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Public ledger. [volume] (Memphis, Tenn.) 1865-1893, August 25, 1874, Image 2

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INSURANCE.
FIRE. INLAND AND MARINE
tji is
Bluff City Insurance Co,
or mm
Office: Xo. 293 Main Street.
PIKECTORS t
Jerome Hill.
f Frank..
H H Rigbee,
i H Smiti,
H Sarin,
t) A Efkerly.
J D Williams,
U w jones.
H M James,
W II Moor.
J C Seely.
David P iladdoit.
W A Gage.
J r KKKLY. President.
View President.
W B. V'""1 ft.
It I . ii.-v-"
PUBLIC LEDGER.
OFFTCB-Ko. IS MaDtsos Srnitrr.
MEMPHIS'
TBMKly Evening. Ang. . "74.
"it Jo LMi has taken cb'rge f the
Ration of th. Linos. The pubhe e
po Km for it prcwrt an regular
Brary. w
Democratic nd ConserTAtiTO rarlT.
For (Jowntur.
JAMES D. PORTER, of Henry County.
IHS WAS OT EACES.
The Utempt o Radical journals to
sake the Northern people believe that a
war of races has bee inaugurated in
the South, hai not succeeded to any
preat exiert The Brooklyn Eagle, a
Republican paper, refused to be im
posed upon hy the ab?uid bowlings of
xarpet-bafger at the South, and their
insane ravines about war of races.
The Eagle discovers ia the political
contest here the true issue. It sajs,
ery truly, that it i fight for " econ
emy apainst stealage," and the Article
concludes thus:
The cry of "a war of races" arises
from those who have an interest in re
cipitating it We know such a war can't
be raised in the Sonlh. We don t be
lieve that the apprehension of one can
lie lied down the throat ot the Korth.
Every reflecting man knows that in the
South now it is not " race against race."
It is honesty against thieves. . It is re
trenchment against bankruptcy. It is
economy against stealage. In ft
bnrg the simple question wag: "Shall
a policy which has rolled up A debt of
one sixth of all our possessions go on
till it Ukes alir The question was an
swered in the negative, and if the ne
groes unanimously voted "yes" it was
the fault of their tutors, not of those
who in very self preservation voted "no." ,
We do not blame the negroes altogether.
They simply followed their new matters,
and because their old masters did not
follow them, e fe nTa " "ar of
races," forsooth,
In Korth Carolina ard Tennessee the
questions for the people were made in
advance for them by Congress. They
hinged on the civil rights bill, sv meas
ure Congress has, by passing it in one
Louse and suspending it in the other,
directly relegated to the States for their
views, and a question which almost ex
clusively affects the Southern States
themselves. By the forms of election
tha fnn.titntinnal Americsn way those
States have overwhelmingly voted to re
ject the bill, so far as it has been referred
to them for decision. There are not
Jiaee Northern States which would not
do the same on a direct vote. And be
cause this question, by its very nature,
set off the races for the time, the defeat
which the blacks received is to be suc
ceeded by "a war of races." We do
not see who is to make that war. The
whites have acted on the defensive in
the two cases of outbreak which have
occurred in overwhelmingly negro pre
cinct of Tennessee and Kentucky.
So soon as Congress shall cease to
tinker with the fag ends of reconstruc
tion and let each race stand on its merits,
each having low all the " rights',' of the
other, the whites end the blacks will
range themselves in politics just as per
sons do up here, a little principle and a
good deal of interest affecting their posi
tion; and each party courting the negro
vote. Th "war of races " will not im
pose on the K orth. Th e North feels that
- it has done (or the negro a good deal
more than it would do again, or ask any
body else to do. Failing industries,
hard times, closed, markets, the outlawry
' of capital and enterprise and intelli
gence wherever negro supremacy ob
tains, are facts felt in the North almost
S as keeuly as in the South, and the de
termination of all the people to try a
change of hands and. influences in this
country will not be arrested Dy this last
' and worst "bugaboo" "war 0
races." It had better be abandon.
A Nirhvilli journal takes a settle
view of local affairs, and advises th.
the best men he sent to the Legislature.
"So far as our immediate local embar
rassments and material home interests
are concerned, legislation at Washing
Loo is not of such vital importance to
us, for the present, as legislation in our
own State capital. The counties should
.select the best brains among their popu
lation to represent them. Better send a
mediocre man to Congress this term than
to the State Legislature next year. Of
course the State should he as ably rep
resented as possible in both but just
now the State Legislature .is of the most
immediate and pressing importance.
Great responsibilities are entrusted to
thb aext Assembly, and great results ex
pected of its deliberations. Our affairs
are in a bad tangle, and sound minds
and discreet statesmanship are to be ap
plied to the work of restoring order out
of chaos. This being the situation, it
should not require prompting from us to
induce our fellow-citizens to exercise
due diligence and zeal in the selection of
the right man for the right place. Look
io your local conventions once again." (
A very important decision has just
been made by Judge Jo. C. Guild, judgi
of the Sumner County Circuit Court, in
the case of the Louisville and Nashville
Railroad Company vs. the State of
Tennessee and Sumner county. Th
noint involved in the suit was, as
whether the State and county had
right to tax the Company for th vaIue
of its roadbed and track ""
county of Sumner. The J"J heId'
1. That the Louisville fll1 Neville
company, by its charter. n not exempt
trorn taxation, i
1 Tlmr it nhect to taxation un
i.wof H73.
Tk.i k aharehoiders might be
taxed, but tha am not i-xeuiyi iuc vj
ital stock d roadbed, fixtures ana roll
;, .i-i- from taxation.
'".." "".i .1--. .1
n't.: . me nrsi line iuui mo uucskw
ha been made m lennessee qn tue
-.r i,i tin railroads, and it is a dues
.;.ib that involves the riclit to tax all
railroads in Tennessee, worth f 100,000,-
000. , The case has been appealed to the
Supreme Court.
The .antiquated maiden, Susan B.
Anthony, denies emphatically the testi
mony given by "Bessie" (Theodore Til
ton's ward,) that she (Bessie) had dis
covered Susan sitting in Theodore's lap.
Susan is old enough to be Theodore's
grand mother, and we are disposed to
discredit the account of this tete a tete.
But if it is true, it adds but another link
to the philosophic assertion, that in love
matters there is no accounting for taste.
Mr. George C. Harding, of the Indi
anapolis Sunday Herald, who shot the
alleged seducer of his daughter in that
city on Thursday, is one of the most
prominent of Western journalists. He
is by birth an East Tennesseean, and
when a youth resided at Knoxville.
A bos hot by Robert Toombs is an
nounced by another noted Georgian.
When asked what he thought of the
Beecher - Tilton scandal he replied:
"Well, by the gods! I am too old now to
become interested in baudy house litera
ture." The Elections of 1S74. .
From the Cincinnati Enquirer. -
Here .is a brief abstract of the elec
tions which have thus far been held in
New Hampshire Democratic Gover
nor and Democratic Legislature.
Connecticut Democratic Governor,
Democratic Leeislature and Democratic
United States Senator.
Oregon Democratic Governor, Dem
ocratic State officers and Democratic
Congressmen.
Nnrth Carolina Seven Democratic
"Congressmen out of eight, large Demo
cratic majority in tne legislature ana
Democratic State ticket.
Tennessee Nearly every county Dem
ocratic. Ditto Kentucky.
There has been but one single defeat,
The manufacturing firm of Brown A
Ive9 carried the State of Rhode hland.
These elections are indicative of what
is to follow in the fall. Ohio, Indiana
and Illinois, especially, will even ip
better than the States which have pre
ceded them.
A Japanese Race.
A Japan correspondent of the Cleve
land Herald writes: "On the outskirts
of Yeddo there is a race course where
twice a year the upper crust and much
of the lower etratum of the city and
surrounding country assemble to witness
the 'Derby' and-' Saratoga ' of the
Orient. Hither ftome jockeys clad,
many of them, in grotesque imitation ot
tho time-honored costume of the ilk;
and here are brought cross eyed, bristly
maned, crooked-legged brutes, whose
first destination should nave been tne
shambles. The track is ingeniously ar
ranged with an eye to amusement of the
public. The turns are so sharp that it
requires an extra balance wheel and a
firm confidence in the integrity of ore's
center of gravity to go around them
faster than a -walk. As in a beautiful
landscape garden one views with
pleasure the charms of nature
heightened by art; so there the
peaceful serenity which ia apt to cloud
'he rider's mind, and make him feel
as though the order of his internal ma
chinery has been reversed, is increased
as be beholds with what care and con
sideration all the natural roughnesses
and declivities that strew his way have
been cherished and perpetrated by the
hand of art. The Japanese public would
regard itself as the victim of gross de
ceit should it happen that there were no
troubles at the races. Uigb and lofty
vaulting, broken heads and fractured
limbs are regarded as necessary adjuncts
of the sport, and that man would be
bold indeed who dared to ruffle the com
placency o ! the pleasure loving populace
of Yeddo bf atraightoning the break
neck turnu of ttm race track. Some
one has poetically described a good
rider and a fine horse as being of ' one
mind.' At a Japanese race it would
fra as though each rider and
tiy had forty minds between them,
''"-rider has a mind to go ahead and
the vtiv has a mind to eo anywhere and
everyw,Pre ese Dn where his rider
wants hi, to g0 The tiATl always
emiveueu hy playful contests between
the two.w ni.j, ei)Praiiy eD(j t0 the pony's
satislaclion. And when ,hoge wh0 re.
tain their seatre once fairly under way
BinnniuK .uuK after the otherj ,ud.
denly eome pony ,u- i:no :ii mom.
bT a forgotten ent-,en,eBt Bnj bolt off
mdeways to fulfill Bno,D will be
filled all at once will a ,je9ire to eat
some ot tne spectator, and wi1 ru(,n
aT T . vi a! I nnnB tltA vnnci ...
: , , j "iiiie still an-
omer win oe actuated uj n, nncontroll-
"'.'7 V"1, . . "h big ear
witn one oi nis nina u-ei. m 0,-
little incidents give variety to tu scene
and add. much to the pleasure r,f the
.Japanese apei-iaiurs.
A clergyman in oneof the rural tow:-
of Maine, who had preached almost two
hours the other Sunday, was interrupted
by one of his hearers, who remarked in
a very loud voice, "There, there, you
have preached long enough I If you
preach any longer we shall forget the
subject of the text!" Ike meeting
closed immediately after.
SEW YORK.
Thrao TnnnaT !reH n-l Arrl vil
" in"" lltmilrcit mououilca
1III'""
yKw YoitK, August 25. Yesterdny
aTK-rnoon a steam tuff was proceeding
down East river, having in tow five coal
barges. Throe young men, between the
ages of sixteen And eighteen, who were
. ... t .1?.V.
rowing, attHiipted to attacn inoir atmv
to the stern 6f one of the barges. Their
boat was capsized and all were drowned
None of the bodies woro recovered. .
Three hundred' Menonites 'reached
here Sunday and left yesterday for the
West
A policeman of this city, who was
lately bitten by a dog sud afterwards
showed such strong symptoms of hydro
phobia as tl require a straight jacket,
has entirely recovered aud returned to
duty.
FOREIGN.
Paris, August 2o.-Carlist advices state
that two hundred Republican volunteers,
who were marching to the relief of
Puryeetlo, were captured by the royal
ists.
The Prefects of the Departments in
the South of France have received spe
cial instructions from the Minister of
the Interior to use every effort to pre
vent the sale of arjns to the Carlists.
Lisbos, August 25. The government
has issued an order directing the Span
ish federalist refugees in this country to
epart at once.
Madrid. Augnst 25.Conscnption is
being enforced throughout the country
without opposition.
' probabilities.
Washington', August 25. Over the1
Ohio valley high barometer and lower
temperature tb,an on Monday, winds
mostly from-northeast to southeast and
clear weather. Over the lake regions
high barometer and low temperature
with winds mostly from northeast to
southeast with partly cloudy weather
and followed by falling barometer and
rising temperature. In the npper lake
regions over upper Mississippi and lower
Missouri valley and northeast, falling
barometer and rising temperature with
east to south winds and partly cloudy
weather, and over the southern portion
possibly rain.
A Wild Girl Hnmt.
It is a tale of Idaho. There are young
sters in the West as well as in, the East;
and two of them, who are fond of the
chase, have had a romantic adventure.
They were out repairing their flames
near Idaho city. Near by a hardy old
miner bad squatted upon a quartz lead,
but he was rarely seen, and the young
sters were not aware that within that old
man's tunnel resided a sylph-like crea
ture, the joy of the old miner. Looking
over toward the old tunnel on the hill
side they saw a sight that thrilled them
with rapture. A young girl, about fif
teen years of age, beautiful as Cleopatra,
barefooted and bareheaded, with a wealth
of rich auburn hair dropping about ber
like a silken robe, stood sunning herself
on a grassy knoll in the bright morning.
Such a divinity had never been seen ia
the wilds of Idaho before, and they Sup
posed sb.3 was & wild girl. Sho Was game
that must be bagged alive. Cautiously
they crept through the tangled thickets
toward the spot where the beautiful
Nanetta drank in the glorious beauty of
the morning. All at once, from under
cover, the hunters made a dash for the
i d beauty, but she was on like a
frightened fawn at the approach.of the
sportsmen. Suddenly she disappeared,
and "though lost to sight, to memory
dear," the chase was not abandoned.
Into the dark tunnel, as the likeliest
placeof refuge, the keen hunters plunged,
only to stand aghast at the sight that met
their gaze. When their eyes oecame
accustomed to the darkness they beheld
tbeir beautiful wild, girl swooning in the
Brms of the rough old miner. J. he burly
miner had seen the poor frightened fawn
chased to the tunnel, and Baw the keen
hunters at bay before him. He disen
gaged bis arms from the inanimate beau
ty. He advanced a few paces, made a
little oration ot one woro: ltumansi
then lifted a heavy boot, drew it back a
few feet, Bee-sawed with it a little in the
air, and sent them back with their saws
and hammers at the flumes. That entire
day the flume was neglected. The young
wild mrl hunters were busy repairing the
canvas seats of their trowsers and reduc-
inir swellings. They have no longer a
desire to hunt wild girls in the Idaho
thickets. Moral: Never go wild-girl
hunting without the permission of her
papa, if you would avoid pantaloons
rents and tailors' bills.
Professor Orton, of Vassar: "The ad
vocates of women's educational rights
(and I am one of them) have raised ex
pectations which will rarely be realized.
There baa been considerable fustian
talk about turning out authors, scientists,
flatform speakers, lawyers' and the like,
t reminds one ot the spasmodic efforts
in England to convert, the working
classes into sages by courses of lectures.
The gallantry of the masculine side of
the world will always overlook the weak
ness which would be condemned or ridi
culed in Yale or Amherst. If there are
any latent Mary Somervilles or Harriet
Martineaus, they will be discovered, and
duly honored. But the ruth should
be spoken that strong, independent
spirits are exceptional. Few carry
forward any pursuit in which they took
the deepest interest while in college.
We expect to do our utmost when we
graduate well iuformed. well-disciplined
minds who will be better sisters, wives
and mothers, sensible and intelligent,
improving and adorning society. That
they will advance literature, science or
art by original thought, investigation or
invention, they have not as yet given
U gns of promise. But let me not be
1 . i i . , tk.t ili. liiti..
ufiunriPrsioo'J na fbjia
eutcatioo ifl superfluous for woman I
am confident that the graduates of Vb
ar wii accomplish ten-fold more hard
work and useful work for the world and
for themsf les than if thoy had not re
ceived a liberal education.''
The hymns of tho Into Isuao Watts
have Wu translated into tho liingmigo
of the Clioctnws.
The Presbyterian church, which mim-
hrrs halt a million members in the
United States, raised about 10,000,000
for benevolent purposos during their last
church year.
A Cuban lady at Saratoga, famous for
her wealth and very elaborate toilets,
wt-ars a necklace of American twenty
dollar gold pieces, valued at if 500.
A new profession, opon 'for women ill
England Victoria bus given the royal
assent to thn amendments to the npotbo
caries' act by which women are admitted
to practice as apothecaries upon the
same geimral conditions ns men in Eng
land and Wales.
INSURANCE.
HERNANDO
Insurance Co.
Of MJGBirillH.
OHice : No. 22 JIndisou Street.
S. H. Dl'NPCOMB
, President.
Vice-Presiilont.
Secretary.
W. 13. (1A1.1! t tATU
F. M.KKI4SUN...A
Blroetorai
8. H. DVNSCQMB.: W. n. O ALTiREATH,
A. VACCAKO,
N. FONTAINE.
JOK IlltLCK.
JOHN f. FIXER.
J. A. SHAM),
L. 11ANAI ER. .
J. II. .MARTIN,
W. B. .MALLOKY,
W. L. HALFOKO.
Inanrr aiairo lia few riie, Ba
rlne ana stiver kiiki.
v Risks on Private Dwellings especially
J-ir1. l-H-'-'l'-t
BANK.
T1IK
BANK OF COHJUERCE,
MEMPHIS, TrTVX-
Cash Capital, $250,000.
JOIIX T. FAIUJASON, : : President
JOHN OYERTOX, Jr., : V. President
It. A. PARKER, : : i : i Cashier
DIRECTORS.
JOHN T. FARGASON of Fariason A Clay
JAS. ELDER late President DcSoto Bank
TUOS. II. ALLEN of Tnos. U. Alien A Co
M GAVIN of M. Gavin & Co
ti. MANSFIELD of Jlanffield Jt Hubee
JOHN OVERTON, jR.....of Memphis, 'lenn
O. II. P. P1PEB of Memphis, Tenn
B. BAYLISS of B. Buylifs Co
JOHN C. UZER of Estes, 1 izer A Co
81 t
ANNOUNCEMENTS.
lor Cougreta.
THOMAS C. LOWE, of this city, is a can
didate for Congress to represent the Memnbis
district, and will submit his name to the Con
gressional Convention at Bolivar the loth of
September. I33-to
To the people of Shelby, Fayette and Harde
man counties:
I respectfully announce myself a candidate
for CuDKreps to reprenent your district in the
Congress of the Laited States. My name
will, therefore, be submitted to. and I will be
forerncd by, the Convention which meets in
iolivar the 8th of September. .
Urt.xix-7 H'iSKA TOWNPRNT.
CONCERT.
ANOTHER CHANCE!
FIFTH AND LAST GIFT CONCERT
IN ill) OF THB
Public Library of Ky.
POSTPONED TO
NOVEMBER 30, 187 4.
Drawing Certain at that Date
LIST or UIFTS.
ONE ORAND CASH
ONE GRAND CASH
ONE GRAND CASH
ONE GRAND CASH
ONE GRAND CASH
5Cash Gifts, 1S0,
GIFT.
GIFT
G1FC.
GIFT
GIFT
Oil) each...
irnO each...
. 2so.oiie
.. 100.000
.. 75.000
.. fo.OKi
.. 25.000
.. loo.ooo
... ltO.OHO
... 150,0110
.. loo.ooo
.. IiiO.OiiO
... to.ouo
.. loo.uo
,M loo.ooo
... 1J),000
, 5O.IIO0
... 950.000
10 Caah Gifts, 14
15Canh Gifts,
20 Cash Gifts,
25Canh Gifts,
30 Cash Gifts,
M) Cash Gifts,
lOOCai-h Gilts,
240 C mil Gifts,
500 Cash Gifts,
19,000 Cash Gifts,
,!") each.
t) earn...
(Ml each...
(IK) each...
0141 each...
,0110 each...
6"0 eac'u...
100 each...
60 each...
8RAND TOTAL
ALU CAbll
20,000 GIFTS,
.,.;.... 82,500,000
PRICE OF TICKETS.
Whole TickeU J?
Halves 2o 00
Tenths, or each coupon --
11 Whole Ticketsfor , S"0 08
Whole TickeU for 1.000 00
For particulars and information, address
TIION. E. HK4M I.V.TTK,
Aeent and Manager, Publio Library Buildins,
,nni.Till, Kv. u-W-viT-. .
SUMMER RESORT.
Bon Aqua Springs.
BOARD FOR JUKE AND SEPTEMBER,
140 per month; July and August, 115 per
"children oer four and under thirteen years
old, and servant, half price. .
Children under four yeara old, 12 per
"illaVd per week, iM ; board per day, $2 50.
Round trip tickets from Memphis to Bon
Au.ua Station "turn, ffl
W. GfV Pattesoh, Cashier.
Mt2. li ""-T
REMOVAL.
REMOVAL MOTICE.
AN OR ABOUT TUE 25th OF AUGUST WE
I I -ii --,.,., n..i nrnt location to
J Will I CI"" auM v-
No. 2T2 Front St.,
where we will opea with a lane stock of
LIQUORS, CIGARS
AID
TOBACCO,
And will o!I at a .mall advance above fac
tory pric.F.
S. KAUFMAN & BRO.
141-t
DELEC ATE ELECTION.
NOTICE.
OmcK op the Executive Board 1
11 SlIKLMY CtH NTY, ,
Memi-hih, Tenn., August 15, 1S74.J
rpHM EXECUTIVE BOARD OF SHELBY
J. oounly, appointed unilur the Bartlctt reso
lutions imd ro-appointcd by the mass conven
tion of the people of Shelby county on tho 11th
inst., hereby ordor that the sub-committees
in their respective civil dixtriote and wards,
whoso names were publinhod in tho order of
May SO, 1S74, and which did sub-committees
are hereby re appointed shnll opon and hold
an election for the number of delegates here
inafter stated; at the respective places in thoir
civil districts and wauls named in paid order
of Jlay 80, 1M74 ; the oleotion ot enid delegates
to bo by ballot; to bo hold by laid sub-corn-luiltces,
iu the civil uitlricta from 12 o'clock
in. to 6 o'clock p.m.,
On tho 8d Day of September, 1871,
And In tho wards In tha city of Memphis,
from 3 o'clock p.m. to S o'clock p.m., on said
3d day of r-'eptcmbor, 1K74; end said sub-com-mitteus
are hereby Instrucied that every Dem.
ocrat. Liberal or Conservative citizen is au
thorised o voti.for said ilelef.'iitcs, provided
ho ii u resident voter of bis civil district or
ward, and will support the, noinincos of the
convention, hereby called; and said commit'
tcos are hereby instructed that thav "ire to bo
the solo judges as to whether the said appli
cant is entitled to voto under the iiualilicn
tions nbova set forth: and tbev will iiimoint
two of their number to recoid tho names of
tho voters, and muko roturn of said election
to the chairman ot the Executive Bourd with-1
out delay.
'I I.. allinn An dnl.l 3.1 .lav .,C Km.l.ml... n. 1
above stated, will he lor seventy-mx delegates !
to the CmiKrofHUinul Convention, culled to
meet at Boiivar, Tcnnosfec, on Kciitoinbor a,
174; and also fur one hundred and seventy
three delegates to the County Convention,
which is horeby called t meet m tho Exposi
tion Building, in the city of Mumpbis, Ten
nessee, on Tuesday, September 15, 174: and
the said election on the said 3d day of .Sup.
teniber, 1S74, will be for tho number of dile
irntes and lit tho nlaces iu said civil districts
and wards as follows :
CIVIL DISTRICTS.
No. 1-At Union Academy. Cengresssonal
convention, two delegates; county conven
tion, five delegates.
No. 2 AtMilwood. . CongressUnal oonvon
tion, two delegates; county convention, four
delegates.
No. S -At Lucy. Congres?ional convention,
two delegates; county convention, fivo dele
gates. No. 4-At Old Union. Congressional con
vention, one delegate; county convention,
three delegates.
No. 8-At Big Springs. Congressional con
vention, one delegate; county convention,
three delegatos.
No. 6 At Raleigh. Congressional conven
tion, three delegates; county convention,
sevci delegates.
No. 7 At Bartlott. Congressional conven
tion, three delegates; county convention, six
delegates.
No. 8-At Wythe Depot and Log Union.
Congressional convention, one delegate;
oounty convention, three delegates.
No S-At Fitherville. Concessional con
vention, thric delegates! ci-unty convention,
five delegates.
No. Id At CnlliervilV fonsr-tsional con
vention, two di-lcg.iu; co-juiy convention,
six delcg t-.
No. 11 At. Geiumn'o n. Congressional
convention, tbree Ueligaiec; county conven
tion, four d..-le(ia:es.
No. 12-AtBuntyn'sand Oukville. Congres
sional convention, uvo dcltfutcr; county con
vention, four delegates
No la-At Arnold's C.ngrcfsior al con
vention, oni uo. cynic; ci-unty convention,
two delegate.
No. 16 At Albert Pike Lodgo. Congres
sional convention, one delegate ; county con
vention, four delegates. ,
No. 17 At MoConnell's Church. Conjres
lonol convention, ono delegate; county con
venton, one delegate.
CITY OF MEMPHIS.
, . . . . . r -r:
1'irst ward Ai soutnwess corner ui imkiu
and Jackson streets. Congressional conven
tion, six delegates; county convention, thir
teen delegates.
Second Word At Poplar ssreet engine-
hous. Congressional convention, six dele
gates; county convention, fourteen dclogatej.
Xnird uara oeconu Bircm, uiiusn. vuU1.
c-quare. congre.5iuai emivoimvu,
delegates: county convention, sixteen dele
gates.
Fourth Ward-At County uouri isuim ng.
Congressional convention, five delegates:
county convention.leloven delegates.
Fifth Ward-Beal and DeSoto. Congres
sional convention, four delegates; county
convention, nine delegates.
. . . .. i . i . .. i. .
Sixth Ward At urooas mumo w
.: .i .n,niinn. four deleaates: oounty
Bi.iuni ... . . -
convention, nine delegates.
Seventh Ward Heat street, near. juempnia
end Charleston railroad. Congressional con
vention, four delegates; county convention,
nine delegates
Eighth Ward Opposite ropiar streei mr-
. : .1 nnnD.nii.in iiv ilnlnu-uLes !
gel. Ongr.l!loui vou.o.iv.v... -
county con vtntion, thirteen delegates.
Ninth W ard Fourtn anu aucuuu
Congressional convention, three delegates;
county convention, eight delegate..
Tenth Ward-Goodwin'. Hall- Congres
sional convention, four dolegutoj; oounty
l.tl.trl.ta.
couveuwvu, mu wB
Voters in the Fourteenth Civil District out
side of the oity of Memphis and east .of the
llornando road, .will vote .n the feven h
ward and those in laid District and west of
it,. Hernando road will vote in the lenth
ward.
Veters in the Fifteenth Civil uismci, ouir
.1,1. f th. -itv of Memphis, will vote in the
Ninth ward.
The Exeoutive Board herely declares that
every citiien possessing the qualifications for
. ... .tat.,1. ii Alevihie as ft dele
gate for said conventions, and the said Hoard
hereby request tint the subcommittee, be
especially cautious not to exercise laHuence
for or against any ot the candidate. i coming
hefere the conventions: an the citu.nsof
thi, county, opposed to Radicalism, are most
earnestly solicited to vote, for de legates H.
their respective civil districts and wards on
SSb0atSuJergnraf.::tht
of likequalitications.
The chairmen of the various siib-com mit
teeV will be immediately notified of any
che.nge, in their committees, and they are
hereby especially r.,u. wa ' -t
mitteea togemer ',,,,;.
utteee ;ge."" -", . in the campaign.
urenare for active service .uvu. - f
The d.1eW . '''"n.TconventioS.
tember, 18.4. to tnei-onaii"' delegate,
will meet in eonvennon wi tb t "
from the i"J,ffliiTei? nid th i "ol
in the town of liol va r o f ,he Ex
boptembcr, pursuant ,o i Congres-
'!"Utl,Di.t?iS to nominate a candidate to
f;.enDt the Dil?rict in th. Congres. oi th.
1 Th5 deVewW. elected on said 3d day of Sep
. 'I', S-l I, the County Convention, will
tember. lo, 4. to the Exposition Build-in
the city of Memrhi.. Tennessee, on
Toda Sep ember 15. 174. at 0 o'clock
a mf! , for the purpo.e of nominating c.ndi
d Tii,Sen?'",:ftnd six Representative, to
rr,",nt Shelby county in the General As-
eOn.rRer tentative to represent the Coun
ti of t-kelbyand Favette. jointly, and
One Fnator to represent the counties of
Shelby. Fayette and Tipton, jointly, in the
0TnbrcoSofrFa,..t. and Tipton are -rwted
and especially urged to send aelenatee
To meet with tb. fchelby county delegates in
,"oril convention at the a-ove named place
limme.liat-ly atler the nominations of the
Shelby County Convention are made) to make
the joint nominations above named.
By order of ()WJ,V pwvI,R
ALBERT Sl'GttS,
I.-HA.M H NELSON.
W II (. ARR'JLL.
N M .10 KS.
H'M M li.LKR.
T" II jl.M AN. Ja,
W W Mi lioWELL,
WM I'.KNJl-S,
M J W AI.DRAX.
Executive Cnanl of Shelby County.
NM JONES.
Intin. fttairioan
Haser J Lvxs. Secretary. 140-i;-2-15S
JNimAJjlCE.
WASHINGTON
1IKE AXU HABI.1K
INSUKAXtD COMPANY
. Office, 5 1-2 Madison St,
HIonn)Iili8, - - Tennessee..
Policies issue"! upon Fire, Marine and lnl&ss
risks at equitablo rates.
J. W. JEFFERSON, President
T. B. DILL ARD, Vice Prea't.
G. W. L. CROOK, Secretary
lUKKCTUKSt
J. W. JEFFERSON, of J. W. JefTerson A Co
T. B. DILLARD, Cotton Factor.
J. N. OLIVER, of Oliver, Finnie Co.
JONATHAN RICE, of Rice. Stix k Co.
WM. SIMPSON, of Pottit Jt Simpson.
J 11. GODWIN, Cotton Factor.
G. V. RAMBAUT, of E. M. Apperson MiCo.
llH-t
SEC0XU AM) LAST
ailAID GIFT COXCEIIT
IN AID Of Till
Masonic Relief Association
OF JiOKFOLK. VA.,
Thur8lay, September 1S74.
nilUS ENTERPRISE 13 CONDUCTED BY
1 the Masonic Relief Assoo'ation, of Nor
folk, Va., under authority of the Virginia
Legislature (act passed Murch X, 1K73) for tbe
purpose of raising funds to complete the Ma
sonic Temple now in course ot erection in
Norfolk.
00,000 IKK E I M 6000 CASH UIt'18-
$250,000 OO!
TO BE GIVEN AWAY I
A New Feature, To-wit: A Gift is Guaran
teed to one of every ten Consecutive
Numbers.
LIS r OF UIFTs.
Cash Gift of
Cash Gilt of
Cash Gilt of
Cash Gift of
Cash Gift of
Cash Gift of
Cash Gift of .....
if ta of $10 0 each
One Grand
One Grand
One Grand
One Grand
One Grand
One Grand
One Grand
$30,000
25.000
20,00(1
10,000
5,000-
2.500
2.000-
15.(00
14,0(10
lo.-so
11.810
25,000
2S.W0
50.000
15 Cash G
28 Cash G
43 Cn-h G
79 Cash G
ilts of 600 each
ills f
ifts of
ilts of
ifts of
ifts of
250 each
l'K) each
100 eich
50 each
10 each
250 Cash G
578 Cash G
60U) Cash G
6000 CASH GIFTS, aggregating !250,000-
Whole Tickets. S10; Half TickeU, $5: Quar
ter Tickets, $2 50: Eleven Whole Tickets or
Twenty-two Half Tickets for JluO. No dis
count on less amount.
Xo IutUvltlual BeiictKs.
This Concert is strictly fr MASONIC pur-
.1 :il l. Ann,ln,-,1 with ,hA .u.nn
ruiset., anu mil uo liiiiuiii wii ...... ...w
iberality, honesty and fairness which char
acterized the first enter, rise.
Juliet ij. riurr-ii, rrcniucui.
For Tickets and Circulars giving full infor
mation, address,
Henry V. Monro, Secretary,
MASONIC RELIEF ASSOCIATION.
NORFOLK, - VIItOIXIA
mw Information furnished by Joe Lorke,
2Rii Mnin stri-et, Room 1. np-sfnirs 114-TiT-tf-
LECAL.
oii-H0Mideut Notice.
Betsy Nelson") Second Circuit Court of
vs. - bbelby county, Tennes-
N. T. Nelson ) tee.
TT APPEARINU FROM AFFIDAVIT IN
JL this cause, that the defendant is non
resident of the Mate of Tennessee; it is there-
i i i .L-. V K.nl.n kn ii iinonrnnpn
lore oruereu uiav u. u.ono .o
herein at the court house in the city of .Mem
phis, Tennessee, on or oeiore too iuiru a1Uu
day in September next, 1H74. and plead, an-
' Ki:.:iVi. kill a. Oi. InniA
swor or aemur to imhhhiu o - - -
will be taken for confessed as to him and set
for hearing ex parte; ana tnai copy ul mi.
order be published once ft week for (our suc
cessive week,, in the Mci-Pnbh. Ledjw.
By Gr.o. 3. Cahipbkll, Deputy Clerk.
1r,i)-ISH-TiT-8-12
SAUCE.
Tit A IKE MAK.
WORCESTERSHIRE SAUCE
SUPREME COURT GENERAL TERM.
JOHN W. LEA et al. against SUNDRY
join "coi;k11;kfEITERS.
When It is apparent that there is an Inten
tion to deceive the public by the use of tho
name of the place and the word descrip
tive of an article, such deception will not
be protected by the pretense that these
words cannot be used in such manner a.
to constitute a " trade mark.'
Where words and the allocation of word
have, byloDguse, become known as des
ignating the article of a particular manu
facturer, he acquires a right to them as
trade mark, which competing dealers can
not fraudulently invade
The estence of the wrong is the false repre
sentation and deceit, on proof of which
an injunction will issue."
Tbe concluding wordi ef the Jndgcs'
decision are :
" The order appealed from should be modi
fied and the injunction extended so as to pro
hibit the use of the words " Worcestershire
sauce on the bills, labels and wrappers ot
the defendant."
LEA & PERRIXS'
CELEBRATED
PRONOUNCED
BY
CONNOISSEURS
To be the
"ONLY OOOI
SAVCE,"
And applicable to
EVERY VARIE
TY OF DISH.
EXTRACT of a.
Setter from
MEDICAL GEN
TLEMAN at
Madras, to his
brothor at
WORCESTER,
May. 1K51.
" Tell Lea & Per
rina that their
Sauce is highly es
teemed in India.,
and is. in my opin
ion, the most pal
atable aa well as
the most whnlo--iOlne
Sauce that
is made."
Worcestershire Sauce.
old Wholesale and for Exportation by th
Proprietors. LEA and PERKINS, Worcester.
England: and Retail bv Dealers in Sauces gen
erally throughout the World.
Ask for Lea A Perrlns'Snnco.
All rartiea infringing on the above will be
prosecuted by Messrs. LEA 4 PERKINS.
JOHX DLCAVS S0'S,
110-riT-lin w TASK,
MORNING CLASS-.
Iff mTTTgM26T I 44 7 3 1 1 I 43 I U I lfi Tot
Memphis, August 25, ls74.
w
153-t
f.24-t

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