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The Morristown gazette. (Morristown, Tenn.) 1867-1920, August 06, 1884, Image 1

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MORRISTOWN, TENN., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 6, 1884.
VOL. XVIII.--NO. 19.
By JOHN E. HELMS.
! t
5 i
I
1
D. B. LOVEMAN & CO.
Dry Mt, &, 7M,
UKESSGS MADE TO OBDKtt.
SBMiillteMaBBiDpliiat
EalretJrkas. Um, Ribbon. KiJ. Silk aad
LJi. OkiM, li.lllrBMC'i I arei.hlnga.
IiJm' kit latm oannauta.
MILLINERY,
THE JIOT COMPLETE
DRY GOODS ESTABLISHMENT
IX THE SOCTH.
Pt-m a k ta at.y. Grd ef ttooaa.
Oar Xptoadia I llaatrl4 Cat.h-ra. wW fraaoai
I tvaltoa. Kaipira ut lT tKoU r Mai
f rr-
t w pj ipraa char(a oa ail Caaa Orders
t Ta tfeuara or avar.
D. O. LOVEMAN & CO.,
ClIATTASOOOA, TENN.
a pel klr
To tb la of tl.e ludiiti, rommfitln
liatrlvr anJ rw artilrr, ll-wuirrr'a Muoi
ark BtUra i peculiarly aUatrJ. atac It
wrrnfUfw lh dirti orfaaa, and
kracm tb I'liJ'.K'al rorrt rm la uabalU
lul laiiw-. It rfre. aol rcrmu
B&alari'l fcrr, Coul.-tio, tlpeiia(
b.Ukfaily uutuUU'. toe biJney. ana
bia 1 Wr. aoJ rartcbe. aa well aa ixiriae.
tbo blood. Wba overebnf br fat l rue,
wb'tbar maatal or phy.iral. tbo weary
ad Ubil:tateO livl it a reliable aarc of
rear wei atrenirtti and r..rai'ort. tor ai
bf all Iruita aoU IVilrr. gvnerallT,
DRS. OWENS & TURNER,
HAT1KO ESTIRID 1STO A MEDICAL bad
Si K'JICAL i-artaerabip, rmpcctf ally tendar
tUe-tr
rroressional Sorrices
M the rltli. na of il imto-n an.l TlctiJty .
iFtlt K at Dr. U. CarrtrfffB drur ab ra."
IVH. 14. lso tl7n:tf
Marion Female College.
, THE 12th SESSION
riLL HKGIS THE FIRST WEDXEJDAT
11 n(i4'ntr,li4. Total .iMiaea la bt-a.a-y
dvartoiebt. fr D-rd. Tuith.u. ec $13
to $iu -r arbotaatte year af lo mntt.. npon
;m.t of vbirh a reci t la fall wiU be f1n.
t!7 f'r C'ttiLiut ami Aer iufsnnaliuix
myiimf ltev. J. .T. Srlierer,
jr 9 2m. MA UIOX, Ya.
"WESTER FEMALE COLLEGE,
(BAPTIST.)
BRISTOL, EAST TENNESSEE.
-rilX or EN IT NEXT ANNTAL TEEM
Tbara4y, Anfnat 21. I, wttb a riaar-
ILIH ruTLtl.
rkAklper CDoctb la aJaoce, $10.00 -If not
pal I la a-l.aara, $11. MO.
TVI1IOJI low. Tba Itealdeat of thi. laetitn
Uva baa aa .irrwao cf l yaara la tb. ach U
r.ma. aa at tbo btaaiD of tb. a.xt term, wtfl
bate a-it4 wttb btoa Dr. M. It Ooferta, a
Ima- rrMiJwt of tbo Baptlat Collef. at Maaay
Cr-k. TaaantM.
ik c ATi:sTi:n, a. sr..
PrM.aut.
Jana 23. l4-ly.
KDUCATIO N !
J3IilltK" College.
o-
iBta bvdiaa aad (entlawian. Eirsn.n far
board, waabiac. taiuoa mm leaa
For One School Yfr 93 to $110.
tora ciriiOMA cji-rseh.
Tba raiitcaarbMIof lhColla baa on. of
tb. n.t cmrrektaa)o cuarMW tauUt. fall
cbutarablp jj w.
laatrnwMatal maaic with aa. of loatrnniaat, EiS.
vaJ fue eatak-n. i-l la-
Tba Itntwti Maaroa, a arbool hierary aad
taatparaaeo arnai. nvxably, oaly as rta. a yoar.
Aajraaa. 3 l!OPWllD,
M.lluaa ColIeg, MUl:au, Teoa.
Jan. la, lwi-1 on.
Emory & Hsnry College,
EMORY VV.
TUCCih Aoaual ftraalon wlUbrftn on tba 4th
day of aeteaaber. IM. Tba Kaaulty baa
nrmili bar u .ubataat tally .BlarfoJ. and tba
bwtUlutf B.. b luiproted. No Coila. In b. COOB
try baa aa ffood a Wati-n. a nd nua. ta lUt to do
aa (wd w.ri Tor a. reamaaoto a wnimwuua
Coc aboe and b Infiieiuatton, addrraa
Riv I.. E. MOSH A. VI., trfTia.
J at la-It ian
CtABENGEtw TUGKEBt
DENTIST.
M0RBLST0WN, TENNESSEE.
CJL- our f. P. trrer$ Drug Htrt.
DaoLlAJJ-ly.
Fcr ClciCw Faailj Qmm
GOTO
W. M. WILMETH
CEALEB IX
Dry Goods, Groceries.
Boots Shoes, Hats At,
1WU A feet for tba Lbjbt-BnBBlBf
DAVIS SEWING MACHINE
t-gowlac Macbino HEEDLEA of all klads. OIL,
A , eonaUBUy om Eaad.
Hbaat markat prie p.14 for all kinds ef Cuoalry
frodnca.
MAIN Sr., MORRISTOWN, TENN.
LS to 8TOXACB
DEPARTMENT
or
D. B. Loveman & Co.
Wlien you want anything: In
Carrsts, Oil Clotfc, Hattun, Sliaies,
Lacs Ccrfatns, Lailsrcpiis, Valances,
winlof Ccrmces. ail Cornice roles
It will Pay You to Como
or Write to Us.
An ImmeiLSBStoct, any class ofGoofls
Always the Seurest Styles.
. T?e Best Good for the Money.
CuUua Cfeaiaa. froaa
All-(Tool TWini Car ptt. t torn Ue .
AlWWaol Extra Sapara, from tc.
TapMlri Braaaala, from Me.
Body BfMM.lt. froas $1 10.
Vatvat Obit. Mosqqvtt. Carpat, Aiavtaiatrr
CaxMLa. at aa oUy low prtaaa.
bb4 for oar baaattfullr Uluatraled 8 prim Cat.
D. LOVEM AH & CO ,
CUATTASOOOA, TlNX.
aprlt U ly I
THE MORRISTOWH GAZSTTK
Subscription Price, 91 CO,
Invariably tn advance, otherwise
Ealaraa at tba rati UtSo. at MorrUtowa, T.aa,
a tKuid claaa mat tar
TERMS OF THE GAZETTE
RAms oy auBscniPTiox.
Var (33 istuet) $1.50; t'j wnAj, 75 ctt;
ZKrt huMAs, 4(1 cento.
It A TE3 OF AD VSJtTISIJiO. Ont inc
ftrtt iVeT&mt $1 , 4xJi $uhtqu4nt inset"
tm, 50 et; dUplaytd adtrtiment$
uiU 14 ckurQi aetvrding t Vu ipact ocu-
pt4d at aoo94 raUt.
TO IIS G VLA R AD VER TISERS tr .
fir $uperir indutmentt, both at U rats
r ckarft and iruinntr ditlaying their
rur.
QQUMUXICATIOXSmutt U aeeompan-
4d by t4 trus nams and addrets tht
trrwrtt rUr u rctt atUnnon.
9 BIT U A R T AT0 TICKS, TrOmUt Rs
tpset and Cards of Thanks charged fr
as rsffuiar adtertitementt.
ALL BILLS for advertising art ? tehen
e i trotted aid payable on demand.
NOTICES IX LOCAL COLUMNS-II
cents per tine far first insertion and 8 cents
per line for each additional insertion.
Tb Whig rrty beaten in
IS 14 under the candidacj of tlia
magnetic Henry Clay, lliutory re
peats itself bbout once in forty
year.
A quarter of a century it Ion 5
enough for one party. The books
in Wasbiogton should be overhaul
od by new men. Turn the rascals
out.
Mr. Blaine's Prohibition record
will probably play a larjje part in
this campaign. The Germans somen
times make ead haroc of a Prohibi
tion candidate.
The Independent Republicans
represent a conscience rote. They
are honest and in dead earnest.
Their support is a Tery high com
pliment to Gov. Cleveland.
The Republican party u the par
ty of the vrerkingmen. Those
horny-handed sons of toil, W. II.
Vanderbilt, Jay Gould and Cyrus
V. Field, all hurrah for Blaine.
Wo cannot keep track of all the
prominent Republicans who are now
breaking into the Democratic party.
But they are welcome all the same.
Each one is a man and a brother.
The mebt threatening eloud upon
the horiron of the Republican party
at this date is the attitude of the
German voters in the imperial State
of Ohio. It will be remembered
that Ohio votes in October.
The Republican newspapers have
got their mud machines all ready to
play on Cleveland, but they don't
seem to make much headway in
throwing dirt The great reform
governor of New York seems to be
invulnerable.
The Republican party has always
claimod the credit for good prices,
good crops and good times. Being
such an omnipotent all-pervading
party, it will probably hare 10 as
same the responsibility for the hard
times this year.
The Democrat will fight this year
not only for the doubtful States, but
for Ohio, Illinois and Wisconsin, and
other Statea which have formerly
been considered reliably liepubli
can. The indications are that this
will bo a great year for the Demo
crats.
The eheek of the Republican edi
tors who aro appealing to the Irish
Catholic vote would supply the new
navy, that U ta be, with an arma
ment of brass guns. These are the
same editors who were egging on
the criminal Know-Nothing crusade
against tho Catholic church in the
Ohio campaign in 1875. They are
men who have insulted the Irish
race on every conceivable occasion.
UILLINERY !
Do yon vtvat a
Sonnet or Sat?
II you rauDut csoms lu partoa Mad yoar ord.r to
Millinery Department,
13.33. Loveman fc Co.
CHATTANOOGA, TENN.
Tha Ht, Moat Faahionabla and Cbaapeat M mi
liary in in. aoum.
Big Line Children' Hats.
oa a. U. amount of money yon visa to .lyand
and will put np ana mb yon bb omm
rihla ariiela for Uk. prica.
Writ, a .aort aaacrlptioa af yonraalf and alao staL
waat color Una. or vreaaaa yon wasi
to waar tb. Hat or Buanet
wtth.
Try at, yon ran da no baiUr. W. da not aand
JilUin.ry oa ipfrvinum .
D. B. LOVEMAN Sc CO.,
Chattanooga, Tinn.
aprlt M ly
The surfaco signs indicate that
the Republican revolt against Blaine
in New York will bo as large this
year as tho revolt against Folger in
1882. If it should be but we will
not harrow the feelings of the Re
publicans by unpleasant specula
tions. Tho Now York World has dis
covered a citiEon, Henry Richards,
who haa worked in the miues'own
ed by Blaine and Elkins in Penn
sylvania. Mr. Richards say-, that
no Irish are employed in these
mines, that the laborers are chiefly
Italians, and that the pay is from
6iity to siEty-five cents a day.
The central idea in this campaign
is that there should be a change in
the Federal Government. The Re
publican party haa now been in
power for . twenty-four years. It
begins to think that it owns the
earth. It must stand aside and give
the Democratic party a chance to
purify this government.
All the great Democratic states
men are working earnestly for
Cleveland and Hendricks, and the
Democratic press is united in sup
port of the ticket, and Republican
roe ru its are climbing over the party
wall so fast that they can't bo count
ed. There is nothing but serenity
and happiness inside of the Demo
cratic camp.
There is something peculiarly un
fortunate for Mr. Blaine in his Pro
hibition record. It is just strong
enough to secure the antagonism of
the Germans, and yet it is not re-
bust enough to attract the support
of the Prohibitionists. If Mr. Blaine
had remained in Pennsylvania,
where he was born, possibly he
would not bo in this predicament.
It is possible that the Republi
can newspapers havo slightly over
worked the case of Mr. Pa reel 1, of
Rochester, who resigned his edito
rial chair rather than support Cleve
land. They are advertising tho fact
that up to this time Mr. Purcell is
the only Democrat of any conse
quence in this great big country
who has gone back on the ticket.
One great good will come out of
this campaign. It will demonstrate
hew deurly the Republican party
loves th j Irishman. Heretofore the
grand old party has hidden this
love, add lot concealment, like a
worm in the bud, feed upon her
damaged cheek. And the Irishman
has occasionally remarked :
Tni all vary wall to di.eembU yoar lor..
Hat why did yon kick ma down ataira t"
The difference between the two
parties was well illustrated by the
personnel of the two national con
ventions. The active spirits in the
Republican convention were oflice
heldert., adventurers and star-routs
ers, wt ile the prominent men in the
Democratic convention were great
statesmen whoso lives make a largo
part of the history of their country
Thurman, Hendricks, Randall,
Morrison, Carlisle, Wallace, Bar
no m, Leon Abbott, Waller, Beck,
Yoorhees, Palmer, Yilas and others.
The big managers of the Repub
lican party have been loafing around
for some time with a smirk of satis
faction en-their faces, waiting for
the Democratic party to make a
fool of itself. But the Democratic
party has acted with singular wis
dom, and the look of satisfaction on
the faces of Mr. Elkins and Mr. B.
Finatice Jones has changed to an
expression of wild-eyed appreben-
sion, which is close kin to despair.
Them is no hope left for tho Repub
lican party except in its favorite
old argument of two-dollar bills on
election day,
LOGAN SELLING
FREE NEGROES INTO SLAV
ERY AT AUCTION.
From tba M.mpbia Appeal.
No man in the United States has
shown as much hatred for the negro
as John A. Logan, the Republican
nominee for Vice President. Ho
has pursued this unfortunate race
with beastlv ferocity. In other
of
days, when the negro was in slav
ery and needed sympathy, Logan
regarded the soil of Illinois " as too
sacred to be polluted by his con
tamlnating tread. If there is a col
ored man in 'the South so lost to
self-respect as to vote for John A
Logan after reading the exposure
wo intend to make in, this article,
then he is so debased and degraded
as to vote for the most cruel slave
driver that ever wielded the lash.
Ignorant of the past record of Lo
gan his atrocious cruelty to the
race when he proposed to hunt
them down as wild boasts the no
gross are howling for his election.
Can it be possible that this is tho
same John A. Logan who, in the
Illinois Legislature, secured the
passage of a bill selling into slavery,
at public auction, all free negroes in
tho State? When the constitution
of Illinois was framed in 1S48, there
were two provisions in it which
were separately submitted to the
people for their adoption or rejec
tion. One was that no negro or
mulatto shall be permitted to mi
grate or settle in the State. On
this the vote was 171,890 to 71,306,
being a majority of 100,590 for the
provision against the admission of
negroes or inulattoes into Illinois.
John A. Logan voted with the ma
jority to exclude the negroes from
the State. The other constitutional
provision submitted to the poople
was that the negroes should not
hold office or have tho right of suf
frage. On this question the vote
stood 211,920 to 35,649, beins: a ma
jority of 170,271 against allowing
negroes or mulattocs to hold office
or to vote in Illinois. John A. Lo
gan voted with the majority against
tbo negroes. To carry these pro
visions into effect, John A. Logan,
who was a member of the Legisla
ture and of the Judiciary Commit
tee, reported to the Legislature of
1S53 and secured the passage of the
following bill:
IF A NEGRO OR MULATTO,
BOND OR FREE, SHALL HERE
AFTER COME INTO THIS
STATE AND REMAIN TEN
DAYS WITH THE EVIDENT IN
TENTION OF RESIDING IN
THE SAME, EVERY SUCH NE
GRO OR MULATTO SHALL BE
DEEMED GUILTY OF A HIGH
MISDEMEANOR, AND FOR THE
FIRST OFFENSE SHALL BE
FINED THE SUM OF $50. IF
SUCH NEGRO OR MULATTO
SHALL BE FOUND GUILTY,
AND THE FINE ASSESSED BE
NOT PAID FORTHWITH TO
THE JUSTICE OF THE PEACE
BEFORE WHOM THE PRO
CEEDINGS WERE HAD, IT
SHALL BE THE DUTY OF
SAID JUSTICE TO COMMIT
SAID NEGRO OR MULATTO TO
THE CUSTODY OF THE SHER
IFF, OR OTHERWISE KEEP
HIM, HER OR THEM IN CUS
TODY; AND SAID JUSTICE
SHALL FORTHWITH ADVER
TISE SAID NEGRO OR MULAT
TO, AND ON" THE DAY. AND
AT THE TIME AND PLACE
MENTIONED IN SAID ADVER
TISEMENT THE SAID JUSTICE
SHALL, AT PUBLIC AUCTION,
PROCEED TO SELL SAID NE
GRO OR MULATTO TO ANY
PERSON, OR PERSONS; WHO
WILL PAY SUCH FINE AND
COSTS EOR THE SHORTEST
TIME; AND SAID PURCHASER
SHALL HAVE THE RIGHT TO
COMPEL SAID NEGRO OR MU
LATTO TO WORK FOR, AND
SERVE OUT SAID TIME. IF
SAID NEGRO OR MULATTO
SHALL NOT WITHIN TEN
DAYS AFTER THE EXPIRA
TION OF HIS, HER OR THEIR
TIME OF SERVICE,' AS AFORE
SAID, LEAVE THE STATE, HE,
SHE, OR THEY SHALL BE LI
ABLE TO A SECOND PROSE
CUTION, IN WHICH THE PEN
ALTY TO , BE, , INFLICTED
SHALL BE $100, AND SO
ON FOR EVERY SUBSEQUENT
OFFENSE THE P E N A L T Y
SHALL BE INCREASED $30
OVER AND ABOVE THE LAST
PENALTY.
John A. Logan was the author
and champion of this bill, which
was not repealed until 18G5. ne
drafted it, and the records ef the
Illinois Legislature show that he
carefully guarded its severe and
cruel provisions against all amend
ments. The slave code was called
bloody, and it is charged that tho
negroes wero often treated with
great 'cruelty; bat the history of
i!Yry farnUues. pp. parallel ta (ha
wicked and atrocious cruelty with
which John A. Logan ' pursued the
negroes in Illinois. This is the man
who is traducing and vilifying tho
bouth and charging our people with
being slave-drivers and hostile to
the blacks. .Logan s bill selling tree
negroes into slavery was monstrous
in its provisions ; yet, in the face of
sucn barbarity toward the colored
people who had fled to the free soil
of Illinois for protection, he now
comes forward as the champion of
the enfranchised blacks. He re
fused the negro shelter in misfor
tune, but new claims the vote of
the raco he proposed to sell into
slavery for tho crimo of bging tree
and daring to locate in the free
State of Illinois. Blaine, tattooed
with his corrupt schemes, is a hide
ous monster. Rut a cartoon repre
senting Logan on the block auction
eering free negroes and mulattoes
to the highest bidder selling them
into slavery because they were
unfit to livo as freemen in Illinois,
will present a picture still more dis
gusting and revolting. Logan, now
that the negroes are enfranchised,
regards them as "the wards of the
nation : but in 1853 he regarded it
as a "high misdemeanor" for them
to pollute tho soil of Illinois with
their presence and proposed to hunt
them down with all the ierocity 01
an Alrican slave-dealer or tbo
Southern slave-driver with blood-'
hounds in pursuit of their runaway
negroes, with the view ot making
slaves of freemen who had either
purchased their freedom or been
emancipated by their owners. Un
der tho provisions of Logan's slave
code, if tho negroes did not leave
the State in ten days after regain
ing their freedom they were again
placed on the block and the punish
ment increased by extending tho
period of ownorship and slavery.
Less than thirty years age Logan
regarded the negro as a nuisance in
Illinois net to be tolerated, and he
was hunted down like a wild beast.
If the colored people are not lost to
shame and self-respect they will
east a solid- vote against the man
who persecuted thorn in the dark
days of slavery, but now that they
are voters would humbug them into
the belief that ho has always been
their friend. It has cost the Appeal
mueh labor to hunt up this damn
ing record. The colored voter will
be lotb to believe it, but Logan and
his friends dare not deny it is readi
ly found in the record of the Illinois
Legislature, written in letters which
time cannot obliterate, making a
damned spot which will not out.
THE TAIL OP THE TICKET.
New York Sun.
When men were hold aa chattels,
Aad slavery ruled the land,
t found in Johnny Logan
A servant at command,
Who boasted that he never
The hardest task weuld shirk.
When slavery called upon him
To do its "dirty work."
Rack back, Black Jack!
Get ahead, no matter how !
Turn over, flop over !
Where is Johnny Logan now ?
He hated all the "niggers"
Outside of slavery's pen,
And vowed that they were cattle.
Who never could be men.
To drive them into bondage
Within the Southern lines,
lie worried negro freemen
With prisons and with fines.
He swore that Northern soldiers,
Who sought to free the slave,
Should never pass through Egypt
Except across his grave.
The sons of trusting neighbors,
Whose mothers well he know.
lie seat across the river
To fight the. men in blue.
But when upon his shoulders
The eagle sign was sproad, - -
And other friends and neighbors
To Southern wars he led,
Then Logan hurried Southward
As fast as he could go,
And killed or put in prison
. The lads he sent below.
Hack back, Black Jack !
Get ahead, no matter ho w t
Turn ever, flo over !
Where is Johnny Logan now ?
AN ISSUE IN HIMSELF.
Harper's Weekly, which has an
enormous circulation all over the
Union, is doing gallant service in
tho'right diroction. It boldly ad
vocates, the election, of Cleveland
and Ilondricks. . So do those great
.Republican journals, the New York
Times, the New York Evening Post;
the Brooklyn Union, the Springfield
Republican, the Boston Herald and
the Boston Advertiser. The last
number of Harper's Weekly, now
eforo us, says: "Tho nomination
of Gov. Cleveland defines sharply
the actual issue of the presidential
election of this year. He is a man
whose absolute official integrity has
never been questioned, who has no
laborious explanations to undertake,
and who is universally known as
tho governor of New York, elected
by an unprecedented majority,
which was not partisan, and repre
sented both the votes and the con
sent of an enormous body of Repub
licans, and who, as the chief execu
tivo ef the State, has steadily with
stood the blandishments and threats
of the worst elements of his party,
and has justly earned the reputation
ol being a courageous, independent
and efficient friend and promoter of
administrative reform. His name
has become that of the especial rep
resentative among our public men
of tho integrity, purity and econo
my of administration, which are the
objects of the most intelligent and
p&irwviw ttw"Ht
THE NEW SOUTH.
What Southern Capital is Doing
Wonderful Growth of
Texas, -
NEW INDUSTRIES.
The Baltimore Manufacturers'
Record thus disposes of the state-i
ment that the greater part of the
capital now being invested in South
ern enterprises is furnished by
Northern parties: "One of the most
gratifying features of Southern pro
gross is the enterprise and push dis
played by Southern men in devel
oping their country. Take Atlanta,
Birmingham, Chattanooga or An
niston, as an illustration, and an ex
amination of their growth will show
that it is very largely due to South
ern, men and money. JNotwith
standing the general opinion to the
contrary, Southern cotton mills
have, to a very liberal extent, been
built by Southern money, and the
same is true ot saw mills, nour
mills, cotton-seed oil mills, tobacco
factories and the many other indus
tries that are now so rapidly in
creasing tho wealth of the South."
The New Orleans Times-Demo
crat says: "The growth of that
young giant of the South, Texas,
has never been equaled in this coun
try. Illinois long enjoyed the dis
tinction f being the most rapidly
growing State in the Union. It is
true that others, like Colorado and
Kansas, sprang from nothing into
populous States within a very few
years, but into no section or portion
of the country did emisrration or
wealth pour as rapidly as into Il
linois, until Texas took its place at
the head of all the States in its as
tonishing development. In tho last
decado tho population of the 'Lone
Star State' doubled. How much it
has increased since 1S80 it is of course
impossible to say, as we have no re
liable figuros on this point, but the
estimate made by some Texan that
it was growing at the rate of 200,
000 persons a year scarcely appears
to be an exaggeration."
A dispatch from Chattanooga to
the Nashville American, dated July
23, says : "Col. E. W. Cole, known
as 'King Colothe railroad magnate,
to-day purchased the entire White
side interest on Lookout mountain,
embracing from 400 to 500 acres and
including tho Point, the Tark, the
Lookout Mountain Hotel property,
the Lookout Mountain turnpike and
all other tracks belonging to the es
tate. The price is reported to be
$124,000. A corps of engineers will
begin work in the morning to make
preliminary surveys for a railroad
to extend from the city to the moun
taintop. Col. Cole states that he will
build a railroad similar to the road
up Mt. Washington in the White
mountains. A charter for the rail
road was applied for to-day.
A magnificent hotel will be
built near the. point and a tower
and. elevator also erected there.
It is reported that Col. Colo also
proposes to endow a university on
the mountain tep, and will make
wonderful improvements every
where, expending from a quarter to
a ball million dollars.
A FARMER'S AWFUL FIGHT
Fiiitztown, Penn., July 17.
Whilo William Seachrist, who lives
near this place, was out in the
woods in search of one of his cows,
he was suddenly attacked by seven
large polecats. Mr. Seachrist is
lame from the effects of white swell
ing, but stood his ground bravely I
and after a lively fight, lasting near
ly twenty minutes, he succeeded in
killing six of the number. He was
almrst suffocated and had to throw
away all of his clothing. He first
saw tho animals in a low undcr
brufeh. They had ' been eating
young chickens from neighboring
farms and became angry when mo
lested in their meal. Mr.. Seachrist
was going through tho brush, when
he suddenly stepped right into the
midst of them. They imagined they
were being attacked and became
savage, .uneoi tne largest 01 ine
cats made a desperate spring and
lit on his shoulders; another cat
clawed, up a sapling and jumped on
his head; the others jumped on his
legs and arms and bung to him like
rats with their sharp claws. They
scratched, howled and bit and made
use of their natural powers of of
fence. With a stout club Seachrist
beat down the cats, holding his
breath for fear of suffocation. He
then held his handkerchief to his
mouth and nose and renewed the
fiht. He beat them down and
stamped the life out of six of them.
The seventh cat escaped in the
dense underbrush. Seachrist hur
riedly rushed away as far as he
could, finally falling through ex-
VV UlVlj MHIJ a waawMp. -
haustion. Ho was taken to Ibis res-
Idenco by other farmers,
HORRIBLE AFFAIR.
MOTHER AND DAUGHTER
BRUTALLY OUTRAGED.
Mrs. Buchanan and Daughter, of
Rhea County. Taken From
Their Home and Outraged by
Seyen Men, Who Carry Them
Away Their Escape.
Chattanooga Democrat, July 29.
One of the most horrible affairs
ever chronicled in this State came
to light this morning. Mrs. Buch
anan, a widow lady, and her daugh
ter, Mary, aged 17 years, live about
fivo miles from Spring City. Sever
al nights a seven men, whom she
recognized as neighbors, came to the
house and made insulting proposals
to tho ladies. Being repulsed, the
villains forced the mother and
daughter to accompany them to the
woods, some distance from the house.
There the ladies were compelled to
remain all night with the men, who
alternately, through the long night,
outraged tho mother and daughter.
All attempts at outcry or escape
were threatened with instant death.
In resisting the fiends the bodies of
both ladies were mercilessly bruised.
At broak of day they wero taken to
the river and forced into a boat and
tho whole party floated down tho
river to Smith's Landing, where the
mother was taken to the west shore,
two of the men froinsrwith her. The
boat, with the daughter and five
men, was taken to tho east side. On
landing tho party proceeded to the
vicinity of Birchwood, in Bradley
county, where the girl was kept in
custody two days, when she made
her escape while the men were
sleeping off a drunkon stupor.
Tho mother made known what
had occurred and warrants were
taken out for seven men and placed
in the hands of the sheriff, who, ins
stead of taking steps to bring the
wretches to justice, went to Cleve
land. Tho warrants were then
placed in the hands of United States
Deputy Marshal Rasor, who arrest
ed a man named Gilhurst, who on
preliminary trial confessed to the
crime and gave the names of the
parties who were associated with
him in its commission. Yesterday
Henry Thomas was arrested in
Bradley county and taken to Spring
City for trial. Gilhurst was com
mitted to jail at Washington.
The other five men, whose names
are not divulged, are still at large,
but are known to reside within a
short distance of Mrs. Buchanan.
Mrs. Buchanan and her daughter
live by farming, and aro quiet and
peaceable ladies, of good character.
The daughter is said to bo quite
handsome and intelligent, and on
tho trial of Gilhurst gave her testi
mony in a modest but quiet manner
that denoted the lady. Her state
ment coincided with the confession
of Gilhurst.
The details of Gilhurst's confess
sion are too revolting for public print,
and are such as to demand of the
outraged law the severest punish
ment known for such shockingdeeds.
YOUTHS IN TETTIC0ATS.
Masquerading for Years in Girl's
Costume Youugr Meu and
Boys Who Find Employment
as Female Operatives and
Clerks.
New York World.
Of the many devices resorted to
in New York by persons of limited
means, and often of no means at all,
there is none probably moro curious
er interesting than the masquerad
ing of boys and youths in girl's at
tire. Strange as it may appear, a
considerable number of persons,
principally operatives in factories
where females are employed, aro of
the male sex, who have donned tho
petticoat because, they declare they
can obtain employment more read
ily than if they applied as males.
An investigation of tho subject
brought to light some curious facts,
showing that while quite a number
ot youths are employed in factories
and stores disguised as girls, some
whose families are in comfortable
circumstances aro also, personating
female characters for the novelty of
the tbing.
A reporter of tho World recently
had his attention directed to thjs
masquerading, and upon inquiry
found that there-are many more of
these peculiar peo'plo than one
would suppose. One of them, a
rather attractive looking " girl " of
modest demeanor, was found and
questioned as to the disguises and
the object that prompted their adop
tion. Under a promise that his
name should not be made public, he
said :
" Speaking of female impersona
tors, I know of several myself and
believe there aro a great many in
tho city. I am eighteen years of
a ay
asre and I have not been dressed in
laTiro liiii ffii mAi'n uifrl.f
w
. " J
years. In fact I have not a single
w
article, of male attif o in my posses
sion. You. seo my mother, liko
thousands of other women loft in
this great city with very little
means, lets out our rooms to gentle
men lodgers. I am her only child,
and we havo no relatives in this
country as far as we know. I was
about eleven years old when I first
dressed in girl's clothes, and since
then I have worn no others. I have
learned housework, needlework and
several other female accomplish
ments." " Have you ever been away from
home?"
" Yes ; I was absent for two years.
I worked the most of tho time in a
knitting mill in Oswego Falls, N.
Y. My first name is now 'Char
lotte ; ' it used to be Charlie. Some
of the girls with whom I worked be-
e:ime suspicious ifnd I came to my
present home in Brooklyn. I saved
about .$150 out ef my wages and
have it now on deposit in bank."
" How do 3'ou keep up the dis
guise?"
" Well, my hair had not been cut
in eight years and is now as long as
any girl's of my age. My waist
measures 22 inches. I wear a No.
5 shoe aud a No 7 glove My cor
sets are not made expressly fur me ;
1 purchase the ordinary Altman ar
tide. My weight is 17 pounds.
You sec my complexion is fair and
features regular. My eyes aro ha
zel brown, and if my hair was a lit
tle lighter I would bo called a
blonde."
" Are those earrings you wear
diamonds ? ''
" Yes ; I bought them myself. I
have no wealthy admirers. I have
worn earrings about six years."
' Do you intend to adopt male
costume soon ? "
"I don't know when I shall
change my dress. I have no desire
to bo a boy, and shall continue to
lead a girl's life as long as 1 can.
I'm afraid I'd make a poor fist of it
trying to make a living at men's
work. I know nothing about ari)
t hi rig except millwork and house
work. My mother and I havo
worked hard and saved what little
we have and now feel safe for the
future. I don't think the question
of my sex has ever been mentioned.
I believe my mother would never
consent for mo to change my attire,
at least so long as I am a good girl
and give her no trouble. You may
laugh at this, but it's true. I am
just the same as any other girl in
my station. I play on the piano
and go shopping and occasionally a
young gcntleman'friend takes mo to
Coney Island or the theatre. I am
rather shy, however, and don't care
much for company."
" Havo you any lady friends? "
" Yes, a few. Wo exchango calls,
but I avoid any intimacy, fearing
they would detect me."
" Who makes your clothes? "
" I have no trouble about that. I
get them made at a dressmaker's,
tho same as any other lady, and
have never had my sex questioned.
I am quite handy with tho necdlo,
and do somo of my plain sowing
myself. My underwear I can buy
cheaper than I can make at home.'J
QUITE A ItACJE.
"Do you know of any similar
cases ? "
" Yes, I am acquainted with three
other persons who havo never worn
boy's clothes. You would bo sur
prised to see us all together. You
would never dream wo wero bojs.
One of them, Josio Q , lives in
Bergen, N. J. There are two other
brothers besides Josio in the family,
and they aro very much attached to
their supposed sister. They are
well off, and Josio has everything a
girl could wish for. Wo seo each
other often. Josie is sixteen, I
think ; at least ho is younger than I
am. Tho ' oldest of my othor two
friends (whom I know as Jennie
Carey) is employed as a bonnet
maker at a millinery store in Brook
lyn. This boy haa been in petti
coats for ten years. So perfect is
his personation that there has never
beeu tho least fsnspiciou as to his
sex. 1 often call at tho store to see
him, and we have many a quiet
laugh at tho expenso of tho other
girls and lady customers. My other
friend who calls himself Ella Ilaupt,
is of German descent, and is the
prettiest and 3-oungest of ns all. Ho
is a clerk in a Bowery storo, and
says he has worn dresses nearly five
years. Ho makes little effort at
concealment, but ho has not been
suspected. He is the- solo support
of his mother and younger brother,
and they all livo in apartments in
Mystic street. Yes," concluded the
masqucrader, "I am satisfied 'it's
easier to get along as a girl than it
is as a boy."
The committee appointed by the
convention formally 1 notified. Gov.
Cleveland ot his 'Wmi nation .for.
President, on tho 29th ult.,"at ',41
baiiv, and Hendricks the following
a m O
day at Saratoga, where ho is tempo
rarily sojourning,
.1
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