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Nashville union and American. (Nashville, Tenn.) 1868-1875, November 26, 1873, Image 2

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IVEDIfESOAlV JTPVJMIIKK 26, 1S73.
The Cincinnati Cmvnicrcial speaks of
a preacher in that city who "squeezed
a large amount of truth into his ser
mon." The "Washington correspondent of
the Cincinnati Gazette says the Grant
and his Cabinet arc annoyed by the
uodsation dispatches sent from that city
in regard to Cuban andSpanish affairs.
The "Washington correspondent of
the Chicago Intcr-Occan says "there is
abundant evidence of an intention on
I ho part of persons variously interested
to drive the country into war with
Such representative Georgians as
Jlcrschcl V. Johnson, Alex. H. Ste
phens, Henry L. Bcnning, Martin J.
Crawford and Mark Blanford, are for
prompt action by the United States
(jovcrnnient in the matter of the out
rage upon American citizens hy the
Cuban authorities. The first named
jrmtlcman expresses the opinion that
"the pear is ripe and it is time it was
plucked." The Georgians appear to
favor annexation.
Hotel prices in New York have
not come down in spite of the falling off
in travel. The Windsor, new and
elaborately furnished; the Fifth Avenue,
the Clarendon, all still chai-ge not less
than five dollars per day. The Broad
way hotels arc somewhat lower. So say
the New York papers. This is the
minimum rate for single gentlemen.
There aic numerous "extras" which
may swell the charges to ten dollars a
day; and a single gentleman occupying
u bedroom, parlor and bathroom, witf
'c charged at least that for his acoonr
niodation alone.
TiiE'Golumbns Ga.) Enquirer main
tains that the South is poor, uot be
-ausc we have less thrift or intelligence
than other sections, but because we do
n t wisely use our gifts. The profits
of our labor go to enrich Europe and
tuc -North and est- It is time our
ioplo were reflecting seriously upon
their vassalage and turning their at
tention to ways and means to prevent
the outflow of money from our midst.
Lot us encourage home production in
every possible way, for only by so do
ing can we hope to regain our former
position of wealth and independence.
The New York stock gamblers were
buoyed yesterday by a report from
Washington that the President and the
Secretary of the Treasury would urge
Congress to make the forty-four million
reserves a portion of our greenba
currency. If any action hy Congress
be neccssury in the premises, how
"mes it that Judge Richardson has al
ready issued over nine millions of the
frty-four? Over twenty per cent is
already out, and less than thirty-five
millions remain of this doubtful re
source. Whence Richardson acquires
his authority for expanding or con
1 racting the currency every day, and
for practically negotiating a loan of
nine millions unauthorized by Congress
is one of the mysteries of our charm
ing financial svstcm.
The falling off of the revenue will
impose upon the Government the ne
ssity of securing increased receipts
and the New York Tribune states that
the opinion held among Treasury ofii
rials is. that Congress will be asked to
obtain it from the surplus wealth of the
country, through a tax upon incomes
or in any event, hy imposing additional
duties upon imported brandies and
wines, or on manufactured spirits at
home, through increased internal rev
onue tax. The Secretary of the Treas
ury stilted recently that he did not know
how much additional revenue would be
needed, but that a more definite know!
edge in that respect would be obtained
after the panic had subsided.
The Oicenfboro (Ky.) Monitor gives
an admirable specific for the present
h ird times: "The country needs more
c un-bread, hog and hominy, old-fash
ioned Democracy, specie and sterling
virtue, and less pound-cake, sirloins
canvas-backs, Radicalism, rascality.
mortgages and modern progress. Last
ly and briefly, let everybody and his
acquaintances quit croaking and go to
work, pay their debts, and when paid
make no more of them; keep stone-jugs
and store bills out of the house, vote
the Democratic ieket always, and the
whole world and "rest of mankind'
will be made happier, wiser and richer
thereby. This is our specific for hard
times.
Among the indications of the day,
it is stated that the Spanish Minister
Admiral Palo, has received a telegram
from his government, a copy of which
lie delivered to Secretary Fish on the
2 5(1 inst., contradicting the report of
the hostile manifestations against the
United States Minister at Madrid. The
telegram declares that Gen. Sickles is
treited with consideration and respect
and that the intemperance of language
of the monarchial press has been
promptly silenced by the threat of im
mediate punishment. The Minister of
the Colonics reports from Havana that
the restoration of embargoed property
of American citizens is being diligently
proceeded with.
At the recent meeting in New York
of the American Public Health Asso
ciation, the subject of "Cholera in the
United States in 1S73" was discussed
with the aid of maps. Among other
things noted was a general coincident
of lack of rain with cholera. This
hardly agrees, however, with the expe
We nee of Nashville. There were 35
deaths in Louisiana, including 232 in
New Orleans; 175 in Alabama, at Bir
ntinghain and Huntsville; 27 in Arkan
sas. all in and around Little Rock; 1S2
in Tennessee; (3:l in Kentucky; 212 in
Illinois; 121 in Indianna; 253 in Ohio;
I' in West Virginia; 5 in Pennsylvania
2'J in Missouri; 118 in Iowa, and i in
Dakotah. The epidemic seems to hav
attacked as many different localities in
Tennessee as in the whole country be
sides, and the number of deaths in
Tennessee shows a total nearly as large
as all the other States combined.
Among our dispatches published this
morning is the following:
New York, Oct. 25. At the meet
ing of the Associated Banks this after
noon, a full representation being pres
ent, action on the late report of the
committee of nine was postponed for
sixty days, and the Committee was dis
charged. Thewhole subject is.' again
referred to a new committee, to be ap
pointed. This netfs must carry disappoint
ment to all who feel an interest in the
financial welfare of the country. For
we think there now remains little hope
that the Association, to whose action
the country lias been looking forward
with suspended breath, will inaugurate
any reforms at all. This is the second
time that they have ixistponed
iction. Why this delay?
Does the Association wish
further time to deliberate upon matters
so grave? Or do they think the pro
posed reforms too superficial, and wish
longer time in order to effect deeper
and more radical changes? We have
no evidence of any such profound good
faith or any such transcendent pru
dence on the part of that body. On
the contrary, we think there is evidence
that the proposed amendments to the
articles of association contained too
much good faith and too much sincere
wisdom to suit the wishes of the specu-
ators and stock-gamblers who belong
to or control the association. The
two most important amendments were
these:
"1. That payment, of interest upon
deposits, either directly or indirectly,
be enhrely prohibited.
"2. That each bank, while it observes
the requirements of the law of Con
gress respecting a reserve fund, be re
quired to carry at all times an amount
of legal tender notes equal to at least
fifteen per cent, of its liabilities to the
public.
These were the measures on which
the issue sprung. At the meeting on
the 19th inst. the sense of the Associa
tion was indirectly ascertained, and as
soon as it "was known to be in favor of
the former of the above amendments,
the chicanery of speculators was set to
work to bring about a delay. And
the same chicanery, we suspect,
effected the further postponement on
yesterday, with the hope that folly
might again take the place of Avisdom,
and apathy the place of good resolu
tions. There is little to be expected
from a body that is thus capable of be
ing dallied with. If, however, the first
expressed and best sense of the associa
tion do prevail in the end; if the refor
mation of prohibiting payment of inter
est upon deposits be made, Tve shall
cive the association credit for one wise
act a pleasure which we now little an
ticipate. When the financial tribula
tions shall be forgotten, the lessons
of practical wisdom which they have
taught will be lost in the same oblivion
a hi: WE IX EAKXrST?
In politics, morals and religion, in
difference is the growing curse of the
times. The same is true of regard for
personal and public health, family
training, and the thousand small in
dustries practiced by our Tennessee
grandfathers and grandmothers. Fifty
years ago our people were self-reliant
and really independent; they imported
next to nothing and never went in debt.
We have made some progress in mate
rial comforts, in the gratifications of the
bod-; but in all the stern virtues that
constitute true manhood, we seem to be
retroexadincr. Indiffercntism is ac-
counted liberality; carelessness is con
sidered content; and lethargy is mis
taken for happiness. The millenium
when politics shall cease to be, which
some are anticipating, will never come
except with the peace of death to our
liberties the peace of despotism. We
commend to all dreamers the following
article from the Memphis Register:
'".New Uepartiu-e papers and so-
called 'Independents' sometimes con
gratulate themselves and the country
upon the dying-out of party antago
nism; that party elections are passing
awav, and that men will hereatter be
elected upon individual and personal
merit, regardless ot party amnatiocs;
in other words, that party barriers are
to be broken down. The be t adminis
tration of government this country has
ever had smce its foundation to the
present time, was when its officers
both State and national, from president
down to constable were elected during
the highest and hottest party excite
ment. Never has its administration
beui so pure, uncorrapted and incor
ruptible, as when there have been two
powerful, well-defined and antagonistic
political parties. Who has forgotten
the grand old times ol Wmggcry and
Democracy ? These were fierce party
tunes when every inch ot party ground
was fought to the bitter end. But
what was the result? Did it make
miserable presidents, governors
(such as Ames), corrupt congress
men and thicvinir State officials? In
the glorious days of Polk and Clay,
Webster and Calhoun midst the
highest party times were thieves and
plunderers the office holders of the
country? Was an honest office holder
then the exception to the rule rather
than the rule itself? No! the purest
and best days this government has ever
seen, wis during the existence ot great
contendintr parties. The ablest and
mo3t honest officers it has ever had
were those elected during fierce party
conflicts. So it ever will be, when
parties are held to a strict accounta
bility for the ability, honesty and prob
itv of those they elect. We would wel
conic back with gladness, the honest
and pure days of party politics
Then we fiad srrcat .Presidents and
Governors all ornaments to their
State: Comrrcssmen, whom, proud of
their position, no one dared approach
with a dishonest proposition; State of
ficials, who would have deemed it an
everlasting disgrace to appropriate to
their own use one dollar oi the peo
pie s money. Uod grant that we may
again have well defined parties, with
officials such as these:
The official vote in Massachusetts
shows that Gov. Washburn had 72.1S3
votes, William C. Gaston 59,300, Gen
Henry K. Oliver, of Salem, the Labor
Reform candidate, 301, and all others
including Gen. Butler, 399. Thoma
Talbot, of Billerica, the Republican
candidate for Lieutenant Governor
had 77,792 votes, leading Mr. Wash
burn 5.G09 votes, while William L
Smith, of Springfield, the Democratic
candidate received 55,13(i, running be
hmd Mr. Gaston 4,z2l. Last year
Washburn's maiority was 7i,271 ant
Grant's 74,212. This year Washburn'
total vote falls 2,091 below his majori
ty last year. How many more such
victories can the Republicans of Massa
chusetts stand?
NASHVILLE TIMOJM AND AMERICAN,
AN MfDIGNAKT WOSAS.
Sometime since Mrs. Marie' Jourdan
Westmoreland, late of Atlanta, Georgia,
appeared ontherostrum of the Woman's
Suffrage Congress m New York, and
expressed the hope thai lecturers would
be sent Southand promising to furnish'
them with letters of intoduction, which
would open to them the doors of the
pedple of this section. This act of the
Georgia authoress was pretty severely
criticised by the papers of that State.
Mrs. Westmoreland has written a letter
in which she claims that these papei-s
misrepresented her speech in the Wo
man's Congress; He says:
"I did not sav I hoped lecturers
would be sent throuch the South.. I said
that I honed thev would co, and with
letters oi introduction wmcn i-.wuum
cladlv irivc them. I knew they would
have a happy and perhaps a lucrative
time, and 1 knew that a few women at
east would be dehehted to know that
women were accomplishing so much
Furthermore, Mrs. Westmoreland
adds somewhat bitterly:
"Why are these attacks constantly
made upon me, and by my own peo
ple? Is it because they hate me per
sonally? It cannot be tor anything
ever did to them, for my house, heart
and well-wishes have ever belonged to
my people, and an unkind word from
theinis always answered oy my rears, is
it kind, is it right, is it liberal or charit
able for them to try to draw down
woman who is trying honestly and by
hard labor to support herself and two
childrenr
Like poor Tray, Mrs. Westmoreland
was caught-in. bad company, and has
suffered the consequences. A Southern
woman, she should never have gone
into that queer agglomeration, the
Woman's Congress. Having gone
there, however, she should not have
undertaken to speak for the South, to
which thesa Woman Concrresscs arc
abhorrent.
AUE THE 1-XAAETS INHABITED?
Prof. Proctor, the famous English
nsh-nnomer. treats lanrelv upon the
probabilities of other worlds being in
habited, the conclusion being that of
the inner planets, Mercury, Venus, the
Earth and Mars, our planet only was
in condition be inhabited by beings
like dwellers upon the earth. Mercury
and Venice must be too hot, and Mars
tod cold. Of the other planets, their
condition was not probably such as to
permit of habitation by beings like the
dwellers upon our earth. On some of
the satelites of Jupiter and Saturn
there might possibly be conditions of
lijrht and heat suitable for beings or-
o-imized like mankind. The lecturer
thinks that possibly all other worlds
O
were, like ours, formed by the Creator
with the design of being inhabited at
some period. Our world, which has
been in existence millions of years, has
been inhabited but a very short period
comparatively, and it was possible that
in time it would be worn, or wasted, or
frozen out, so as to be no longer habi
table So other worlds, not habitable
now, might undergo changes ns the
ages go by which wcmld make them so.
If we assume there is any consumption
of force in running the vast machinery
of the universe, then the latent heat
that prevents all water becoming snow
in the atmosphere, and ice on land, and
prevents the congelation of all blood in
animals and sap in plants, must be
wholly consumed, and all living beings
become as hard and lifeless as granite.
Granite, and all other minerals, were
once probably in a gaseous state, and
the long consumption of heat has
brought them into their present solid
or crystalline condition. In transform
ing oxygen and hydrogen gases into
water, a prodigious quantity of latent
heat has been set free on this planet,
and lost by radiation, or in sr-ine other
way An escape of a less amount here
after by the continuance of the same
law, will convert all water into ice,
freeze the earth to its core, and render
the existence of cither plants or ani
mals impossible. Science points to this
conclusion.
It appears that Ordway, the present
Sergeant-at-Arms of the Houseof Rep
resentatives, is not to be allowed to re
occupy his post without a struggle.
Col. A. H. Markland, GeneralAgent of
the Postoffice Department for the Wes
tern States, and Col. D. W. Munn, of
Illinois, are making vigorous efforts to
supplant him. And now comes the col
ored brother who wishes to bear off the
laurels. The Washington correspon
dent of the Cincinnati Gazette says:
"A colored candidate for Sergeant-at-Arms
has appeared from Kentucky in
the person of R. A. Green, M. D., of
Bowl ing Green. He has issued a circu
lar to the members, setting forth that
he thinks it about time the 800,000 col
ored voters of the country shall be rec
ognized. He says of the candidates
announced, Mr. Markland was a Colo-"
ncl, postofficer, or something of that
sort m the army, and has rotated from
one office to another; that Dwyer should
be sent up Salt river for his successful
efforts in, placing Ohio alongside of
Kentucky in the late election; that
Munn, of Illinois, should be thrown
out because his State has had the Pres
ident ever since the party was organ
ized, and that Ordway is too large a
man for so small a place."
The New Yorl: World cites the house
of Spraguc as an illustration of how
protection, like vaulting ambition o'er
leaps itself. The Senatorwasof course
a protectionist, to prevent foreign
prints from competing with those made
by himself and brother. Like the
hatching chicken he fed in and from
the" egg in which he was incased. So
he never sought the outlets for his
goods that he could have found in In
dia, China, South America and the
Levant. A fiian manufacturing by the
tens of millions should never depend on
any one country, which may any year
be overtaken with short crops or a
panic; such large dealers should natu
rally be free traders. But the Spragues
put all their eggs in one basket, and
that basket got badly smashed.
The courts do not appear to have
much mercy on railroads whose con
ductors forcibly eject and maim passen
gers upon the violation of any regula
tion. S. McKinlay, who was forcibly
excluded not long ago from a Chicago
and Northwestern car reserved for
ladies and gentlemen with ladies, and
received severe injuries, has been
awarded $12,000 damages by the Linn
county (Iowa) court, but the case will
be appalled.
THE INDIAN STEAE.
The excessive outlay under the pres
ent administration for Indians has no
parallel in the history of the govern
ment, even when Indian wars onaiarge
scale were carried on in Florida and
elsewhere. By way of illustrationvthe
New York Sun says?
Tf in rvnlv necessary to compare the
first four years of Mr. Lincoln with the
first four of Wen. wane oucu a, -comparison
admits of no political prejn-
dtce, and only aeaia wui mu uij -.uio
furnished in thcTreasuryreports. And
to clinch the evidence we will take Mr.
Boutwell last report us Secretary un
der Geh. Grant, lor the authority.
1801 .S2.SC5,481 17
18K) 67,012,923 06
18ft!
, 227,018 37
3,152,032 70
1870 3,407,038 15
1863..
1804..
1S71 tAWJXn
2,K,V 61
1872, 7,061,728 82
Total. ..10,975,438 21
Total... 824.03087 47
The difference between these two pe
riods is fourteen millions of dollars in
round numbers, or more than three
millions a year bevorid the cost of tour
years under Lincoln! And this, too,
in presence ot a constant ciecnnc among
, i -r T 7 1. "Li.
the -Lnaians, wnicn uugiib m,TOOiuujr
to reduce the tribal and per capita out
lay. It is no secret that this vast increase
of Indian expenses has been brought
about by deliberate Iraud, corruption
and conspiracy, to rob both the red
man and the Treasury. At the very
last session of Concress a large appro
priationwas made for a tribe which
has no existence at all, except by false
personation at a frontier agency, and
through the collusion of rogues who
divide the plunder.
Mr. Harlan stood up in the Senate
with characteristic effrontery, and as
chairman of the Indian Committee,
carried that and other money grants m
the same bill, every dollar of which rep
resented a willful fraud. By these
shameful processes which are perfectly
understood, party organization has
been maintained, crime condoned, and
christian statesmen and christian
bankers enriched. The time has come
to tiy honesty in public life and econo
my in carrying on the viovernment.
South Carolina paid for public
printing last year 5331,945 66, and
left an unsettled balance on the same
account of $116,035. The Legislature
may not know how to read, but they
certainly hold the art of printing m
high estimation.
The amount checked out of the
Treasury by the Secretary of the Navy
on account of the expenditures for fit
ting out war vessels since the capture
of the Yirginius, has already reached
three millions of dollars.
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS.
NOTICE.
mHE FOUR NATIONAL BANKS of this
JL city will be closed
On Thursday, 2sTov. 127,
it having been designated as a day of Thanks
giving and prayer.
Notes and bills maturing that day should be
nam wcanesuav, tne s.tii liibt.
JOHN rOUTERFIKLD,
Cashier Fourth National Dank
EDGAR J ONES,
Cashier Third National Bank
V. B. DORTC1I.
Ca&hicr Second National Bank
W. C. BUTTEKFIELD,
It " Cahier Fut National Bank
Notice io Shippers.
T71REIOIIT OFFICE NASHVILLE. CHAT
I' .ninnr:i nnil St. Tennis ltaUtrav. Nashville
Tenn., Nov. 20, 1S73 There will "be no freight
received or delivered at the Depot of the Nash
ville, Chattanooffa and St. Louis Railway on
Thursday, the 27th. Thanksgiving day.
nov26 2t Y. B. JONES, Freight Agent
REMOVAL.
DR." T. A. ATCHISON
Has Removed his Office to
Xo. 117 CHURCH STKEET,
Next door to the Battle Houm?.
nov2Geodtm B.
f
2J-Af BBLS. EGGS WANTED, I-Oil
.OUU which the highest market price will
S. G. BRADLEY, Produce Dealer,
nov2G im No. ll." South 3Iarkett
Chancery JLancl Sale.
John Hcuglmn Lot near Nashville.
"nURSUANT TO A DECREE OF THE
L Chancerv Court at Lebanon, pronounced at
the October Term, 1S73, in tlio case ot iiaunan
iicuguau ct ais. vs. RODert iiuwanis ei ais.,
will exiose to public sale, on the premises,
On Tlinrsdny, Xow 27, 1873,
a lot of 'lv acresof cround. situated in David
soinrounty, adjoining the city of Nashville, on
the Murfreeeboro pike, near where said piko
crosses Brown's Creek, the boundaries of which
are given in a deed from Win. B. Lewis to John
Heughah, of record in Davidson comity, Tenn.,
and which is referred to for a more particular
description.
TElt MS. credit of one and two years, ex
cent 10 nor cent in cash, with notes and ap
proved security, and a lien retained, and for not
less than ssoo.
Sale to begin at 12 o'clock m.
H. Y. RIDDLE, O. & 31.
Oct. 28, 1S73. nov26 2t
DITSOX & CO.'S CELEBRATED
Home Musical Library.
Lne.xcellcd Collections of Bound 31 uslc.
VOCAL.
Gems ol" German Song;!
Gems of Scottish Sons:!
Gems of Siicrcrt Sons!
Wreath of Gems !
Operatic Pearls t
Silver cnoru l
Shower of Pearls ! Duets,
Musical Treasure ! A'ocal and Instrumental
INSTRUMENTAL.
FOR TIANOFOR.TE OR REED ORGAN.
Gems ofStrnnss!
Organ at Home!
Pianist's Album!
Pianoforte Gems
Home Circle! Yols. 1 and II.
Price of each book, in Cloth, 83.00; in Boards
82.30: Fine Gilt, 84.00. Thu above splendid
books are perfect treasure houses of the best
and most popular music, being selected as the
"cream" from an immense stock. 2(0 to 250
pages, full sheet music size, in each book. Buy
these books for present?. In each book yon get
,?2j worth ot music, in the whole library, cost
inc, according to mmling, $35, .?42, or S&G, you
will set Three Hundred and Fiftv Dollars worth
Sent, postpaid, on receipt of retail price.
OLTVETl D1TSON & CO., Boston,
CIIAS. H. D1TSOX & CO.,
711 Broadway, Sew Yorlt.
nov2G dwcd&sat&wtf
AGRICULTURAL.
FARMERS,
"TTTE ASK YOUR ATTENTION TO OUR
Y V largo and complete stock of
Field and Garden Seeds, Agricultural
Implements and Machinery,
Fertilizers, etc.
Send for Catalogue.
C. II. STOCICELL & CO.,
88 Broad street, and 2 and 4 Collece street
fcb2 73 codly NASHVILLE, TENN
JJEAL ESTATE AGENCIES
THOS. CHAllWELL. A. W. JOHNSON, JK.
CHADWELL; JOHNSON & CO.,
Ifceal Estate Agents,
WILL ATTEND TO
BUYING, SELLISG AX1 ItEKTIXG OF
PRO PEIITY.
ALSO TO THE NEGOTIATING OF LOANS
And will make Cash Advances on Property or
Rents where parties ucsiro it.
Oflico, N'o. 42 t'ctlar Street, nearly op
poslte Postoflice.
deel ly
SLATE ROOFERS
F. J. JOXES & CO
PRACTICAL SLATE ROOFERS
Wholesale and Retail Dealers In all kinds of
American Slate. All orders promptly
attended to.
Ofliccaml Yard cor. Vine fcCliiirch sts.
Particular attention paid to Overhauling Old
jy2Cm itoois.
WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 26, 1873.
AMUSEMENTS.
A GRAND CONCERT
wiiii be given
- T r
AT THE CATHEDRAL
ON WEDNESDAY, NOV. 2G,
FOR TIIE.BENEFIT OF
THE CHURCH OF THE ASSUMPTION
Doors opens at 7 v. m. Concert to begin at 8
TipVnfs. 50 cents, to bo bad at tlio llnsic
Stores and at the door of the Church.
For particulars, nee programmes. nozo zi
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS.
Non-Resideiit Notice.
State of Tennessee, Davidson County Green
field, Atwcii snccu vs. l-cier j eiuungs anu
wife Original Attachment.
TV THIS CAUSE IT APPEARING FROM
X affidavit tiled that the defendants, Peter Jen
nings anu nis wue uennmgs, are non-resi
dents of the state oi icnncssee, anu an attach
ment havinc been issued upon a debt dne by ac
count, under S250, for goods sold, defendants by
ilalntins, anu nas ocen rciurncu levieu upon
ot Kn. '214 in West Nashville plan of lots: It is
tlipTnfnrc ordered that publication be made in
the Union and American, a newspaper publish
ed In Nasuviiic, ior lour consecutive weeKs, re
quiring the said defendants to appear bcforc,me
on the 1st uay oi iiaunary, ioi-1, io ucienu sam
suit commenced by original attachment, or the
same will be ncarq ex,parre.
dJSO: a. BASKETTE,
Nov. 23, 1 873. J ustice of the Peace,
nov2C oawlt
MISCELLANEOUS
Look to Your Interests,
THE PRICE OF
ST. BERNARD COAL
HAS BEEN
KEDUCED 3 CENTS PER BUSHEL,
the load delivered being $3.50 instead of S4, for
ltounu or urate uoai, as ncrtoiorc.
THIS GREAT KEDUCTIOX
Has been made in view of the stringency of the
times, and to show the neonle that the St. Ber
nard Co. will not only furnish their Coal, but
put it at living rates to consumers.
ltOvajlW a 1 K ATTUJN , HUMS K W.
1 EDGEFIELD, TENN. 1
IINkM & Anderson
Have on hand a largo and general stock of r;
S FAMILY GROCERIES,
i i
O
2 Which they offer
g AT THE LOWEST CASH PRICES
We invito a call from all who want sup-
" plies. IE?" Our motto Is, Quick sales and 1-5
"3 short profits. he
5 nnrm x- ,tvni?n.c;nv ft
"3 Cor. Woodlnntl mill Tnllp Streets, a
5 novll lm eou
JVOTICE.
ALL PERSONS ARE HEREBY FORBID
den to pass over or use as a pathway the
Trestles between the College Street Depot of
the L. & N. K. li. and the Depot of the N., C. &
St. L. R. R. and N. & N. W. R. R., and are
warned that if they persist in doine so it will bo
at tueir own riSK. j. n. ihujias,
Gen'l Sup't N., C. & St. L. R. R
ALBERT FINK,
V. P. and Gen'l Sup't L. & N. & G. S. R. R
nov20 lw
Wood! Wood!!
T)EST QUALITY' OF
ri wood
delivered to all parts of the city at So per cord
Orders left at Amoroso's sample itoora, xieau
erick street, or at the AVood Yard of Jo. Am
brose, corner of Front and Jeffersbn streets
will be promptly filled. novu lm
sH'OTICJE.
TT
U NTIL FURTHER NOTICE, THE DIXIE
Oil Company will pay S1.40 each for all good
Coal Oil Barrels, delivered at the Works on Mc-
Lemore street.
oc3tf ROBERT THOMPSON, Prcs't
COMMISSION MERCHANTS
W.
Hoover HAr.nis.
R. C.
K. Martix.
AVW
HARRIS
Genera! 1
& CO.,
brokers,
31 South Market Street,
Make cash advances on Cotton to their author
ized corresiondents in Lircrjtool, New York,
New Orleans and Charleston. Oiler at ail times
Snirnr. Coffee. Canutes, Foreign ami
Domestic Liquors, Etc.,
Direct from Refiners, Importers, and Maun
facturers. nov22tf
WILLIAMS. BLACK & CO.
126 l'cnrl .Street, Jfcw YorK,
AND
"WILLIAMS IJLACK k 1VILLIA3IS
CIIAKLESTOX, S. C,
Commission Merchants
Special attention given to the purchase and
sale of Cotton for future delivery.
Advances made and information furnished by
Harris & Co.. 34 South Market street. nov22tf
J. N. ROBSON,
Commission Merchant
Nos. 08 East Bay and 1 & 2 Atlantic Wharf.
CIIARI.ESTOX, S, C.
Havinc ample means for advances, a business
experience of twenty years, and confinins him
self strictly to a Commission Business, without
operating on his own account, respectfully so
licit consignments of Cotton, Flour, Corn
Wheat, etc. novlS tt
GIFT CONCERTS.
The Shortest Koiitc to Fortune
$100,000 for only $2.50.
THE LARGEST RETURN FOR
THE SMALLEST INVESTMENT.
A Grand Gift Concert!
WILL BE HELD
AT LEAVENWORTH, KANSAS,
DECEMBER 31, 1873
FOR THE BENEFIT OF
A JUVENILE REFORM SCHOOL.
40,000 GIFTS!
$450,000 m PRIZES!
PRINCIPAL. PRIZE, $100,000!
Consisting of the superb palatial residence of
Simon Abeles, Esq., unsurpassed as n privato
dwelling In the United States, being only a few
blocks from the Courthouse, surrounded bvmag
niticent grounds, orchards, gardens and vine
yards. The building has been only recently
completed with all modern Improvements.
l'RIZE LIST.
13 Prizes, Real Estate 153,125
1 Cash Prize A 1,000
2 " " 510,000 each 'JO.OOO
4 " 5,000 " 20,000
4 " 2,500 " 10,000
20 " " 1,000 " 20,000
50 " " 500 " 25,000
100 " " 200 " 20,000
200 " " 100 " 20,000
300 " " 50 " 15,000
C98 " " 20 " 13,960
i 000 " " 1 " 10.000
1,15$ " 5 5,790
36,450 " " 2.50 " 91,125
ibToOO $150,000
The title to the above real estate is guaranteed
perfect.
The liberal terms of the scheme brings itwitli
in the reacli of all the greatest 'opportunity
ever offered for the poor man to rise to wealth.
PRICE OF TICKETS.
Single Tickets, 2.50; Eleven Tickets, S25.00;
Fixtv-six Tickets, S125.00; One Hundred and
Firtj-six Tickets, S250.00.
The drawing will be made under the superin
tendence of a committee appointed by the high
est officials in the State, duly sworn to the faith
ful performance of the duties assigned them.
The highest officials both of City, County and
State have not only endorsed Mr. Abeles, but
also his scheme.
The demand for tickets is unparalleled, ml
all desiring to participate in the drawing shoi.
at once form their clubs and send in their orders
Agents Wanted in all States, Cities and Towns
in the United States and Canadas.
83" Money should be sent by Registered Let
ter, P. O. Order or Express, witli the full ad
dress of tho purcahser in plain writting.
For further Information and particulars, send
for circulars to the Manager and Proprietor,
and address
SDION ABELES,
LEAVENWORTH, KANSAS.
fep23 eod3m wed,fri,suu
MEDICAL.
DR. SAMUEL ARNOLD'S
STATEMENT oV CfESf.
Dr. AnSoi-D-D
sejited to Jhe
your Unjon P
rating miuny,
Tho undersigned have become the proprietors of
facture the same; and arc also the proprietors of
nov23 eodly
BANKING,
Mist atiosaal Bank,
Or JfASUVIIXE, TEJlSf.i
No. 55 NorUi College fctreer;
The Deslffnntcrt Depository oi ibo
United States for MirtcTlo
Tennessee';
Capital
Surplus Fund so.wo
DIRECTORS :
M. BURNS,, , C. R. PARSONS,
E. R. CAMPBELL, A- O- EWING,
A. L. DEMOSS, WM. SIMMONS.
M. B. PILCHER.
Receives Deposits, Deals Irt Foreign and Do
mestic Exchange, Gold, Silver and Govern
ment Securities. Collections made and
remitted for on day of payment at
current rate of exchafigoj Bev
nue Stamps for sale.
M. BURNS, W. C. BUTTEKFIELD,
President. . , , , Cashier.
THEO. COOLEY, .
jaull tf sp Assistant Cashier.
CLAIM AGENTS.
M. J. MORAN, 42 Cedar st., Nashville, Tenn.
J. H. PERRY, 1,418 F st, Washington, D. C.
MOKAX & PERRY,
SOLICITOUS OI? CZ,1I1IS,
Nashville, Tenn., and Washington, D. C.
Prompt and particular attention given to Col
lection of Claims for all Departments of the
Government. oc8 3m
BUILDING MATERIAL.
DEALERS IN
Building; Supplies, White Lime, Ce.
ment, fire ItricK. Fire Clay,. Plas
ter Paris Plastering Ilnir,
White Santl, Etc,
No. 40 NORTH
auglT tf
SUMMER STREET.
LEGAL SALES.
OFJFICE OF
Clerk aiid 3Iastcr of Chaiicery Court,
DAVIDSON COUNT!',
Nashville, Texk., Nov. 18, 1873.
Henry Hide ct nls., hy etc., vs.
R. IT.
Mnnlovc.
K0TIGE IS HEREBY GIVEN,
THAT, FOR THE SPACE OF 20. DAYS
from this date, bids, of not less thanJS2,500,
will be received, by the undersigned, at the
above office, for tho tract oT C2 a'cres in the 23d
Civil District of Davidson county, Tenn.,
formerly owned by Benjamin H. Hyde, dee'd,
and on which be resided atthc timeot his death.
Particulars, as to terms of sale and descrip
tion of tract, can be obtained on application.
NATHANIEL BAXTER. Jr.,
Clerk and Master.
novlD eod3w '
Chancery Sales
FOR
"WEDNESDAY, DEC. 10, 1873.
IN PURSUANCE OF DECREES REN
dercd by the Chancery Court at Nashville in
the respective causes, I will sell at public sale,
to the highest bidder,
At the Courthouse door at Nashville, on
Wednesday, the 10th day of Decem
ber, 1S73, at 12 o'clock M.,
the following described property, namely:
David C. Edmondson ct als. vs. Henry
W. O'Neil ct nls.
An undivided three-fourths interest in a tract
of 103 acres in the 11th Civil District of David
son county, Tenn., near the Nashville and Hills
born turnpike road, beginning at a rock on the
'south bank of Otter Creek, and running 8 poles
to a rock; thence south 53 poles with John M.
Cutchcn's line to a stake; thence east 180 poles
to a stake in Pleasant Clardy's line; thence north
C dcg. west 12 poles to an Elm root; thence north
136 ioles to a stake in the middle of Otter Creek;
thence west lis poles to a stake on Caldwell's
line; thence south with it 95 poles to the begin
ning. TERMS OF SALE Onc-thlrd cash, and
the residue on credit" of 1 and 2 years, with in
terest from day of sale. Notes required with ap
proved security and lien retained.
N. B. For the space of 20 davs from this date,
bids will be received by the undersigned, at his
office in Nashville, on the above tract, such bids
to be not less than $70 per acre, and the party
so bidding will be required to comply amply
with the terms of sale as above described.
NATHANIEL BAXTER, Jn.,
novl9,2C,dec3,10 Clerk and Master.
CHANCERY SALES
FOR
WEDNESDAY, DEC. 3, 1873.
IN PURSUANCE OF DECREES REN
dcrcd bv the Chancery Court at Nashville In
the respective causes, I will sell at public sale,
to the highest bidder,
At the Courthouse at Nashville, on Wed
nesday, Dec. 3, 1873, at 12
o'clock m.,
the following described property, viz.:
C. O. Cnbler vs. Wm. Strong;.
Certain lots in the city of Nashville, beginning
at tlio corner of Lewis and Spring streets, run
ning eastward!) along Spring street 161 feet,
more or less, to a 15 foot nlley; thence south
wardly 100 feet along said alley to a stake;
thence at right angles about 161 u feet to Lewis
street; thence northwardly 100 leet to the be
ginning. ALSO, beginning at the norOi corner of said
alley and Spring street, running eastwardly
about 1G1,' feet to Lewis street; thence with
Lewis line southwardly ICO feet to a stake:
thence at right angles about 161X feet to said
alley; thence northwardly and along said alley
100 feet to the beginning. Being the same lots
conveved to Isaac Shook by Henry Hill, bydeed
dated "Sort. 26, 18C0.
TERMS OF SALE. Credits of 6 and 12
months, with interest from day of sale. Notes
required with approved security and lien re
tained. Sale free from redemption.
Thos. Chad-veil, Es'or, vs. ticorge
2tZancy ct al.
A tract of laud situated in the 18th Civil Dis
trict of Davidson county, and bounded as fol
lows: Beginning at the northeast corner of tho
land now, or lately owned by E. H. Childress,
Sr., and situated on the street known as tho
Vaughn street, or turnpike, and running thence
in a western direction with the centro of said
Vaughn street 93 poles 14 links to a stake in tho
centre of said street; thence due south 98 poles
to a stake in Mar)- A. Chadwell's north boun
dary line; thence east 30 poles 1J link to said
Chadwell's corner; thence north 31 poles to a
stake; thence east 63),' poles to a stake; thence
north to the beginning.
TERMS. Six months' credit, with Interest
from day of sale. Notes required with approved
security, and a lien retained.
Sale free from redemption.
David T. Dozlcr vs. Thomas A. New
born and others, (and cases con
solidntcd therewith).
A Tract of Land in the 14th Civil District of
Davidson county. Tenn., bounded as follows:
Beginning at a wliite oak near the end of a lane
in road leading to Nashville, in the eastern
boundary or the original tract, and runs with
said road south 69 a deg. west 64 poles to a stake;
thence south 88 deg. west 64 poles: thence
south 69 deg. west 22 poles; thence south 37 deg.
west 22 ioles; thence south 18f deg. west 24
lioles; thence south 51K deg. west 16 poles to
Big Harpeth River, at tho mouth of Flat Creek:
thence down tho river with its meanders In all
166 poles to a point near tho mouth of another
small branch; thence up tho branch with iU
meanders north 37 deg. cast 15 poles, north 25
deg. 11 poles, north 37 deg. west 6 poles, north
47 deg. cast 16 poles, north 13 dcg. west 14
jiolcs, north 32 dcg. east 1G iolcs, north Rl deg.
cast 40 poles, south 64 V dcg. east 19 poles to a
stake in the lino of a 54 acre tract conveyed by
Larkin to Demoss; thence witli said line north 1
dcg. west 20 jioles to a stake, corner of said
tract; thence south 89K dcg. cast 101 poles to a
stake; thence south deg. 87 poles to a stone;
thence south 1 deg. west 60 poles to the begin
ning, containing 23.' acres, more or less.
Also a tract of land situated about half mile
from the tract aforesaid and bounded as follows:
Beginning at a large hickory on a ridge corner
ed by a tract conveyed by Martha Parch to W.
JL Lovcll, and runs south 35 deg. west -38 2-5
poles to a hickory, Lovcll's corner; thence south
80 deg. 32 poles to his corner; thence west 85
poles to a stake and pointers in the line of tlio
56 acre tract; thence north 51 poles to a large
hickory, corner to the same; thence east40 poles
trv n l.xpp'i- thence north 7 Doles to a stake;
thence east 33 joles to a beech; thence south
24K lioles to a beech; thence east G3 poles to the
beginning, contatnlng38 108-160 poles.
TERMS Ol SAXd-i. Jreuim oi i,
2 and 3.
years, with interest from day of sale. Notes re
quired with approved security and lienretained.
Sale free from redemption.
NATHANIEL BAXTER, Jc,
novl2, 19, 26&dec3 Clerk and Master.
car Sir. You ask my opinion of tho union1 Pills-, wfiielr yew bare recently p
public. Having nseu many Tancuraui ms m my ianniy, i uniresiuniiigir iieci
ills, which I have b'CPit sing-for tw.clve months, are the be3t I have ever seA, o
but certainly and efficacious very respcciiuuy, w. G. HAKulNu.
GREAT UNION PILLS.
Ttj O. HARDING.
re-
are
ope-
this valuable medicine, with the right to manu
the celebrated family acdiclne, known as
LITTERER & CABLER,
Corner of Brook and Market Streets.
WHOLESALE DRY GOODS,
-A- GAJEfcD.
FUBMAN & CO.
Announce to their friends that they hrfte Inkcn
a'dvanta'go or tho times and purchased a
second Fall SfoCi nd are prepared "
to supply the wants of the Trelc
with a full line of
STAPLE AND FANCY
DRY GOODS, NOTIONS,
TOT&, ETC, TC,
AT T1IE VERY IXJWEST PRICES.
Tho atteritloa of Cash Buyers is respectfully
invited.
FURJIAN & CO.,
No. 1 HlckV Block, Nashville, Tcnri
Oct 15, 1873. oc!52m
MEDICAL.
A Stitcli in Time Saves Nine.
DO NOT NEGLECT A COUGH BECAUSE
it troubles you but little now. Now is tho
very time it Is easiest removed, and none would
surfer if thev knew how ewdlv they can be cored
by the timely uso of titfCargK'S Puctorai.
Balsamic Sritur. Sufferers froffl all ailments
of the Brcast. Lungs ami Throat, will tintt that
hv Tisinir the Pectoral Balsamic Sytud they are
usinc the best expectorant, which removes alf
nhleirm. soothes, all irritation, and radically
cures. For sale by R. Jt. PAGE.. Druggist, 160
North College street, NasiztH'e, xenn.
ocl0 2m
Ivoid Quacks.
A VICTIM OF EARLY INDIS CRETION,
causing nervous debility, premature decay,
etc., having tried in vain every advertised rem
edy, has discovered .1 simple means of selPcnro
which he will send free to Ills fellow-sufferers.
Address J. II. REEVES, 78 Nassau st reef .New
York. oc4 eoaai
war n isa a n iba B5
61T St. CirlM treet. St. loult, M., hu btcn Ion j(t eo
gtgedln tho tremtmentof aU renereU &( xul d!faes
tha nj- ,pitJUt la St. Louli, tie city pap3 HT
alio tptrmatorrhoes, leznil deblUtj aod lmpottaey, mi
retail or eu-abuie la 700111, or f cxn&l excenes ; fjmptoxni
being, nerrooinesi, seminal emliiloci, debUltr, dtmaei, ot
light, delecUre memorj, pimples oa tie fice.pbjilcaldecir
arenion to oelet--of females, coafnstGaof Ideas, loss o'f
sexual power, an permanent1 eared. Pamphlet 39 pages
free. Brerj letter of Inquiry lrlth one stamp answered.
sep? lv
skin Diseases
"TTTILL SEND (FREE) RECEIPT FOR SIY
nificl.- Wnrnis. IllntrJips. Freckles. Motll final
Tan, leaving the skin clear and with a healthy
glow. Also saro process for the growth of Hair
on oald Heads or smootn laces, ii. jritavj. a .
Chemist, 42 Pine street, N. Y., P. O. bor 5,12
(Send starrlp.J ocl02m
UNDERTAKERS.
RR GROOMES & CO
IFiuieral Uncleriaker,
AGENTS FOR J. M. PULL1AM.
42 and 44 NOKTH CHERRY STREET,
NASHVILLE.
Tr iT PTtS IV TITTRTAL CASES AND CAS
XJ kets, and Agents for Crane, Breed & Co.'s
and other Improved Cases and Casket. Attend
promptly to all funerals in city or surrounding
n,,ntr ofltli finp TTpurses for both Adults and
Children. Telegraphic orders filletl with dis
patch. Taylor's Patent Corpse Preserver, be
sides other Preservers, that are warranted to
preserve a corose trom 15 to 20 days without de
cay. Uiiy ami uigui. j
janll
JOB PRINTERS.
THE PRESENT PANIC
Has reached the Manufacturers of Paper and
Ink, and other stock used in
1W
And we are consequently enabled to work
AT KEDUCED PRICES
We have now on hand a flno line of papers
suitable fat
ALL BRANCHES OF BUSINESS
But we would especially call attention to our
stock of Mercantile Papers, and our
supply of types for printing
Bill Heads,
Letter Heads,
Monthly Statements,
Account Sales,
Note Heads,
Bills Lading,
Certificates of Stock,
Price Lists,
Notes, Drafts, Checks,
Dray Tickets.
Ciradars,
Envelopes,
Cards,
Etc., Etc.-
We Make a Specialty In Printing
POSTERS,
HAND BILLS,
DODGERS,
SHOW BILLS,
DATES,
PROGRAMMES,
WEDDING CARDS,
TICKETS,.
INVITATION CARDS,
VISITING CARDS,
EITHER TN
PLAIN OR FANCY STYLE,
AT THE LOWEST CASH PRICES.
THE
UNION AND AMERICAN
JOB ROOMS
Are furnished with the various styles of type
necessary to do all kinds of
Book, Pamphlet, Periodical,
NEWSPAPER,
Or other heavy work,
IN A SUPERIOR MANNER,
At prices below that of Northern and Eastern
Cities, and in any and everything
we pro1 ose to do, we
CHALLENGE COMPETITION.
The Union and American Co.
Will receive orders for the making of
BLATSTX BOOKS.
WITH PRINTED HEADS,
Book Binding and Ruling,
In any style that may be desired, and for any
purpose', and warrant all work.
ADDRESS
U5I0X AND AMERICAN,
NASHVILLE, TENN
PRINT!
NEWSPAPERS.
EVERYBODY READS m
Everybody Wauts 1
9
THE NASHVIUuZT
UNION AND AMERICAN.
IT IS the Fcoplc's Paper.' '
IT IS the Defender of the People
Rights.
IT IS thcDcnouncer of Wrong in high
placet at iccll as low.
IT IS the Friend of the People in ollft
things,
ii ii i k-i
IT PUBLISHES and discusses all?
questions in ichich (he People. are.caa-Ja
cerned. L
ITS MATTER is varied, notcy, itt--f
ieresting and unexceptionable.
'iff
IT IS the largest, fullest and ZiresiL
paper (taking all Us editions) published
in the bouth.
IT IS the great News, Family, Polity
cal and Agricultural Journal of lhf
Southeni States.
IT GIVES Telegraphic News from aU
parts of the world as soon at any other
paper published in America. "
JT GIVES, by Telegraph, the genera,
news of the Old World as soon at aif r.
other paper puhlishedin the United Slaia
IT GIVES, by Telegraph, the laieH
market Quotations of aUForeigadDo
mestic markets, day by day and week by
week.
IT GIVES, by telegraph, day by day,
the elating quotations of Gold, Steels
and Bonds in this city and New Yorkf ef
the day before.
IT GIVES daily, scmi-wecllg mid,
weekly the current market price in the ,
city of Nashville, of every article ofPrctA
duce and Trade in Tennessee.
IT GIVES to the Mechanic an account
of every new invention calculated to ad
vance his interest by lessening his ia&srv
IT IS A FINANCIAL chronicle which .
publishes to the people every fact in the .
finances of the State and country, calcu
lated to advance or retard their interests
IT GIVES all the current political
wetcs and movements of the day, andithe,
honest opinions of its conductors thereon,.
IT GIVES aU local, Slate and miscel
laneous nexes of the day.
IT GIVES a good shareof Literature .
and Poetry fresh, carefully chosen andj,
cntertaing.
ITS AGRICULTURAL and House
hold columns, by Dr. DANIEL LEE,
(who is alone employed by this papertrr
and icho stands first among the scientific
and practical Agricidlurisis of this coun
try, arcfull of plain talk to Farmers arid
Housewives, and advocate their intereeU,.
in all things. .
SUBCRLBE NOW FOR THE
MAMMOTH ...
Wceltl) Union & Ameritm
CONTAINING
Tivclrc Pages, making ScTcnty-trro
Columns,
Al $2.00 a year; 1.00 si months, 50c.
three months. j.
THE PIONEER IN
CHEAPNESS.
Cluboing Rates.
To clubs of five or more subscribers' we
will send our MAMMOTH WEEKLY1
for one year, each, 1.90.
Any one getting up a club of twelve,
1.90 each, shall have one copy gratis.
To clubs of twenty or more subscribers
we will send our Mammoth Weekly 'for
one year, each 1.80, and one copy gratis
to tlie getter up of the club. - ?-
The Semi Weekly
UNION AND AMERICAN,
Is made up from three dailies, and itfdU
of choice matter. Mailed Wed- ,
nesdays and Saturdays. ' Ji
(.
One year only -1.00; six morJths, 2.00r
three months, 1.00.
S-3
THE r"
Daily Union & America
Is filled with the latest and fullest Turin
from all quarters.
TERMS OP SUBSCRIPTION
By Hail or at lie Business Office t
Daily, 12 months, in advance 10 00
" 6 " " 500
" 3 " " 2-50
" 1 " " 100
" lweek, " !2S
Delivered by Carriers In the CUy-aa
Ed&efleld. rr
Daily, 12 months 1200
" 6 " ; 61,00
" 3 " 3W
" 1 " 1,00
" 1 week : 2
- -Ml
ABTEBTISXB;
AT HOME AND ABROAD,
Will unquestionably reach a greater num
ber of readers through the
columns of the
UNION. & AMERICAN
Than any other paper published in JVn
nesseeor the South. j
Address UNION AND AMERICAN
NASHVTLL.E, TENN,
wm
-.Vf-

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