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Public ledger. [volume] (Memphis, Tenn.) 1865-1893, April 22, 1870, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85033673/1870-04-22/ed-1/seq-1/

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MATTRASSEJ ANOEIDBIM. , , -C, . , , ' 4 41 k I Hlf 111 R . ' ' 3 7&3' 8
,t.wJ v i-j T) j 7 &;SS Ji-J JJ-J Als vJI JLi JL Uvo 2 melsioiis f
1'CRNITI'RE ESTABtWBMESIT, 1 ' i 0 J
no. 4 com street, ' :TTT77r- nnrcT pttv pjtj PTTT ATI ON " "' Fifteen Cents Per Week. 5 ' xX ' '"' " 4 V
(Next southern Expre.. Co.,) -MEMTHI3. By E. WHITMORE. ' ' I LARGEST CITY CIRCUIiAJLXUJl. c) g j srr 'VX
KudBMMWH ii ...
' BUSINESS HOUSES.
ATTWOOD ft ANUEKNUiN.uoriuw iau
tor and Commission Merchants, 204 Front.
B" TNK"kIKST1!J ATIONAL OF MEMPHIS.
F. B. Davis. Pres'tj Newton Ford,V. P.
BOWMAN. C. H., MACHINIST AND
Scale Fuotor, Vrl Main itreet. Special
attention iriven to repairing scales
RAIO. R. . A.
CO.. SEEDS
J i
Dientx, eta., .179 Main it., Jackson mock.
CATHOMO BOOKSTORE, 312 SECOND ST.,
near Monroe. W.J. Mansford, Prop r.
Madison street., B, 11. looey, -r t;
ET C.
hirk, Cashier.
CAROLINA LIFE INS. CO., 219 MAIN ST,
J. Davis. Pre'ti W. F. Boylo. r.ec'y.
TEaI'PTV AN C E FanDERSON; ATTOK
. J ney-at-Law, aaoMain itreet, Memphis. "
ij rvICKIKriON, WILLIAMS A CO.. COTTON
TpMMONS ft SON, BOOKS,
STATIONERY.
1J Magaz
F- TsHER
and Di
Magazines, etc., lOJefforson and63Beal.
AMIS A CO.. MARBLE-WORKS
d Drain Pipe, cor. Adams and Second.
rtni'pn. T.Knpni.n. aoknt
DEALER
V3T in Organs and Knabe'i Pianos, 375 Main,
G ROVER ft BAKER'S SEWING MA
. chines, 318 Main street. '
H" "EINRICH, P.H. ft BRO.. CONFEC
tions. Groceries, Liquors, etc., 224 Main.
T ITTLETON ft VREDEN BURGH'S IN-
XJ euranoe Agency, 22 Madisontrect,
V EROY, "JTMERCHANT TAILOR, NO. 17
Jj Jefferson St., between Main and tront.
M
cCOMBS, KELLAR BYRNES, HARD-
ward, Uutlery, etc, sayi ana a ain.
ORGILLBROS. ft CO., HARDWARK, UUX
lory. Agricultural ImplemenU, 312 Front.
PODESfA-ft"CAZASSA, DEALERS IN
Confections, etc, 252 Main.conjMonrt.
T5rESC0TT, 0. F. ft C0.( DEALERS IN
X Coal Oil. Lamps, Soaps, etc. 40 Jefferson.
STEAM DYERS ft CLEANERS ,
Hanson ft Walker (late Hunt ft Qa'naon),
JS46 Second itreet. - ; ,
rnERRY 4 MITCHELL, WHOLESALE
' JL dealers mmtehoosaiidHati, 329Main.
HTf 'HITMORE, E., STEAM JOB PRINTER
V 13 Maditon itreet.
INSURANCE.
' .Mttttomont of
1 15ie Home Insnrance Company
oipSrEW HAVEK, cow.,'
JANUARY 1, 1870.
Capital Stock 222'SS2 52
Surplus 786,305 49
, a -s -7 ASSETS : ' T 1 f ..' . i . ' V
Cash ow hani. In banks, and in k
course of transmission.... 5,301
Real Estate owned by the Co 739,500 00
Loaned on mortirajeon real estate 53,800 00
United States Bonds, 5-20 124,503 13
Virginia State Bonds 1 1 ,652
Tennessee State Bonds 10.700 00
Alabama State Bonds 10.000 00
North Carolina State Bond..... 4,7 00
South Carolina State Bond-.. .: -" 1G.600 00
Now Havon City Bonds 55,000 00
National Bank and other New
Haven stocks ,........,... i. 87,730 00
Railroad Bonds - - .350 00
1 H,;tl, .,f,fi1r Anllalrl.
10,090 30
Bills Receivable for inland pre
miums .J..!..-. .,.
' Salvage elaimsdue the Company.:.
Loans on call and sundry accounts
i Agents' balances
40,085 61
; 68,515 a;
16,a4 63
sales, ottice turnuure.anu agency
. suppliei on band.....
Premiums due at home and branch
..:. 29.565 40
ofboea m.
Interest and rents accrued
74,522 12
17,470 60
Total....... $1,786,365 49
' LIABILITIES:
Losses in process of adjustment..!..f 166,133 79
k Premiums reoeived in 1S69..........U 2,106,340 61
Losses paid in 18U9 1,358,907 60
Premiums received sine organ i- "' ,
.fttion 9,415,597 66
Losses paid since organuation 6,275, iU6 i'l
" V. R. SATTERLEE, Preaidont.
SAM'L L. T A LCOTT, p-e-jj.-t.
. CHARLES WILSON, J rresiuents.
t r WM. K. GOODKLL, feecretry. '
E. B. C0WLES, Assistant Secretary.
Statu of TitsNnasgg,
UOIIl'TROLLKR BUKFICK,
Nashville, January 1, 1870.
:-
I, G. W. Blackburn. Comptroller of the
Treasury, do hereby certify that the Home
Insurance Company, located at New Haven, in
tbe "Stale of Connecticut, has produced to me
satisfactory evidence that said Company has
complied with all the requirement of the laws
' of the State of Tennessee imposed on Insu
. ranee Com panioa; and J further certify that
11. T. Toiulinson ft Co., ag'tsofsaid Company,
have also complied with requirements of the
laws of the State, made and provided in such
i uaaes: wherefore, said Home Insuranoe Com
pany has authority to tiike riks and transact
the business of insurance in this State at
Mpmithix- Tennessnfl.
' G. W. BLACKBURN,
Comptroller of Tonncssee.
H. T. T0MLINSdN & C0 AGENTS,
17 MadlMon Hi., IMeinphlii.
XXXVII D1VIDEXDI , ' ,5
Safest, Cheapest System of Insurance.
a, .. j . -.. .
STATEMENT OF THE
Wasliinston Insurance Co.
u ' 172 Broadway, New York.
Cash Capital, . - 9100,000!
' ASSETS, FEBRUARY I, 1870:, f ,
Tnited States, State, City and other
stocks (innrkct value) $.115,121 00
Bonds and Mortgages M,44o SO
ilemand Loans - lift H 0")
Cash 3MT.9S7
I'npaid Premiums. ........... 11.24 ii
.Miscellii0coua........-.- Sl.lta 10
fi,fi97 02
.. 4.SM 00
I'npaid Lones .......
Capital and Surplus IS01.37 tl
A dividend of (8) eight per pent. Is this day
declared payable on demand, in cahh, to stock -holders.
p p TTFRT,KB, President.-' '
IIEXRY WKSTtl.V, Vice President.
WM. K. LOTH HOI. Secretary.
WM. A. St'OTf, Assistant Secretary.
Stt or TNicssiti,
Cohptboi.i.icr Orririt
NaJhvii.lk. January 1, 1K70.
70.)
I, -O. W. Blackburn. Comptroller of the
Treasury, do hereby certify thai the Washing
ton Insnrance Company, located at Xew lork.
iu the State of New York, has produced to me
satisfactory evidence that said Company has
i.mplied with all the requirements of the laws
' of the Slate of Tennessee implied on insurance
companies! and 1 further certify that H. I.
Tomhnsun Co.. agents of said Company,
have also complied with the requirements of
the laws of the rotate, made and provided in
such cases: wherefore, said Insnrance Com
panv has authority to take risks and transact
i he business of iasaranve in this State at Mem
puis. Tennessee. () w I!LACKBURXi
Comptroller of Tennessee.
H. T. lUMLiNoUrt &. IA, AUiJYia,
; 17 Iladisea St., Memphis.
BLACKSMITHS.
rwLir mi-sits. josh stals.
HAURER & CO.
mats ornrso ar
Xo. 207 Poplar Street,
Between North jlarket and High it., a new
Blacksmith and Wagon Shop,
4 Sl A FIR PBKPAREH TO DO '
i sunn work in all iu branches at q
Hie rerv lowcl rate". As we ape prac- I
tiral mechanics of b.ng riH.,sp. :
mi hare lived in Mctnplii lor more than
I ve ve vesrs. we assure the public that we will .
give geaeral utislariioB, and a?k them to riv
us a UuO. 1
VOL. X.
45
u
03
Do you want
l i V.J
; Onr
PUBLIC LEDGER.
TnB PUBLIC LEDGER 18 PUBLISHED
very afternoon (except Sunday) by
tlE" WHITMORR,
At N. 13 Madison street. i ..-
The Pum.ic Lkdokr It ierved to ritv iubcrl
bers by faithful carriers at FIFTEEN CE.ST8
PER WEEK, payable weekly to the enrruers.
By mail (in advance): One year, 4&; iix
months, H ; three months, t-; o'.ie monvth,
7Soenti. r r . i ( i
Newsdealers supplied at VA cen'ti per oopy.
Weekly Public Lodger,
Published every Tuesday at $2 prr annum (in
advance) ; elubi f five or more, 1 6U.
Communications upon subjeots of renml
Interest to the publio are at all times accept
able.. , , t&. K ,;(,. --.M V -. .
Rejected manascrlpU will not be returned .
RATES OP ADVERTISING IN DAILY :
First insertion .$1 00 per square.
Subsequent insertions !0 " "
For one week S 00 " "
For two weeks : 4 SO " "
For three weeks 6 00 " "
For one month.....-,...-........, 7 50
RATES OP ADVERTISINa IN WliEKLT.
First insertion ....SI 00 per square.
Subsequent insertions.. 60 " "
Eiitht lines of nonpareil, solid, oonstitute a
square.
Displayed advertisements will he chanted
aeeordina; to the spauk oeeupieil, at abere
rates there being twelve lines of solid 17 pe to
theinoh. , . ...
Notices in local eolumn inserted for twenty
cents per line fo.r each insertion. ,
Special notices inserted for ten cents f iei line
for each insertion. .
Notices of deaths and marriages, twenty
entt per line.
Advertisements published at interr lis will
be charged one dollar per square for c atch in
sertion. To regular advertisers we offer snpe rior in
dueemonts, both as to rato of chart toti and
manner of displaying their favors,
- All bills for advertising are due when con
tracted and payable on demand.
All letters, whether upon business or other
wise, must be addressed to. . . -
i ; : i .; ' e. whithokii,
: J ' Publisher and Proprietor.
IF WBKIfEW.
If wo knew the woe and heartache
Waiting for us down the nmd.
If our lips could taste the wormwood.
If our hacks could feel Die load,
Would we waste the day in wishing
For a time that ne'or can be?
Would we wish in such impatience k
" For oar ships to come from sea?:
,1 j r . i . "
If we knew the baby fingers
Pressed against the window pane.
Would be cold and stiff to-morrow ,
Never tronble us again '
Would the bright eyes of onr darling
Catch the frown upon our brow ? , .
' Would tho points of rosy fingers
Vex us then a they do now?
1 : Ah, these little ice-cold fingers.
How they point our memories back
To the hasty words and actions
Strewn along our backward track
How these little hands remind us.
As in snowy grace thev lie.
, Not to scatter thorns but roses , "
For our reaping by and by I . t.. . .
Strange we nerer price the music
Till the sweet-roieed bird has flown l ;
Strange that we should slight the vio lets
' Till the lovely flowers are gone ;
Strange that summer skies and sunshine
Never seem one-half so fair.
As when winter's snowy pinions
CL-l.- . I - k:, -i ' .
4
; j A Warsitng; to Tneater-Vo'erm. ' '
An amusing incident occurred tbo
other night at the National Theater,
Washington. In the front row of the par
quette gat a beautiful, bright Uttle boy,
about three andahalfyears old. whose ap
pearance and childish (though jhrewd) re
marks attracted much attention, and who,
with a natural curiosity of childhood, ask
ed he meaning of everything that struck
him as pecnlirr, among which, the large
exodus of gentlemen to tuke " a smile "
was one; he asked the friend who had
him in charge: "Where are all these
people going Is the piny over?" llo
was told they were goiug "to drink."
He watched them file past as he 'looked,
over the front of the pnrquette, and he
took a stout elderly gentleman fairly
aback by asking him in a perfectly audi
ble voice, " Are yon going to take a.
drink?" All in the vicinity fairly yelled
with laughter ana c apped hands w.tn '
delight, doubtless to the astonishment of
o
that portion of the audience who were , ( h Argentine Republic,
not withm hearing of the cause. It .s .3, B, ..oe with Bra7.it. On
feared he old. gentleman by his look j h f A ;, with , Trtly of
thought that some one had prompted the J,1 hca'ptured the city of Cor
child. but such was not the case; U was '".m. Th. Aentines
just as stated above.
A lady from llavti, hr the name
ir.-.: v,- r
Parana, of a tropical hue and decidedly '
exotic appearance, is making a stir out i
est in the character ot a public loetu-
M d aa,CR, .nd .bopomine smitt en with
her charms, took her home with hi m and
' made her his wife. A few days alter
giving birth to her first child tshe died.
! Mrs. Parqua'i father was killed in one of
! the revolutions of the countrv, and the '
j lecturer is the last of her family. An
j nncourtly critic compares her complexion
i to a " Cuba Six " a dark olive, cloudmi
in spots. She has black enri hair,
straight nose, a large mouth, small feet
and hands; is fond of green and orangc
colored silks, and betrays a weakness for
frilled rkrmixr and red flannel peti
coats. Miss Dickinson niut look to he
laurels.
Strong-minded women don't eat eggs.
They can't bear the yolk, you know.
rer. and .seven mentioned as the prob-j M,T '1H(a, the celebrated trip-
able rival of Anna Dickinson herself. ! " gi , b the
Her father was, sea captait ., and com- V" . . f , the Ap.
manded a vessel in the African trade. . P''-'VU,, , i -,'. Th.
: 4 ; MEMPHIS; TENN.: FRIDAY EVENING, APRIL 22, 1870.
Brown Domestics? f If yon do,
J.'!
SEA ! I S L A
-
12 1-2 Cents a Yard.
Domestic Department will not be
.I i nil jaw '?.ri
LOPEZ.
The Unhappy .President
of Pr-
More than once during the long war on
the La Platta, Brazilian reports have
killed the dictator of Paraguay, and his
obituary has beeu printed in the Ameri
can nd European papers. It looks now
as if the story of his capture and death
in the wilds of the Matto Grosso is true.
The report comes by the Bio de Janeiro
monthly packet to Lisbon, and London
dispatches say that the sews is fully con
firmed. 1 - ' )
. The remarkable man who has so long
resisted the conbined efforts of two pow
erful nations, assisted by a third, to ties
stroy his power, was born in Paraguay in
IM9.7 He was the ion of the former
President, Don Carlos Lopez, a man of
i.nrulnr astuteness, enerey ana resolu
tion. Don Carlos succeeded to the des
nnti.t nower of Dr. t'rancia in 1H44.
Paraguay, ever since it threw off the
Span'i ah yoke, was ruled by the imporions
will of one man. Francia was its lord
for thirty years. Before his death was
Announced, the cider Lopez succeeded
in establishing himself as the successor,
and when he died in 18G2, after a san
ormnnrv and oDDressivereizn of eighteen
years, he left by will, according to the
constitution of Francia, the scepter to
hia ann Don Francisco Solano Lopez.
Paraguay, thongh in name a republic,
was never otherwise than a despotic mon.
arnhv. and its ruler was less trammeled
by law and conscience than the master
of the Unent ou tne dbuks oi me uo
nhorus.
. Before the elder Lopes passed away,
he sent his son to Europe to study the
world and to improve his mind and man.
ners. Don Francwco went abroad os
tensibly on a diplomatic mission. He
traveled, as the heirs of rqyal houses are
wont to travel, in, care of a trusted officer
of the court, winch m tins case liappenea
to be an old Italian General, who had
seen much service in the Valley of the
La Plata. The Prince and his guardian
visitor! thn lend iii if cnmtals of the Conti
I nent, and in most places negotiated
commercial treaties. An exaggerated
! nntinn nrpvuilpd in Etiroue. t that time,
I of the value of the growing trado of the
j La Plata, and young Lopez wbb received
I with much consideration. Before he left
! tl, nid World he contracted a domestic
alliance which lasted through all his stib-
I sequent fortunes, both good and baa, ana
! which exerted a material influence upon
the country owr which he was to ruie.
i H mot in Dublin one Eliza Lynch, an
. Irish woman, the wife of a surgeon in the
French army. She left her nusoana ana
' f,,llw,.,l lnez to Paraeuav as his mis
i tress, and became in time the mother of
' his aiv i-hiMren. Her power over -him
i was unlimited. It was the belief of- the
! victims of the dictator's relentless policy
thut Minium e I.vneli influenced him to
i the commission of his tfOTht act of cru
! elty, and nerved him to tha desperate
! roanltitinn to sacrifice the whole Para-
; cuayan people to th cconsummation of
! ins personal ambition
! Lonez became President in 1K62. A
year later he dispatched Senor Herrera
one of the hiyhest naval omcers, to
Europe, with several of the brightest
vounir Paraguayans of European descent.
to study engineering and military discip
line and strategy. When Senor Ilerrera
returned, he carried back a large quan
tity of war material and a score of Eng
lish founders and workmen. This would
seem to indicate that Lopez, at the out
set of his reign, hH warlike designs
upon liis neighbors. The war came in
164. Of eourse the two sides had differ
ent versions of the casus belli. Lopez
charged the Ifrazilians with a violation
of the treaty made with his father for the
maintenance of the ttaiu quo of the La
Plata. Brazil had interfered in Uruguay
in favor of Flores, the leader of the Colo
rado party. The Blanco wer driven
from power, and this it wes that Lopez
proceeded to resent. He seized a Bra
zilian steamer on the La Plata, and thus
broke up the free navigation of the river.
H tii rear all gjie Brazilians living in
Paraguay iw yrison. and then suddenly,
A&ntinn f -ar. invaded
I n nun , " " '
were unprepared for hi advance, as a
treaty was in ' K,y....., .. ....
;ii the case of war between the Argentine
LVpiiblic and Paraguay, hostilities could
n,5t lie commenced without six months'
ironlins Kptlll
Emperor of Brazil took command in per
son. The first battle w as a naval one,
fought in June, on the Parana, and re
sulted ia the driving back of the Para-
Lopes disputed every mile of bis tm-
: nntie mutually exchanged.
.,. nrr 1 be next was toiignt on p ace to sec oi.' " t"- j -- r j V j
fanTSt rrUW8 Ana, in Brazil, and the The hole.' A cWk complaining of 'fever Prince., Mana u prcttv and rich, and .
luies Vere again vic't rio.is. capturing an-1 gspes.' . -que.t. a day's h ave. a. In ! aTSnd -dap.-hiu of Karf August and con-
p- Vr-ri ,zf i u . tv1,
hold TluS on thr- Parana Thf,' The stockholders of the Indian.polU ! and .NapolooU k.QM what h U about''
nlace underwent' a siege of two Tears. I (Indiana) Hotel Company have decided T " " T j-
and T iU d,7ens Vtl.cted the gre.-t I to locate the hotel on lou 10. 11 and 12 "To the parent whow son die. .n
rrHitwtnemrr.ry character of the in square Xo. 4 !-the property of Wm. 'infancy fa the Louisville Conner
Wcutor Not 1 m Jy tbaa4 lives ShJ and the Gold.b-rry heirs-being Journal tUr m.a . be ome.h.ng
ltiX tataW did it fall I?5 feet on Pennilv.ni. Mreet by 20: pnenb.rly soothmg ,n the thought thai,
were saennceu or " . . . , .- , ni,;n .trt The intention no matter what may be the late of the
i-!n inn liHnos oi me sine in kj. ,-" -r - - r . ..
torr. He madfl suuid at junw.inrnirvrT. Fr.,luu.
at 'Tebiquary, and at lat at Vilett.. i ing fliO.OCO to $2y0.wUw.
t:vke a look at an article of 36 Inches wide.
N D C 0 I T 0 IX
A.T -
found wanting in other inducements.
' ' '
Early in 1869 he was routed at the latter
place, and was forced to abandon Asun
cion, the capital, and take to the moun
tains. . During the last year of his rule
at Asuncion he had a diplomatic diffi
culty with Mr. Washburn, the United
States Minister, in consequence of hav
ing arbitrarily imprisoned certain Ameri
can citizens. Mr. Washburn quitted the
capital, and took refuge on board an
American war vessel; but the prisoners
were subsequently released Bfter much
suffering. Mr. W ashbnrn was recalled,
and Gen. McMahon was sent out as Min
ister from the United States. He suc
ceeded in re-establishing friendly rela
tions with Lopez, and remained with him
in his shifting camp until Congress an'
nulled the mission.
After the loss of his .capital the for
tune of Lopez went steadily on the
downward, course. Though driven to
the mountains, he raised new armies and
mi.de new attempts to maintain his. au
thority, f The allied army, commanded
by the Count d'Eu, a son of the French
Duke de Nemours, and son-in-law of the
Emperor of Brazil, pushed him from
position to position. As his forces grew
weaker the ferocity of his nature in
creased. He was implacable toward his
foes, and gave quarter neither to his
firisoners nor the Paraguayans who were
ukewarm in his cause. '" The allies es
tablished at Asuncion a provisional gov
ernment, and the first act of the new
Paraguayan Congress was to declare the
defeated President an outlaw. A price
was set upon his head, and death was
decreed to all who should recognize his
authority. The finishing stroke was at
Ascurra, August 13, 1869. Lopez lost
nearly 7000 men. Thenceforward he was
a fugitive. With a few devoted adherents,
and his mother, children, and mistress,
he penetrated the savage Matto Grosso
district, to the north of Paraguay. From
time to time we have heard of his wan
derings, of his skirmishes with the van
guard of his pursuers, and of his diet of
roots and herbs. A few weeks ago it
was said thut he was striving to make
his way into Bolivia. Now comes the
tidings of his bloody end by the lance of
a Brazilian trooper, after he had defiantly
refused to surrender. He was lijerally
hunted down.
With tho death of Francisco Lopez
rnn.uips rwav the Inst ventire nf "nnrson&l
government" in Paraguay. .It will be
to the interest of the allies to maintain
a constitutional government at Asun
cion. The dictatorship has cost the
little inland nation dearly in treasure
and lives. The six years' war has re
duced it to a desert. The fields are de
stroyed and the cities are in ruins. Out
of a population of over one million souls
it is said that barely one hundred thou
sand remain. The fact is appalling.
Such a destruction of life in six years is
almost unparalled in history. Of the
survivors the great majority are destitute
and actually dependent upon the Brazil
ians for their daily food.
Lopez was only forty-three years old.
In personal appearanco he was like all
the Paraguayans, of mixed blood and
swarthy cotblexion. He was ,;ery fat
and short of stature, and inclined to
sensuality, both in eating and drinking.
Of his extraordinary executive abilities,
his luauajement of the war against such
heavy odd i the best evidence. Whether
it was fear or j,atri,'m that moved the
PniH,nii,rani in immobiii) themselves, it
nnnt he denied tl.stihev rallied around
him after every defeat with unabatud j
confidence. Lopez was generally re -
gardedby the people of this country a
s merciless tyrant, although he hud no , of t(ie ij which is ook'bratod inhc
smnll party of believers. .Many stories j Sl)ring uf th. year, and kept np for sev
of his crueltie are related, and on the: pral ,,. 'j'lirouKliout the dnv the
other hand much has been said of Ins j lal,ri(;"chine.se took to the cemetery
bravery and the devotion of hiR followers. , sort of conveyances, loaded with
It hn beeu ktiled that ven the women
went into the di'tois find fought in his
ense. and that hin men wem ren.ly to
sacrifice everything lor him. Surely the ,
complete, true story of this man s lite
will he an intercoms narrative.
" ."
F unny.
Among the oftVe-aolders in the British ,
provinces in inaia are many natives, ,
who have studied English after fashion. ,
The Madras Athena-urn gives some spec-1 4 J PaPp'' a wnel "cn-imen-
"An ex-sohoolmnster, petition-; Bey qolds lecmved tho d'fpatch ail
ing for a cleskship. promises that '1 and ' nouncing tho reconstruction ot the .Stat',
my family will ever cease to pray to the I he rend it and handed it to a citizen
humble Almighty to shower his blessings 1 with the remark: Here, take your Mote
vnu for ever and ever. Another, .
begging for an increase of salarr on ac-
count of the rise in prices. Jays: 'My
jain and sufferings are impeachable, and i
ie onlr in the comprehension of gentle-
men Ol your Uflnorame uispusmun, rrauj
to open your bowfcU ot compassion to i
sympathise with the afliitWd, lind by es-
tending your gracious hand to shoulder
them from the civil darts of this dear
citv 1 A third makes the following ex- j
cuieforabsenci: ' I'lease excuse attend-
ing office t.wlav, as mv grandmother dis-1
patched her life, and want to go toJirir.s :
im in niAe tLa hiHel strictly first-class in
-, l. ...j- ..I -...i .i.A. ,., ;n i ttiatri ffiHKin nu nsu n. lueiuiie
o
02
K
O
K
t
o
A Lesson for Women sknd tbelr Cor-
respondent. 4
From the New York Star, 1.1th.
The letters in the McFarland-Richard
son case are a history in themselves, and
carry a lesson which it would be well for
both men and women to heed. To wo
men especially, the teaching commends
itself, and we do not mind for once using
our columns to give a bit of advice to
those who evidently need it. Women
not only express themselves in all mat
ters more fully and unreservedly than
men, but they have, in some affairs, a
sort of recklessness peculiar to them
selves, being seldom found among men.
The tendency seems to arise partly from
a kck of the faculty of .foresight, and
partly from a blind belief in the honor
of the person to whom the letter or com
munication is addressed. 1 bey do not
tuke eontintrencies. which may throw
their written thoughts into the hands of
third parties, into consideration, ihey
know, or think they know, that they can
trust their correspondent, and there this
thought ends; they "gush." Thev inno
cently, and, perhaps, with the purest mo
tives, compromise themselves not only,
but their correspondents also. We can
not take up the room at present that
would be required to show explicitly
wherein we think the origin of the evil
lies, but will be satisfied in pointing out
the radical reasons, acd let our readers
judge whether we are right, bv their own
observations or researches. Women are
not educated to the practical affairs of
life as they should be. If they were,
they would deal more with things as they
actually are, and not invest them with
vain imaginings or false sentiment. Wo
men are very much, indeed altogether,
what men have made them, and when
thrown out into more independent and
personally responsible positions, either by
our fuitlilesanuag or piisfortune, are not
always equal to the burden imposed.
We criticise Mrs. Calhoun's letters, not
so much as the letters of n woman, as
letters. In this world, so full of human
(not good) nature, such unreserved
thought should never be committed to
paper; if expressed at all, it should be
only in the spoken and unwitnessed con
fidence of friend with friend. It is bet
tor never to write, beyond the merest
buniiibi. any thought we are not willing
should be bruited world-wide. On the
other baud, let ns say that a strict ad
herence to the first principles of honor
will always determine the cause of the
person in receipt of such letters. Any
letter containing the cordial confidence
of another should, when once its contents
are received, be committed to the flumes.
The thing revealed in secresy may
appear triviul, but to the writer
it may involve much. We do not know
what a day may bring forth. Death may
give to the world things itinocent in
themselves which, viewed throuijh the
jaundiced eyes of envy, or covetousness,
or even idle gossip, would damn an in
nocent man or woman. No doubt there
are lesson: regarding the sanctity of
marriage, the dangerous influence of
bnsy-bodies, wretched hallucinations of
free love and rouriente teachings to lie
learned from the testimony thus far
evolved. But this little matter of honor
and correspondence strikes us as being
particularly appropriate just now, and
we sny: When you speak to the man or
woman you speak to them alone: when
you put your pen in ink apd give your
thoughts to paper, you babble to the
! "S ' V"P"
win Id.
1 T)0 ciiine in
! 0 Sunday. d int., their annual Feast
roast piirs, fruits, pastry, etc. There all
the delicacies were spread over the
craves of drnnrted friends, and around
v .1 .. n i.nPi, an UOWPd number
of ,;,,, Friends were then Invited to
partake with thorn of the refreshments
after which they returned to town. On
Monday the wealthier Chinamen repaired
to the cemetery, and went through the
cert-monies.
. 7
and run it; aim presently auueo: i icei
as if a great weight bad beeu liTled Irora
.me; thank (iod lam through with the
heavier contract i rr uramw..
have done the best I conld. I have a
v,... ... . ....... r- .
iw tr-m.-
- - .
Ittur from John Midoll, wcaieed by
one of his friends in Louisville, says:
" It is now believed that the tntended
wile ot the rnnee imperial is i . me
i nncess ains uouusui mm ,Ic.u.r
and not the daughter of the tmperor of
child irt the next world, it can never be
come a member of a base-ball club in
this."
NO. 4GI
1 W V. R D
RCGCEItOB
MEGIBBEN & BRO.,
Importer and Wholcaalo t'nab Dealpra In
BRANDIES, WINES, LIQUORS,
And
DISTILLATION OP WHISKIES,
NO. 276 SECOND ST.,1 jYRES BLOCK
IMeniphis, - - Tennesse.
Cheapest Dress Goods House
1 3V THE
Grenadine Berege, .
Linen Lawn (fast color), " . ; i
Lonsdale Fine Domestic,-
1,000 dozen Ladles' Hose, '
1,000 dozen Ladles' Handkerchiefs,
And everything in the house will be sold In proportion, at
20-45
THE FAVORITE AND BLACK OAK
ooorciivo STOVES,
NOW 80 WELL AND FAVORABLY KNOWN. CAN BE FOUND AT ALL TIMES,
together with s food assortment of ,
Heating Stoves, Lamps, Tinware,
GRATES, HOLLOW-WARE, ETC.,
: , at .
T . S. J U K E S ,
No, 3Q8 Second Street, MempltlH, TcniiCKseee.
Roofing, Guttering-, Cotton Brands and General Job Work will
rceelre Prompt Attention. 9-3-t
f f IA K canton m yK 2 CO
1 GISOCEKIES t lffj& p
3 S V-I mas and m S
RAILROADS.
Memphis and Louisville R. R.
CONDEMNED TIME TABLE.
TAKES EFFECT FEB. 7. 1870,
Time
Time
Leave
Memphis ... 2.4" p.m.
Humboldt . 7.15 p.m.
4.00 a.m.
8.15 p.m.
Arr. nt
f.ouisville. 9.00 .m.
Cincinnati 2.30 p.ni.
18 00
a -jo
28 50
40 30
4o ,V
37 47
a no
Kl II)
5 2 00
55 110
10.00 p.m.
4.4.) a.m.
3 15 a.m.
3.50 p. m,
10,30 p.m.
I. lii p.m.
tt.U) a in.
1.00 p.m.
9.30 a.m.
12.00 m.
o.OOp.in.
17 45
24 30
Indisnnp s i.JP.iu.
Z 00
Cleveland - 7.30 a.m.
BufTiilo 1.55 p.m.
35 35
42 15
1'ittsbiirs;-.- 4.47 a.m.
Baltimore.. 7.00 p.m.
as 50
62 45
5ti 45
53 15
Wash't'u,...lQ.M) p.m.
I'hilad'a..
T.
0 p.m.
N. York-
10.00 p. I
55 4."
Boston
.11.00 a.m. 68 00
60 45
The 2.45 n.m. train from Memphis leaves
daily. The 4.00a.m. train leavesdailyexceiit
Sunday. Since the completion of the Uiuo
river bridire at j.ouisvuio, me omnious ana
ferry transfer at that point is avoided.
Klnpi.iitv o.ra run thronirh on the 2.4ii n.ai
train trom Memphis to Louisville, iinnectinc
at Louisville with Silver Pnlatw sleepinr and
dav cars, running tnimucn trom Louisville ie
Philadelphia and New ork without change.
Bprlhs, sections or state-rooms can be engiincd
in throuifh car to New York at Ticket Office,
Zu'i Main street.
Trunin connect for afhville ami l. Louis
as follows:
Leave MenpWi. S.45 p.m. 400 a.m.
Arrive at 4sUville. .o0 a.m. fi.00 p.m.
StTliuis.... 10.00 p.m. 12.00 u,m.
Ticket Office. 237S Main street, near Jeffer
son 1 and at Depot, head of .Main street.
J, F, 1I0Y1, Superintendent.
Jas. 8i:sn, Ticket Asent tMa-t
PASSENGERS GOING EAST,
Tla Louisville or Cairo,
BHOCLD rCaCKASI TICkSTS ST THR
Erie & Atlantic St. Great Western IVy
(Forming the hesl and mtenmfortble line to
New iMtk, Boston, and Northern and Atlantic
cities, wun mafrninceni rusniusiiuniuini
and N iirht Coaehes, through to New lnrk
without change.
TWO EXPRESS TRAINS DAILY.
This is the only line IWim Cincinnati toXew
Yerk under one management I the only line
from Cincinnati to New York without break of
(iaujre ; the only line whose trains run through
to New York without change; the only line
running eoaches through without using com
promise wheels 1 the only l;nc running Pnlace
Broad tlauge Coaches through without chanire.
SW If you desire prompt time and certain
connections, finest scenery on the continent,
most comfortable cart in the world, most mag
nificent dining balls and ample time for meals,
and the safest, best, and most comfortable
route go to New York by the EsiE axd At
lantic ASD tiRSAT Vt SMTKRS KtlLTAV.
Tickets by this line for tale at all Ticket
Offices ibroujh the South.
VM. R. BARR,
fieri '1 Passenger Ag't, N . T.
yr. n. phattic.
(tcn'l S'.tilh'n r't. Cin'-ir.pnti, O.
JNOTJCEu
NOTICE!
To theCUizensof Shelby County.
tpHE CONFEDERATE RELIEF AXD His
torical Association nqaeet that yoa iadore a
application for telief aniens you are fully sat
rtr4. apoa mar personal knowledge, that th
apt'Ii, ant really needs assistance.
JOHN W.DAWaOX.
JJJ Secretary.
AYRES-BLOCK,
W . 1 U TV T
TO '
their own
CITY
10 cents per yard.
25 " " "
' " .. - l.' : .'I
i; , a u a
$1 60 per dozen.
$100 " '
VENDIG BROS. & CO.,
No. 22l 3ralri rStreer.
I STEAMBOATS.
Memphis and Arkansas River
PACKET C0MPAST.
VKITED STATES MAIL I.I3CE.
Hjrlnjf AiTUnoement.
rjTHE ELEQAST PASSENGER PACKETS
THOS. Tf. ALLEN Pritchard, master
MARY BOYD llainos, master
CELESTE E. W. Jloland. maetcr
OZARK W. B. Xolaud, master
Will Leave Memphis
I"" Oil 1 I T T L 13 II O O K
And all intermediate binding! on
Jloudajs, iYeduosiluys and l'rld:ijs.
Connecting at Little Rock for PORTSMITII
and all intermediate points, with the new ami
very light-draft packets,
DARDAXELLE
PORT GIBSON
FORT SMITH ..
..Dismukos, master
E. Smith, master
Burnett, master
Also making direct connection at Little Itock
for HM'f. tifUiNUS, with the regular mail
eoAeaea.
irtmhts consicood to this line at Jlomphis
or .Mouth of While river, will bo forwarded
promptly tu destination without ch:irge for
triinler. JOIJ.N D. ADAMri, President.
W.
. II. Kivxkiiat. Asent.
No. 3 Mnrion St.. Stonton Mlock.
PAWNERS HIP;
Copartnership Notice.
X. J. Birlsv. Oro. Mellkksb. V. McMiai..
7"E HAVK
THIS DAY ASSOCIATED
i a partner. Dr. D. McMeal.
11 WHS US
The Arm name will be contiuued. We return
our thanks to the cilixens of Memphis and
surrounding country for their liberal patron
age during the past, and respectfully solicit a
continuance of the same for the future: guar
anteeing always to tnrni.-h the best artirle of
coal at tlx lowest market r.tWs, and to attend
to nil orders promptly, with an aim solely to
give satisfaction.
ISIUI.LI, .UE.LLMIMI CO.,
iwuth Court aud .Main streets.
Memphis, April 1. lTn. 40-oS
AGRICULTURAL.
BRINLY PLOWS,
p jrT agrsiNFD sr
R.G.CEAIG ii ID., Agents,
S77 and 379 Main at.
Cliolfe French Flower Seeds,
At Oralis' Seed Store.
Permian (Jiiano,
At CratVa Seed Store
Cuvver's Thosphate,
it It. (i. Oaic A Co., Agent
AILORSj
Tailors' Notice.
MRTn PEPLOW H AVE P.EMOVm TO
No. 22 liavoso street, two doors west ef
Ainin
They are rea.lv l do work Weil and
..II fl ee 'he-,..
WRAPPING PAPER.
Cnno AVriiIitf I oper.
nROWX. DILI.ARD CO..I14 FRONT ST..
...In ..nlj t:;r Hotf?J Kettiley A Co.'s
Cane Pi-r. hive aow hand a lull supply
and general ateortment l' uses, which they
are uttering allow Ci'J:ssati psjcis. l'f

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