vorth Court atreet.
fsSEf.LToROVB A CO., GAYOSO PLA-
ning Mill, S12 Adams strevt, east of the
Baycn
SECOND
Mr. Ml
1H WRYTERIAV
CHURCH.
r. i ' ' . i . :
ror. Main and
nT PATRICK'S CHURCH (CATHOLIC)
O eornrr Ileaoto and Linden atreeta.
iStPETER'SflirRCH (CATHOLIC). COR.
n Adm and Th'" tr .
CT. MARY'SOKKMAS l mipkcii tUAiii-
I OLICI, cor. Ma'rkH a'd Third atreeta.
eTTLAZARl. CHl-RCH. (EPISCOPAL),
Rl-. CHl Rril (KI
, .trrot. et of Third.
p Madi.on
PM,lr ret. pear Alahama.
ivTpAf'CO AND ClVfARR-A LARiIK AND
I aoperi"r 't, ck at Thnrnicnd. FosterACo. a
TnVacenci'ts. T Mnnroejtwt.
TlFlTn VORK A CO.. STEAM JOB PRIN-
V t. n Vadi-r.n-iTt.
rlOMAS-. S. P.. ATT'iRNFY. OFKICK.
I .with Wright McKiaaick). Kit Will'ama
Tli.-tr " T -
II. I GUION,
WITS
BOTHTLR, TBEIETANT A CO,
Ko. r SEC05D STREET.
(in L-.l aed Ue Ullertirr of
raaU.
D:
Of.
B Wliltmoro A Co.
VOL. VI.
PUBLIC LEDGER.
rOILMiUD
KVXRT AFTERNOON. EXCEPT SUNDAY.
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AT
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AI1 letters, whother upen business or
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WHITMOHB ft CO.I
Pnhlihcra and Proprietors.
For the Public LiDoaa.
The La.t Drink ! The Lai t Drop!
There is'iomething lad and melan
choly associated with the above caption.
The last drink, or the last drop. To some
it is a key-note of sorrow of the deepest
kind, filling the heart with unutterable
grief It is a separation ofitimes of kin
dred spirits, sools and companions, for
ever from life. It is the dividing line
between time and eternity between life
and death. The last; how sad in many
things and to many people. The sad
part is not to be portrayed; there is
another side of the picture to look at, for
there is brightness in partings and there
is pleasure in sadness. The last drink T
Is it so that the last drink has been taken ?
Yes; it is true. Well, then, the man is
a' man again; the bonds that did bind
him have been rent asunder, and the
body and spirit of the drunkard is once
more free; yes, free to walk in the sun
light of the days the starlight of the
night; to move and act on the earth and
among men as a man, and enjoy the
pleasures of life in their fullness. The
last drink is it so? Yes. Then look
at the smiling faces of the little loved but
neglected ones at home. See how fondly
they cluster around the redeemed father
when his day's work is finished and he
returns home. 'Hear their jovial prattle;
listen to their voices, full of sweetness
and gladness. The last drink baa been
taken. What a change has taken place I
But this is not all the change that has
been wrought. You look inside and
observe the little ones who are so happy
at home because pa has taken his last
drink. You see the fond and loving wife,
the devoted mother, wreathed, as it were,
in smiles of joy and beauty, full of love
and earthly bliss, seated at home with her
little cherished ones all happy. What
a pleasant picture to look on I Who
would not admire and love to behold such
a bright picture? Yet it is so. The change
has been made, because the last drink has
bsen taken. The cup that once was so
fondly loved has been dashed to the
earth, and broken into fragments.
f B
Signs. Members of Congress are beginning to
see that Congress is not exactly tne
American Government. This is well.
The sooner the majority in that repre
sentative body clearly understand the
fact, which is daily becoming more fa
miliar and better nndentood by men oT
all parties, who make and unmake mem
bers of Congrass, we shall the sooner get
back to onr normal condition as a free
people, living nnder representative gov
ernment. The signs of the times are,
that the voters generally throughout the
United Stales have had enough of Con
gressional humbug. Congressional tyr
anny and Congressional repudiation of
sacred constitutional obligations. Every
day Congress is widening the bfeach be
tween them and the people, and, as they
are not likely to follow sonnd advice, and
atill persist in punning illegal means of
perpetuating their own power, con
centrated as it is in the bands of a few
andacions leader., we presume that noth
ing can stay the irrrepreaaible conflict.
These short-sighted Kdical leaders
have, all along, fancied that by grasping
more unlawful power and wielding it
over the heads of the people, they were
strengthening them.elves as rulers.
Never was there a greater mistake, it is
this which is estranging Republicans by
thousands from their support. It is Ibis
very foolish and outrageous conduct,
that is rolling op the majorities against
Radicalism all over the North. Their
attempted usurpation of tbe prerogatives
of the President and Supreme Court, is
losing them, as it ought, tbe support or
all reasonable men all over the Cnion.
The aicoi of the times are, that Radical
dominatioa is about to be checked and
abruptly terminated by the white people
of the L oiled States- PiiUburg ot
Mr- Ual.lead. editor of the Cincinnati
Commercial, thus writes about l essen-
den :
" Senator Ff aen?eu has said within a
day or two that be did not intend to per
jure himself to pleas anybody; and be
also remarked, pleasantly, to a frieed,
that be expected befur log to be, tbe
most anpopalar till i X England-"
MEMPHIS. TENNESSEE, WEDNESDAY
Bpiculatlom as to th Verdict.
J, B. 8., tbe Washington correspondent
of tbe New York World, conjectures as
follows :
It has never been difficult to name the
Radicals in the Senate who were almost
certain to sustain the impeachment.
They are in order as follows :
Wade, Chandler, Howard, Sumner,
Drake, Thayer, Conness, Nye, Stewart,
Wilson, Morton, Morgan, Freylinnbiivien,
Williams, Cameron, Cattell, Ferry, Yates,
Willey, Tipton, Morrill, of Vermont,
Howe, Patterson, of New Hampshire,
Cole, Cragin, Conklin, Pomeroy, Corbett
and Ramsey.
Tbe Senators heretofore regarded as
doubtful were Fessenden, Trumbull,
Edmtinds, Crimea, . Fowler, Sprague,
Ross, Anthony, Van Winkle, Norton,
Harlan, Henderson, Sherman, and Mor
rill, of Maine. This list of doubtful
Senators has now dwindled until it hardly
includes tbe following names:
Feasenden, Trumbull, Grimes, Fowler,
Van Winkle, Sprague, Anthony, Ross,
Norton, Edmunds, and Morrill, of Maine.
A very few of tbe Senators above
named have been expected to judge this
case according to law and equity, thrust
ing politics temporarily aside. The
newspapers of the conutry have teemed
with dissertations npon the supposed
virtue of men like Fsssenden, Trumbull
and Edmonds; and the Democratic jour
nals especially have indulged the pre
snmption that they would manifest some
regard for the verdict of history npon
themselves.
But other and more publio considera
tions have beea uppermost in tbe mind
of even tbe most eminent respected con
servative Republicans in the Chamber.
Mr. Wade, to whom the epithet of
"honest was strangely applied some
time, in the pae,t, has the reputation here
of being any thing but a trutbtul or
worthy man. I don't propose to speak
of his execrable manners, bis notorious
profanity or ill temper, or bis unfitness
by reason of a general lack of the ameni
ties' which befit a man in high station to
assume the Presidential chair, I merely
allude to the fact that he is hated and
despised by a good many Republican
members of the Senate, some of whom
have hesitated to rick the fortunes of the
party at this critical juncture in his
bands.
Butler and his friends have been con
fiiient, from the first, of tbe success of
the impeachment. It is understood, now,
that, on the strength of information con
veyed privately to New York, certain
operators in Wall stree', not wholly un
acauainted with tbe designs of the virtu
ous Managers, are prepared to speculate
upon the' slight rise in gold which might
be caused by a verdict of guilty.
Some of the means adopted to influ
ence doubtful Senators are so despicable
that it is to be boDed, for tbe sake of
justice, tbey may sometime be fully ex
nosed. Agents have been employed in
various States to highten the political
pressure brought to bear npon the Sena
tors, by procuring letters to be addressed
to tbem'filled with all sorts of promises,
intimidations and threats. Anonymous
and forged notes have reached Senators,
hinting, in the event of the failure of the
latter to vote for conviciion, at a possi
ble public disclosure of some of their
mot intimate nrivate concerns. Even
the wives, or the female "friends," of
Senators have been, in a few instances,
approached and solicited to use their in
fluence. The spies, voluntary and en
gaged, who have busied themselves with
the attempt to extract from Senators and
their intimates some expression of their
opinion of intent, are a legion of both
sexes.
While the Court is in session, little
pages flit from time to time through the
noiseless doorway, bringing cards and
missives. From time to time a Senator
quits bis seat, and is " seen '' in the cor
ridor or in the marble room, by a curious
and persuasive politician. At nigUt,
after the Court adjourns, a multitude of
secret conclaves are held in libraries,
parlors, and nooks about the public
places of hotels. Then gambling saloons
and worse retreats are populous with
Congressmen and politicians from East,
West, North and South. Then alt the
varieties of tbe situation are canvassxd ;
rumors and opinions diverse and strange
load the air. A subtle and corrupt
diplomacy is at work in the dark hours
nntil late bedtime throughout Washing
ton. Mr. Fessenden is still counted npon by
the President' a.friends to vote against the
impeachment. He is a very reticent
man, but there is a report that he said at
his boarding place, a few days ago, in tbe
course of a general conversation upon
political affairs, that "within a fortnight
he would be tbe most unpopular man in
Maine." " Only this, and nothing more."
Mr. Trnmbull is spoken of on both sides
as a "slippery" person. That appears
to be the chief reason why he is expected
to vote for acquittal. Mr. Grimes' "hon
esty" is alleged by those who are san
guine that hewill vote as he wants to,
without regard to the behest of his party.
Mr. Tan Winkle is distroate i even by the
Radicals, and is claimed by the enemies
of the impeachment as one of the Sen
ators who are pretty certain to vote not
guilty. The hope that Mr. Sprague will
vote with the minority is based partly
upon the conservative tendencies he has
occasionally manifested, and partly upon
his relation to his father-in-law, tbe Chief
Justice, who is presumed to be adverse
to tbe conviction of the President,
But Mr. Sprague, although tbe young
eat member of the Senate, is a man of
far more independence of character and
jadgmeot than he i usually credited for.
He is certaiuly o tbrall of the Chief
Justice, and is enabled by bis immense
wealth and superior position in hi own
Start) of Rhode Island to be his own
master in every respect. Leaving ont
of tbe question a thought that be will
vote strictly according to his conviction,
I fear that be is a Radical too aspiring, if
not too shrewd, 10 haaard his standing
in the party by theconrae expected from
him. If this fear is well founded, neither
can Mr. Anthony, who, it baa been some,
times aaserled, would vote with Mr.
Sprague, be claimed as an anti im
jwacber. Quite as mach stres has been
laid upon the idea that ty- Ron will
vote for acquittal as opoa iae aopporel
kindred intention of a'y Radical Sena
tor. But there ia aot th .lightest appa
rent proof ia aapport of tbia idea, and I
confer to have o faith in it Mr. Nor
ton. Mr. Elmonds and Mr. Morrill, of
Maiae, may vote aot guilty I doubt it,
but am willing, together with all friend,
of the President . , o indulge a
faint bop ia that behalf. Mr. Sherman
is a Seaator concerning whom there are j
o many opposite opinion, that perhaps
CITY CIBCTJUITION.
be ought still to be in the column of
possible incorruptibles.
It thus appears that of twelve Senators
whose votes are claimed or hoped for by
tbe managers of tbe impeachment, at d
also by the President's supporters, hardly
one can be claimed as certain for the
President. Besides the insecurity of tbe
expectations concerning these Senators,
tome of the Radioals here pretend to an
ticipate that Reverdy Johnson, who it
olassed with tbe Democrats, it just as
likely as not to cast bit vote for convic
tion. But that, of course, is mere specu
lation. There remains, indeed, when this con
tradictory talk about Conservative Sena
tori is sifted to the bottom, little else but
hope to go by. No one could make this
admission with more regret than I, who
have consistently striven to discover, ao
cept and define, for the encouragement
of the readers of the World, every valid
proof and argument in favor of tbe cer
tainty of acquittal.
The Example of T.nnene.
From th Baltimore Sun, May 4.
Tbe announcement by Gov. Brownlow
of his determination to call out the mi
litia of tbe State to suppress disorder
and preserve tbe public peace, is not a
very favorable symptom of the workings
of reconstruction in the model State in
which the proscriptive principles which
Congress has since embodied in the laws
for other Southern States, were first put
in operation. In fact, so deplorable is
the state of things in Tennessee that
even that leading Republican journal,
the New York Timet, is compelled to
declare that '' the condition of Tennes
see is far worse than that of any other
Southern State." The Timet adds:
" The violence of political parties, the
operations of secret societies, the feuds of
families and factions, the animosity be
tween tbe white and black races, the bit
terness against the Brownlow govern
ment and the Brownlow policy have
brought about a state of afTiirs in which
life is unsafe, society is in constant dis
turbance and industry is seriously pros
trated. We have recently bad accounts
from gentlemen conversant with matters
in the middle and western poriions of the
State, which have given us a more vivid
idea of anarchy than anything that we
bave ever before heard of in the United
States."
Such, then, is the result of the sweep
ing disfranchisement of whites and en
franchisement of freedmen, of the strin
gent despotism and ferocious spirit in
which Tennessee has been governed.
Instead of bringing about pacification,
or even order, Tennessee is now, Bfter
three years of Brownlowism, in a condi
tion bordering upon anarchy, and re
quiring tbe militia to be called out to
preevrve society from chaos.
When the Border State Republican
Convention assembled in this city last
summer, Mr. Maynard, one of the mem
bers from Tennessee, made a speech, in
which he declares that " when Tennessee
acceded to the simple -proposition of
legislating for the people lor human
beings then all tbe difficulties of race
and complexion and condition disap
peared. And so it will be throughout
this vast country when we reach that
simple altitude.. All the difficulties that
bave shaken us with a tempest will dis
appear and be at an end." Read by the
light of actual events in Tennessee, we
may see exactly what this twaddle, and
much of the same kind from oth-.r Radi
cal sources, was worth. Mr. Maynard
was perfectly right iu saying that such
as the state of things is in Tennessee,
" so it will be throughout the whole coun
try," when it is reconstructed on the
same principles- Most of the Southern
States, through the machinery of the re
construction conventions, will soon be in
tbe same political condition as Tennes
see, and tbe Border States are invited to
the same entertainment; and there are
those who would force it upon them if
they will not accept it voluntarily. What
a piospect for tbe South and the nation I
The fairest section of the land consigned
to anarchy, or eUe the heavy burthen of
taxation must be increased to keep up a
large standing army for the purpose of
preventing the militia, so-called, of the
South from being overpowered by an out
raged and persecuted people-
The Crowning Disgraca.
Last week we commented with some
severity on the conduct of the military
towards certain friends and schoolmates
of ours, at that time confined in a little
six by nine dungeon in oeima. l ney
are in the dungeon no longer. They
were taken thence last Monday, hand
cuffed in pairs, like felons, and carried
to a loathsome, enn-parchel, fever
stricken prison, perhaps to die- Just so
long at the English language shall be
spoken among men, will this diabolical,
wicked, tyrannical, inhuman outrage
shed a food of lava-like condem
nation and infamous reproach upon
the American name. The finding of the
court in the case of the Eutaw prisoners
would disgrace even the annals of the
French revolution. With no evidence of
aov importance before them, except tbe
details of a perjured villain the ton of
the thief who was whipped these irre
sponsible despot have consigned to an
unnecessarily cruel and ignominious
doom, some of the best and most virtuous
young men of the South. Oh, Poland!
Ob, Hungary I Oh, Ieelandt How blessed
your station and how kind your fate,
compared with oars.
Tbe general feeling among onr people
is that of the most interne indignation
and horror. We bave heard but one ex
pression among all with whom we have
conversed on this subject Tbe unani
mous decision of the white race it em
bodied in that expression) "Should I
ever be led into a difficulty with any one
of these thieving, ineendiary sooundrels.
either he or I must du in the encounter I
Think of it, freemen of the North I
Your Sonthexo fellow -cit'tens, for an
insignificant offense a miaereble, petty
misdemeanor handcuffed lik lelons,
treated like dogs, snatched from homo,
friends and kindred, almost without
warning, condemoed to oara laoor, an
enormou fine, and tent far away to a
distant and pestilential dangeon by a
set of rpaaletted tyrant oa the perjured
testimony of a thieving.villain to rot
to wither to die, if need be, for no
other reason at heart than that dying
Radicalism may revive and flourish
oa it, mooo) oi in political oppo
nents. Tb' are hundreds of jails
in, and acjareot to Alabama. There
as no earthly need tor sending tnee
yoaag mea (aitnouga tnej naj oeen
aieejx-d in guilt) oauid of th Slate for
ioceret-ratioe and punishment. Tbey
were ent to th Dry lortugaa, therefor,
imp'y for sacrifice. Is it your will that
EDGEI
U JLU
EVENING, MAY 13, 186S.
we shall submit qu'etly to this and simi
lar outrages now preparing? Is your
spirit so basely contemptible at to lead
yoa to thus insult, degrade and murder
your fellow-countrymen ? If not, in tbe
name of God and of justice, speak at
once, and speak in a voice that tyrantt
can neither fail to hear nor ditregard-
Marion Commonwealth.
014 Prices of Living.
In these dayt of high prices it will be
refreshing or tantalixiog, as tbe case may
be, to know the prices our English fore
fathers paid for their meats, bread and
batter. Ia 1130 bread enough to feed a
hundred men one day cost twenty-five
cents, and a sheep sold for eight cents.
In 1200 tbe price of the best wines was
raited to twenty cents a quart, to enable
the dealers to live by them. One cent
loaves of white bread varied from aix
teen to oinety-iix ouncet in weight,
according to the price of grain. Wheat
wat three cents a bnihel in 1286. The
law fied the price of two pullets at three
cent.: and a fat lamb from twelve to
eight cents, according to the season of
the year, 1299. In 1313 Parliament fixed
the price of a fat ox at about twelve dol
lars; or, if cora-fed, at eighteen dollars;
a shorn sheep at one dollar twenty-five
cents; eggs at three centtaaozen; ana
other aruciet of breadstuffi, etc, con
tinning at the prices given above. In
1307 tbe best wine coat five dollars a 'on.
Wheat wat thirty-seven cenU a bushel in
1390, and this was deemed a famine
price by tbe bistoriani of that period,
who designate that year at " the dearth
year." Ia the time of Henry the Eighth
beef and pork settled down to a cent a
pound, and veal at a cent andabalf.
Three pint of milk were told for a cent
The best of it wat that these prices were
fixed by law, and so placed out of the
reach of speculators, though people
grumbled at the enormous rates, a they
thought them, as they do bow. These
prices are reduced, for convenience, from
sterling to federal money.
Democratic Stat' Convention.
By direction of the Democratic Cen
tral Committee, a State Convention it
called, to assemble at the city of Nash
ville, on the 9th day of June, 1863, for
the purpose of appointing delegates to
attend the National Democratic Conven
tion, which will meet at the city of New
York, on the 4th of July next.
Tbe people of the different countiet
throughout the State are requested to
hold county conventions and appoint
delegate! to represent them in said State
Convention.
All persons opposed to the policy of
the Radical parly are cordially invited to
participate.
Democratic and Conservative newspa
pers of tbe State are requested to publish
this call- By order of the Committee.
Taos. R. Jennings, Cbm'n.
I D. WaI.XKB, Secretary
DRY GOODS.
CO
C3
53
C3
O
PC
CQ
cc
CO
f2ewf
jffliiaj
aawe
ST j
UJ
Flncn Oenta Per Week.
NO. 61.
s. Mccirrair.
KcCAFFRKT & CORNELIUS,
GENERAL
UNDERTAKERS
EMBALMERS OF THE DEAD,
HO. 300 SECOND ST. NEAR IRONROE,
MEMPHIS, : i t
TENNESSEE.
M
KTALLIC CA8K9 AWD CA8KKT3 AND
WHITMORE & CO.,
Froprtatort of tbe
PUBLIC LEDGER
STKA9I
PRINTING WORKS,
No. 13 Madison Street,
A KB DAILY EXECUTING ALL KIND
of
JOB PRINTING,
IN A STYLE
Unapproachable In this Market
AND AI
LOWER RATES
THAN1ULL COMPETITORS
Our eld vatrona know ni appreciate tbe
abore tacts, and au we asa oi eiuen u in
them to
GIVE US A. TRIAL t
Tbe Fastest Tresses,
Newest Styles of Type
Large Stock of Slatlonerj,
Eucedlngly Lot Cent,
Together with the larg patrons extreme
nailer It ia ear fewer to offer lade
aaeat. ia aria, which ear watpetiteo
afford te kit,
gSlafwM.DEANCoJ - fij'g
g H i-i-i wM-jaadiDii.ia j y.4 S 5 J
- a tJ? I CHOICE GROCERIES, TEAS 13 P"&
g S4 provisions. j 9 :h
g :- J I
U N D E RTAKERS.- j TRANSPORTATION.
w. a. coaKLics,
m?1-jrXZlI
"nfA-n ' -m lULiJll 11113 0 liUUlOllLLLj
. X. IX. MIOOIT,
iVttornoy - at - Law,
OS Valval IP", njMMlt Hnnlelpstl
Oure
HuWl,
MEMPHIS.
TKNNFRPFK.
UV T1-1.4V
M .li N K L Li ,
. CORX DOCTOH,
I'M ! Mia, 1M kfltr4,
TJp Stain, oornor of Waihlngton.
row Oneranted ! V-V -
Quickest Route East
IS BT TUB
RAILROAD LINE I
Oaily OS) llonre and OS Mlow te to Hew
York, 20 1-a flours to LoulavUl),
11 S-4 Hoars to UTaahvillo,
and SI 1-a Hoars to
St. Loots.
Doable Dally Trains Continued.
BOTH TRAINS MAKT!7(J DTRKCT
1 broach Connections to all Eastern Citi'S,
an advantage offered bj no other route (rota
Memphis.
Coratneneina; Honday, April 97, 1MH,
Trains will leare Memphis as follows :
Slorntna; Express, 7:00 avsat.
ingot Express,
4:00 p. in.
The 7-M a.m. Mornlnt Express reaches Lciii
Tflleat 4:"fl a m., Indiannpol'a at 10 a.m., Cin
cinnati at 12 nmn, and New Yrk ir:l o m.,
the nnt Uj,7 Hours sand 40 Nlnotes In
adsante of Kay fr tn learioe Memphis the
same day by other roui.i, and with Doe Night
Less Railroad T rural.
tbe 4:00 n.m. Night Fxpre arrira at Leals.
Till" at 12:30 p.m.. NasbrilH at r:43a.m , St.
Louis at 1:311 p.m., thenextdty Kaaiera pas
songers t kin. thia Train bare cb"ii- r f route,
fro n Loui-Yi'le eithT by thn JtffVtrsonville
Railroad aia Cinninuali or Indianapolis w ihe
Unite! States Mail Lini S"araer vie Cincin
nati, reaching Now York the seoend morning
eleven hours and fifteen minutea in advance of
Kaasen.ers taking night trin fiom Memphis
yany other route, and w.th one tight les.
railro d trarol.
THROUGH TtCKKTS. at ReWrt Rates,
can be procured at the Company's Office, 2XS
Main .treet, corner of Jefferson, or at Jepot,
head of Main .treet; also, at laverton Ho el,
and of l.arry Harm tad A Co .corner of Main
and Madison street.
RaiiK-age Chocked at Depot or by the
Memphia City Transfer Company, at Hotels,
Private Ke-ider ces. or en board boat, arriving
at Memphi. to all princinal re-tern Ci i'S.
RAM. It. JONES, Sm erinlendent.
ASA HILL, Pataenrer Ar-nt. 4H-t
FREIGHT XOTICE!
To
Merchants!
SAVE INSURANCE
ALL RAIL ROUTE
"VIA.
Memphis & Charleston Railroad
AND CONNECTIONS,
BETWKKN NEW YORK, ROSTOV. PHIL
adelphia, Baltimore, and Memphis, Tena.,
and the (feat Southwest. Le'S Hauling or
Freight. I Quicker Time I Shorter Itiatanee t
And a. Low Ratea as by any nther line. All
claims for loss or damage promptly settled at
po'nt. of delivery. For further information
apply to -
C. S. SAWYER, Oen'l Ag't, 378 Main St.
A. J. LOWE, Agent at Dennt, or to
W. J. RON A,
Ocoeral Superintendent,
J. r. LOPEZ,
General f'rt. Ag-eat,
4P Memphis Charleaton R. R.
MARCH, 18H8: NQW READY, THE Fol
lowing work, containing 10:tM closely
printed, large octavo pages, well bound in law
heep. Price, $10 :
THE LAW REGISTER! eomprUing all the
lawyers in the United States.
ME STATE RECORD: containing the State
and county officers, the organisation, juris
diction, and term, of the Court for every
nun sn. aemiory.
THE OFFICIAL DIRECTORY for the United
s
tttates ; ntaining the officers of th. Federal
Governmen t, thedutieaofthe several Depart
menta, ske'enes of all the member, of Con
gress, the officers and ternu of the Federal
uourta.
THE COLLECTOR'S ASSISTANT: giving
the lawa for collectingdeh'., executing deeds,
verifying claims and takic testimony, with
forms for every btate ; with much other aae
ful information ; the whole constituting aa
Official and Busine. Manual.
Prepared from official returns by John Liv
ingston, of the New York bar. Secretary of tb
Merchants' Union Law Cempany. New York:
Published by the Mercbauto Union Law Com
pauy. No. 124 Br adwav, third floor (ia the
American Fzchanre National Bank Buildina).
The honk will be sent, prepaid, te any ad
drrss ia the I'nited State, on receipt of tea
dollar: or, it will be forwarded by expreea,
with biil, to be paid on delivery.
From Alex. W. Randall, Poatmastee General ; x
St. John B. L. Skinner. Hr Assistant Post
master General ; Joseph II. Blacktan, Chief
Clerk Postofiice Department.
WiSRittOTOM, D.C., Febraary 34, l?.
John Livingston, Esq., Secretary Merchants'
Union Law Company, New Yorki
Plia 8ia: Your new Law RerMer aed 0 fa
cial Directory, juat iaaaed. eppeir. to have
been very carefully prepared, ard we think acay
be of graat aervire in the raD-tio of the
Kaaineaa oi thi. Depa'tment. 1 be work will
doaiiles. prove va'uab:e to everj official,
banker, merchant and ha.ineee mea.
ALEX. W. RAN I'ALL,
Pnetiaa.ter General.
ST. JOWS B. U tK IK N r R.
First Aatant Po.fiaj'e (General.
J'l.-EfH H. .BLACK
Chief Clerk rortjc Department.
From Hen. FRAKCIS K.SPIXNKB, Treara-
rerof the United States.
Waaaiworo.. D. C Febraary Si. W,
Joha Livinratos. Es Secretary Marokaats'
Unioa Lew Co-:
Dia.Sis: Taeaew Law Rerlaterand OK
eial lirctry. jo,l i seed, appear, te bare
bees very carefully prepared, aad se lod it(
g-et acrTice in the transie-ion -f the buiirea.
f tbu Department. W e ihink the work w i 4
prevea valuable acqai. tioa te, and alteald a
aa tbe dee. eL vry promiaent omrial. beak
er, merchant, aad baeinea. r aa.
r. n. m i r. .
5- TreemreT 1'r.i'ed f'aiee.
F. B. niLLlHD,
Jutstlce oT the Peace.
rriCE, Xo.S leaTerwoo er-.
ta-M
U i a a a A a . t

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