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Public ledger. [volume] (Memphis, Tenn.) 1865-1893, April 26, 1872, Image 1

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H52
CAS.
PAPER.
GAS
-Of the- '
EDGfER.
Paper ! : Paper ! Paper !
or ALL KIITJM.
Memphis Gaslight Co.
(Tlio Old Company)
IS NEVKK BELOW '.
TWENTY-FIVE CANDLE
A. V. DU PONT H. CO.
Manufaoturen and Wholesale DaaUr.
n
City Official Journal. LARGEST CITY CIRCULATION. Fifteen Cents Per "Week
VOL.' XIV. MEMPHIS, TENN.: FRIDAY EVENING. APRIL 26, 1872. NO. 49
LoKiiTlIle, ' . l . e . . KeitickJ
:!0'powEnU -
1
NET PHICEl
$2 20 per 1000 Cubic Ft.
k u m . . 1 ;
MJOTEItH MET FBEE. ,
Company' Office,
No.
6-t
291 Second Street.
WOOD AND WILLOW WARE.
Wheeler, Pickens & Co.
A A
Healers In nil kluils
Wood and Willow Ware
CORDASE, TWINE, PAPER,
SIEVES, BUXSHES, BROOMS,
BLACKING, MATCHES, ETC. "
, ' -. : ,
TN ORDER TO ACCOMMODATE OUR IN
X oreasing business anil for the better con
venience of the Wholesale Trade we will,
:after April Int. ocoupy the twe adjoining
uteres for a Wholesale Department, making
lit separate and dietinot from the retail, trust
ing thereby to afford much better facilities to
Kotk branches. ,
HHEKI.ER, PICKERS CO..
T 0,-04 H. ft'iHyj end 8 Mnin
MUSIC.
E.A.BENSON,
: t 1 s - . t-
317 Main ftJ 317 Main
IS NOW OFrEBIKO '
ttr STKINWAY Piano from....J475 to WOO
BT G ABLER Pianos from....-.M00 to 1550
,- V8SE k SONS' Pianos frora350 to $S00
tee- MASON k HAMLIN Organs..! To to 300
Piano for Sale -ui Manthly Payments
MMSA'MNr
brought to the South.
NOW IN THE TIME TO BUT
Country morchants and dealers will please
send in their orders, as I can All theut at New
York prices for cash or good oily acceptances
for thirty, sixty or ninety days.
Old Pianos taken in exohange for new ones.
IManos tuned and repaired in a satifactory
r.. v. v ui' d . .
SH'Miiin street. Memphis.
J7t
CROCERIES.
TO MERCHANTS.
Forster, Kealhofer & Co
.otlers iu
STAPLE AND FANCY "
GROCERIES.
330 Front Street.
" t
Fresh Goods Constantly Arriving.
Xew S. l Ilaius,
UrcakTuMt Ilaron,
Dried UHf,
Itulogna SuiiMage,
Full Ktiu k of Canned liomln,
IV I new, LlquorM,
Cigar and Tobacco.
Collect, Teas
Mugart. Xyriij.
Flour, Lard and Pork.
A consignment of Dried Poaches.
ANNOUNCEMENTS.
For CrivlUca T Collect.).
J HARVEY MATHKfJ is a candidate for
,,h. r.ir,. .f Priiilera Tax Col
lector for Shelby county, subjeet to the Demo
cratic Convention. '
rr County Trnnlee.
K. WOODWARD is a candidate for re-etee-
tiisr to Hie ollice 01 irusiee oi cmmii com,,,
(.ubi-ct to ine action ui m.
Coertr Convention.
Deuiocratio
2-T
g-er fclseriil, ,
MAKCU8 J. WRIGHT is a candidate for
re-election to tli otlk-e of Sheriff of Shelby
.i h nn.iiina August election. euo-
Sect to the action of the Democratic Conven
lion of June aitb.
48-t
GEORGE L 11 ARRIS is a candidate for
Sheriff of Shelby county, subject 16 the action
of the Demooretio Convention. 45T
' "ATPTCURRY'aiiPounwis himself as an in
dependent candidate for re-el.aiien to the
office of Sheriff lor Shelby county. Election
.Auguit. 1872. 11. re.peotfully refers tu tiie
euerchanU and lawyer, of Memphis as to his
litne to hold the emVe.
CI1AS. h. ANDERSON u a eandidate for
Pkexiff of Shelby county, eufcfect to thedy-
HIIOl OI 10 aaiiu v-usi "uw". .-
u'eare auth
- tUUKST
huriaed to announce CoIodmI J.
At iu ntyat the ensuiog Auguiteleotion.
bnetnyt t. De,n,cratic Convention. 21t
subject to
' eaany inquiries I ieteb an
In an.wer i
thorn you to a - .u., oaniy. at the A
.'waeonee my nui. e. a cstwi
date lor t-hoTin i -Djtct M ,ne action of
V . ... tunveoujoa.
the Democratic Coun. 1 'Bi r BALL
To the People ot venm.
RESPONSE .TTTHEOT8.
-r - nnnni.r dMire. sumci.n ;w r -.--
Hon. T. A. R. elon
Lhatunooga. March lj.lCT.
ll-w
To the People of Teniewee. .
1. enponte to the call of maay leading
M Thuey in Af ; i,FAKLANI).
VarH't-vnt' Tfr.fl. i" "
Miiinir
1N
ad i.flu.nt.U-.ontrol mf t n
natter. 1 h.rtby aooounc
UaM fo' the office of Jude of the eupr eree
Court made vrcant bye . re.irt.
R1KS PIANOS AF.t T
' PUBLIC LEDGER:
rnni public ledoer is publisbrd
L .very afternoon (except Sunday) at No.
U Madison street. '
The Poauo laooai Is served to elty subscri
bers by faithful carriers at FIFTEEN CENTS
PER WEEK, payable weekly to the carriers.
By mail (in advanoe)i One year, $t six
months, i throe months, $2; ona month,
75 cents.
N.wideaJers inpplled at Hi oanU per oopy.
Weekly Public Ledger,
Published every Tuesday at ti per annum (In
advance) t elubs of five or more, II 60.
Communications upon subjects of general
Interest to the publio are at all times aooept
able. , .
Keiootod manuerliiU will hot be returned.
RATES Of ADVERT1SIN8 HI DAILY.
First Insertion... .. 1 00 per square.
Subsequent insertions......... do
for one week. ..... J 00
or two weeks........ 4 50
Fer three weeks.....
Sot ona month..
6 00
T W
RATES OF ADVERTISING IN WEEEXI.
First insertion
Subsequent insertions.
...11 00 per square.
.... 50 "
Eight lines of nonpareil, solid, constitute
square. . . . -
Displayed advertisements will bo eharged
according to tho artci oeeapied, at above
rates there being twelve lines of solid typo to
tho inch.
Notices tn local column Inserted for twenty
gents per lino for eaoh insertion.
To regular advertisers we offer superior in
ducements, beta as to rate of oharges and
manner of displaying their favor.
Bpeotal notices inserted for ten oenti per lino
for eaeh insertion.
Notice of death and marriage, twenty
Oent per line.
All bill for advertising are duo when con
tracted and payable on demand.
All letters, whether upon btuinee or other
wise, must be addressed to.
E. WHIT WORE,
'' Publisher and Proprietor.
A Lesion from the Tnrf" Second
Boat Won't Win."
From the Lexington (Ky.) Press.
Old Aunt Betsy Harper, the sister of
Joha ilarper, the old turtman, whose
assaaaination last summer is mill an un
developed rnvstery, used to take a lively
lubercsii iu luu rueuib ui wuuu b iruiu,
and when he would come home from the
races she always asked particularly bow
he came ont. Uue spring there was
more than the usual excitement in re
gard to the races, for the purses were
large and the contest was expected to be
very sharp. John's horses ran remark
ably well that year, rrade very fast time,
but do all he could he could only run
second best, and consequently won no
money. He came home a little down
cast, and was Bbarply questioned by bis
sister as to the result. John said the
horses ran remarkably well, and that in
two races he was second best. ,, " Don't
tell me about second best, Johnny; sec
ond best don't win any money," was the
emphatic response of the old lady, and
she made no further inquiry. This
is precisely the condition of politi
cal parlies. The Democrats form
a strong, respectable and patriotic
party, and they run close up in many
States, but have only been able to run
"second best," and, in the language of
Aunt Betsy, " it don't win." The habit
of the old turfmen under such circum
stances was to change riders, and then
he was sure to come out first. And we
think the Democracy might learn a little
wisdom from this old turfman. They
have been badly beaten in two or three
races, and because they have been badly
ridden. Give the party a good rider
and it will outrun tho old Radical hack
as fur as Longfellow can a dragoon
horse. The only question to be consid
ered is to beat Grant, and if we can t
beat him with f straight-out Democrat,
let ns beat him with a disaffected Re
publican, and if it becomes necessary
we can beat the Republican afterward.
Like the old man of the sea on the
shoulders of Sinbad, this man Grant is
astride of the national neck, and let us
invoke the aid of all power human,
divine and diabolical, if necessary to
rid us of the curse, for anybody it better
than he.
The Mnrqota of Bate.
The Marquis of Bute, who was mar
ried Tuesday morninz last in London,
to a daughter of Lord Howards) is one of
the wealthiest peers ot ungigno- ne
inherited a princely property, and, dur
ing his minority, the accumulations were
very great. lie owns four magnificent
residences. Mount Stuart, romantically
situated, on the Island of Bute; Cardiff
Caetle, built :n the eleventh century,
wherein Robert, Duke of Normandy
died, after being a prisoner in it for
twenty-eight years; Dumfries House,
Ayr, and London Custle, Kilmarnock.
The Bute docks at Cardiff, entirely his
property, ere sixty-five acres in area,
and cost upward of $j,000,()00. He also
owns most of the (aind of Bute, and
other landed property of gret extent
and value, ine title oi ice uaarquis oi
Bute gives him a precedence of all but
princes and dukes. The family motto
t Avito tirtt honere. "He flourished
in an honorable ancestry.1' Lord
Howard, whose daughter the Mar
quis has espoused, is a member of the
Catholic house of Norfolk, the oldest iu
the peerage of England. He is nncle of
the present Duke of Vorfolk, and has
been in the British House of Commons.
He is in bis filty-fourth year, and mar
ried twice, his second marriage taking
place one year after the death of his first
wife. The bride is in her nineteenth
year.
Children.
I like children he said to me one
day at the table 1 like them and re
spect them. Nearly all the truth telling
there is in this world is done by them.
Do Too know they pta the part in the
household which the king s Jester, hp
often had a very long bead under his
cap o4 bells, nsed to play for a mon
arch? There is no radical club like a
nest of children in pursery. Did you
ever watch a baby's fingers? have
often enough, though 1 never knew weal
it was to Ins one. Did you ever see how
they will poke tiios wonderfully small
fineen of theirs into eva.y fold, crack
a4 crevice they can get at? Tale U le
first 4itn feeling their way into the
solid facts he material world. When
they begin to the same thing
over again in another tre. If there
is a crack or a flaw in yoW a;rrr ,0
their confounded shoulder hitting que
Uo, they will poke and poke until
they tv. got it gaping just as the
baby's finger bate pade a rent ont of
the ntora of a hole in hi pinafore that
yow oW eyes never took notice of. Jbea
ibey snake su; b fool of us by copying,
oo a usaie scale, what we do in a gran 4
manner.1 Uiuttr n enaiu uoinu.
KE EEST WERE AWARDED
, J0HJT HAMPDEX PLEASANTS. ,
Jklh of a Noted Vlrsrlnln Jonrn
olltof the olden 11 me 111 llael
aad Mentis. .
Correspondenoo of the Courier-Journal.
Ricihomd, April 21, 1873.
This morning while passing the Whig
office I dropped in to get a copy of that
journal of a nrevion date. Glancinz
up at the wall I there saw the portrait of
one ot the monrntulest faces 1 ever look
ed upon, I knew almost instinctively
that it was the portrait of John Hamp
den Pleasants, the founder ot the Whig
and one of the most brilliant journalists
of the aee in which he lived. There was
a classio mould about the features that
enchained and charmed me. The severe
and pensive aspect, the gentle and ami
able lines of the mouth, the soft light of
the eye and the exquisite expression of
intelligence tbat seemed rather to repose
upon the sorrowful, beardless face, told
that it was the face of no ordinary man.
The brows, slightly contracted, indicated
pain of spirit. There appeared to be
some inward torture which the sufferer
would conceal from the world; there
seemed to be a secret shaft rankling in
his breast which would rccoive a new
barb and sting, if exposed to the cold
and pitiless glance ot tne vulgar crewa;
there was a shrinking reserve and yet
un openness and frankness which could
only belong to a nature singularly proud
anu sensitive, it was a luce wnicn a
mother might well worship so mild and
benignant and refined and intellectual.
Makinz myself known to Colonel J.
C. Shields, the oresent nroDrieter of the
Whig and former associate and friend of
Mr. i'leaeants, X begged that lie would
give me some incidents connected with
his lite. He cheerfully acceded to my
request, and I learn from a mutual
friend that to talk about Mr. Pleasants
is to him a labor of love. 1 could read
ily have detected this; for, as he would
revive the incidents of his lif'o and ap
proach the sad conclusion of it, his voice
betrayed decided emotion, and his eye
at one time seemed to fill with a tear of
tender memory. Having been intimately
acquainted with Mr. Pleasants through
the stormiest and most eventful years of
bis life, and having had fair opportuni
ties for observing the excellence of his
character, he oould not dwell upon the
subject without manifesting the deepest
feeling.
I learn from a document furnished
me by Colonel Shields, that in 1818; Mr.
Pleasants, then a young man of twenty
one, married a lady of Lynchburg, and
located in that city for the purpose of
practicing his profession, the law. He
failed in the law, whether from want of
application, from distaste for its dull
and dry details, or from any of the many
causes that always have led to failure iu
a profession so exacting in its require
ments and jealous of its claim, does not
appear. It was while waiting for real
clients, and becoming weary of imagin
ary ones, tbat be devoted some or ma
unoccupied time to writing paragraphs
for the Lynchburg press. His articles
were so sprightly and attractive that he
was soon induced to enter the neid oi
journalism as the editor of the journal
to which he had been , contributing.
After remaining in Lynchburg until
1824. he. wilh Mr. Butler, started the
Constitutional Whig in Richmond. The
location of the ollice was in a cellar on
Main street. The lirst edition was
printed on a hand press which required
two culls to work off the paper. This
press was very old, toe stone naving
been brought from Williamsburg during
the Revolutionary war, and was the old
. -
est printer's stone in the United States
It had been imported from England,
and ueon it had been printed the first
paper ever published in Virginia. It
was afterwards placed on the tomb of
Mr. Augustine Davis, who died in lHi'j,
and was the oldest editor in the Union
"To supply the types with ink," the
same obromcier tells, a negro man
stood, with two immense balls made of
buckskin, stuffed witb cotton or some
such soft material, and fastened around
wooden handles about a foot in length,
which he dipped into a vessel of that
fluid while the form was passing under
the press aud returning When these
balls had been sufficiently supplied, he
touic ope in each hand by the handle
and beat the fflrrn over in the manner
of a man beating cider.
Such was the rude mechanical process
adopted in getting on the hrst issue
of we Whig. The intellectual part of
the work was performed with niore grace
and elegance; lor ew writers nave ever
eoualled Mr. Pleasants for polish, bril
liancy and foroe. He possessed rare
powers of observation, sparkling wit,
fruitful invention, humor of the most
austere flavor, yet exquisitely delicious
a style remarkably pure, manly, and
perspicuous, uoionei onicias airectea
us to the old files of the paper, and I
read witU a mournful interest some of
bis beat jed;torli. J uey are massive
without being clumsy, and eossajn grace
without weakness. His pen seemed to
flow with siMaulor freshness and ease.
. . r. " ... i rut
There was not a ripple sp-B the smooth
and brilliant tide; yet there was an
elastic vigor and power about his pro
ductions that charmed the profound,
ybila they pleased the superficial.
Mr. Pleasant ys what was known as
a State's Rights Whig, entertaining, J
believe, about the same political views
that Mr. Benjamin Watkins Lee main
tained. I pete opinions ne uainiaineu
with all the eal and ability Bf his ear
nest nature. His babiu were prodigal,
but remarkably free, I think, from gross
dissipation. His intercourse with hi
associates and friends was amiable and
gentle. Hii hand was "open as the
day to melting charity," and his heart
bvtriloif d with friendship and kind
ness. ' The terceni boiitiyU fcrsbats
never robbed 'him of these excellent
qualities. His generosity in repairing
a wrong, his readiness to afford redress,
Hi great courage in facing enemies and
his unshrinking de!ity in clipping to
triends were conspicuous feature) ifl his
character. Rendered poor bf the' gen
erous impulses of hie nature, he was
forced 10 Mill b;g jptrest in the Whig,
and soon after withdrew trow lU edi at
rial control.
The Enquirer was at that time con
ducted by the elder Ritchie and bis sons.
Te bitter antagonisms and rivalries of
the' iwo iorals have been the theme
of many sreside eon.eiaris, both in
Virginia and Kentucky. The story of
their conflicts constitutes a part of the
history of the country. The lavage seal
v.th which they assailed each other, the
hot and worrying passages thatdaily an
imated their columns, and tho brilliant
RICHEST PRIZES AT LATE
shafts of wits which were perpetually
flying; through the intellectual field of
conflict and combat are to-day dwelt
upon by old Whigs and old Democrats
with animation and interest. The bitter
spirit thus engendered did not terminate
with Mr. Pleasants' connection with the
Whig. The Ritchies continued to issue
the Enauirer. and a short time after Mr
P.'s withdrawal from the Whig a fierce
and scathing article appeared in the cot
umns of the Enauirer, written by a Wash'
ington correspondent, which was replied
to by Mr. Pleasants in a tone and temper
that led to the fatal meeting between
young Ritchie and himself. It appears
tbat no details for the fight had been
agreed upon, and when Mr. Pleasants
appeared noon the field the conflict com
menced, which resulted in a fatal wound
to the latter. He was borne from the
ground and carried to his residence,
where the widowed mother and little
children received the dying man. This
meeting is said to have been painfully
touching. There were hurrying to and
fro among the servants, there were ago
nizing sobl of anguish and piercing
cries of grief. The heart broken
mother and the poor, weeping little
ones gathered about the bloody form of
the son and father, la them be bad
always been affectionate and devoted,
and they in turn loved him with exceed
ing tenderness. When they looked
upon the pale, ghastly features of the
dying mau, and saw how completely
wag the sanguinary work, a passionate
storm ot incontrollable griet burst lortn,
and friends and foes if, indeed, he then
had any foes were overcome with
emotion and turned away; for misery
has a privilege and everywhere is felt to
be a holy thing, and all pitied the
unhappy family against whom its blight
ing artillery was then leveled. A short
time of painful suffering and the bright
eye began to lose its luster, the lips
assumed an ashy whiteness, the noble
countenance became rigid and the jew-
elly star of life descended far down the
unending isles of death. "Cases there
are," says a gifted and delicate writer,
and those are not rare, in which asingle
week, a day, an hour, sweeps away all
vestiges and landmarks of a memorable
felicity; in which the ruin travels faster
than the flying showers upon tho moun
tain side, faster 'than a musician scat
ters sounds;' in which 'it was' and 'it is
not are words of the self-same tougue in
the selfsame minute; in which the sun
that at noon beheld all sound and pros
perous, long before its setting hour looks
out upon a total wreck.
Genealogy of Bonrbon Whlaky.
Prof. S. Williams in St. Louis Republican.
It is not generally known that the
genealogy of iiourboa whisky is as pure
ly German as a " Pennsylvania Dutch "
descent in a direct line can make it.
Look in the State Department at the pa
pers relating to the Pennsylvania whisky
rebellion against the federal excise tax
in 1780. The names of the compromised
parties will be found to be obankweller,
or Schwartz, or some other addition pro
nounced with the sweet Uerman ac
cent." These Teutons, the pioneer im
migrants from Germany, were as stiff-
necked anti-mockers on the liquor ques
tion in the infancy of our republic as
thry are now. and resented all govern
ment interference with their glorious old
Monongabela whisky as stoutly as mod
em Germans do the puritanic attempts
to deprive them ot their Sunday lager,
And thus " old Bourbon " became the
first-born of " old Monongahela." The
blessed old patriots who invented Bour
bon whisky, and whose names can still
be found branded by their descendants
on any bona bde ante-bellum barrel
alas! how few and hard to find were
the Spearses, the Kellers, the Kizers, the
Kleisers, the Lydicks, the Uotlinans and
others, who found it healthy to light out
from Pennsylvania about the time that
United Mates marshals with writs in
their pockets were hunting; for Hugh
Henry Breckinridge, the ' author of
" Modern Chivalry." They were a florid
ponderous, stalwart and manly race, and
the tourist is astonished at the per cent-
age of heavy weights visible even now
among their descendants at any Bour
bon court-day gathering. They embark
ed on broad-borns with their wives and
children and copper stills, floated down
the Ohio to Limestone, crossed the
Licking hills and built their cabins and
set up their stills in the cane-brakes of
Bourbon, free from the molestation of
i r .. I . L-1- o .1 :
uniteu states ifjareuaia. oquu me eiuise
tax was repealed. There was no mar
ket for produce in Kentucky. Stock
had to be driven through hundreds of
miles of wilderness, and across the Alle
gbanies to be sold. But by converting
the corn and rye into whisky and ba
con, tbey could tiatboat it out of Licking.
sell bout and cargo in the Spanish port
of New Orleans, and walk home through
the wilderness with their Spanish doub
loons swung over their shoulders in can
vas bags. Such is the origin of Bourbon
whisky, wliich owes its reputation to the
same honest propess which made old
r'A 1, i .. ' r o Im ii. ,u
Bnnelnar ns Fine Awt.
The English girls are noted for their
health, good sense and good looks, but
dance tbey cannot. True, they hobble
and waddle about on the stage, and go
through the figures, btft their performing
bears aboift the 64 we rplutlftq to the
graceful fuiry-like movements of their
I'rencb sisters as those of the clumsy,
slow-paced trupk-horse do to tho steps
of the fleet-tooled racer. In Paris one
of the famous jokes is to burlesque the
English dancing. Of course, the French
girls have to pad considerably to get up
to the average of English feminine so
lidity, and they waddle out on the stage
somewhat in rjuck-fcsbioa. Then they
dance as if heavy weights were attached
to each limb, attendants with handker
chiefs being present, who, in the pauses,
wipe off the perspiration brought to the
dancers' face, br fb&t aiuai be very
bard work. The Trench laugh convuf
siveiy when at these performances, and
though 'the' thing is overdone, the carica
tures suggest tae truth'. t is evident
tiiat P-tuvideuue ovv u.eauk lLal Kng
lith dame should indulge much in the
light fantastic toe, but should be content
with good, simple, solid amusement of
another sort. Although much more
money is expended in getting op spec lo
de in England than in France, it is
wonderful how Hjucn mote brilliancy ap
pear In the French piece. It i said
tbat nothing ever witnessed in England
can at all compare wi'h tho humor and
display with which they bring out King
Carrot, which, on account of the bur
t!Ef.PK!57Aia-G0LD AND
lesque of Napoleon III in it, has a Euro
pean reputation. People are made up
to represent all the vegetables of the
garden, and all the insects that feed
upon them, in exquisite perfection of
fancy, even the touches of green at his
knees assisting to give King Carrot his
vegetable character. There is nothing
on the French stage which approaches
the coarseness of The Black Crook, but
some of the actor wear scarcely a sus
picion ot clothes, and it requires a pow
erful magnifying glass to discover the
gauze which is the only covering of one
beautiful girl. Victor Hugo and other
french writers attribute the French
fondness for the nude to their child-like
innocence and classic taste, inherited
with their Greek blood. Mr. Conway
suggests tbat it this be the true explana
tion, the iLve-angelic age ot feden can
not be far off in Paris.
SEWED IN A SHEET.
The Komanee of an Injured Wlle'a
stevenfe.
From the Courier-Journal.
An amusing though just case of retali
ation upon the part of the wife for in
human and brutal treatment received
from bcr husband occurred near the
corner of Hancock and Gray streets a
few days ago, the facts of which as de
tailed by a gentleman of the East End,
wbo declined to give names, are as fol
lows:
There is an American living in the
viciuity ot the above mentioned locali
ties wbo, with no conception of the obli
gations tb:.i, upon him as a husband,
but totally given up to ruffianism, ha
been in the habit of spendina the money
which should go toward the support of
those dependent upon him by both the
laws ol God and man, for whisky, and
when bis brain is swimming under the
influence of the fiery element going
home, and without any cause whatever,
but simply lor amusement, beating his
wife whom he had promised at the altar
to protect and cherish. It is strange to
what extent the love of woman will sub
mit to be outraged, but there is limit
even to its all-abiding constancy, as the
facts in this aptly demonstrate.
Xbe above state of persecution con
tinued until a few days ago, when the
last spark of love being crushed, and the
ast link in the chain which bound the
wife to her husband being broken by the
weight of cruelty which had been heaped
upon it, and her pride and the indepen
dent spirit of her youth which bad lain
dormant for so long having been aroused,
she told him in positive terms that his
inhumanity must and should be stopped;
that she would submit to his brutal
amusement no longer. The husband,
however, did not regard the warning,
and continued in his former course of
ife uutil one day be came home wilh
more aboard than usual, and, throwing
himself upon the bed, resigned himself
to " balmy sleep, tired nature's sweet
restorer," though the sentiment did not
apply in his case either in spirit or in
tact, as the subsequent events proved.
When the husband had fallen asleep.
and was perfectly dead for the time be
ing, a bright idea struck the wifi by
which she might revenge her wrongs
and tree berselt from bondage. Accord
ingly she proceeded to pack her clothes,
and having finished this so as to have
them ready for immediate removal, she
took a large needle and, carefully thread
ing it witb a large and strong thread,
she approached the bed where the hus
band was lying, aud wrapping him up
in a stronger quilt, sat down and care
fully and securely sewed him up in it,
simply leaving ms Head ont. Having
completed all the necessary arrange
ments for the successful operation of
her plans, she seized the cane which
bad so often been the instrument
of her torture, and began laying
it on the sleeping man with all the
force she could master, stimulated by the
memory of her own mistreatment. The
man awoke and begged for mercy and
help, but the louder he begged the harder
and faster she applied the cane, until
exhausted with her labors. She took
her clothes and left for the house of
neighbor friend where she still remains.
despite the entreaties of her husband,
who escaped trom his situation by the
assistance of the neighbors, to return.
Let wives learn a lesson from the con
duct and spirit of this poor, persecuted
woman, and let beastly husbands beware
that they may escape treatment in like
manner.
MUSICAL MERCHANDISE.
vVo.
373 Jlain Street,
xxirus, TMir.
14-91
HOTElj,.
C0MNT1I
HOTEL,
(Formerly Merngg Hence),
LOUIS CHAPMAN,
(Late of Memphis k Charleston R. R.)
Froprletor,
THE ABOVE NAMED HOURS HAVING
cbanstd hand, the proprietor intends
that it shall be the Lest aoure of the kind on
any railr.w n the t-outn. ine bar contains
the bett liquors to be found north or bouth.
Tmm. .tr' t'r mn!.. ..-il'4
PROPOSALS.
TO BRIDGE. BUILDERS.
CITY ENGINEER'S OFTIC?, 1
Miaruls. T5- April ji, ltp. j
A I. VD, FHOPOeALs) WILL BE RE-
vuived at this once until 12 o clock m..
M'edneadar, Mny 1st, for constructing
three wooden bridge in Fort Pickering. For
further information apply at this office. The
city reocrves the right to reject any or all of
the propos'-
fl. I'M r-M nans.
' City Engineer,
MATOR'S OFFICE. CITY HALL. I
iliMrai. ItKX.. April 23. 172. 1
BIDS FOR THE PRIVILEGE OF RE
oorin dead aaimal. etc., trom within
the eity limit., for two years from May 10,
1;2. will be received at Uiisc&ssca or before
May 4, 1ST2.
4.v .TOHV .innvsV. M. rnr.
SILVER t'EDALS AND DIPLO
WHITE
COLL'S, 273 MAIN ST.
FI'LI.
NAINSOOKS, CAMBRICS.
ORGANDIES, TARLETOIJS,
SWISS AND INDIA MULLS,
Colored Piques and Seaside Stripes,
Chintz Patterns and Mantaban Cloths.
ea ? W p ohoici i' , s.
S I V GltOCEKIES t 3 S
V I " ' '' 1?JW ' g 2
March, 1872. SPRING
II ILL, TERRY
839 MAIX STREET, .... MEMPHIS. TENff.
Are now ready for MERCHANTS (only) with the largest and best stock of
Boots, Shoes, IlatM and Straw Goods,
Suitable for Men, Women and Children's wear,
SPRINCS.
Montvale Springs,
Blount Count j, East Tenn.
THIS FAVORITE SUMMER RESORT
will be opened for the reception of guests
on the 19tb l day. Ticket to the Spring,
and return can be obtained at all prominent
points.
Board per Month for May and June, $45;
for July, August and September, tiU; for
three month, I15U.
Address, for descriptive pamphlet, etc.,
JOS. h. KIN Gl, Propriotor,
Montvale Springe.
RITKB IN HKVPHIS TO
John S. Tonf, Esq., Col. H. E. Jackson,
Capt.R.C.Williamon. P. D. Boyle.
Col. J. Harvey Mathes, Btratton 3c James,
Capt. J. W. Sliced , S. F. McNutt,
Mnn.fMd Hirhe.
47-W
JMUJvlS.
MEMPHIS
AGRICULTURAL
-AND-
MECHANICAL SOCIETY.
UNDER the authority of An Act passed at
the last session of the Lerinlature for the
benefit of the Agricultural and Mechanical
Associations of this State, the
Memphis Agricultural and Mechani
cal society
Will comment, the SALE OF TICKETS and
DISTRIBUTION OF PHIZES
0a Wednesday, the 27th Inst
The proceed ar to be applied to the general
ana rapid
IMPROVEMENT OF THEIR GROUNDS
And from the profits the managers hope to
foster and build up an institution permanent
ana succeasiui, in which tne oitisen oi onr
city aad county may ttei a just pride.
The drawinr will take nlace under the con
trol of Messrs. James Coleman. Tobias Welf.
Thas. E. Hills aud W. O. Woodson, who have
been regularly appointed managers under the
law.
For full narticulars with reference thereto.
apply at tne emce t toe society.
qi3 HECOM) ST.,
Under the Greenlaw Opera House,
J. G. BALLESTINE. Pres't.
I.ios TtorsDiLr, i y.
Mi-mr-hi". Vjrcli V. 1H72. 2?-t
. V4 1
PJlOJPOJiALS.
NEW JAIL CONTRACT.
CO
A hri.
Point. C
CONTRACT FOR BUILDING A NEW
ok and iron lai in the town of I nar s
Coahoma county, Mississippi, to be let
out to the lowest bidder by the undersirned
members ef Board Supervisors of .aid coualy.
On the 22d dar of April, 1872.
Plans nd ipjieation to be Men at the
Clerk' uhiM. in the Uwn of Friar's Point.
Term to be made known on tbc day of
letting. The Board of Supervisors do not
bind themselves to accept any bid. unl.M
proper security is given in double the amount
ol tne contract, and that .aid iai h b.
completed npen the date than aad there
agreed upon.
IS. UAKKI.NUTIW, Pria.at.
i. C. LMH,
A. HIXIU.V,
III
lE.NRY WALL.
L. M. UAMUM.
Members of tbe Board of SuierTiore.
y-V- OK". R Al.ri'HV.n.rlt
MAS. H. G. KOLLENEEKG'S.
Bt jut twmoTed to th.h new, larg
fonr-etory warehouse. No. 184 Main Ik
JM
GOODS
AT-
LIKES or
TRADE. March, 1872.
& MITCHELL,
ever brought to our city. 78
FOR SALE.
Lots For Sale in Ma City,
-0N-
Long: island, New York.
I
DA CITY IS SITUATED ON LONG Is
land. Jo mile from Aew York city, the
on Island railroad running cantm!!.
tnrougn iaa my. iiou tnere ar Hereby ol
fered for sale on the following terms i Filty
dollars each, on a credit of ten years, paya
ble in ten annual instalments say 15 (X) per
year on each lot. The parties owning the
above property propose to sell to the Southern
people one-hall of the lots, say 1UI0, on the
above term, without interest. The Eaut
River Bridge is now in process of construc
tion, connecting Manhattan Island, upon
whioh Now York i situated, with Long la
land. This la a good opportunity for any person of
this section of country to invest small sums
in the purchase of these lots. Terms are
easy, and within the reach of all. Property
on Long Island will rapidly increase in value
as soon as East River Bridge is completed.
Map of the City of Ida caa be seen, and
full infnrmatinn tiv.n nnnn ttrmlifntinn ti.ii-
made to BY. FONTAINE,
responding Secretary,
No. 19 Madison street.
a. oXitD.
ALL LETTERS AND INQUIRIES IN
reference to Ida City and the purchase and
sale of lots should be addressed to Jiy. Fon
taine, Corresponding Secretary, No. 19 Madi
son street, Memphis, Tenn. The title to tbc
property is perfect in me. and the advertise
ment and map published correctly represent
the value and attractions of the place.
11 Ml JAOOB THOMPSON.
PUBLICATION.
TIIE
SOUTHERN FARMER!
A HOITHLT
AGRICULTURAL JOURNAL,
Published in the city of Memphis
for fire year, and edited from the commence
ment by
Dr. M. .IF." PHILIPS,
who ha been known as a worker in the eau
aver sine 1832, assisted by many able con.
tributors, asks, through it editor, for a libe
ral share of patronage, believing h can,
supported by friends of the cause, do much
good.
THE FARMER i now ditched in neat
covert, and will appear in January in an en
tire new drcu.
Swbeerlptlon price $S per nnnnnr.
TO
NEWSPAPAR PUBLISHERS.
THE SOUTHERN NEWSPAPER UNION,
at Nashville, Tenn., are furnishing
TWELYE
DIFFERENT
-Of-
EUITI0XS
Beady-Printed Ontsides, InsIJes
&nd Supplements
For the Coin try Press, in a style equal to any
eoncera engaged in tbe same business, and at
a cheaper rate than Chicago, Milwaukee, or
New York. Orders promptly tiled for any
newspaper in tbe South. Address,
d.f Ne.hville. TVr'rt.
INSURANCE.
MASONIC MUTUAL
Life Assurance Association,
5o 834 Front Street,
stafnoU Block, cor. Tnioi street, ap stair
1f) CONSTITUTES TOO A MEMBER
$16 f 10 for poliey, II eir.mlniag fee. and II
annually. No other eipenM except in rae ot
tbc death of a member, wkea yon will be a.-
s..f.i n
274 SECOND STREET.

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