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Public ledger. [volume] (Memphis, Tenn.) 1865-1893, July 13, 1871, Image 1

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RAILROADS. i v. 1 1 - . .
MEMPHIS & LITTLE ROCK R. R.
Clmngo of Time Speed Increased.
COMMENCINO SUNDAY, JUNK 4. 1
and until further notice, truini will
daily as follows (city time) i , .
Leave Honefiold (opposite Memphis) a.m
Arrive at lluntorsville (op. L.itock) C:S0 p.m
nnminwt j, ' j j
Leave lluntorsville ...... 7:Yla.m
Arrive at Uopefield - 4:20 p. in
The ferry-boat will leave foot of Union
stroet promptly at 8:E0 a.m.
Freight train leavoi Hopefield on Mondays,
Wednesday! and Fridays at 4:40 a.m.
For tickets or information apply at the Com
pany's office. fY, Madison street, at ticket
office of the Memphis and Charleston railroad,
278 Main streot, or at ticket pOice of the
Momphis and Louisville and Mississippi and
Tenner, railroadman. treet.E
, (jen'l Superintendent.
C. P. OAKLEY, General freight and
. Ticket Agent. g-t-'
Chants t Nrbmleilo MlaaiitHlppI
wild Tenueaaee Kallroait.
Oryici or Okh'i. BupKRWTMnrKT, 1
Mkmphis, May 28, 1871 J
ON AND AFTER SUNDAY. MAY M. 1871,
until further notice, tiaius on tbn road
will run as follows: .
Arrive. Leave.
New Orleans Mail. daily.5:(sl p.m. 1:10 p.m.
Kxpress, daily -..SiUO a.m. 4:35 p.m.
i'roiitht,daily(eroeptSun-
day) .......... - 1:20 Pm 5:40 a.m.
fifi-Bl JA8. YOtHJK. Pen. Sup't.'
MEMPHIS AND LOUISVILLE
" ' ' ItAILItOAI). '
INiiiiiiiier Selxcdnle Juno 13.
Day Express, Ieuvos . 4 :00 a.m
New Vork Kxpress, daily 12:45 p.m
Nashville Express 6:J0p.ui
TjHiKUANT RLEEPINa CARS WILL RUN
J j throimb to Kt. Louis and Louisville on
the 12:4.') p.m. train, and to Nashville on tho
fi::il) p.m. train. 1'he 4 a.m. and 5:30p.m.
train does not run an .Sunday. 77-t
MEMPHIS ' & CHARLESTON
RAILROAD.
CHANGE OF TIME!
DOUBLE TRAINS DAILY.
On and alter Monday, Jnly 3d,
TRAINS ON THE MEMPHIS AND
Charleston railroad will leave and arrive
as follows:
I.av Memphis.
Through Mail Train: J?.;30 B,nl
Through Express Train 12:01 night
Through Freight and J unct'n Ac n 5:4(1 a.m
Bumerville Accommodation ... 6 :ou p.m
Arrive at Memplila.
Through Mail Train....... J(2:JJP-m
Throueh Express Tram 1(1:15 p.m
Through Freight and Acn'n Train- 7:( p.m
bomurville Accommodation 8:00 a. ui
1(V, Id" O. I.. ANDERSON. Pnp't.
JOB PRINTING.
. C. A. KEEHN.
RUN, I
mi:k,I
sireot. I
. ' I
J Oil VKI.M1K,
SiHO M.il Street.
VIK.UI'HIH.
Th new Railroad III up printed on
4'nrda. BIIMicada, I.elier-Ual, 'lr
enlaraand Knvelopea.
KnirllNh, Orrnisn and Hebrew JTob
PH.itlnirn.atlT.WHli'il. l''-"""-T
ii -. r.,, UnKlnann Jtr .VichnlRnn.
A. W. MnCoNHKi.t., formerly with Quinby A
Robinson, IStil.
Western Foundry,
AHD
MACHINE SHOP,
Sholby Street. 1
(OPPOSITE THE OLD OAY0S0 HOUSE.)
NEW ARBANGEHEHT.
NICHOLSON & McCONNELL.
ISuccossors to W. A. Robinson A Co.
NICHOLSON A McCONNELL, HAVINO
leased the above named ioundry for a
term of years, offer their "ervices to t he pub
lic, soliciting onlors for ALL K1U ye
W0K1C IN Til El R LINE, promising dispatoh
and promptness for all work intrusted to them.
Speoial attention given to repairing machinery
and stKunibont wnrk. 4H-l!n
RLEICJSJPR?
HALEIG 11 SPIMNUS WATEll.
rnilE WATERS PROM THE RALEIOH
J Springs will be supplied to all who may
desire them at No. lii Washington street, ice
house, fruiu and after June 30, Mil. The
waters from these celebrated springs arc
known by hundreds of the people of Memphis
to be an almost oertain cure for all disorders
of the stomach, bowels, liver and kidneys.
All orders specifying the kinds of water de
sired can be left with the proprietor of the
ice bouse, or sent to Raleigh U J. 11. Cole,
who will personally superintend the putting
up of the waters as per order. A lull supply
always to be found at the ice hoose.
lir-,-Vi J. II- C(U,K. Proprietor.
ICE.
MEMPHIS ICE CO.
JIICKEY & BAItTLETT,
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in
PURE LAKE ICE
(Mite?: 310 Itialn SL,
Storehouse, Xa 9 Howard's Ilow
SHIPPING ORDERS RESPECTFULLY So
licited. Orders left at either place will be
CROCERIES.
R. H. GLISSON & CO.,
Xo. 1 13 Main Street,
IJ AVE JUST RECEIVED AND OFFER
I 1 for sale a full assortment of staple and
funcy groceries, etc. ; Geo. F. Davis A Co.s
star bums and breakfast bacon, Evans Bro. I
bee hive hams, best brands 01 family Hour,
choice table butter, sugar, coffee, tea, spices,
el?. Pure old Cogaa brariy; port, .hrry
and Madeira wines; old Bourbon and Robin
son county whiskies nil of which we sell at
lowest prices. All good? sold are delivered
free oi charge and under guarantee. rle
call. I""' our goods, and be convinced f the
fet. M-ltf
If
oi i ii mm m-m mm a t dj i r. "J " .i 4 n uici--.tT4' e - 11 - mm mm
nn. i m i ' km mvt m,a - wm , i . - t - m. uv ft., tj . ' . . i ii it r, n . a i r km r . b? ri i
By E. WHITMORE. ' LARGEST CITTT CIRCULATION. , , w . t fifteen Centa Per Week
VOL. XII. MEMPHIS, TENN.: THURSDAY EVENING, JULY 13, 1871. NO. 116
PUBLIC JLEDGEIl.
rpHB PUBLIC LEDOER IS PUBLISHED
X. every afternoon (except Sunday) by
E . WIIITHORE,
At Ne. 13 Madison street.
The Public) LinogR Is served to city subscri
bers by faithful carriers at F1FTEKN CKNIS
PER WEEK, payable weekly to the enrriors.
By mail (in advance): One year. $l sig
months, $4; three months, 12; one month,
75 cents.
Newsdealer! supplied at 2X eenta per eopy.
Weekly Public Ledger,
Published every Tuesday at $2 per annum (in
advance) s elubs of five or more, $1 50.
Communications upon subjoets of general
Interest to the public aro at all times accept
able. Haieoted manuscripts will hot be returned.
RATES OF ADVERTISING IN DAILY.
First Insertion tl Jp per square.
Subsequent insertions nj) t J
For one wook J JJJ ,,
For two weeks 4 M
Fer throe weeki..........,..... g W) M
For one month........... 7
RATES OF ADVERTISING IN WEEKLY.
First Insertion II W P wuare.
Subsetiuent insertions ou
Eight lines of nonpareil, lolid, eonstitnte a
square.
Displayed advertisements will be charged
according to the bpaci ononpied, at above
rates there being twolve lines of solid type to
the inch.
Notiees In local eolumn Inserted for twenty
cents per line for each insertion.
Special notices insorted for ton cents per line
for each insertion.
Notice, of deaths and marriages, twenty
oents per line. 4 ,, ,. ...
Advertisements puniisneo ai iuimri.
be charged one dollar per square for each In
sertion. To regular advertisers we oiTer superior In
ducements, both as to rate ot charges and
manner of displaying their favors.
All bills for advertising are due whon eon
traeted and payable on demand.
aii whniii.rnnAii hnsinese or other
wise, must be addrossed to.
K. W1IITIHS.IRK,
Publisher and Proprietor.
A RUSTIC MAIDEN.
0 fairest of tho rural maids 1
Thy birth was in tho forost shades ;
Oreen boughs, and glimpses of the sky.
Were all that met thine infant oyo.
Thy snorts, thy wandering, when a child,
Waro ever in tho sylvan wild ;
And all the beauty of the plaoe
Is in thy heart and on thy face.
The twilight of the trees and rocks
Is in tho light shailo of thy locks;
Thy step is as the wind, that woavos
Its playful way among the leaves.
Thine eyes are springs, in whose serene
And silent wntors heaven is seen;
Their lashes aro the herbs that look
On thoir young figures in the brook.
The forest depths, by foot nnpressed,
Aro not more sinless than tby breast ;
The holy peace, that tills the air
Of those culm solitudes, is there.
Burnett's Cookino Extracts aro the
best. Sold by nil "first-class drupKiatn
and grocers.
A t'nrloiiH Story.
A curious story is told respecting the
small-pox hospital nt Hampstead by the
Hampstcnd and Iliehgntn Express. " A
woman, it is stated, who hnd occupied a
bed in one of the wards was reported to
her husband as being dead. The neces
sary funeral arrangements were accord
ingly being mado by the widower, who
himself followed the supposed remains
of his deceased wifo to the grave. To
his astonishment, nnd it is to bo hoped
his delight, tho lady whoso obsequies had
thus been celebrated returned home
about n fortnight after her funernl in a
state of extreme surpriso nt not having
received any intelligence during that
period from, her husband nud family,
whom she found in deep mourning. The
explanation of this misadventure was
that the woman removed to a convales
cent ward, and another patient who af
terwards died had been put into the bed
sho had originally occupied. The name
of the first patient having been 'inad
vertently loft tip nt the head of the bed,
cnused tho mistake that gave rise to so
much pain and pleasure.' If tho facts
stated are correct, there would seem to
be room for improvement in the arraHgo
mcnts as well as tho site of the hospital.
Had the disconsolate husband, during
the interval which elapsed between he
funeral of his wifo and her return to the
domestic circle, embarked in a second
mnrriage, one of the two ladies would
have just ground for dissatisfaction.
J'all Mall auzette.
Spirited Uerinan Uirlu. i
A charmicg wny to ring out an old
fashion and ring in a new, was that
adopted by some young ladies of Berlin,
with reference to tho chignon. Tho na
tional spirit now at white heat in Ger
many is, if anything, more ardent among
the women than tho men, as indeed it
always has been and will be tho world
over. So the fair patriots resolve to re
flect more of the German nationality in
their dress, and abandon and henceforth
ignore French fashions, but moro espe
cially the really odious chignon. Ac
cordingly the sixty young ladies, daugh
ters of the wealthiest citizens, who were
selected to welcome tho returning army
at the Bradonburg gnte, had a mooting
in which the question of their nttirn was
settled. It was that of Margaret in Kaul
bach's sketch of her first meeting with
Faust, which have been thoroughly iden
tified with theOermnn maiden in all art,
and especially familiarized of Into by the
"Margueritas" ofthe stnge. Two plaits
of their own hair hanging down the bnok
was to be indispensable, and they were
pledged mutually and to the municipal
authorities on no occasion to use false
hair. These sixty wealthy young ladies
ought certainly to be more than a match
for one Empress, and she not so much
of an Empress as she was, and they will
receive the congratulations of the entire
world if they carry tho day against false
hair.
A Strasburg correspondent of the
New York Tribune pays a flattering
tribute to our countrywomnn, Clnra
Iiarton,' who, besides nursing the
wounded in hospitals as long as the
Franco-German wnr lasted, formed and
executed a plan for marking the graves
of the soldiers who died in the prisons
of the South. She is now in Strasburg,
where she has founded, with her own re
resources, a large and always increas
ing establishment of work fur women,
which counts more than two hundred
and fifty mothers of large families
widows, wives of prisoners or wounded
soldiers. Twelve hundred persons
little children and aged parents have
Wn fed and warmed and clothed all
winter by the earnings of these women,
and by this means held through the ter
rible crisis above the degradation ol
beggary and vngrancy.
MUUDEIt AND LYNCH LAW.
Fill ns-aienlara of th Terrible
'I'mcedy In lronolx ( onaly, III.
A Ky Wliipprl nl Kwnateil to
ixtntli by tllM raiher-'l'lie 4'oro.
nor'. lniniM S'oilnln of lli
nunlerrr-Tlie l-'liil Tka Iroiil
Ilie Jail by n Mob mxl llmiiceil. .
From the Teoria Roview, July fl.)
A few days ago we gave a brcif state
ment of a brntal murder near Onarga,
in tliis State, in which a father killed his
own son. The prominent actor in this
dreadful tragedy was nnmed Martin
Mera, an Irishmnn by birth, about forty
four years of ago, five feet eight inches
in hight, thick-sot and muscular, with a
forbidding countenance, a restless, im
patient eye, and a deep, guttural voice,
lie owned , a place containing eighty
acres, about two and a half miles from
Onarga, in Iroquois county.. His house
shows a considerable degree of refine
ment, and the number of books and
papers indicated that its owner was u
perswn of considerable intelligence. Ho
wns known among his neighbors as hon
est, a prompt paymaster, and a hard
working man. But he hnd a dreadful
temper, and, when under its influence,
would whip his horses unmercifully, cut
out tho eyes of his hogs, and indulge in
other act of brutal and fiendish passion.
His family consisted of his wife, an in
telligent lady aged about forty, ahd six
children, tho eldest fourteen yoars, nnd
tho youngest about twenty days. The
eldest boy was named Martin, nnd ho
was eleven years of age.
On the 15th of Juno, Mera came to
Oilman nnd posted two written notices,
that his boy had run nway from homo,
and offering a reward for bis return. Ho
stated jocosely that he did not know why
tho lad should leave, ns ho had always
treated him well. A few days after,
some of tho neighbors began to suspect
that something was wrong, and, on the
30th, Messrs. McCourtio nnd G. B.
Winters, of Onarga, and others, swore
out a warrant nnd started for Mora's
house. On their way they stopped at a
school which Mora's oldost duughter
was attending, and questioned her. On
promising to protoct her she said her
father had beaten her brother, and, after
beating him, had put him on the stovo,
and sho hud never seen him since, but
believed he was dead.
Armed with theso facts tho party ar
rested Mera. Uo was perfectly cnlm,
and insisted that his boy had run away.
Ha was relensed, and eight men
watched the house in hopes that he
would visit tho grave and give them a
clue of the body, but ho was taken to
Onarga on a warrant for murder, nnd a
large party went out to loot lor t ne Douy
of the mnrdored boy. Tho search was
continued all day without success, hut
finally, late in the olternoon, Mr. Jonn
Barnes, of Oilman, found near tho hedge,
south of the houso, a pieco of clay Biib
soil that hnd been cut with a spade. A
stick was forced into tho ground about
three feet, and on being drawn out, it
smelled of d(cnTed matter. The ground
was removed and tho body of the boy
Mnrtm wns found buried four teet eight
inches deep. IIo wns enveloped in a
sheet neatly pinned about his body, and
he had on his shirt, pnnts, and cap, tho
latter pullsd over his eyes. The body
was very much decomposed, but the fect
, r i .
gave oviuenco oi iikui), uurni.
The news quickly spread, and Mc
Courtio went to town to seo Mora. On
his approach Mora was saying to the
crowd, " If I've killed the boy, why don't
they find the body?" McCourtio re
arinnded. " Martin, they have found the
body, and you must submit to these
handeutls.
"Where did they find it, Mo. 7"
"Closo by the hedgo in the garden.'! -"Hnvo
mercy on me Mel" .
"How can you ask for mercy, never
having shown it while your boy pload for
it ? No, sir, do not nsk mo lor merer.
"I did, Mc. I did whip him to death,"
said Mera.
Tho excitement in Onarga was intense.
and a largo crowd gathered, expressing
their determination to lynch the pris
oner. During this timo Mera seemed
perfectly cool, and even expressed his
regrets that he did not do the work more
thoroughly, lie was hnally put m a wn
mn and removed to Wetseka. the county
seat, where ho was lodged in jail. This
was last Saturday. Un Sunday tno cor
oner imnnneled a jury and hold an in
quest. The facts of finding the body
were civen as above.
Tho mother and sister of tho boy testi
fied as follows:
A TALK UP HOIIHOU.
Mury Mera, the wifo and mother, ap
peared m court with a child two wccks
old. Mrs. Mera, notwithstanding a
bursting heart, told tho tale of horror
calmly.
1 live two and a half miles from
Onarga: Martin Mera is my husband;
have resided there six years; Martin
treated his children kindly nt times; he
has not whipped much lately; he whip
ped our hoy Martin on J uesdny night,
two weeks ago last Tuesday; lie whip
ped him very hard; I did not see him;
my babe was born that day; did not
hear blows, bufr heard the child's cries;
they were in the kitchen; I was in the
bed-room; the parlor is between the
two; 1 heard the child cry, " Yes, sir!
yes, fiirl no, sir!" The whipping con
tinued some time; my husband would
ask him, " Will yon work? " The child
did not scream; I do not know what
time tho child went to bed; Mera got
up between fonr and five; I was under
the influeuce of some powders, nnd did
not awaken until breakfast was over;
did not sleep during the night much;
the little girl came in and asked me if I
wanted brenkfast; I told her I did not
want breakfast; did not hear any dis
turbance; about ten o'clock the child
came into the bed-room, followed by his
father; his father was whipping him; he
whipped him very hard with a horse
whip, a hlack-snnke, about one nnd
a half inches at the butt; did see him
strike him a great many times; all 1
saw of the whipping was in my bed
room; he did not strike him with the butt
end of the whip; tho lash wns broken
off so as to leave the whip only about a
yard long; he dodged around tho room
to avoid the blows, promising to work,
and asking. for mercy; he did not hold
the child; the child went around and
around the room, and my husband gave
him some very hard blows; the child
plead: " Don't whip me, father! don't
whip me, and I will work!" Ho was
naked when he came into my room; his
father made him take off his clothes;
take off everything; the boy had just
come in from tho field, his face wns
swollen from tho whipping he received
the night before; he was not crying
when Le rame into the room; his futher
whipped him yery hard for ten
or fifteen minutes, the boy all tho timo
begging tor mercy, ana promising to
work; his father at lost stopped, when
he told the child to put on his shirt;
the child made an effort and failed; his
father again ordered him to put on his
shirt, when ho said, " I can't see itl I
can't seo it! I can't see itl" "Yob
can't see it? " " No, father. I can't see
yon, father, I can't see you, father! " and
loll dying; my Husband said, iiavo l
killed him? and I said, "Yes, you
havo; you have finished him;" he then
took him in his arms and bathed him
with whisky, and tried to get him to
drink some; he tried to pour some down
him; ho then threw some liquor oyer
him, and tried to revive him, and having
failed he cried: "Have I killed him,
have I killed him?"
He rubbed him with spirits half an
hour; thfr child raised his hands once,
and moved his lips, and it was over.
His last words wero "I can't see, I can't
see. lio then pusnoa tno Douy unaer
my bed, where it romained until a little
beforo midnight. After night, Mora
went out often, staying lor a short tune,
and then would return. He took tho
body out of the front door. He said he
would give his right arm and leg rather
than had it happened. He would suffer
any torture to have him back again. He
generally treats his family well; he is n
good provider. The only trouble was,
the boy would tell lies. Ho would tell
tho boy to tell tho truth and mind his
lessons.
He is n very high-tempered mnn, and
never knows when to stop. If I was on
my feet. I could have saved my hoy, but
my babe was only one day old. I wns
on my bed. IIo has not always treated
mo well, ho cave mo a cracK asido the
head ono or two times. I did want to
leave hira some time since, but ho prom
ised better, nnd wo got along very well
afterward. Ho has had somo trouble
with his neighbors, but he never spouo
bad of them. My brother came to see
mo once, nnd my husband drove nira ou.
The first day I was nr I went to look
for the grave. 1 told Martin I had boen
out to look for the grave Ho asked,
"Did you find it?" 1 told him " No:
" 1 don t think you could," wns tho re
ply. When tho men camo out to search
for the body 1 denied it, for my own and
my children's sake. I knew that Martin
was a passionate man, and that our lives
wero in danger. IIo told me not to tell
of what happened, and he said, " This is
a bad job, and then snid, "It was too
bad."
; The children wore not ntraid ot him
except when ho was whipping some of
them; I was afraid of him at times; he
is a very passionato man, and when he
was kind he was extra kind; when the
men took him away, ho said, " This is a
bad job; this is a terrible thing; " I did
not say a word while the whipping wns
going on; I looked nt him as much as
to say, you havo done enough, but I did
not speak, as I know he would bo more
angry; he was not under tho intluenco
of liouor at the time he killed tho boy;
he has whipped tho girls a number of
times with a horsewhip.
He went for a neighboring woman; on
Tuesday morning, about ton o'clock, I
was taken sick; the woman came and he
took her back after dinner; tho boy was
healthy; never hoard him complain un
less it was the headache; he would have
been eleven years old on the 17th of
June; his shirt was bloody, hut do not
know where it enmo from; it did not
come from his mouth; his face was
swollen in tho morning; suppose it was
from tho wninninir tho night before; 1 do
not know whom tho whip is; ho was in
his right mind; ho never acted singularly ;
ho is a man of good, sound senso, steady,
and adapted to money-ranking.
LITTLE MAOrjlK.
This little girl, about seven yeurs old,
said: Father whipped brother with a
whip; ho put brother on the stove; lie
laid him down; ho cried when he was
put on the stovej there was lire in the
stove; ho lnid hint down on his back on
the hot stove; brother tried to get away;
his clothes wero all off; father made
him take them off himself; father hit
brother on tho back and head; he hit
him lots of times; ho threw them in the
shed; he then walked in and stood up by
tho side of tho wull; he whipped him
and took him into mother's room; I
never saw hira moro; I don't know what
was done with him; father told me not
to sny anything about it, or ho would
punish mis I loved my brother; father
whipped me sometimes with a whip.
SARAH MKRA
Is a very modest-appearing girl of about
fourteen years ot age. She swore: I
always lived at home; father treated mc
well at times and sometimes not; he
has punished me two or three times; the
last time in December Inst; ho did
threaten me four weeks ago; I did work
around tho stable helping father; did
housework; about a year and a half ago
ho whipped me very hard with a horse
whip; not tho same whip he used on
brother; he whipped me very hard in
December because I had been at a
neighbor's and staid an hour; he often
threatened to whip me if I did not do
the chores; on Tuesday, two weeks last
Tuesday, ho brought brother in nnd
said ho had not worked, and whipped
him and knocked him down twice;
father continued to whip him until he
could not stand np; " he would whip
the life out of him;' two or three times
he would sny this, and brother would
plead with fathej, saying, ' Futher, don't
whin mo any more oh, don't whip me
any more!' He was a good boy, and
when brother went to bed about ten
o'clock, he said ho did not know why
father whipped hira so; he never told
stories only when tiUher made hi in,
father would sny that if he didn't own
that ho did do so and so he would whip
him, and to avoid it he would own to
things he never did.
TUB FATAL MOltNlNti.
On Wednesdny morning I cot un and
got breakfast ready; father rose when
breakfast was ready; brother got un. but
fell so badly that he went to bed again;
father made him get up and go out and
fied the stock, and when he came back
father whipped him and sent hira to the
field; he went for him and brought him
in; made him take off his clothing, and
then commenced whipping him; he then
puked him up and laid him on the stove;
the stove was hot enough to heat an iron ; I
was baking biscuit; father put him on
the stove twicej brother pleading all the
while, " Father, don't burn mel don't
burn mel" He screamed very loud, and
the skin stuck to the stove; his skin
came off from his back and his f't, and
it stuck to the stove; U mudied so I
opened the door and father immediately
shut it; wlulo brother was pleading lather
said he would burn him until be would
work; he has whipped me very hard, and
has said he would punish mo till I could
not sit up; I have a mark on my Arm
where he struck mc lost. December with
a horsewhip; it cut through the flesh And
was sore two weeks; I havo seen him
strike mother with his fist and blacken
her . face; saw him strike her a
number of times; don't know how many;
mother told me always to do what father
liked, and we always tried; ho whipped
brother a number of times with the butt
end of a horsewhip on tho head ; he
knocked him down three or fonr times;
the flesh from his back and fect stuck to
the stove; he whipped him afterward; i
never saw my brother since ho wont into
the bedroom; 1 did tell a lady tnnt i
never expected to seo my brother again;
that he had not run away, because he
could not? 1 was not going to tell, he
cause futher had whipped me very hard,
and 1 was afraid of him; mother was go
ing to leave one time; I do not know
what the trouble was; she shows marks
where father whipped her; ho took
brother in his arms and put him on the
stove and heJd him there two or three
minutes.
The jury on those facts brought in n
verdict that Martin Mera, sr., had feloni
ously, intentionally, and with malice
nforethnught, murdered his son, Martin
Mora, jr., on tho 11th day ot June, and
committed him to appear at the Circuit
Court on Wednesday, the 6th.
The excitement grow until on yester
day morning, when a body ol men,
headed by Dr. B. J. Daniols, of Oilman,
nroceeded to Watseka. burst open the
jail, disarmed tho sheriff, took Mera to
a grovo outside the city, and hung him to
a tree until he was dead. The mob was
orderly and quiet, and consisted of
about one thousand peopio, a lew min
ntcs beforo being hung Mera culled
upon the Masons to help him. As none
camo forward, he snid bitterly: "I for
swear all Masons. Ho then called
unon the Catholics. A voice said
"Call on God alono; no one else can
holp you." He then said: "May the
Lord Jesus Christ have mercy on my
soul, nnd the Holy Virgin pray for me. '
A rone was swung over a branch, and
ono end tied to Mora's neck. Ho was
then placed in a wagon, and when the
rnno was nil i listed tho wagon was driven
from under him. Ho struggled terribly
for a few minutes, and then settled
down, and soon it was all over. Thug
ended one of the roost hornlilo aiiairs
that has ever transpired in this State.
How AdvertUrinoBla Pay.
There haVe been many eminent men
who have made their hundreds of thous
ands of dollars by advertising. Here is
the opinion of a few well known names
called at random from a score of others
whieh wn micht cite:
" Without advertisements I should be
a noor man to-dnv. H. T. Helmbold.
My success is owing to my nuernwy
in ridvortifiine." Bonner.
"Advertising has furnished mo with
a eomnetence." Amos Lawrence.
" I advertised my products and mndc
money." N. Longworth.
" Constant and persistent advertising
is a euro prelude to wealth. Mepncn
Girnrd. ,
" IIo who invests ono dollar in busi
ness should invest one dollar in adver
tisintr that business." A. T. Stewart.
" The man who pays more for shop
rent than for advertising, don t under
stand his business." Greeley.
Philadelphia statistics prove that dur
ing the past six months nearly three
hundred people died in that city who, at
tho hour of their death, wero more than
eighty-years of age.
CLOTHING.
JOHNSTON & VANCE
MANUFACTURERS
CLOTHING
A lj(0
Furnishing Goods I
No. 305 Main St.,
Under Fcauody Hotel.
T II 13
Jlomo-Mado Shirt
If mde to order. In .very style and pattern.
This shirt is caitrante.it to give central satis
faction to th. puMic.
1'atent Siiirnl-tSeam Drawers, th. most ele
rant drawer mad. for summer wear for cool
ness and comfort.
Th. proprietors tak. pleasura In infnrmlnr
their customers, and the puhlio generally,
that they are enabled to have the 6nor grailcs
of clnthinc mad. to order, expressly for this
trad..
To rent lcm on residing oatside of Memphis
a Kood fit will be cuarnnteed by fenUinx the
following meafurements in inches: ISire of
Collar worn ; measure from con tar ol Shoulder
alnnir arm to Knuckle ot small finger; around
Chest, W aist, and Wrist. Mate number of
Plait: if for Studs, tipuals, or Buttons i
stylo of Cuff.
Newest Goods and Latest Styles
Can h. seen at this fashionabl. and popo
Miaoiisamenu si
B Pip J S
h I liJJ H
r li if H
0 U 4 F 3
i I (tmi I si
A J f f WM. DEAN & CO. stw
S3 g iV4 Choice Groceries, Toas, j U-S5
a .3 lLt,V provisions:' i 13
10,000 TEA CANNISTERS GIVEN AWAY!
TN OUUKK THAT EVKHY PKltSON MAY HAVE A PROPER AND CONVENIENT ARTI
I nlo for holding Tea. florin Ihe nnzt sixty days w. will present oach purchaser of pound
or mors with a handsom. bromed Tea Connistor.
r 9 f ( OHOICS 4 VlCf' ' 3 tL
10,000 TEA CANNISTERS (NOT) GIVEN AWAY,
HUT AS OREAT A NUMBER OF FAMILIES WILL BE SUPPLIED WITI! THE BEST
Urnoerie. ft tho lowent living 2rwv1 J",
COOK STOVES!
d
o
O
n
a
a
a
o
o
1
-a
C3
X
AN ASSORTMENT OJf
; 1IKATINU 8TOVEN, TINWAKE, IIOLI.OW.WARE, LAHFH,
AND HOUSE FURNISHING 0()DS GENERALLY.
nnin. (inH.rlnc. and KtonHl Cutting
WORK of all descriptions especially solicited.
attention of prompt onaeuicioui,wor.uiou.
Qjjf IVo. :tUH
BLANKS.
LEGAL BLANKS!
Warrantee Deeds,
Trust
Quit Claim
ii
Deeds of Gift,'
Attachments,
Leases,
Chattel Mortgages,
Crop
ii
Summons,
Executions,
Garnishments,
Subpoenas,
WRIT OF FORCIBLE ENTRY AND
DETAINER,
Appearance IJoiuls,
Tower ot Attorney,
Deputations,
Dray Tickets,1
Bills of Lading,
Etc., etc., etc.,
KEPT ON HAND AND FOR SALE
C H EfA P ,
AT
rTIUS OFFICE !
Paper ! . Paper ! . . Paper t
OFAU KUDS.
---'ill tf I 1 ,1 I I
A. V. DU PONT t& CO.'
Manafacturers and Wholes tie Dealers,
LouIstLUo, ... Kentnckj
Have Just removed to tbell new, lore
tour-story waronouse, no. xo maia h.
Wl-T
' W.I.I.I". WWW. m r - --
COOK STOVES!
w
S
B
n
L
to
0
P
'A
K
Pi
a
w
s
w
R
e
m
H
IS
promptly attended to and warranted. JOB
Orders from th. oouutry will reooiv. th.
.titti-tiu
Hoeonrt t-4treet, MemphU.
BOCSJkNDSHS
March, 1871. March, 1871.
Spring Trade.
HILL, TERltY & MITCHELL
ARE NOW READY FOR THE SPRING
Trade, with a heavy stock and food as
sortment of .
BOOTS, SHOES AND HATS I
Which they offer to MERCHANTS ONLY, in
qunlitios and prices that will prove satisfac
tory. I ISO Mnin Street,
MEMPHIS - - TENNESSEE.
SN-t
CLASSES.
Money Cannot Buy It !
For Sight Is .Priceless!
THE DIAMOND GLASSES,
HAVCPACTOBBD BT
J. E. SPENCER & CO., NEW YORK,
Which are now offered to the pulilin, ire pro
nounced by all th. celobroted Opticians of th.
worU to be th.
MOHT l'liltF-EOT,
Natural, Artificial help tothehnman eye ever
known. They are ground under theirown su
pervision, from ininuui Crystal Pebbles,
melted together, and dorive their name,
"Uiamonu," on account of thfir hardness
and brilliancy. Th. SCIENTIFIC 1'KINCI-
l'LK on which they ar. constructed brings th.
core or center of tb. lens directly in front of
the eye, producing a cloar and distinct vision,
as in the natural, healthy sight, and prevent
ing mi unpleasant seuauonf. iuco m uiiui
mering and wavering of siKht. disxiness, etc..
peculiartoallothers in use. They are mounted
in tho finest manner, in framos of the best
quality, of all materials used for that purpose.
Their finish and durability cannot be sur
passed. C'AUTiog. Non. genuine nnless bearing
their trad, mark stamped on evury frame.
0- W. C. UYKli. Jeweler and Optician, is
solo agent for Memphis. Tcnn., from whom
they can only be obtained. These goods ar.
not supplied to piddlers, at any price.
14-enil-M-H
BOOK BINDERY.
Franklin Book Bindery.
ABB
BLANK BOOK MANUFACTORY,
No. 15 West Court Street, Memphis.
H. C TOor, Proprietor.
RLANK BOOKS. PAPER RULINO. AND
hiniiinrof .very description, executed in
a yery superior manner, and warranted to
give entire satisfaction.
-My Blank Book panorembnoe the first
mills in America; my stock consists of tb.
finn.t in the entire marknt. and Drives to Com
pote with any house in Memphis. Parties will
find it to their interest to a-iv. m. a call before
ordering elsewhere. 113-t
PHYSICIAN.
Ulb J. M. ItOGlillH,
Kenldeaee, 341 A labaae 8 1
A I.MORTIN REAR ST. MARVSCHURCH.
J Poplar street, may be consulted at bis
residence. Moraine. Tom 6ol: aooa, U
to 1, and from 7 to 3 in the evemug.
so-lU'l Ultir! lii I mlpu lrt.
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