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Public ledger. [volume] (Memphis, Tenn.) 1865-1893, April 25, 1870, Image 1

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Tt E M O V E r
I A -
E EXCELSIORsM "S
eS DISTILLERY'
FURNITURE.
f 1 .' t
:JT1
Manufacturer or
MATTRASSES AND BEDDINQ.
General Upholstery
avo . . , . - ,
r FUK.ITUnE K8TABLI8UKEST,
No. 44 Court aUreet,
(Next Southern Express Co..) MEMPHIS.
144 t
By E. WHITMORE.
LARGEST CITY CIRCULATION.
Fifteen Cents Per Week.
Vv .a 4-7 O-
mm,
BUSINESS HOU8ES.
TTWOOD ANDERSON, COTTON FAC
L tor and Cummiiiaiun Merchants, 214 Front.
B
ANK-KIRST NATIONAL OF MEMPHIS.
F. B. Davis, rres t; newton rora, v. r.
TOWMAN. C. II.. MACHINIST,, AND
JD Scale Factor, 202H Main itroet. Special
attention given to repairing soales.
(WAIU, R. O. A CO.. SEEDS, IWPLE
j went, eto., 379 Mam St., JacksonJBIock.
C
ATHOLIC BOOKSTORE, 312 SECOND ST..
near Monroe. W.J. Mansiora. frop r.
(SfTY BANK, NEW BANK BUILDINO.
J 9 Madison street. 6. II. Tobey. Prei't;
E. C. Kirk, Cashier.
CAROLINA LIFE INS. CO.. 219 MAIN ST.
J. Davis. Pres'ti W. F. Boyle, Sco'y.
CLAPP. VANCE A ANDERSON, ATTOR-neya-at-Law,
Main street, Memphis.
IC KIN SON, WILIifAM'S A CO., COTTON
Factors, 210 Front street.
EMMONS A SON, BOOKS, STATIONERY,
Magailnea.eto., 10 Jefferson and 63 Heal.
Iis1ier7Xmisac6., marble-works
and Drain Pipe, cor. Adams and Second.
OEPEL, LEOPOLD, AGENT, DEALER
in Organs and Knabe'a Pianos. 375 Main.
ROVER A BAKER'S 6KWINS MA.
chines. 318 Main street.
E IN RICH. P. II. A BUO., CONfEC
tions. Groceries, Liquors, etc., 224 Main.
T m'LETON A VREDENBURGH'S IN-
JU surance Agency, 22 Madison street.
LEROY, J., MERCHANT TAILOR, NO. 17
Jefferson St., betweeiMain and fjront
if cCOMBSTKELLAR A BYRNES, H ARD
1M ward. Cutlery, etc., 322H and324 Main.
rROILL BROS. A CO.", HARDWARE. CUT
J lery, Agricultural Implements. S12 1 ront.
ODESTAA"CAZASSA, "DEALERS in
Confections, etc., 252 Main ,cor. N.Conrt.
RESCOTT, O. F. A CO.. DEALERS IN
CoaLOil, Lamps, Soaps, etc., 40 Jefferson.
STEAM DYERS A CLEANERS
Hanson A Walker (lata Hunt A Hanson).
246 Second street. -
rpERRY A MITCHELL, WHOLESALE
X dealers In Boots, Shoes and MHat, 3Mam.
HITMORE. E., STEAM JOB PRINTER,
lii Mauison street.
INSURANCE.
-i Hlntement of
The Home Insurance Company
"o f'hSW H AVE N , ! O 5T . ,
f f JANUARY "l. 1870.- I
Capital Stock. - il
Surplus
ASSETS: .
Cash on hand, in banks, and In
course of transmission I
Real Estate owned by the Co y
Loaned on mortgage on real estate,
United States Bonds, 5-20
Virginia State Bonds
Tennessee State Bonds ..
Alabama State Bonds
North Carolina State Bonds
South Carolina State Bonds..
New Haven City Bonds
National Hank and other. New
Haven stocks....!... ............ j
Railroad Hon!
Loans, with stock collaterals
Bills Receivable for inland pre
miums '
Salvage claims due the Company...
Loans on call and sundry accounts
Agents' balances
Safes, office furniture, and agency
supplies on hand
Premiumsdue athomeand branch
oHines -
Interest and rents accrued
000,000 00
780,305 49
255,301 38
739.MX) 00
63.S00 00
124,503 13
17,tV2 48
10,700 00
10,000 00
4,7. 00
10,500 00
65,000 00
87,730 00
45.3ri0 00
lfl.OUO 0
49,035 61
08,515 20
lfi,(W4 63
88,308 58
29,565 40
74,522 12
17,470 60
Total $1,786,365 49
. " LIABILITIES:
Losses in proeess of adjustment....! 166,133 79
Premiums received in 1869 2,106,340 61
Losses paid in 1809 - 1,358,907 60
Premiums received since organi-
latiou.., W15.SW 66
Losses paidsince organisation 6,27o,iUO 72
D. R. SATTERLEE, Presides t. ' -SAM'L
L. TALCOTT, 1 Vi Pre.ijent.
CHARLES WILSON. I Vlce president.
WM. S. HOOHELL, Secretary."
E. I). COWLES, Assistant Secretary. .
? ,! i:" i v. f 6TAT OP TeHNESSKS,") .'
' ' ' COUI'TKOLLKR'8 Omck,
Nashville, January 1, 1870. )
I, O.- W. Blackburn. Comptroller of the
Treasury, do hereby eertify that the Home
Insurance Company, located at New Haven, in
the State of Connecticut, has produced to mo
satisfactory evidence that said Company has
complied with all tlio requirements of the laws
of the State of Tennessee imposed on Insu
rance Companies; and I further certify that
H. T. Tomlinson A Co., ag'tsofsaid Company,
hare also complied with retirements of the
laws of the (State, made and provided in such
cases: wherefore, said Home Insurance Com
pany has authority to take risks and transact
the business of insurance in this Stute, at
Memphis, Tennessee. .a.;,
i. O. W. BLACKBURN,
Comptroller of Tennessee.
H. T. T0MLINS0Y & CO., AGENTS,
17 Madison St., Mem phi a.
39-59
XXXVII DIVIDEND!
Safest, Cheapest System of Insurance.
STATEMENT OF THE
Washington Insurance Co.
172 Broadway, New York.
C'asli Capital,
$100,000!
ASSETS. FEBRUARY 1, 1870:
United States, State, City and other . '
stocks (market value) ,,S'?1 21
Bonds and Mortgages
Demand Loans '.V'-
jjft,B 3b,tvi9 87
Unpaid Premiums J1.2M 4.5
Miscellaneous - 31,tJ 10
$S05,ft7 92
.. 4,300 00
Unpaid LosscS.......'.....-
Capital and Surplus
. $801,397 92
A dividend of (8) eight per cent, is this day
declared payable on demand, in uahu, to stock
holders. c pATTERLEE, President."
1IKMRY WESTON, Vice President.
WM. K. LOT II RUP. Secretary,
j WM. A. fCOTT. Assistant Secretary.
8tat op TnNKaagg,-)
CoMPTaoi.t.rH'g Umn, f
Nashvii.i.k, January 1, 1870. )
I (1. W. Blackburn, Comptroller of the
Treasury, do hereby eertify that the Washing
ton In?n ranee Company. l.w-aU-d at New lork,
in the State of New York, has produced to me
satisfactory evidence that said Company has
romplied with all the reauireuienUof the laws
of the ilate of Tennessee imposed on insurance
companies; and 1 further certify that 11. T.
Tomlin.oa A Co., aenta of said Company,
have also complied wilh the reouirem!iits of
Ilia Uws ef the State, made and provided in
fuch cases; wherefore, said Insurance Com
pany has authority to take riV and transact
the tininess of insunnoe in this State at Mem
..bis. Tennessee. - q BLACKBURN,
Comptroller of Tennessee.
IL T. TOMLINSON" fc C0,AGENTS,
17 MMdlaoa Ht., Hrmpkls.
! to '
I BLACKSMITHS.
mii-ir MACRca. 'obii eraxa.
MAURER & CO.
bti onsn AT '
So. 207 Toplar Street,
Betwera North Market and High st., a new
Blacksmith'and Wagon Shop,
4 SD ARK PREPARED TO DO
A. suns work in ail its branches at tr q
the very low.t rati-s. Aswe are prsc- WV
' tiral aerhnmr of on eTprtrnr,
and have lived in inempnis ior mm ion
twelve years, we snre the public that we will
. ive nral satisfaction, anj k them to civt
. us Uuti 1
VOL. X.
I :s a
o
PUBLIC LEDGER.
'rriHE PUBLIC CEDOER IS PUBLISHED
A. every afternoon (except Sunday) by
" 12. W II IT MO RE,
AtNe. 13 Madison street.,
The PiJbi.io LitnoitK is served to city subscri
bers by faithful carrier at FIFTEEN CENTS
PER WEEK, payable woekly to the enrriers.
By mail (in advance): One yoar, ftt; six
months, $1; three months, $2 ; one uiontb.
75 cents. ...
Newsdealers supplied at 2)i cents per copy.
.Weekly Public Ledger,
Published every Tuesday at 12 per annum (in
advance) ; clubs f five or more, $1 50.
Communications upon subjects of ireneral
interest to the public are at all times accept
able. Rejected manuscripts will not be returned.
RATES 0? ADVERTISING IS DAILY:
First Insertion......-.. ,...M..$1 00 per square.
Subsequent insertions 50 ' "
For one week S 00 '
For two weeks 4 60 " "
For three weeks 8 00 " "
For one month 7 50
RATES OF ADVERTISING IN WEEKLY.
First Insertion 00 per square.
Subsequent insertions 50 " "
Eight linei of nonpareil, solid, constitute a
square.
Displayed advertisements will be charged
according- to the SPAflt occupied, at above
rates there being twelve lines of solid type to
the inch.
Notices In local column Inserted for twenty
cents per line for each insertion.
Special notices inserted for ten cents per line
for each insortion.
Notises of doaths and marriages, twenty
cents per line.
Advertisements published at Intervals will
be charged one dollar per square for each in
sertion. To regular advertisers we offer superior In
ducements, both as to rate of charges aoid
manner of displaying their favors.
All bills for advertising are due when con
tracted and payable on demand.
All letters, whether upon business or other
wise, must be addressed to.
K. WIIITMOKU.
Publisher and Proprietor.
For the Public Ledger.!
CONGRESS.
A President and Cabinet we have seen
Conspiro to wrest from citiiens rights lane
Their fathers' pride and glory it has been
To boast in speeches eloquent and in song.
We've seen our Congress doingall that's saean.
Perpetrating every act and deed to wrong
A fallen people; and still not content, . . ;
But lengthens Out its cruel punishment. '
Behold the reconstruction acts of fraud
Unon the Constitution of the land:
An instrument the Congress daily laud
Whilst raaehin. forth a desnerate hand.
And rends to fragments as they still applaud.
Thus stultified before the world tney stand.
Mvannntrvl with Constitution thus effaced.
Thou art Indeed ' dishonored, wronged, dia-
graced 1 - ' "
Once the Groat Republic I that mighty naino
Resounded over (very land and sea; .- t
The first the happiest in history's fame
The land of liberty, home of the free;
Where none might wrong us, none unjustly
blame
Without the lawa protection. Liberty : '
Was indeed a thing of life and lisht.
Dispensing equally to all his right.
Gone are those days of governmental bliss.
Where all were happy all contented wort:
What other government e'er yielded this.
Whose happy people could with us compare?
Alas, one Radical malicious hiss
Dissolved the whole and scattered It afar.
And left instead we've military juries,
Fraud.theft.oribes.oaths and official perjuries'.
And left us, ton, the negro, a blessing
For which we thank the so-called Goverment.
He is a treasure greatly worth possessing ;
His precious time is mostly wisely spent
In banjo playing, song, dance and dressing..
And other thing! of equal snt-i-ment.
At making laws, too, he's expert indeed,
And will be more so when he learns to read. '
"r:. t-n. a. AffiA-uinker h. is scant '
Of all that kind of knowledge most desired.
And which enables one often to supplant
" An adversary who is less Inspired.
But learning mom is useless, stoceeur Grant '
Has not from office yet himself retired ;
i.j ahilat at Washington he deign to nararw.
He is the high, happy hop. of evvry nigger.
The negro Is, it seems, his beau idea!,'
Ami ia unite likely so to long remain ; .
The Indian some thought to be his real
Lore, but still the negro dwell upon bi
krain.-
And in deferenco to the President we all
Must bow submissively, altnougn in pain.
GifUd Grant I great General ! grand, glorious !
Why should he not. at pleasure, worry us?
X.
T .L U-ut latnlv at tha
.first fill . ' i" i '''
National Theater, Washington, in cop
junction with his son nd little Bessie
(iermon. Hie remnrkanie tact unoui
the performance was that the three
were respectively the crand-sou, Rivatr
grand-son, nnd prpnt-er'at-prund-daugh-ter
of the " first Jefferson," former man
ager of the aaine theater, aud descend
ants by one leas remnvn from the second
Jefferson, who also held the same office.
Mr. Beecher is coming on but slowly
with his Life of Christ; but thnt he is
holilinK congregations to "Bie parpii.
at Plymouth Chun h, is apparent from
the followinr Herald "personal:"
" Beecber's The lady with preen kids.
Gentleman would like to become Mter
i acquainted. Address J. L., Herald
I office."
MEMPHIS,. TENN.
H M I il 'd it li tt
ON MONDAY
, We r ill open
HEAVY LINE
Look at these,
BEST VALUE
HOME OF THE FREE LOVERS.
RIclinrdsAn La. Kesiilenc-The
lleritnice of the Woman wUo Lett
Her Husband. : .
From the New York Sun.
. A couple of miles north of Newark, in
the modern suburbs of Woodside, and
near the banks of the picturesque Pas
snie river, stands the pleasant villa,
which A. D. Richardson, the gifted young
journalist, fondly hoped to make his
home, and where, surrounded by every
comfort, with every luxury at immediate
command, and with the beauties of na
ture and art combined to elevate the
tastes and dispositions of the children left
to his care bv the faithful, loving and de
voted wife ot his early manhood, he could
pass away into a quiet, satisfactory, and
eniovable old aee.
To-day the master rests in the clods of
., ... 'LI
the valley, ana tne cause oi tne lerrioie
tragedy the woman whose first husband
lives a wreck of humanity, discorded for
the second, who now slumbers in the
grave this unhappy woman tt the mis
tress of the house. And throughout the
populous suburb, which boasts but few
finer architectural ornaments than this
house, there are scarcely any neighbors
willing to acknowledge an acquaint
ance, much less familiar intercourse,
with the seeming prosperous and fortu
nate woman. Shunned like a pestilence,
a simple object of curious gossip, with
none to pay the respect and deference
American women of character so uni
versally receive, Abby Sage McFarland,
reveling in the name and fortune of the
dead llichardsou, has here her happiness
or misery, solitary, friendless, forlorn.
. After interviewing a small boy on the
road, the reporter proceeded to the cor
ner of Iay street, where the boy pointed
to the house and left him. The boy was
quite right in calling ita lane rather than
a street. It boasted no sidcwulk.was but
about thirty feet in width, and unpaved.
The lane was perhaps six or eight hun
dred feet in length, terminating abruptly
at the base of a long, low hill, recently
stripped of a growth of forest trees.
Near the base of the hill, aud nearly op
posite the end of the lane, stood the villa.
The grounds in front were terraced and
ornamented with a few scrub evergreens,
nnd a carriage road curved gracefully to
the entrance gate. The inclosure era
braced perhaps ten acres, all unimproved,
except that portion immediately in front
of tho honse. The incldsurc is the rough
est and plainest kind of a board fence,
seriously dilapidated, and especially in
need of repairs at the gate.which seemed
to he wholly broken down. .
The bouse is large ' and cheerful-looking,
though lacking tho surroundings of
shade and ornamental shrubbery, which
had doubtless been designed to be sup
plied in time.;. It is two stories.-with an
attic, and built of wood in the clustered
or conglomerate style peculiar to Ameri
can rural architecture. Its features are
two gables, facing, respectively, to the
east and south, with a square tower at
the intersecting angle, through which is
the main entrance. The tower rises a
full story or section above the roof of the
main building, with balconies at the up
per windows, thus furnishing a fine ob
servatory, commanding an extensive
view along the charming valley of the
Passaic, embracing the baronial castle
built by the lamented Phil. Kearney,
the umbrageous retrentof Ilenry William
Herbert, known as the "Cedars," and
others of scarcely less pretentions, with
which the region abounds. The city of
Newark is also covered by the view, with
half a dozen small .boroughs or hamlets
in cither direction.
Romantic Story efsn Arlreaa.
Miss Logan gives instances of many
actresses who Tiave captivated rich and
titled suitors by their beauty and clever
ness. Among the stories thnt she quotes
on this point, the most interesting is thnt
of Miss Mondel, a German actress. We
give the romantic history as we find it
related in her book:
"It is said that she waa the most
lovely woman in Germany, her beauty
being of the tiue German type, of the
peculiar fairness bcheld in no other
country golden hair, in soft, silky
masses, without the smallest tinge of
auburn pure gold nnburn'shed; a
complexion scarcely ever seen in
nuture, and almost impossible to
produce by artificial means; lips of
deep carnation; teeth small and ex-
3uisitely white, and eyebrows of the
arkest brown, with eyes of the deepest
blue. All this made such an impression
on the heart of the Duke Lewis of Ba
varia, that from the moment he first be
held her at the Munich Theatet be vowed
himself to the worship of this one idol.
But Mademoiselle Mendel was valiant in
defense of her reputation, and resisted
every overture, even that ot marriage, ,
on the part of the Duke, well knowing
that it was almost out of his power to
contract any alliance of the kind, as ,
much was expected of him by his iamily. j
At that time M He Mendel was io the
hnbit of weario; a velvet collar, with a I
clasp ornamented by a single pearl of
treat value, which had been presented to .
ber by the King of Saxony, and in order
to quell all hope of succes in the bosom ;
of her ducal admirer, she declared to
him one day that she had made a vow to ,
bestow her heart and hand on him alone i
who could match tbis fincle pearl with
at many others as wuuld form the whole
necklace,
"The declaration was made laugh-1
MONDAY EVENING, APHIL 25, 1870.
it :
,' t : '.
MORNING NEXT
a Xew Line of
N S HEETI NG-S ,
titer are the
IN MEMPHIS.
ingly, for the fair creature knew well
enough that the Duke, living fully up to
his income, could never accomplish this
herculean task. Soon afterward she
heard that the Duke had sold his horses,
broken up his establishment, and gone to
live in strict retirement in a small cot
tage ' belonging to his brother s park.
That very night, when about to place the
velvet band upon her neck, she found, to
her great surprise, that a second pearl
had been added to the clasp. She knew
well enough whence it came, and smiled
sadly at the loss of labor she felt sure
that Duke Louis was incurring for love's
sake. By degrees the velvet band be
came covered with pearls, all of them as
fine as the one bestowed by tho King of
Saxony, until one evening great was the
rumor in Augsburg the iairMyidel had
been robbed; while on the stage, divested
of ornament, in the prison scene as Bct
tina von Armstedt, her dressing room
had been entered, and the ' velvet
collar with its row of price
less pearls had disappeared from
the toilet table. This event was too ter
rible, her nerves so shaken, that in spite
of the assurance of the chief police
magistrate, who happened to be in the
theater at the moment, that he was sure
to find the thief in a very short time, for
he had tho clue already, poor M'llc Men
del was so overcome by grief that her
memory failed her entirely, so that on
returning to the stage not a word could
she remember of her part. Tho audi
ence waited for some time in astonish
ment at the silence maintained by the
actress, who gazed at tho audience in
piteous embarrassment until by a sud
den inspiration, and almost mechanically
indeed, she remembered she had the
rehearsal copy of the play in the pocket
of her apron. She drew it forth without
hesitation, and began ' lo read from
it. At first the audience knew not
whether to laugh or be angry, but
presently memory, pathos, forgetfulness
of all ut her art had returned to
M'lle Mendel, -and in the ntterance of
otic of the most impassioned sentiments
of her speech, she (lung the rehearsal
copy iuto the orchestra, and went on
with her part without pause or hesita
tion. . The applause of the audience was
so tremendous that one of tho witnesses
of the scene has told ns that the monster
chandelier in the center of tho roof
swung to and fro with the vibration.
But on her return to the dressing-room
the excitement proved too much for her,
and she fainted away. On coming back
to consciousness, it was to find Duke
Lonis at her feej, and the head (yminin
taire standing by her side, bidding her
take courage, for the pearls had been
found. "Where are they?" exclaimed
she. "Are yon sure tha, none are
missing? Have none been stolen?".
Duke Louis then clasped round ber neck
the string of pearls, complete at last, no
longer sewn on the velvet band, but
strung with symmetrr, and fastened
with a diamond clasp. . What more could
be done by the devoted lover? He
had spared neither pains nor
sacrifice to attain his end, and M'lle
Mendel consented to become his wife.
The Emperor of Austria appears to have
been much moved by the story, and sug
gested the nomination of the bride elect
to the title of Baroness de Wallersee,
which thus equalized the rank of the
fiancet, and enabled them to marry with
out difficulty. They live the most re
tired life possible in their little chateau
on Lake Stahnbere. They gay that the
Duchess Louise o? Bavaria never puts
off, night or day, the necklace of pearls,
the clasp of which is riveted to her neck,
and in consequence of this peculiarity
she is known all through the country
round by the name of the Fairy Perlina,
from the old German tale of the Magic
Pearl."
rblsieae Labor Is Texan, '
From the Galveston Civilian.
The experiment with Chinese laber in
Texas has now been three months in
operation, and from every point of view
has proved a decided success. The tes
timony of President Baker and the
oHicers of the Central railroad, in the
fnrther construction of which the first
body of Chinese brought to Texas is at
work, is unanimous as to the satisfactory
deportmeut in every way of the men
employed. Steady at their work, indus
trious "when the contract hours of labor
have expired, sober, fruiral, willing and
mindful of the stipulations of their
airreement, but exacting in the fulfilment
of those in their favor, is the sum of the
evidence in relation to them. They find
no inconvenience in the climate, and
enjoy good health thus fur; nor do they
anticipate any inability to stand the
higher temperature of the coming sum
mer. In contrast with this Ftate of affairs
among the Cliiuese gtunds the fm-t that
a numlior of the Swedes who cn-ne to
labor on the same work have already
given up their contract, and left for
Minnesota, declaring that they cannot
endure the hot mn, and must geek a
colder elinma. We think this result
settles the question as to the class of
labor that ii. ;it be sought to revive the
drooping in! jstry of our coast country.
For railway construction, wo aro in
formed that President Baker, of the
Texas Central, President Young, of the
Northern, and Receiver Crosier, of the
Houston and New Orleans railroad, all
nnite in the opinion that Chiuese labor
is the only lalor that they can depend
upon under the present circumstances
Q
O
o
p
He
Ui
o
o
that attend the State. With this convic
tion, two of the three parties above men
tioned already contemplate a large
increase in the number of Chinese in
their employment.
MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS.
Corn in Florida is tasseling.
Charleston is luxuriating in green peas.
Columbus, Cs., has 2,500 taxable dogs.
Washtub Simmons is the name of a
black Mississippi legislator. 0
Prince Alfred has made a lucky
mining speculation in New Zealand.
A Georgian lately paid for a bushel of
meal in gophers; and received three
mud-turtles in change.
Theodore Tilton is going io print ten
copies of the Independent on white satin
for the crowned heads of Europe.
Huntington County, Pa., has gener
ously increased the School Superintend
ent's salary fifty cents per year, making
it $H0O 50.
Thirty years ago a keg of butter was
let down in a Pennsylvania well to cool.
It was takeu out recently and found
sweet.
Nast, theartist whose political cartoons
in Harper's Weekly are a strong point in
that paper, is a Bavarian, thirty years of
age.
An astronomer predicts the coming of
a comet this year, of such brilliancy that
night will be turned into day, and gas
companies will be ruined.
A woman in Berlin has devoted her
life and means to schemes for the educa
tion of the cab driters in thatci'y. She
desires to make them intelligent enough
to be honest.
A Michigan farmer who insulted a
resident of Jackson, in that State, one
day Inst week, was struck by him on the
side of the head with the palm of the
hand, and fell dead.
The West Point Factory, on the Chat
tahoochee river, is now in full operation,
with 1,032 spindles and forty-eight looms.
It is making yarns and osnaburgs, aud
employs about fifty hands.
Mining iu the Taylor shaft in Northern
Illinois Coal and Iron Company, at La
salle. was interrupted a few days nuo in
consequence of extensive fires produced
by spontaneous combustion. .
It is said that the Emperor of Bassia
has repeatedly had attacks of delirium
tremens. During these attacks he is
always tortured by the belief that he
murdered his' father, Nicholas, and pois
oned his oldest son.
Young Stone, anAmerican, has prick
ed with his rapier nearly all his fellow
students at Heidelberg, and the Univer
sity authorities have been obliged to shut
down on his dueling. This Stone is evi
dently a hard one.
A sitting-room, two or three bed-rooms,
with use ot kitchen without attendance,
can be obtained at Brussels for to
$28 a month; a servant to cook and at
tend for $3; a servant merely to do the
housework can be got for $H.
"Alliert Richardson Beecher Colfax,"
according to the World's correspondent,
is the name which the unlbrtnnate son,
fpopntlr hnrn to the pr-Smilpr Si'huvler.
is doomed to wear through life. Why
have we no law against such beastly
cruelty to helpless iufunts?
A clergyman, in a recent sermon, in
New York, quoted an anecdote uf an old
merchant who instructed his clerks:
" When a man comes into a store and
talks of his honesty, watch him; if he
talks of his wealth, don't try to sell him;
if he talks of his religion, don't trust
him a dollar."
There are west of the Alleghanies 2,700
Presbyterian churches, a.d 2,200 minis
ters, leaving- 500 churches quite unstip-
plied. There is an annual increase of
about 150 churches, while about 75 licen
tiates enter the field annually, partly
balanced by a loss of 40 annually by
death.
The Utica Herald, discoursing of the
arrest of 21 Harvard students, who passed
the night in a station house, says that
the vagaries of students have been too
patiently borne by residents in the
vicinity of colleges. A few applications
of law would do more to prevent the re
currences of outrages than all the
" warnings and rustications " it ia in the
power of Faculties to aduiiuister. . .
A monstrosity of the sheep species
exists on a farm at Itichmond, Missouri.
The body and head seem to be shaped
naturally, hut instead of four legs,
nature in this case has doubled herself
by supplying eight; a pair of legs are
attached to the under middle portion of
the i.bdomen, and the remaining three
on the side, two before and one behind.
The left fore leg is forked at the knee,
with two distinct hoofs.
At one of the recent concerts at the
Tuileries, "one of the most beautiful
women " of Paris attracted much atteu-
tton by the r.mprcsa conversing witn ner
for some time, and on her returning to
her seat all eye were turned upon her.
The lailv, accustomed to this bomajre.
thought it was as usual paid to her)
charms. Hut anddenly she discjvered i
th; one of her beautiful evebrows. made j
of It it, had dropped in her lap, and that
this it was which attracted so much at
tention. She fainted, of course, aud no
doubt wiil take better care in future of
ber fiiiDgs.
, '' ilAYRES BLOCK,
EDWARD W : D TJ TV'TN
STJCCESMOK TO
MEGIBBEN & BR0.,
Importer and Wholeaale Casta tealera In
BRANDIES, WINES, MQU0RS,
Aud their own ' 1 : ' ' '
I)I8TILL,VTION OF WHISKIES,
NO. 270 SECOND
lIempliis,
THE FAVORITE AND BLACK OAK
COOKING KTOVES,
VTOW 80 WELL AND FAVORABLY KNOWN. CAN BE FOUND AT ALL TD1KS, .
1M together with a good assortmvnt of
Heating Stoves, Lamps, Tinware,
GRATES, HOLLOW-WARE, ETC.V V
at' '
T . S. 'J,IJ K .IS gj",
No. 388 Second Street, 3Iempliif, Tenne8eee.
Roofing, Guttering, Cotton Brands and General Jolr Work will
receive Prompt Attention. 9-3-t
"" RAILROADS,. I j?T.?A!y,?.?-I.Sim
Memphis and Louisville R. R.
ONDF.XSED TIKE TABLE.
TAKES EFFECT FEB.' 7. 1870.
Time
Time
Leave
Memphis ... 2
Humboldt- 7.
Arr. at
Louisville - 9.
Cinrinnntl 2.
Inilianap's 7
Cleveland. 7.
Buffalo . 1.
Pittsburg... 4.
Baltimore. 7.
Wah't'n...l0,
Philad'a. 7.
N. York-...W.
Boston 11.
, M. B. II.
4.00 a.m.
8.15 p.m.
.V p.m.
,lo p.m.
00 a.m.
30 p.m.
.50 p.m.
.30 a.m.
,&5 p.m.
47 a.m.
00 p.m.
.00 p.m.
,00 p.m.
.00 p.m.
.00 a.m.
13 00
23 SO
28 nO
40 30
4i 55
37 47
62 00
55 00
52 00
.V flu
68 U0
00 p.m.
45 a.m.
17 45
21 i
2! (Ml
35 S5
42 15
38 50
52 45
5 45
63 15
55 45
60 45
15 a.m.
50 p.m.
:io p.m.
05 p.m.
.00 a m.
00 p.m.
:) a.m.
.00 in.
00 p.m.
Tho 2.45 n.m. train from Memphis leaves
daily. The4.U0a.m. train leaves daily eicept
eunuav. Mnoe me compimiun oi mo vino
river bridge at Louisville, the omnibus aud
ferry transier ai inai poini in avjiueu.
Sleeping oars run through on the 2.45 p. m
train from Memphis to Louisville, connecting
at Louisville with Silver Pulace sleeping and
day ears, running inrourn irom hubituiviv
Philadelphia and New York without change.
Berths, sections or stato-rooinscau be engnfrcd
in inntuun cars vo rew iurt at xitau vwre,
'7Vtl l.tn ttrnAt.
Trati-s connect for Nashville and St. Louis
a lollowa:
Leave Momphis 2.45 p.m. 4.00 a.m
Arrive at Nashville...... 9.00 a.m. fi.00 p.ui
" "6t. Louis 10.00 p.m. 12.00 p.ui
Ticket Office, 217' i Main street, near Jeflor
son; and at Depot, head of Main street.
J. F. BuYD, Superintendent.
Jar. Spsrd, Ticket Agent. 0-02-t
PASSENGERS GOING EAST,
Via Louisville or Cairo,
SHOULD PURCHASE TICKETS IT THE
Erie & Atlantic & Great Western R'y
ForminE the best and most comfortablo line to
.New York, Boston, and Northern and Atlantic
cities, with majcnifioent Palace Combined Day
and Right Coaehes, through to New York
without change.
TWO EXPRESS TRAINS DAILY.
This is the only line from Cincinnati to New
Vi.rk nrwl,r nn fnnnnffpinent : the only line
from Cincinnati to New York without break of
liauire; the only line whose trains run tnroutjn
to New York without change; the only line
running coaches through without using- com
promise wheels ; the only line running Palace
Broad Gauge Coaches through without change.
aarlf you desire prompt time and certain
connections, finest scenery on the continent,
most eomfortable cars in the world,,most mag
nificent dining halls and ample time for meals,
and the safest, best, and most comfortable
route o to New York by the KaiK ano At
lantic AND UrUAT WK8TKR KaII.'AT.
Tickets by this line for sale at all Ticket
Unices throujh theoouth BARK, .
Gen'l Passenger Ag't, N. .
W. B. S1IATH O.
Gen'l Sonth'n Air't, rincinnnti. O.
NOTICE.
NOTICE !
TotlieCitizensof Shelby County.
fJWIE CONFEDERATE RELIEF AND His
torical Association request that yon indorse no
application for relief unless yon are fully sat
isfied, upon your personal knowledge, that th
applicant really need assistance.
J0IIX W. DAWSON.
CORSETS.
Best French Corsets
AT THE
Southern Hoopskirt Manufactory
T AniK? WILL FIND IT TO TTIIER IN-
IJ terst to purchase French Cor-cts of me.
they are genuine and imported direct from
WLKLY. L'UDKAU and M HE Dl'PuNT.
To ladies desiring a cloe-filtin, durable cor
set, 1 would repeetfully recommend the
Werlys while the L'OiKaa is an elrmit cor
set, elaborately embroidered. The iui.nt is
a thost corset, of a most beautiful r-stiern., 1
have them in sise from 16 to 35. and I prr.mise
to eiehang en sis for another anal the
proi-cr at is procured. Also tJi
Inprers Breait Ptlclr.
The Inviiible Walking Pkirt is tb only
fliionb!e kirt f.r ontd.-.r drcs. while
the NfcW PUKTE K'iKE is indi?irabletothe
train drc. Hota rkirts caa be had osi T at
the manufactory. 1S Maia St., acar W i-h,-iuftoa.
53 Lulls LANulv.
ST., AIRES BLOCK
- Tennewse.
Memplii3 and Arkansas River
. . PACKET COMPANY.
rSITEl STATES" MA1X LIKE.
l-tijrlnff AiTttnifcmcnt.
rjlIIE ELEGANT PASSEN0ER PACKETS
T1I08. II. ALLEN, Pritchard, master
MARY BOYD -.Haines, master
CELESTE E. W. Noland, master
OZARK, W. B. Noland, master
Will Leave Memphis
FOIl I, I T I? Xj 11 ROCK
- . And all intermediate landing on
Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays.
Connecting at Little Rock for FORT SMITH
and all intermediate point, with the new and
very light-draft packets, , . (
DARDANELLE
FORT GIBSON
FORT SMITH....,;......
Dismukos, mastor
E. Smith, master
. Harnett, master
Also making direct connection at Little Rock
for HuT bl'lUNUS,.with the regular mail
coaches.
Freights consigned to this line at Memphis
or Mouth of White river, will be forwarded
promptly to destination without charge fur
transfer. JOHN D. ADAMS, President.
W. H. KrrsrnAY, Agent,
Nn. 3 Mndison St.. Ktanton Bl"ck. Ql-f
COPARTNERSHIP.
Copartnership Notice.
N. J. Bioi.ry. Geo. Mkllersh. D. McMkai..
WE TIAVE THIS DAY ASSOCIATED
with ns as a partner. Dr. D. McMeal.
The firm name will be continued. We return .
our thanks to the citisens of Memphis and
surrounding country for their liberal patron
sge during the past, and respectfully solicit a
continuance of the same for tho future: guar
anteeing always to furnish the bent article of
coal at the lowest market rates, and to attend
to all orders promptly, with an aim solely to
rive satisfaction.
BIULEY, MELLERSTI CO..
South Court and Main streets.
Memphis. April 1. 1S70. 40-53
AGRICULTURAL.
BXtlNLY PLOWS,
JUST ERCKINRn T
K. U. CRAIU CO., Agents,
877 and 379 Matu at.
Choice French Flower Seeds,
At Craig's Seed Store.
Peruvian (Juano,
At Craig'a Seed Store
Cuvver's rhosjihate,
54 K. G. Cralir & Co., Agents
BOOTS AND SHOES.
F. Q. Tebet. We. B. Mitchell.
TERRY & MITCHELL,
Exclusive Wholesale Dealers
IK
Boots, Shoes, Hats,
XO. 329 MAIX STREET,
MEMPHIS, .-- - TENNESSEE.
i y o .
Har Just received a larr stock for
SPUING TRADE
WHICH WE OFFER TO
MEKCIIAXTS OXLY.
U. " TF"TIV VlTHfT T..
REAL ESTATE.
For Sale Low for Cash,
IOT XO. lifl. FR05TING 102 FEET ON
J Kobeson lrt. aad raaoia sack lsU f-i
to aa alky. . .
Lot .No. 64: a corner lot. ironiing va imwi sa
Surrtt-treet. raaningbx k X'leei alley j
in lliil'i sebdi iimi, near M. Agues aad
Ye ttreet railway.
Tile abur per-'"'" will be -.! 1 low fnr ..
Arilyto K"Yrt K TKKZtVA.M.
Or to J. F. LOWKV, barUett, l.a. 14

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