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Public ledger. [volume] (Memphis, Tenn.) 1865-1893, February 17, 1871, Image 1

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BUSINESS HOUSES.
BANK-FIRST NATIONAL OF MEMPHIS.
V. B. Davis, Pros'ti Newton Ford, V. 1.
BOWMAN. C. H. MACHINIST AND
Scale (aotor, &MH Main street. Speoial
attention given to repairing scales. "
fWVi BANK. NKW BANK BUILDING.
J Madison street. B. II. Tobey. Pres'ti
kT 0. Kirk. Cashier I J. A. Hayes. Jr., Ass't.
CAROLINA LIFB INS. CO.. MAMS6N
it. J. Davis. Prei't i W. P. Burl. Bec'y.
DICKINSON. WILLIAMS k CO., COTTON
Feotors, 210 Fient street.
jlMMONS A80N. BOOKS. 6TATIONKR1,
!i Magasines,sts..1UJolfaronand68Beal.
jlisilKK. AMIS k CO., MARBLK-W0RK8
' and Drain Pipe, cor. Adams and Second.
10KPKL. LKOPOLD, AOKNTTBKALKR
T In Organs and Knabe'a Pianoi. 375 Main.
1EIN1HC1I. P. 11. A BRO., CONFKO
tions, Groceries, LIjuon, etc.. 224 Main.
foCOMBirKKLLTRftBYRNES. HARD
L ward, CutleryLatOML22S and SB Main.
-RGILLBROS. k CO.. if ARDWARK.COT
t lery, Agricultural Implements, 312 Front.
JTRAM DVKKS k CLKANKRS
) Hanson k Walker (lata Hunt Hamon).
16 Sacond atraat.
CT. JOSEPH'S INFIRMARY. CORNER OF
kj Jefferson and Third streets. In charge of
tbe Sisters of the Order of Bt. Dominic
w
11ITMOKE. E., STEAM JOB PRINTER,
13 Maaison street.
WW.-JACKSON, VETERINARY 8UR
. geon.f Ottiooi Brooks' Stables, 447 and
449 Main itreet. 128-t
INSURANCE.
Statement of the Condition
OF THR
PHCENIX INSURANCE COMPANY
.. Of Hartford, Coil " .
Hade to tbComptrolloror(hHtat
or Tennessee, on Jn. 1, 1871.
ASSETS AT MARKET VALUE :
Cash on hand. In bank, and due
hmi. ..nti 1154.335 81
United States securities 157.4S2 50
Loans on approved securities 137,275 00
New York Link .took. 89.500 00
Hartford bank stock. 446.700 00
Miscellaneous bank itocki 61.580 00
Bonds State, city, railroad, and
vrtter M.4w W
Missouri Slate Stock . 27.900 00
Heal Eitato S
Accumulated iutereit S,a06 05
11,738,921 98
Unadjusted lossei, $96,808 42.
Stati or T!rrAK,
3
ConTtnuii'i Orior,
Nabbtilli, January lit, 1871
I, Ed. R. Pennebaker, Comptroller of the
Treasury, do hereby certify that the Phoenix
Insurance Company, located at Hartford, in
the State of Connecticut, has produced to me
atisfactory evidence that said Company has
complied with all the requirements of the laws
f the State of Tennessee, imposed on insur
ance companies: and I further certify that II.
A. Littleton, auent of said Company, has also
complied with the requirements of the laws of
the State, made and provided in such cases.
Wherefore, said Insurance Company has an
tbority to take risks and transact the business
of Insurance in this State, at Memphis, Ten
nessee. ED. R. PENNEBAKER,
138-155 - 1 " Comptroller of Tennessee.
MISSISSIPPI VALLEY
INSURANCE COMPANY,
Of ' Memphis, Tennessee.
CAPITAL, --- - $300,000!
Office: No. 293 Main Street,
Over German National Bank.
P. S. DAVIS, President.
R. V. VREDENBURUH, Vice Pres't.
' W. J. LIT TLKJOHN, Ass't Secretary.
H. GRONAUER. Solicitor.
DIREC
F S Davis,
J J Murphy,
W R Moore,
F M Maban,
TR Smith,
Beni Eiseman,
U II Judah,
N D Menken,
Jacob Friedman.
U M Loewenstine,
TORS !
J W Dickinson,
T B Dillard,
Isaao Schwab,
J W Jefferson,
A Seessel,
J T Farirason,
W P Proudflt,
R V Vredenburgh,
F W Smith,
Newton Fod.
Fire, .Marine and River Risks taken at as
low rates as tne haiara win permit, anu iopso.
Dromotiy aojusiea.
Statement of the Condition
or th
Hartford Fire Insurance Co.,
' On the Slit day of December, 1870;
Made to the Comptroller of the State of Ten
nessee, in conformity with the laws of said
Mate.
1st. The name or tne company is tne dakt
roitD Fibk Iksukaxci Company, and is
located s.t Hartford, Connecticut.
. CAPITAL.
. . nti 1 - .;t,l .Innk
8d- ' !J -1.000,000 00
4th ", ASSETS.
Cash on hand and in bank.... t 42,873 39
Cash in han.is of agents and n
course of t.nsmission 186.142 00
Bills Receivable .for loans, secured
by personal an
curity v
Real Estate unencumbered..
Kent and interest acc.-ued, pay-
ablo January 1st, 1871...
R.17.325 79
344.135 08
17.267 17
Citocks anu oonas, as por i cno ttr
filed in Auditor's office 1.609.775 36
2,737,519 39
LIABILITIES. '
oth. Liabilities to banks, or others
due or not due '
6th. Losses adjusted and due.......
7th. Losses either unadjusted or
8th. Adjusted and not due .......I 162,992 a
9th. Losses in suspense, awaiting
further proof
10th. All other claims apiinst the , . .
Company, unpaid dividends , , bM w
IMISt'ELLANEOl'S.
11th. The greatest amount insured In any one
risk is 1,90,000, except in special casus. ,
12th. The amount insured in any ose city,
town or village depends upon its site and
how built.
13th. The amount insured in any one block
depends as above.
14th. Certified copy of the Charter of the Com
pany, as filed, heretofore.
15th' Oeneral Power of Attorney for agents to
accept service of process previounly filed.
....-. UEO. C. CHASE, President.
, J.D. BROWNE, Secretary.
Statu or CowmmcjiT. 1
County of Hartford,
Hastfosb, January 12, 1871.
Personally appeared George L. Chase. Pres
ident, and t. 1. Browne, Secretary of the
Hartford Fire Insurance Company, and made
oath that the foresroing statement, by them
subscribed, is a true, full and correot state
ment of the afl'airs of said Company, and ex
hibits, so far as can be ascertained at this date,
its actual condition on the .flat day of Decem
ber. 1870. Before me,
' UKO.bUMNER. Notary Publio.
STATI Or TlKKtRSII.'l
toupraoLLaa'a Omen, V
, i.' ' Nassvills, January 1. 1871. )
I Ed E. Pennebaker. Comptroller of the
Treasury, do hereby certify that th. Hartford
Fire Insurance Company, located at Hartford,
in the !tu of Connecticut, has produced to
me satisfactory evidence that said Company
bas complied with all the requirements ef the
iawsof the State of Tennessee, imposed oa in
surance Companies; and I further eertifytbat
Henry A. Littleton, agent of said tomcany.
bas also complied with the requirements o' the
laws of the Slate, made and protuied in such
eases. Wherefore, said Insurance Company
aaa authority to take risks and transact the
basinets of Insurance ia this Male, at Mem
phis. leu-es.y pEs5EB AKER .
13J-1.V) Comptroller of Tennessee.
MASONIC MUTUAL ,
LiijB Assurance Association,
. ' , So. I'nlon Street,
fMs, Te.uea.ee.
C10 COHnTTCTES YOU. A MEMBER
JS I L 1 (or policy. II esaminini tea. and II
annually, k u er eipan.a except in ease of
the death of a -ier. wb.u you "'l',"-
wWi f - .uu,,,umusumuumfur-r-uuuuu-suusm..m..uumf
WHITMORE. JOB PBINTBR AND
Hi. Publisher. IS Madison suae.
By E. WHITMORE, , ! 11 LARGEST CITY CIRCULATION. ; ; , ; 1 J
VOL XL
PUBLICJjEDGER.
rnHl PUBLIC LK1M1KR 13 PUBLISHED
X every aftarnoon (except Sunday) by
E. WIIITMOIIE,
At Ne. IS Madison street.
The Posi.10 Lidosb Is served to city tnhscH
bers by faithful carriers at FIFTEEN CENTS
PER WEEK, payable weekly to the eners.
By mall (In advance)! One year, 8t siu
months, 4 three months, 2; one month,
76 eents. . -'
Newsdealers supplied at 2 cents per copy.
Weekly Public Ledger,'
Published every Tuesday at t2 per annum (In
advance) ! clubs of five or more, II 50.
Communications upon subjects of general
Interest to the publio are at all times aooept-
ReieoUd manuscripts wiu or be returned.
, RATES OF ADVERTISING IN DAILY,
First Insertion...- .........n 00 per square.
Subsequent insertions . t
Forone weak 3 00 .,
For two week. 4 50 " "
e! i.h. L""b' ?s
cur vum uiuu.u hm w
RATES OF ADVERTISING IN WEEKLY.
First Insertion II 00 per square.
Subsequent insertions.. 60
Eight lines of nonpareil, solid, constitute
Displayed advertisements will be charged
according to the erAOl occupied, at above
rates there being twelve lines of solid type to
to. men. . ....
Notioes In local column Inserted for twenty
eents per line for each insertion.
Special notices inserted for ten cents per line
for each insortion. . ,
Netioes of deaths and marriages, twenty
eents per line. ' . . , , ,
Advertisements published at intervals will
be charged one dollar per square for eacn in
sertion. s
T. H.nl.r .1 vBptla... w. nfTae annarlor In
duoements, hetk as to rate ot charges and
manner of displaying their favors.
All bills for advertising are due when con
tracted and payable on demand.
All letters, whether upon business or other
wise, must be addressed to.
E. WHITMORE,
Publisher and Proprietor,
LIHES TO MY DAKLIHg ORE.
Write me very often,
Write to me very soon s
Lettors to me are dearer
Than loveliest flowers in June.
They are affection's touehes.
Lighting of friendship's lamp,
Flitting around the heart-strings
Like fire-flies In the damp.
Write to me very often, dearest;
Write In the joyous morn.
Or at the close of evening.
When all the day it gone.
Then, while the stars are beaming
Bright on the asure sky I
When through the fading forest
. Cold the wild winds sigh;
Draw np the little table
Close to the lire and write
Write to me soon in the morning.
Or write to me late at night.
Oh, write to me very often.
For letters are links that bind
Truthful hearts to each other,
Uniting mind to mind ;
Giving to kindly spirits
Lasting and true delight.
If we would strengthen friendship,
Never forget to write.
THE DAVENPORTS.
How They Perform Their Wonder
ful Trivka.
From P. T. Barnnm's "Humbugs of the
WorId."J
" Omne ignotum pro merifiou "Wonder
ful, because mysteriuus. ,
" The Davenport Brothers are natives
of Buffalo, New York, and in that citjr
commenced their career as ' mediums '
about twelve years ago. They were then
mere lads. For some time their opera
tions were confined to their own place,
where, having attained considerable no
toriety through the press, they were
visited by people from all parts of the
country. Uut in 1800 wiey were inauceo.
hv John J. Coles, a very worthy spiritu
alist of New York city, to visit that me
tropolis, and there exhibit their powers.
Under the manaeement of Mr. Coles
thev held 'circles' afternoon and eve
ning for several duys, in a small hall at
195 Bowerv. At the request of the 'con
trolling1 snirit.' made through a horn,
the hall was lighted at intervals during
the entertainment, at which times the
mediums could be seen seated at the table,
looking very innocent and demure, as
if they had never once thought of de
ceiving any body. Un one ol these oc
mainns. however, a policeman suddenly
lighted the hall by means of a dark lan
tern, and the Doys were cieany seen wuu
instruments in their hands. They
dropped them as soon as they could,
and resumed their seats at the table,
Satisfied that the thing was a humbug,
il, audience left in disgust, and the
policeman was about to march the boys
tn the station-house on the charge of
swindling, when he was prevailed upon
to remain and further test the matter.
Left alone with them, and the three
seated together at the table on which the
instrument had been placed, he laid, at
their request, a hand on each medium 8
head; they then clasped both his arms
with their hands. While they remained
thus iituated (as he supposed), the room
being dark, one of the instruments, with
an infernal twanging of its strings, rose
from the table and lit the policeman
several times on the bead. Then a
strange voice, through the trnmpet, ad
vised him not to interfere with the work
of ithe spirits by persecuting the me
diums. Considerbly astonished, if not
possibly scared, he took bis hat and left,
fully persuaded that there was " some
thing in it."
The boys produced the manifestations
by grasping the neck of the instrument,
awinirinir it aronnil and thrusting It into
different parts of the open space of the
room, at the same time vibrating the
strings with the forefinger.
; When sitting with a person at the
table, as they did with the policeman,
one hand could be taken off the investi
gator's arm without knowing it, by gen
tly increasing, at the sme time, the
pressure of the other hand. It vas an
easy matter then to ruie and throw the
instrument or talk through the horn.
To secure greater immunity from de
tection, and to enatiie tnem to exniou
in large halls which could not be easily
darkened, the boys finally hit upon a
" cabinet as the best thing in which to
work. They had some time before made
the "ropewst a feature of their exhi
bitions, and in their cabinet show they
depended, tor success in deceiving, en
tirely npon the presumption of the au
dience that their hands were so seoured
with ropes as to prevent thPir playing
upon musical instruments or doing what
ever else the spirits assumed to do.
Their cabinet it about six feet high,
MEMPHIS, TEtf N.I
six feet long and two and a half feet
deep, the fron consisting of three doors
opening outward. In eBch end is a seat
with holes through which the ropes can
be passed in securing the mediums. In
the upper part of the middle door is a
lozenge-shaped aperture, curtained on
the inside with black muslin or oilcloth.
The bolts are on the inside of the door.
The mediums are generally first tied
by a 'committee of two gentlemen ap
ptfuted from the audience. The doors
of the cabinet are then closed, those at
the ends first, and then the middlo one.
By the time the end doors are closed
and bolted, the Davenports, in many in
stances, have succeeded in loosing the
knots next their wrista, and slipping
their hands oat, the latter then being
exhibited at the aperture. It does not
take the mediums long to draw the
knots close to their wrists again."- They
are then ready to be inspected by the
committee, who report them tied as they
were left. Supposing them to have been
securely bound, those who witness the
show are very naturally astonished.
Sometimes after being tied by tire
Committee the mediums cannot extri
cate their hands and get them back as
they were ; in which case they release
themselves entirely front the ropes be
fore the doors ' are again opened, con
cluding; to wait till alter "the spirits"
have bound them before showing hands
Or making music.
! It is a common thing for these im
posters to give the rope between their
bands a twist while (heir .limbs are be
ing bound, and that movement, if dex
terously made while the attention of
the committee-man is momentarily di
verted, is not likely to be detected. Re
versing the movement will let the hand
out. ,
I The great point with the Davenports
in tying themselves is to have a knot
next' their wrists that looks "fair and
square," at the same time that they can
shirt it and get their hands out in a
moment.
If flour has been placed in their
hands, it makes no difference aa to their
getting those members out of or into
the ropes; but to show hands at the
aperture, or to make noise on the musi
cal instruments, it is necessary that they
should get the flour out of one hand
into the other. The moisture of the
hand and squeezing packs the flour into
a lump, which can be laid into the other
hand and returned without losing any.
The little flour that adheres to the hand
can be wiped off in the pantaloons'
pocket. . The mediums seldom, if ever,
take flour in their hands while they are
in the bonds put upon them by the com
mittee. , i . ."
The principal part of the show is after
the tying has been done in their own
way. Mr. Fay, who accompanies the
Davenports, is thus fixed when he hypo
thetical spirit takes the coat off his back.
As I before remarked, there are several
ways in which mediums tie themselves.
They always do it, however, in such a
raaner that, though the tying looks se
cure, they can immediately get one or
both hands out. Let committees insist
upon untying the knots of the) spirits,
whether the medium! are willing or not.
A little critical observation will enable
them to learn the trick.
If the Davenports were exhibiting
simply as jugglers, I might admire their
dexterity, and have nothing to say
against them)but when they presumptu
ously pretend to deal in "things spirit
ual. I consider it my duty, while treat
ing of humbugs, to do this much at least
in exposing them.
A Cinelnaittl Woman Trying; to Die
, pese or Her Nick lluabniid. i
From the Cincinnati Commercial, Feb. 13.)
There is a fearful scandal in circula
tion over in the Thirteenth Ward, in
which, however, tbo " drug store club "
of gossips seem to believe, to the effect
that a certain corpulent wile1 appears
over-anxious to nasten me permanent
absence of her invalid but absurdly tena-
cious-of-hfe husband. It is related' by
thnRR who have invaded the sick cham
ber that she has prepared for him, and
occasionally airs in nis presence, the
neat suit in which his corpse will be
dressed. " if I should bo so unfortunate
as to lose vou. my dear." People who
hnvn heen culled to sit UD with this ob
ject of conjugal solicitude, state their
be hef that he is being aiowiy, dui
surelv enouL'h. friiiktened and starved
to death; that the moment ' his wife re
tires for the meht hie weakv noiio
voice is heard imploring for just one
square meal of cold turkey or. some
spiced oysters, whereas he is never per
mitted anything stronger man a very
mild form of beef tea. Not long since,
report has it, the invalid was mean
enough to rally in spirits, and appa
rently in strength, aud one fine day to
ask for an airing on the avenue. Forced
hv hiii nlaintive BDDeala. and "by the
suggestion of neighbors that it would be
cruelty to refuse, the wife took him out
for a drive. She improved, it is stated,
upon the grave-suit dodge, in this in
stance, by driving to Spring Grove and
giving him an opportunity to carefully
inspect the neat little corner lot that she
had purchased for him in case he might
need a grave soon. ; -' 1 ' "
l ive Witlila Year Heaua.
We don't like stinginess. We don't
like economy, when it comes down to
rags and starvation.. We hare no sym-
Dathv with the notion that a. poor man
should hitch himself fast to a post, and
stand still, while the rest of the world
moves forward. It is no man's duty to
deny himself every amusement, every
recreation, every comfort, that he may
get rich. It is no man's duty to make
an iceberg of himself, to, shut his eyes
and ears to the sufferings of bis follows,
and deny himself the enjoyment that
results from generous actions, merely
that he may hoard wealth for his heirs
to quarrel about. ' .,,!
Uut there is an economy winch is every
man s duty, and which is especially com
mendable in the man who struggles with
poverty an economy which is consistent
with happiness, and which must be prac
ticed it the poor man woo Id secure inde
pendence., It js almost every man's
firivilege, and it becomes hi duty, to
ive within his means; not up to, but
within them. Wealth does not make
the man, we admit, and never should be
taken into account in oar judgment of
men: but competence should be secured,
when it can be, by the praotice of econ
omy and self-denial to only tolerable
extent. It should be secured, not ao
much for other to look upon, or raise
us in the estimation of others, as to se
cure the consciousness of independence
and the constant satisfaction, which is
derived from its acquirement and pos
session. I
4 FRIDAY EVENING,4 FEBRUARY 17, 1871.
FASHIONS. I-
Something; Hew Iss Funerals, ,
: A Chicago Times correspondent writes
from New York about funerals:
1 The present innovation is to lay the
body upon a couch, dressed in its accus
tomed clothing, with a pillow nuder the
head. The position is usually that of
right or left side, . and the hands are
arranged in gome natural and easy
position. If the dead is a lady, a
handsome shawl Is thrown over the
figure, and if a man, an Afghan or
silken quilt serves for a covering.
Flowers are in the room, but not in such
obtrusive abundance as to make the
odor of these beautiful things haunt you
forever afterwards. The funeral is an
nounced, and the friends aud acquaint
ances are invited, through the public
prints, to be present and take leave of
the departed. No hearse and no conin
affront the sight and chill the blood with
those traditional sentiments which af
frighted our childish years. As many
days afterwards as the condition of the
remains will permit, a few of the nearest
and dearest are invited to assist in the
sad ceremony of burial. Loving hands
lift and lower the casket, and tender
ones strew the earth softly above it with
flowers, and perhaps some favored wrap
pings of the dead are added to lie be
tween the dust which usually fulls so
heavily and harshly upon that other
dust that is so dear. ; No strange eyes
witness this last sacred attention to the
departed, and no memory of a thought
less jar or heavy tread comes back to
embitter the remembrance of the sorrow
ful event.
; Fresh Bf ewe r Dr. Livingstone.
' Sir Roderick Murchison has sent the
following letter to the London Times; ,
I heartily rejoice to announce to the
public that I have this morning (the
24th) received a letter from Dr. Kirk, at
Zanzibar, dated the 8th of December,
1870, which bas relieved me from all
anxiety respecting the fate of my illus
trious friend Livingstone. Dr. Kirk has
jost received a letter from the great Arab
Shiek Said of Uny-amyembe, dated 16
Rabea el Akbar, which, being translated,
is to this effect: ."After compliments,
your honored letter has reached, and
your friend has understood it. The peo
ple (that is of a caravan sent from Zan
zibar) arrived in good health, and are
going on to Ujiji to our friend, the Doc
tor. , The news of him is that he
has not yet -returned from Manimcs
(the Arabic word is spelt in three
different ways), but "we expect him
soon, and probably he and the people
with supplies will reach Ujiji at the same
time." Dr. Kirk adds: "At all events
on his arrival at Ujiji from his western
journev he will have goods for his present
wants. The new gang 'of men with
fresh goods has set out, and, the roads
being free, we may hope they will reach
quickly and safely." We now learn for
the hrst time that Dr. Livingstone has
made an extensive journey to the west
of Lake Tanganyika, and this accounts
for the long-continued absence of all in
formation respecting him. Any letters
that Livingstone may have written and
confided to jealons Arabs have probably
either been destroyed by them, or lost
with some of the caravans that perished
on the journey to the coast during the
cholera epidemic.
There is a colored yonth in the Fresh
man Class at Yale College.
Mr. Sullivan, of Lockport, N. Y., in
troduced a new fashion in suicide by
cutting his throat with a handsaw.
' A Chinese thief, having stolen a mis
sionary's watch, brought it back the next
day to be shown now to wina it up.
The Chicago Times, announcing the
fact that a man there married to get out
of jail, remarks that some men have
queer idea ot liberty.
The Nevada legislators are in trouble.
The treasury is without runds to pay
their per diems, and they threaten to ad
journ sine die in consequence. .
" Chorpenning" ' is a newly-coined
word, meaning swindling the govern
ment without incurring penalty, much
used in Washington at present.
Report hath it that General Beaure
gard intends to make Paris his perma
nent place ot residence as soon as tbe
condition of France is settled.
General Von Moltke is not a Dane, as
has been stated. He was born in Meck
lenburg, and entered the service of Den
mark early in life, but afterward quitted
it tor that ot rrussia. , . .
On New Year s day the Pope had
reigned twenty-four years, six months
and fifteen days just one day longer
than Pius VI. tits pontificate has been
longer than that of any Pope. '
A London paper expresses the belief
that Gambetta is a victim of the opium
habit, and that during the war he has
seldom been removed from the influence
of the drug.
' A kiss, says a French authoress, gives
more pleasure than anything else in the
world. But Puck declares that that wo
man evidently never experienced the
childish rapture of descending the parlor
stairs by sliding down tne bauistsrs.
In the case of Elizalieth R. Coffey
against the Home Life lnsuranoe Com
pany, which was a suit brought in the
Superior Court of New York, on a policy
of 15000 on the life of plaintiffs hus
band, and which the company refused to
drv on the srouud of alleged suicide, the
jury rendered a verdict for plaintiff for
the lull amount. . m .-'"!. ' '
Ex-Governor Fletcher returned to St.
Louis a few days since from the Indian
country, where he completed a treaty
with the Shawnee and Wyandotte In
dians for the right of way for the Atlan
tic and Pacific railroad through their
reservations. This gives the road the
unobstructed right of way front the wes
tern border of Missouri to the Colorado
river.
The New York Herald has a letter
from outside Pans, dated "Inside a
Shell, January 24.' The writer says:
In a few minutes 1 shall be dead. Hits
of my dissected body will be splashed
against the house-fronts of Pans, .and
the splinters of my bones will have be
come assistant projectiles destined to
slaughter Frenchmen.. At this supreme
moment but one human sentiment re
mains within we pride at my uncom
promising execution of my duty as your
correspondent. I am going to be volun
tarily shot away in ordtr to supply joe
with sensational copy. I do not think
any other American special ever went
so far as that, and I confidently expect
that yoa will retain tbe monopoly of this
self-sacrifice."
STOVES.
Great Excitement
if) ,n
OVU THR WQNDISrUI. SVCCSSS Of
l
in'
DUCK'S BRILLIANT
Cooking : Stoves !
, I '. I '.") ! l.i ' .
THE LARGE NUMBKR OF PREMIUMS
awarded " BUCK'S BRILLIANT " cook
ing stoves at all the leading Fairs In tbe
country, together with the unanimous testi
mony of the thousands of housekeepers who
have used them, stamp them without a doubt
Tli Bent Cooking Stoves in
i
the World.
Buck's Brilliant was awarded the
First Premium at the St. Louis Fair, 1HS9. -
First Premium at the SU Louis Fair, lHtW.
First Premium at the SU Louis Fair, lSOi.
First Premium at the M. Louis Fair, 17.
First Premium at tbe tit. Louis Fair, isni. .
First Premium at the St. Louis Fair, 1.
First Premium at the Louisiana State Fair at
New Orleans. ljii.
First Premium at the Louisiana State Fair at
New Orleans, 1K70. ! . r ,
First Premium at Memphis Fair, ISfiS.
First Premium at Memphis Fair, 1870. ' '
First Premium at many other Fairs of less
note.
Defeating In actual trial all the leading
stoves of the country, including the Charter
Oak, Charter, American, Champion, Fashion,
Stewart, Home Comfort, and many others:
and to-day the "BUCK'S BRILLIANT"
Stove stands WITHOUT A RIVAL. Every
stove guaranteed to give entire satisfaction or
the money refunded in full. For sale by .
RISK & JOHNSON, Gen'l Ag'ts,
i - . - "
And dealers in all kinds of Cookingand Heat
ing Stoves, Mantles, Urates, Tinware, Tin
plate, Tinners' stock, etc. : and also agents
fur the oelebrated COAL COOKJNO bTOVK
j "Buck's Guarantee." (
The best eoal Cooking Stove in the market.
No. 30C Main St., Memphis, Tenn.,
)pnsiteCBhj)dHMcKJ90-J
BOOK BINDERY. 1
Franklin Book Bindery,
snd 4 ;
blank book manufactory. l
fNo. 15 West Court Street, Memphis.
: S. V. TOOF, Proprietor. :
BLANK BOOKS, PAPER RULING, AND
binding of every deseription, executed in
a vary superior manner, and warranted to
give entire satisfaction.
HP My Blank Book paperembraees phe first
mills in America; my stock consists of the
finest in the entire market, and prices to com
pete with any house in Memphis. Parties will
find it to their interest to give me a call before
ore! crin g cl.cwhcrc. ; 11 -t
HOTEL.
National Hotel,
Corner Main and Fourth its.,
LOULSVILLB, KT.
SHIRLEY & McCORXLE, Proprietors
HAVING RECENTLY MADE AN ADDI
tien of forty rooms to this eeatralll
located hotel, together with spacious
. r1 tl I .
It!
Parlors and Reception Rooms,
t :
I
We desire to call attention to the improved
style of tbe house and our very lew rates.
This hotel is in tbe center of the city, conve
nient to all business bouses, steamboat land
ing, postoffice and places of amusement.
Street ears leave the door every ten minutes
for all parts of tne city. .1
) f . -.
, FARE, M 60 PER DAT.
SHIRLEY k McCORKLK.
oerLouisville Transfer Company omnihuscs
leave this hntnl in time for II t ruins 11 '-M
NOTICE.
$1,000 Per Week
Can be made on the quiet by parties who are
ud to snufl. without interfering with other
business. Address, confidentially, THUS.
NOKuAn ( U., nroaousy, rw
Verk. -ooH-IM
NEWSPAPERS.
The Southern Advertiser.
' "ANZEIGER DES SUDENS," :
gTAiimHiD vDcecivrn,)
Leading Organ of the German Population ef
the Southwest.
LOUIS WUSDERMAN.-KDirei si Paor'l.
Office t Cor. Tilrd and Jeffemm,
la Postofllce Building, Memphis, Tsnaessee.
1
Its exeeedinrlv larre eirenlatiou threugkevt
the city and Mate offers bcnoes men aa ei
cellent opportunity to make their besineM
known to uie thoasaada ef Hermans living ia
INSTITUTE.
Mechanics' Institute.
MEETS AT ODD TBLLOW9' HALL. TS
o'clock. R.gular bu.inee. meetint . firtt
St edawday night of eacb moatk. hgular
roUuquial meeting, T'I ? n'lht.
X. cinivb, rresueni.
F. Sriia. Secretary. L4-I
I ; . ; .' I .' 't ' 1 ) lil'iil. v.- j
'.. 4 '- Vi, it I lfnf
i ; .... . ..') . . .; . .:.) ... i. !. '''. . - ' 3
Fifteen Cent Per Week
NO. KG
JOH N J . 0 1 FERRALL,
..! , . . ...: ,. DEALER IN
CHOICE FAMILY GROCERIES!
' 1
ITT IN IS
400 Main Street,
- Uooda delivered FREE to any
COOK STOVES !
A N ASSORTMENT OF
HCATIXa STOVES, TIHWAKE, HOLLOW-WAKE, LAMPS, !
AND HOUSE FURNISHING 000DS CjENERALLT.
' Rooffing, Guttering and Stencil Cutting promptly attended to and warranted. JOB
WORK of all descriptions especially solicited. Orders from the oouutry will receive the
attention of prompt and efficient workmen.
I . j ' -L . E9 m ,J U ia- mU W 9 t
o,j.f . . ., No.'3a8 Beoond Street, Memphis.
REAL ESTATE DISTRIBUTION !
Of 3Iempliis, lor 1&71.
SHARES
IMMEDIATELY
$500,000 WORTH OF SHARES!
THE FOLLOWING
REAL ESTATE AND
"Will be Dravn for
1 New Memphis Theater ' $80,
2 Palatial Residence on Beat street., 50,0(10
3 Business House on Main street ... . 40,0110 .
4 Handsome Residence an Shelby street 2b,00O
6 Business House on Second street 40,000
t Beautiful Suburban Home. 2 miles from Memphis, 15 acres 24,000
7 Elegant Residence on Shelby street 24,0ti0
8 Business House on Second street 40,(100
9 Magnificent Building Site oa Vance street... v 5,7isi
10 Fine Residence on Jefferson street - 22.000
11 Hundseuie Building Site on Bass a venue.
12 Substantial Residence on Orleans street...-
13 Splendid Building Site on Vance street
14 Cottage Residence on Jones avenue
H Fine Building Site on Vance street
16 Handsome Suburban Uome,2miles from
17 Beautiful Building Site on Bass avenue
18 Double Cottage Resilience on Vance street..
19 Fine Buildinr Site on Bass avenue
20 Cottage Residence on Vance street
21 Handsome Building Site on Dunlup street
22 Neat Cottage Residence on Dunlap street
23 Beautiful building Site on Vance street i.. 4,tJ0 1
24 Double Cottage Residence on Dupre street 4.U00
25 Fine Building Sile on Monsarrat street - 2,it
26 Elegant Buililing Site on Tate street ..... .. 1,000
27 Handsome Building Site on Monsarrat street. - 2,000
All of the above Property being In
28 Splendid Plantation, containing 900 acres,
Makinr in all twenty-eight ehoice and valuable nieces of Real Estate, challenging com
parison with any distribution ever before offered to the public.
n a laae pleasure in lesuiying 10 tne aoove usi 01 property neing piacea at a tair valuation.
ipASSMORE & ItTJFFIN, Real Estate Agents,
' McmphlM, Tennessee,
29 One Chick ering Grand Piano
M One Chiokering Grand Square
31 Une tbickering urand bijuare H
XI une I nickering urand pquare
U One Rosewood Seven Octave ..
U One Rosewood Seven Octave
15 Une Rosewood Seven Octave
16 One Rosewood Seven Octave.
37 I ne Rosewood Sevea Octave..
38 Uae Kosewood beven Uctave..
39 One Boudoir Orgae (Fstey k Co.)
40 One Rosewrod Cottage Organ . .
41 One Five Octave Cottage Organ. ...
The Drices. as above, for Chiekerina'a Pianos and Ester k Co. s Orran. arc taken from their
respective Price Lisu, and are correct.
42 and 43. two Jutes Jurrenscn Watches, ttfO -h .
44 to 51. inclusive, eight Watches by Straiten, $20 each
52 to 59, inclusive, eiitht Elgin Watches by Raymond, AU each.....
(0 to 67, inolusiva, eight Diamond Sets, SioO each...-
(W to 87, inclusive, twenty Hold Watches and Chains Ladies', S140 each X.
Sri to lot. inclusive, twenty Vest Chains, SuO each.....
list Sterling Silver Tea Service, mounted in gold........... ........
I'M Sterling Silver Service..-...- ... -......
110 Diamond Set..
111 Diamond Pin bolitaire
11J to 131, inclusive, twenty Diamond Rings, SlOOeach
132 One Full Set Pearls . -
133 Sterling Silver Tea Service, mounted in gold....... .-....
34 Sterling hilver rxrnce
3ft to 1:4. inclusive, twenty Diamond Rings.
.V Siarlinc Silver Service. ........ .
156 Sterling Silver Tea Serv.ee, mounted in
gold
We certify that the above list of Vt etches.
selling rates. ... . '
importers ana Uealers in Watches,
The whole distribution will embrace the amount of
500,000
Divided Into shares of Five Dollars each, which can be obtained by addressing Passmore
Ruffin, Real Kttate Agents, Memphis, I.naesne, or of local A rents throurhout the country.
Th kiiu.n.1 tl.i, Iii.tnhuuB feel oousjdeat of pertecting their undertaking at a
earli.r day than was originally cuBtcmplated.
liue notice, through tne pre" na agencies,
eemmittae. unexceptionable, will ee seiecua
n e respeeuully rsler te aay hjuih wi ia j uipou, iiua,
PASSMORE & RUFFIX, Agents and Manage.
133.f Mo. 44 ilame) cjtree
PAPER."
Paper. Paper ! 'Paper!
OF ALL HINDS.
an on --f; i)i o-iU
A. V. DU PONT & CO.
Manufaoturarl and Wholotala D.al.n,
LouLsrllle, lentacky .
Dare Jort remorad to their new, lara
four-.tory warahoaaw. No. 184 Main it.
hl !
I
:-eto.t
MM i.l :hj.
- -, - -. , Memphis.
part of tbo city.
14-12-143
COOK ST0YES I
B
O
3
IBS
n
Es
se a
O
P ,
I
ST ,
4
a
H
R
st
4
w
s
w
M
H
.
5.0 0 EACH!
AFTER THE SALE OF
PERSONAL PROPERTY
at Memphis, Term.
4,4"0
g.OiX)
4,810
7,rl
.' 4.8I0
the city, 12 acres 12,000
4,000
6,500
- 4.OU0
6, 500 '
- 4.UOO
.. . 4.0U0
the City of Memphis aud its Suburbs.
in Panola county, Mississippi 132,001)
fl.OM)
725
..... 700
67S
60
575
51
.... 63
MA)
475
400
210
200
.... ..
.
II. it. HOLLKSBKKti.
Ag.ni lor vnicsenng m son, ana uitr a to., jueuipnis, xenu.
f 900
2,t)
l.OiiO
. 4.1SO
2,t0
-.. 1.2H0
, 7i O
. so
l,uJ
l,iJ
2.UO
- 6iJ
1o
2:
4.0J
ao
lUOr
-
t'JUOeach
-
Jewelry and Silverware are placed at our regula
. , F.D. BAKM.M ACU..
itiamonus ana ouverware, aeapou, i.no.
OO!
owing to the great demand for tirkru.
win o givn to id 11 rue ei erawmg.
w siipenniena ine same.

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