OCR Interpretation


Nashville union and American. (Nashville, Tenn.) 1868-1875, December 24, 1873, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of Tennessee

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85033699/1873-12-24/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

NASHVILLE UNION AND AMERICAN, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 24, 1873.
WEIttXSOAY, IIIXXMIJI.K 31, 187:$.
Kansas is :is prolific in aspirants for
Senatorial honors :ib Tennessee. There
arc no less than sixty candidates for
the United States Senatorshrp from
the formor State, not including cx-Scn-alor
Pomeroy. Statesmen are thick
out that way. A local paper says there
are other men who expect to be elected,
but they are too modest to say so.
It is announced by the Washington
Star that Mr. James Lyons, who was
recently appointed United States At
torney for the Eastern District of Vir
ginia, has written a letter to the Presi
dent declining the position. It is inti
mated that Lyons considers himself
slighted in not having been tendered
the more honorable position conferred
on Mr. Hughes.
The 1'itUbiirgh Post nays: "General
ITegley our own General Ncglcy has
been re-elected President of the Union
League of America. Considering the
fapt that he is one of the leading de
fenders of the salary steal, the Union
League of America- has done jvell."
2Tegley is the sort of men the Republi
can leaders delight to honor, as has
been demonstrated in Congress.
During the fiscal year ending on the
00th df June, 1873, the imports from
Cuba into this country amounted to
77,-160,82C. Exports from the United
States to Cuba during the same period,
15,2S1,039. "With a good government
in Cuba, a government that would pro
tect the people in all their rights, our
trade with that Island would quadruple
in a single year.
PKOFLIG AtiX Of THE AH3IIMSTKA-
The reckless profligacy of the Ad
ministration is in the highest degree
ularmiug, as a comparison with former
Administrations will show. Li this
comparison we exclude war, navy and
pension expenditures, as the responsi
bility for those expenditures rests upon
those who provoked and produced the
rebellion. Aside from this expenditure,
wc have the following exhibit:
Total.
Increase.
24,274,921
1,02U,G27
7S,201,183
JS37-1
ISfil-GS....
1MW-73-...
jll5,S28,220
HO.KM.IKS
"J0,732,7N)
Total inc. Grant over Buchanan... $1K3,105.M2
" ' Grant over Lincoln 15,830,730
If the present Administration had
displayed the economy that was exhibi
ted under President Lincoln, the money
which it has squandered in one term
would have siiffiecd to carry it entirely
through another term; for the increase
is much more than double. And the
amount of that increase is the measure
of the plunder secured by Administra
tion hangers-on.
"A IEMOKAMSEI COXGKESS.'
Under this caption the Boston Advcr
titer, an Administration Republican
journal, thus'mps its par ty:
"What the nation regards, and will
henceforth regard more serious than
ever before, is not the loss of a few
hundred thousand dollars, more orless,
but the loss of dignity; not the cxtray-
p. i ii., i.V.V- vjIivl o Jllll
morals. Kb tax could be so oppressive
or discouraging as these repeated cvr
deuces of demoralization in hiih places.
They poison the fountains of virtue all
over the land. And in this direction
Gen. Butler, twice repudiated by Mass
aehusetts, is a fit leader. Gentlemen
Representatives, Republicans or Dem
ocrats, who follow such leading, you
may well believe the people are not
blind. Do what you may, the
principles involved in this salary busi
uess, win dc among ttie
issues on which the country
will p;iss judgment. Your attempts to
whistle them down the wind will not
avail. That part of the Republican
party which assists or countenances
such attempts will be defeated. Noither
presidents nor cabinets, nor prestige
nor patronage.' nor the cant oi uema
irojnics can save it. The moment it is
clear that corrupt and corrupting influ
ences have procured control of the Re
publican party and eannot be shaken
oJT, there will be a new birth in poli
ties. The forwardness of preparation
among the people for such a contin
gency is much greater thani- common
ly supposed. The events in "Washing
ton since Congress has assembled have
not tended to quiet apprehensions that
the Republican organization is drifting
to the bad. Ko department of the pub
lie sen-ice is in a satisfactory condi
tion, and, worst of all, there seems to
be an indisposition to work a refomia
t:on. There is everywhere" indifference
to the suggestions of wisdom and com-
liion -scute- AYliuu iui .administration
ceases to trust true men whom the peo
ple trust, reserving its honorable re
wards for subservient incapacity, the
country will prepare for a change, and
there is no help for it."
IIl'YIAG AX EMXTIOrV IN SOirill
CAKOEIXA.
A dispatch was recently sent all over
the country from Columbia, S. C, an
nouncing that Senator Pattersim had
been tried and honorably acquitted of
all charges of corruption in securing
his election to the United States Sen
ate. The Charleston Ncics and Courier
says the dispatch was a misrepresenta
tion of the fa cts in t he case.concocted and
forwarded in the interest of Mr. Pat
terson, and adds: "The fact that the
election of Patterson was procured
solely by the use and promise of money
is perfectly notorious in South Caroli
na, and the United States Senate can,
if it likes, easily satisfy itself that the
partial defeat of the feeble efforts
which have thus far been made to
bring him to justice was accom
plished by the very same means." The
News and Courier prints the affidavits
of some of the African Legislators as
to the price for which they sold them
selves to John Patterson. One Miller
swears he sold himself for sixty-live
dollars, which is far below the old price
for a good field hand. Another, a like
ly fellow, named Ellison, swears before
Trial "Jestice" Kirk that lie sold him
self for any sum of money between five
hundred and a thousand dollars, and if
so, that comes nearer old prices. An
other, one Battcas, says he was offered
four hundred'dollars. It will be seen
that the range of prices is so wide that
the' fail to establish reliable quota
tions. The object of these oaths is to
convict-John Patterson of bribing his
way into the Senate of the United
States a piece of business which no
man in the United States doubts that
the said John Patterson did successful
ly transaet paying for th legislative
votes considerations varying from a
two-gallon jug of whisky to a thousand
. dollars a head.
THE SUPPLEHKXTAKY CI VII.
EIGHTS EI EE.
Whenever, therefore, a question
arises concerning the constitutionality
of a particular power, the first question
is, whether the .power be expressed in
the constitution. If itbe, the question
is decided. If it be not expressed, the
next inquiry must bc,vhethpr it is
properly an incident to an express
power, and necessary and proper to its
execution. If it be, then it may be ex
ercised by Congress. If not, Congress
cannot exercise it. Mr. Justice Stoni.
The civil rights bill, now before Con
gress, provides that whoever, being a
corporation or natural person, and
owner or in charge of any public inn,
or of any place of public amusement or
entertainment for which a license from
any legal authority is required, or of
any line of stage coaches, railroads, or
other means of public carriage of pas
sengers or freight, or of any ceme
tery or other benevolent institu
tion, or any public schools sup
ported in whole or in part
at the public expense or by endow
ment for the public, shall make any dis
tinction as to the admission or accom
modation therein of any citizen of the
United States, because of race, color or
previous condition of servitude, shall,
on conviction thereof, be fined not less
than 100 nor more than $5,000 for
each offense, and the person or corpora
tion so offending shall be liable to the
citizen thereby injured in damage, tobc
recovered in an action of debt. This bill
is supplementary to a statute already ex
isting on the same subject. Thepowcr
of Congrats to legislate upon this sub
ject is derived only from the following
clause of the fourteenth amendment:
"No State shall make or enforce any
law which shall abridge the privileges
or immunities of citizens of the United
States." This is a prohibition on the
States .and docs not, therefore, express
ly confer upon Congress any power.
Another section of the same amend
ment confers upon Congress the power
to enforce the provisions of the amend
ment by appropriatc legislation. This
power was implied already in the grant
of the express powers, and was added
out of "abundant caution." This su
perfluous addition made at so advanced
a stage of our history was extremely
injudicial, if not silly. "What
implied power, then, does
the above prohibition carry with
it to secure obedience to it? Until a
State has made or enforced some law
abridging the privileges or immunities
of citizens, it would seem that.Congress
-should have no occasion to exercise the
authority which the prohibition im
plies at all. Laws are usually made to
cure an evil, and wise lawgivers have
always waited for an evil to show it
self before undertaking to remedy it;
and while they have not been accustom
ed to anticipate cviis, they have been
equally unaccustomed to supply reme
dies for imaginary evils, "Wc arc not
aware that there has been any State
legislation hostile to the privileges and
immunities of citizens. But there are
States in the .Southern portion of
he .Union which are regarded
as uncertain in their purposes; and
those States might pass such a hostile
law. "It is the bright day that
brings forth the adder." Then, lest
they may make the inimical law, pre
vent. This is the logic that seems to
instigate the Radical lawgiver of Amer
ica. But what power does the prolnbi
tion confer by implication? Docs the
the prohibition iuiply that Congress
may invest the United States Courts
with sole and exclusive jurisdiction of
every cause, arising out of a refusal by
the owner of a public house, or by the
directors of a public school or of a rail
road, or by the keeper of a cemetery to
admit or accommodate a citizen because
of race, color or previous condition?
Docs the prohibition on the States to do
this or that confer upon Congress the
power to take away from the State
courts all cognizance of such cases and
give it exclusively to the Federal courts,
that they may constantly hold it and
exercise it, whether or not there be any
State laws hostile to the' provisions of
the Constitution? The civil rights act
so confers upon the Federal courts this
exclusive jurisdiction. Is so radical a
measure a necessary and proper means
of enforcing the prohibition? Is it
even "appropriate?" to use the licenti
ous phraseology of such law-givers as
Sumner. Did the people when they
ratified" "thc f ourt-eontli amendment
mean thus to strip the States of then
authority? It cannot be. The ver
biage of the prohibition will not admit
of so loose a construction. Such a
construction is utterly at variance
with the spirit of the rest of
the Constitution, and diametrically op
posed to a long and time-honored cur
rent of judicial opinions regarding the
inviolability of the authority of the
States to regulate their own internal
police. If the Supreme Court shoidd
decide the civil rights act constitution
al, it would only be by accepting in a
loose sense the phrase, "by appropriate
legislation," which was a fraud on the
popular will, designed to insure license
to despotic rulers. It could never have
been decided constitutional in the old
view of the supreme law. The civil
rights act is objectionable because it
strikes away the authority of the States
in an important matter; and we would
much rather hear of a movement
for its abrogation, than of a bill
to supplement it. The fourteenth
amendment was adopted when
there was respect for the "higher law."
The civil rights act was passed while
there was respect for the same odious
doctrine. And the effort to supplement
and confirm this act, is evidence that
the "higher law" still holds sway. But
there is hope that the day will come
when this "higher law" will be looked
upon by the American people as the
miserable and contemptible pretext for
tyranny and oppression that it is.
Garfield is growing virtuous. The
Washington correspondeut of the Cin
cinnati Gazette says: "If the Senate
salary bill does not puss, and final
action does not reduce all the salaries
to previous rates, Gen. Garfield will ask
the House, in behalf of the Committee
on Appropriations, to order that the
legislative, executive, and judicial bill
shall only contain such appropriations
for salaries as were provided by the law
in force at the beginning of the last
Congress, i
IIlttlEEG AS A FIXE AKT.
Every year since the war Congress
has met and with becoming gravity de
clared it to be wise and proper "to
make provision, at the earliest practi
cable period, for the redemption of
United States notes in coin." This
Radical humbug has become so polished
by use and friction as to excite the ad'
miration not only of all the supporters
of Grant and Richardson, but of all
who participate in the fun of a profita
ble joke. Trading with and in the do
predated notes of the government is
far from being an honest calling. It
corrupts the nation at its fountain; and
where the head springs send forth
water that is impure and poisonous, the
contamination extends through all tire
stream that lies below. Congress can
not practice the tricks of bankrupt
gamblers, paying one paper promise by
issuing another, and not foster and
patronize gambling luiiversally. All
the talk about "making provision to
redeem United States notes in coin" is
a thrice acted farce, of which school
boys ought to be ashamed. " Reduce the
expenses of the Government to what
they should be, to meet the ideas and
condition of the people, and all deprc
ciated paper woidd at once disappear,
and be a matter of past his
tory, The nation is to be plun
dered, and its credit, as well as
its cash, must be handled. How
long will the country uphold this iniqui
ty? The shrinking m'values that has
already taken place renders this a very
favorable time to resume specie pay
incuts. If Congress waits for another
inflation of prices, there must be anoth
er crash, with another contraction, tens
of thousands thrown out of cmploj---ment,
with universal suffering, that
long cultivated humbug may be prac
ticed as a fine art. No other reason
can be given for the present bankrupt
condition of the Federal Treasury than
to general squandering of the public
money. The doubling-of the Presidents
salary, and more than doubling of the
annual expenditures on the executive
mansion, are fair samples of the way
that economy is practiced by a Radical
Congress. There can be no reform till
the people take the subject inhand,and
punish every member who does not labor
faithfully to cut down expense, reduce
the tarriff, and pay promptly all debts
that are due. The extravagance of
Government is without a parallel in our
history of one hundred years, and has
become a very hotbed of crime. If this
crime in public servants is not con
demned and punished, its influence on
society at large in all the States will be
most calamitous. "Washington is a city
whose example will corrupt both public
and private morals far and near. Men
now go there to steal themselves into
the first circles in the Union, and the
people arc taught to believe that such
political and financial conduct is all
right.
A STA11TE1XG STATEMENT,
The Cleveland (Ohio) Herald, an un
wavering supporter of the Grant ad
ministration, says:
""When Mr. Dawes states that the
pay of the President, including salary
and perquisites, amounts to -100,000
for a Presidential term, he states a fact
that commands the attention of the
country. At that rate of pay the office
of President will be sought for its pe
cuniary value. And when we arrive
at that point we have entered upon the
downward slope in the history of this
Republic. It is a fearful thing for
Congress to say to this country 'that
the highest office in its gift is a position
for the attainment ot wealth.
There is reason to fear that we "en
tered upon the downward slope" when
the Republicans bought Grant and
elected him President. "We have cer
tainly been going from bad to worse
ever since his inauguration. Here is
one of the evidences as furnished by
the Ncio Yorl: Tribune of Dec, 15:
"If there is anything in which mere
partisanship should be avoided, it is
certainly in questions of public money.
"We appeal to thoughtful citizens of all
parties, and to idl honest Congressmen,
however classified, to consider dispas
sionately the present alarming defi
ciency in the revenues of the United
States Treasury. The temporary de
pression in our foreign imports pro
duced by the panic has undoubtedly
diminished the revenue, but the extrav
agant appropriations of the Forty-second
Congress would have produced a
deficiency without the aid of the panic.
Certain it is that the expenditures of
the current fiscal year will exceed those
of the last by several million dollars,
and yet the rdinary oexpenditures of
the last fiscal year are without prece
dent in the history of the country.
"Why should the army expenditures be
nearly three times greater, than, they
were in 1860? "Why should the cost of
he navy have more than doubled in the
same time? Why should it still cost
six per cent to collect the internal rev
enue? "The fiscal year 1S68 was the last
complete year of Johnson's administra
tion. Since then it has been claimed
that the Government has grown eco
nomical. Wc should like to sec in what
branch of the public expenditure this
economy can be found. The public
debt has decreased, and therefore the
interest account is less burdensome
than it was six ycais ago. Six years
ago the army was larger than it is now,
and vast sums were distributed about
that time in bounties to the soldiers.
These two items of extraordinary
expense have naturally ceased
to exist. But the navy costs as
much and amounts to as little as ever.
The chief remaining items of public
expenditure, so far as the Secretary of
the Treasury furnishes information
upon which a comparison can be based,
compare as iollows:
Civil.
18CS. 1S7.-S.
$.1,000,13.) S7.2ol.832
. G.757,402 C,89C,.-.a7
2.491,737 3,820,132
. 200,114 34(1,531
112,000 125.-421
Congress
Executive
.ludiciarv
Sub-Treasuries
Mints and Assay Offices
.Miscellaneous.
Mint Establishment (i,683 1,0S2,341
Coast Survey 4.V,701 &52,82i)
Light Hoiisecstablisment 2,013,730 2,000,280
Collect ing customs an J
revenue cutter service. 7,015,075 B,ui5.0u2
Public building, and re
pairs of same 1,090,002 10,003,048
Post Office deficiencies.. 4-,101,177 4,705,475
Refunding proceeds of
captured and abandon
ed lironcrtv 042.043 1,000.079
Indians 3,9S8,354 7,051,705
Forts and fortifications.
and improvement ot
rivers and harbors fl.33I.S97 8,319.470
Foreign intercourse sal
aries ol .Ministers, con
suls, etc 1,291.311 - 1.371.303
Steamship subsidies 191,007 72.",(iOO
Marine hospital estab'm't 500,812 400,703
surveys oi puunc lanus... -iyo i,va,vw
Total... 543,007,231 $68,833,095
l-JlXty AO OLIKJ Y 11 tin 1UV1 JU Llll"
teen items of over fifty per cent in five
years. Uongress grows expensive in
the same ratio that it grows contemp
tible. As the Judiciary sinks in pub
lic estimation the administration of jus
tice rises m cost. Public buildiiiescall
for five times as much afe they did five
years ago. Indian airairs require
double the amount they did m lobe,
but what per centages go to the Indians
and what to the agents we cannot Bav
in every item there is an increase, ex
ceptin the solitary instance of the
Marine Hospital establishment. Ob
serve", too. that the current fiscal year
is destined to show a large advance on
the disbursements of the last. In the
year ended June 30, 1865, the last year
of the war, the expenses ol the uovcrn
ment, after deducting the interest on
the debt, drawbacks, pensions and the
cost of the Army and Navy, were only
34,015,ooc!.5b. The same expenses
last vear were b7b,7)Ll.rJ5Mb, or sever
al millions more than double. In 1868
they were 51,688,501.74. The respon
sibility for the rapid increase of the
public expenditures cannot be saddled
on the panic or on Gen. Burricl. The
taxes must at no distant time be in
creased, and the reasons why an in
crease is necessary-must be sought in
the reckless mhdelity ot those in power
both in and out of Congress. Shall it
continuo unchecked, and unrebuked?
IEOX, TIMBER ANO COAE.
The Columbia Herald finds work for
the next Legislature to protect the tim
ber in "the iron counties of Hardin,
r Wayne and Lawrence, from destruction
by the annual burning of forests in that
region. Col. KiUebrew is credited, by
the Herald, as making valuable sug
gestions on this subject, based on his
industrial survey of the State, which is in
progress. The following is copied from
the Herald:
"Now it is possible by any efficient
law to keep the supply ot timber con
stant. It is estimated that an area cx-
tendine in every direction from the
furnace of six miles would keep one
with economy in blast perpetually, if
there was a stringent law m action
acainst firintr the woods. These files,
which are kindled every year in the old
coaling grounds, sweep with resistless
fury, destroying not only the leaves, but
all the young sprouts that shootuplrom
the stumps of trees which have been
used for making coal. These sprouts, if
protected, would oe oi sumcienc size in
twenty-five years to make good coaling
wood. Nor is this a matter of surmise.
Much of the land near Wayne Furnace
from which fires have been kept out,
has been twice coaled during the past
thirty years, and the sprouts after the
second cutting are now from eight to
ten feet in height. On the other hand
there are large areas covering thousands
of acres which were coaled over twenty
years ago in which not a tree as large
as a man's arm can be found. And the
cause of this is the annual burning
which kills the young shrubs as fast as
they shoot up, The excuse given for
kindling these fires is that it induces an
earlier growth of the grass, and that
stock are able to subsist two weeks
earlier in the spring in consequence of
this burin". Now the woods may be
valuable to that class of fanners who
rely upon the commons for pasturage,
but we protest that the loss to the
owners of this property, and to the iron
interest of the State is ten times as
great as the value of the new grass for
stock. If these fires are kept up the
-seats of the furnaces will have to be
changed every twenty or twenty-five
yeara, and a large extent of the country
rendered fruitless and worthless: a
weary wild desert unprotected from the
parching rays of the summer sun, a
wild waste where even the barren grass
will soon refuse to grow."
There can be no reasonable doubt as
to the soundness of these views; and
with the loss of timber will follow less
rain in the summer season and more
severe drouths. Indians may kill thn
her to make wastes and prairies, but
civilized white people shordd know and
do better. Well managed, a cord of
wood will grow on an acre in a year,
which gives 6 10 cords on a mile square
of land. With good iron ore that costs
nothing, coal made from ; forty square
miles will yield a very desirable crop of
this metal. By working up our pig
iron into castings, bars, steel, nails and
other articles, the value of the annual
growth of timber rises into indefinite
millions annually.
A Western paper relates, as an illus
tration of the power of love, the case of
Miss Catharine Uates, ol Cornwall, Eng
land, who traveled all the way toToulumne
Countv, California, to wed the lover she
had not seen for eight years, and found
him wedded to a Mexican ranchero s daugh
ter and the father of five children.
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS.
Notice to Cotton Shippers.
Cotton "will not be keceived at
tbc Tress on
Thursday, Soth lust.
A. E. BUItlt,
Act. L. & X. & G. S. & X., C. & St. I,. Railway.
It
Postponement.
THE GUEAT AUCTION SALE OF FUIi
niturc, etc, advertised to take place at the
Kentucky House. North Market street, adjoin
ing the Sto'ck Yard, on the 13d inst., has been
postponed until Friday, Dec. 20, when it will
positively come oft', at 10 o'clock a. m.
.1 " -r T lin i X' . . r
LouUvillc & Nashville ami Great South
ern JCailrouUj
GENERAL AGENT'S OFFICE, )
Nasiivillk, Ten-it., Dec. 24, 1873. $
FREIGHT WILL NOT RE RECEIVED
nor delivered on Thursday, Dec. 25.
TAIIV 111. 1 .-(Ti
It G cncral A gent.
Lcuisvillc &iKasuriIIo andJGreat South
ern Kauroau.
NASHVILLE AND DECATUR DIVISION,
Ofkick op Geskkai, Agent,
Nashville, Tcnn., Dec. 21, 1873.
NOTICE TO SIIXFI'ERS.
-VTO FREIGHT WILL BE RECEIVED OR
JLN delivered at this Depot on Thursday, Dec.
it w. u. iJ.fl.Yas, uciri Agent.
B50 HEW ABB.
ASHVILLE, DEC. 23, 1873. ESCAPED
from Haggard's Quarry, on the evening of Dec.
21, 1873, eight (8) convicts of following descrii-
tion. The above reward will be paid lor the de
livery of each one to me at the Tennessee Peni
tentiary. JAMJX HEARD,
From Gibson county, 22 years old, 5 fett 10
inches high, weighs iuo los., moincr s mark on
right shoulder-blade, also scar on left knee from
a cut.
I.EM FOSTER. CoIorcU.
From Davidson county, 22 years old, 5 feet Cl
inches high, weigh3 1C5 lbs., end of third finger
on left hand cut on".
EI IIEXDERSlia, 'Colorctl,
Lincoln countv. 21 rears old, 5 feet 7 inchcshiL'h.
weighs 182 lbs., longscar on left arm, also one on
left hand and wrist, anil one on right hand.
IIEXKY EAKK, Colored,
Tliirldsnu rnuiitv. 23 vears old. 5 feet 8w inrlwu
high, weighs 15S lbs.; "he is iock-marked.
AM ItED EAUK,
TifiviilNntt rnimtv. 21 vears old. 5 font in i. inn)irB
high, weighs 15l lbs.; no visible marks.
EITO'IS MAltRISOX, Colored,
Knox county, 27 years old, 5 feet CJ,' Inches high,
weighs 1IS lbs.; has a scar on Iclt hand from a
cut, and small scar on the forehead.
JACKSOX IHtOWX,
Knox countv. 2G vears old. 5 feet 6n inchesliifli.
weighs 151 lbs.; scar on right slde'of the.mouth
and scar on Iclt hand.
IJIEE l'ARKA, Colored,
Shelbv countv. 28 vears old, 5 feet 6 inches
high, weighs 101 lbs.; left leg has been broken.
aim uiuu iiuuj ui ten u.tiju ucwi jiiiisueu.
dcc24 tf W. MATT BROWN, Warden.
NOTICE.
SEALED BIDS WILL BE RECEIVED UP
to the 31st December, Inst,, for all good, mer
chantable fresh meats fno shanks) for the use ot
thn Ci Workhouse lor the cnsuiiicvear.be-
ginning oiljthe lirstday of .lanuary, 1S74. i,U
addressed to me, or left at the Mayor's ofllco for
me. TiiuiiAS aiii.su.n,
Cuairinan woriiiiouse committee.
Uec23 Ot
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS.
No. 3,362.1
SIIJBRIJFJF'S S.IIjE.
B
,Y VIRTUE OF A WRIT OF VEND.
I Kt. tn rim j1irrWf! mt.l Tn1l..il
the iiimuraoie circuit uourtoi David&m coau-
--, ----- - - - ' H1.U 1 1 u j u
will cxioso to public sale, to tho highest bid
der, for c.ihh, at tho Courthouse door, in the city
of Nashville, on Saturday, the Sd dav of Janu
ary, 1874, within lawful hours, all the right,
uuui aiiu luiuvot umi a. jm oireiicer jias
in and to the following property, to-wit: Fifteen
shun nf flu rnnltnl vtnnl nt t..
yv 'i'v, '-v.n v & illb JLllU AM
uiiranco Company, each Miare representing a
noun"" ui uimuuiiurcu uouara, ami beinir
I. fieri mi nx thn iirnirv nf A a c.n....H .
satisfy a-judgment against him and in favor of
Gennett & Co. for j?1,2(p0, besides Interest and
cuau
Dated this 23d dav of December, 1673.
E. D. WHITWORTH, Sheriff.
By II. H. WILKINSON, Deputy
dco21,27,23
NOTICE.
T
X WILL, O.N THE 1st DAY OF JANUARY;
1S71, Rent or Lease all the Stalls connected with
the Market for tho ensuing year. Twins made
known on day. GEO. W. NORVELL,
Dee. 23, 1S73. Ass't Marshal
dcc23 td
I Have Found II.
Gc
O TO THE STORE OF DARIUS WATER-
HOUSE & CO., Bridge Avenue, to get your
Christmas Turkica and supplies. "Wo sell for
cash and sell cheaper than anybody. Give us a
trial. dec23 2t
Xoticc to the Holders of the Circnlatinsr
Notes of the Bank of the Union.
BY ORDER OF THE CHANCERY COURT
at Nashville in the case of W. F. Cooner. Tr..
vs. R. II. Thompson and others, the holders of
the circulating notes ot tho Bank ot the Union
arc hereby notified to present tho said notes for
payment to tho Trustee, on or before tho 1st day
of July. 1874, or before the final dividend of the
trust tuuus in talc l cause, it tho llnal ilivuleml
should bo delayed bevond that date, otherwise
they will be forever barred from any claim in
iiid funds. W. F. COOPER, Trustee.
Dec. U, 1S73. dec23 3m Dim Wlm & SWlm
2?axtnexsliip !N"otice.
Wc have this day formed a copartnership under
the style and name ol
PLATER & NELSON,
For the purpose of conducting a
General lire Insurance Business
representing, amongst others, the following
Companies:
Koynl of Liverpool $12,500,000
Impcristl, London 10,000,000
Plnntcrs, Memphis 300,000
A share of the public patronage respectfully so
licited.
Ollkc, Bank of Tennessee Blinding.
THOMAS PLATER. "W. C. NELSON
dec23 lw
The Great Money Panic
IS OVER!
AND AS THE CORPORATION HAS A
large debt falling-due in January next, and in
order to meet the same wc must make collec
tions those who are in arrears with their li
cense for merchandising, running hacks, drays,
etc., must come forward pftmiptlyby the 1st day
of Jannarv next and settle the same, or they will
bo lined as provided by city ordinance. Further
indulgence cannot and will not be given.
dec213t S. A. DULINU, Recorder.
HO, FOR CHRISTMAS!
DODD ANDERSON'S
FOR
CHRISTMAS SUPPJLTJES.
Doild it Anderson luive everything;
you want.
K2-Call for CHRISTMAS TURKEYS on Wed
nesday next.
Cor. Woodland und Tulip sls.,EdgciIcld
dccl8 till dcc2j
MISCELLANEOUS.
n KAft RRLS. KCSGS WANTED. FOR
V.OUw which the highest market price will
be paid by
S. G. BRADLEY, Produce Dealer,
nov2G -lm No. 1 15 South Market st
Jl'OTICJO.
Until further notice, the dixie
Oil Company will pay S1.40 each for all good
Coal Oil Rarrcls, delivered at tho Workson Mc-
Lemorc street.
oc3 tf RORERT THOMPSON, Trcs't.
Agent, J. Xj. ATKINS,
118 JforlhlChcrry St.
,VLL KINDS OF HORSE-SHOEING DONE.
decl7 2taw wed.sat tf
REAL ESTATE AGENTS.
For Sale,
A. TWO-STORY BRICK 'DWELLING ON
Cedar street, in good condition. Price So.OOft
one-third cash; balance in 1, 2, 3 and 4 years.
ARRINGTON, FARRAR & WEAK LEV,
dec21 eodtf Agents, No. 3fi N. College St.
For Exchange
"We HAVE A FARM OF 300 ACRES IN
Sumner county, with two-story Rrick House,
which wc will exchaugo for city property at a
fair valuation.
ARRINGTON, FARRAR & WEAKLEY,
dccll codlf No. 3G N. College.
For Itcnl,
A
LARGE AND COMMODIOUS WARE-
liouse, fronting on Church, Clark and Front
streets, suited cither for storing or manufac
turing.
, ARRINGTON FARRAR Si WEAKLEY,
dccll cod tf Agents.
For Kent for 1871.
WlJ HAVE FOR RENT SEVERAL NICE
nud choice Residences, well located; alto Cot
tages and Storehouses.
ARRINGTON, FARRAR & WEAKLEY,
nov30 tf No. 3G N. Collcgo btrcet.
BUILDING MATERIAL.
J. BROWN' & CO.,
DEALERS IN
Bnildin? NiippHes, White I.imc Co
mcnt, i ire Urieli. Fire Clay, I'll -icr
1'arlM. l'laslorinur Hair,
White .Sand, Etc
No. -10 JfOItTII St'MSltU .STKriTT'
augl7 tf
UNDERTAKERS.
R.H. GROOMES & CO.,
JrTiineral UBiclertakers,
AGENTS FOR J. M. PULLIAM.
tli and 41 JfOKTII C'MEIIKY STKEJBT,
NASHVILLE.
"PvEALERS IN BURIAL CASES AND CAS
I ) kets. and Agents for Crane, Breed & Co.'s
ana omcr iim-s .hm, vn,.-. ...Lcim
promptly to nil funerals in city or .surrounding
country witli fine Hearses for boih Adults and
Children, ''elegraphic orders lllled with dis
P'ltch Taylor's Patent Corpie Preserver, be
sides other Preservers, that are warranted to
presei ve a corpse from 15 to 20 days without de
cay. At tuo offlce day nd night.
J anil till ap
mm
BOOK NOTICES.
Books for all the Year Bound.
W. T. Berry & Co.
BOOKSEIiTjEKS,
Wo. 5 Union and American Block, Cherry
at., opposite maxwell nouse
Have now ready ibr inspection a choice colleC'
tion of STANDARD LIBRARY BOOKS, suit
able for PRESENTATION BOOKS FOR THE
HOLIDAYS. Among them are tho following-
The Illustrated Thackery. 22 vols. Levant mo.
The Illustrated Dickens. 23 vols. Cloth.
The Aldino Poets. 52 vols. Tree calf.
Professor Wilson's Works. 12 vols. Calf.
The illustrated Lever. 22 vols. Cloth.
Waverley Novels. 48 vols. Half calf.
Irvlng's Works. 28 vols. Half calf.
Buhver'3 Notpls.i.42 vols. Half calf.
Edgeworth's (Miss Maria) "Works. 10 vols. Calf.
Plutarch's Lives. Drydcn's Translation. 6 vols.
Moore's Poetical Works in 10 volumes. Calf.
Hcmans' roctical Works. 8 vols. Calf. -Wordsworth's
Poetical Works. 6 vols. Calf.
Byron's Poetical Works. Murray's best edition.
1U YU19.
Moore's Life of Byron, Murray's best edition,
u vols. uau.
Knight's Popular History of England: An n-
lustratcu History oi r.ngianuirom ine ear
liest Period. 8 vols. Cloth.
Walton's Completo Angler, with Original Me
moirs and notes, z vois. uaii.
Wood's Illustrated Natural History. 3 volumes.
noyai b vo.
Staunton's Shakspcare, containing 1,700 Illus
trations trom original uesigns.
Dana's Household Book of Toetry. 1 vol.
Living Female Writers of the South. 1 vol.
Goethe's Faust. Translated by Bayard Taylor.
l vol. 8 vo.
Cyclopaedia of the Best Thoughts of Charles
J'lCKCUS. 1 vol. o vo.
Poetical Quotations from Chaucer to Tennyson,
By S. Austin Alibone.
Hand-Book of the Cathedrals of England, witli
illustrations, o. vols.
Comic History of England, with 20 Colored Etch
ings, by tiilbert Abbott A'Bcckett.
The Comic History of Rome, with Illustrations.
By A'Becket.
History of the Princes De Condo in Uie 16th and
17 in uentunes.
The Works of Richard Brinslcy Sheridan, with
a ..Memoir, l voi.
Old Court Life in France. 2 vols. 8 vo.
W. T. BERRY & CO.,
Booksellers, No. 5 Cherry street, opposite Max-
wen nouse.
dcc20 tf
BANKING.
OF NASHVILLE, TENN.,
Ho. 55 North CoUcgo Street.
Tho Designated Depository of tho
United Ntntcs for Middle
Tennessee.
Capital '. S230,000
Surplus Fund 00,000
DIRECTORS :
M. BURNS, C. R. PARSONS,
E. R. CAMPBELL, A. G. EWING,
A. L. DEMOSS, WM. SIMMONS.
M. B. PILCHER.
Receives Deposits, Deals in Foreign and Do
mestic Kxcnangc, uoiu, silver ana uorern
v mont Securities. Collections made and
remitted for on day of payment at
current rate of exchange. Rev
nue Stamps for hale.
M. BURNS, W. C. BUTTERFIELD,
President Cashier,
THEO. COOLEY,
janll tC sp Assistant Cashier.
FINANCIAL.
ROBINSON, CHASE & Co.
No. IS BROAD STBEET, K. Y.
Transact a general Banking Business iu all its
details, allowing interest upon
deposits to
Panics, Banlting Institutions, Private
Bankers and Individuals,
Particular attention paid to the investment of
ESTATE A?,' TRUST FUNDS,
and information regarding tho same furnished
upon application.
Buy and sell upon commission Gold, United
States Stocks, and all Securities dealt in at tho
New York Stock Exchange.
First-class Munclpal and llauro.nl loans ne
gotiated. Euoinsu N. Ronixsox, TnoiTAS B. Atkins,
Geouci: II. Cuase, ' William T. Morris.
dcclbam
COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
W. HoorER Harris. R. C. K. Martix.
HARRIS & CO.,
General Brokers
31 South Market Street, -
Make cash advances on Cotton to their author
ized correspondents in Liverpool, New York,
New Orleans and Charleston. Offer at all times
SiiHiir, Coffee, Candle. Foreign nml
Domestic I.icjnors, Etc,
Direct from Rclincrs, Importers, and Manu
facturers. nov22 tf
WILLIAMS, BLACK & CO.
ISO Pcnrl Street, New York,
AND
WUiLLUIS, 1JLACK Ss "WILLIAMS,
CHARLESTON, K C,
Commission Merchants.
Special attention given to the purchase and
salo 6f Cotton for future delivery.
Advances made and information furnished by
Harris & Co., 31 South Market street. nov22tf
J. N. ROBSOIf,
Commission Merchant
Nos. C3 East Bay and 1 & 2 Atlantic AVharf,
CHARLESTON, S, C.
liavinc amnio means for advances, a business
experience of twenty years, and confining him
self strictly to a Commission Business, without
operating on his own account, respectfully so
licits consignments of Cotton, Hour, Corn,
Wiicat, etc. novio ii
MEDICAL.
'lvoid Quachs.
A VICTIM OF EARLY INDISCRETION
causing nervous debility, premature decay,
etc., having tried in vain every advertised rem
edy, has discovered a simple means of self-cure
which he will send free to his fellow-sufferers.
Address J. II. REEVES, 78 Nassau street, New
York. cc4 cod3m
DR. WHSTTIER,
617 St. Charles utrctt, St- Louis, Mo-, has been longer en
gaged In the treatment of all venereal and sexual diseases
thaoaoj specialist in St. Louis, as the cltj- papers she?
also spermatorrhoea, sexual debllitj aod impotenej, as tha
res tilt of self-abuse tn jouth, or sexual excesses ; symptom
being, ner to tunes s, seminal emissions, debility, dimness of
sight, delectlro memory, pimples on tho faee, physical decay
aversion to society of females, confusion of Ideas, loss of
sexual power, are permanently cored. ramphlet36 pages
free, iivery letter of Inquiry with ont stamp answered.
NEWSPAPERS.
THE BEST PRESENT
That a husband can give to his wife is a receip
lor a years subscription it-w; iu
CHRISTIAN OBSERVER,
Of Louisville, one ofthe largest ami uesi iu
family religious newspapers, Presbyterian, mil
unscctarian, containing articles on practical re
ligion from some of the ablest ministers in tno
South, able editorials, stories for tho young, re
ligion news from all the other denominations
nlWellnnrnns, scientillc, farming and literary
departments, general intelligence, wholesale
market. For specimen copies sent free to any
address) containing list of premiums write to
A. & F. 11. CONVERSE, Pubs.,
Uecl8d&w6w LOUISVILLE, KY
NASHVILLE
CITY BUSINESS LIST
Bahcrs and Confectioners.
L. II. F.LDKIDGE. 85 Church street.
MttS. fiKO. (ilEKIC. 42 Virion strect.
JOaEKMANN Jt CO.. 31 Public souarc.
CilAS. I10I1KUT.SOX. 21 N. Market street
. II. WESSEL, 32 N. College street
Boots and Shoes.
B. M. EATHERLY, CI N. College street
CIIAS. II. HALL, 47 N. College street
J0HK HOLAHAS, 9 Union street
MASEY & BU0.. 03 Church street
TBECY X COYLK..21 Union street
T. E. 1VISSTEAD A CO., 7 N. Cherry street.
Clothing and Gents' Furnishing Goods.
S. P0WEBS & SOS, 20 rnblic Square.
China, Glass and Queensicarc.
HICKS. HOUSTON A CO., 51 N. College it and
Druggists.
A. II. C0USEXS & CO., corner Broad and Cherry
streets.
Furniture Manufacturers and Dealers.
WEAKLKY & lVARKEX, 10 and 11 N. College st,
Hats and Gents' Furnishing Goods.
JOHN' 31. JIcKEK A 15KO.. 30 Union street
WAI.V & WALKER. 21 Public Square...
ISAAC AVATEUFIEL1,43 Union street
Hoop Shirt Manufactory and Ladies'
Goods.
I). L0VE3IA5 & CO., 16rublic Square,
Millinery.
31 IIS. TYXES, 21 N. Summer street
Mattress Manufacturer.
ED. II. 31ILLEB, 7 North College btrcet
Ma mrfaclurcrs and Dealers in Ha ir Vork
JOS. E. LOISEAU & CO., 21 N. Cherry street.
Manufacturers of Furs and Dealers in
Hats and Gents Uoods.
LAXDE & 11 KO., 21 Public Square.
Music and Musical Instruments.
B. D0K3IAX & CO., 83 Church street
Plumbers, Gas and Steam Filter3
IIESDEBSOX BBO'S A CO., 73 N. Cherry street
Photograph Galleries.
C. C. (HERS, 45 Union street
B. l'OOLE, comer Cherry and Union streets.
Retail Dry Goods.
THOlirSOX BBO'S A KELLY, 11 N. Summer st.
Paints, Oils and Glass.
CIIAS. II. (1ATJTIIIEB, 15 N. College street
Saddles, Harness, Etc.
J. I). JIABCII A SOX, 53 N. Market street
31. 3IcKE0., 53 S. College street
Sewing Machine Agencies.
FLORENCE, E. A. Nklsox, 152 Church street
SIXtJEB. J. B. CAr.rE.NTEn. 122 Church street
WEED. B. W. Randall, 3 N. Summer street
WHEELER A W1LSOX, HOWARD & Soule, 120
Church street
Stove, Timcarc, Etc.
rilllLirS, BUTT0KFF A CO., 22 N. College st
Tobacco, Cigars, Etc.
J. A L. WII0RLEY, 17 S. Market street.
Trunk Manufacturer.
W3I. DUXSTEAD, 31 N. College street.
Watchmakers andJcicelers.
ATKIXS0X A ALSTEAD. 27 N. Cherry street
I. 31. KOBFL A CO., 15 N. Cherry street.
II. II. STIEF, 5 Union street
E. WIGGEBS, Zl'i N. Cherry street.
WALL PAPERS.
GIFT CONCERTS.
The Shortest Route to Fortune
$100,000 for only $2.50.
THE LARGEST RETURN FOR
THE SMALLEST INVESTMENT.
A Grand Gift Concert!
WILL BE HELD
AT I1EA.VEXWOKTII, KAXSAS,
DECEMBER 31, 1873
FOR THE BENEFIT OF
A JUVENILE REF0KM SCHOOL.
40,000 guts:
$450,000 IX PHIZES!
PRINCIPAL PRIZE, $100,000!
Consisting of the superb palatial residenco of
Simon Abcles, Esq., unsurpassed as a private
dwelling in the United States, being only a,few
blocks from the Courthouse, surrounded by mag
nificent grounds, orchards, gardens and vine
yards. The building has been only recently
completed with all modern improvements.
FilIZE LIST.
13 Prizes, Real Estate
1 Cash Prize ,
$150,125
20,000
20,000
20,000
10,000
20,000
25,000
20,000
... 20,000
310,000 each...,
4
4
20
CO
100
200
300
638
1,000
1.153
5,000 " ...
2,500
1,000
500
JtO
100
CO
20
10
5
2X0
15,000
13,9C0
10,000
5,790
...... 01,125
36,450
40,000 j 8430,000
The title to the above real estate is guaranteed
perfect
The libci.il terms ofthe fcchcnrohrings itwith-
111 uiu leiicii ur itii uiu irrcaiesi onooriiiiiiiv
Villi IU 1UI 111U l"Wl 1UUI1 lUfUV iu ncaiui.
PRICE OF TICKETS.
Single Tickets, $2.50; Eleven Ticket, P23.00;
pixtv-six Ticket. S125.00: One- llundreil ami
Fil'ty-six Tickets, S25O.00.
The drawiii2 will be made under the till norm-.
tendence of a committccnpotntcd by the high
est, umuiais in ine acne, may sworn to me faith
ful performance of the duties assigned them.
The highest officials both of City, County and
State have not onlv endorsed Mr. Almlrs. imt
iiisii ill.-, sciiunit:.
The demand for tickets is unparalleled, nd
all desiring to participate in the drawing shot,
at once form their clubs and tend in their orders
Agents 'Wanted in all States, Cities and Towns
in the United States and Canada..
tS Money should be sent bv Registered Let
ter. P. O. Order or Express, with tho full ad
dress of the'purcahser in plain writting.
For further information and particulars, send
for circulars to tho Manager and Proprietor,
and address
SBIOX ABELES, -LEAVENWORTH,
KANSAS.
sep23 eod3m wed,fri,sun
STOCKHOLDERS MEETINGS.
NOTICE.
milE REGULAR ANNUAL MEETING OF
I the Stockholders of the Nashvillo Life Insu
rance Company, for the purpo-o of electing
seven Directors to manage its affairs, will bo
held at the oilice of the Company, No. 16 Max
well House.on Jlondar.Jan.5. 1871. at loo'clock
A. M. AS'M. HENRY SMITH,
dcc20 tde Secretary.
JVOTJCF.
TlIE ANNUAL MEETING of the Stock
holders of the First National Bank of Nashville,
Tenn., will be held at tho offlce of said Bank on
Tuesday, Jan. 13, 1874, for the pur-ose of elect
ing seven Directors to servo the ensuing year.
dcc!630d W. U. BUTTERFIELD, Cashier.
Fourth National Bank.
T
HE ANNUAL MEETING nf the Sharehold
ers of thin Bank, for the purpose of electing Di
rectors, will be held at the Ranking House, in
this city, on Tuesday, the 18th day of January,
1874. JOHN P0RTERMELD, Caihier.
decl3 lm
A3 feS
LIFE INSURANCE.
THE EQUITABLE LIFE" ASSURANCE
SOCIETY, Nrw Yoek, Tff-
Haa an accumulated capital exceeding7-.
$23,000,000,
i early revenue of more than
S,00O,O0O. . :
The Lives Insured by this Society lire careful
ly selected in different parts ot North ABKrie
and Europe, furnishing-, by this broad Held of
operations, an additional and exertional safety
to the Policy-holders. Tho Insurances are made
only on the Mutual Principle. Tho Surplus Pre
miums are returned annually to tho Injured.
Policies are also issued upon the
TONTIIEaPiAX,
or upon the principle of accumulating profit?
for definite periods, which was llrvt introduced
by this Society, and Ita been recommended and
endorsed by eminent experts in Life Insurance,
and by leading business men. Forty-four per
cent has been earned and accumulated on the
premiums paid on its Tontine Life Policies, and
forty per cent on tho Tontine Endowment Poli
cies issued within the last live years.
No Lifo Insurance Company has such large
annual transactions as the Equitable; cort9 is
more prompt and just in its dealing.
STEELE fc LIXDSLEY,
GEN'L MANAGERS OF MIDDLE TENN.,
Nos. 40Ja:d 41 N. College Stkeet,,
XASIIVILLE.
de 5 lm cod
REAL ESTATE SALES.
TRUSTEES' SAJLE.
UNDER AND BY VIRTUE OF THE Au
thority in mo vested by the terms and pro
visions of a deed of trnst to us executed by M.
C. Cotton, on Dec. 3, 1870, which is recorded in
Register's Office for Davidson county, Tenn., In
book 44, page 2S2, wc will sell at public auction,
On Thursday, Jan. 1, 1S74,
at the Courthouse door in the city of Nashville,
County of Davidson, and State of Tennessee,
tho following described property, to-wit: A lot
of ground in the city of Nashville, Tenn., lying:
on the west side of College street, about midway
between Ash and Mulberry streets, in said city,
beginning at thu corner or the lot known as the.
Gun Factory Lot, and running north with tho
west margin of College street eighty-nine (83)
ieet andjtcn (10) Inches West to tho corner of J. II.
Earhard's lot; thence cast with Earhard'a lino
ono hundred and forty (140) rect to an alley:
thence south along the line and centre of said
alley eighty-nine (8U) feet and ten (10) inches to
the lino of said Gun Factory lot; thence east
along the line of said lot one hundred and forty
(1 10) feet to the beginning. Said lot being com
posed of fiftv-two (52) feet and ten (10) inches,
conveyed to the said Cotton by F. Cramer by
deed, which is recorded in Register's Offlce for
Davhlson county, Tenn., in book 31, page 491;
and of thirty (30) feet conveyed to the said Cot
ton by A. J. Bosworth, bv deed recorded In said
oflico in book 18, page 92 "of five (5) feet convey
ed to me by A. A. Hatcher by deed registered In
said office in book32,pago 476; and abo of two (2)
additional feet conveyed to said Cotton by
Mouohan and Knowles,by deed recorded as tho
above in boufc 33, page 322. The property here
tofore described Is the property of the said M.
C. Cotton, conteyed to nsas above stited, to se
curo the payment of a note for $2,500, executed
to us as Trustets on Dec. 3, 1870, and payable
Dec. 3, 1872, which note, with interest, was not
paid at maturity.
Tho property is well improved, and will ba
sold to the highest and best bidder for cash.
Sale free from the equity of redemption-
We are authorized to iakc absolute deed to
the purchaser.
DANIEL F CAXXER.)
A. G. ADAMS. J Trustees.
JAS. M. HAMILTON, 1
Saturday, 10th July, 1873.
I agree that the salo as above adre'rji may
be made whenever the above namedrril!itees
mar elect, and I bind rovself to abidei,-th
same as covenanted ia the deed to me.
Juno 11, 1873. M. C. COTTCv.
nov27 eodtds
OF THE
BY VIRTUE OF A TRUST DEED, DULY
registered iu the Register'3 Offlce of tho
Countv of Davidson, Tenn., iu book 45, pages
309 and 310, and executed to mo on the 19th of
July, 1871, by the Tennessee Agricultural and
jiccnanic association as inueiasuy ami security
to "W. A. Cheatham. I). II. MeGavock, A. O.
Adams, John H. Williams, AY. II. Jackson, J.
51. Hamilton, Hiram Vaughn, Robt C Foster
R. If. Gardner. Thomas I!. Johnson, Thomas
Chadwell, N. K. Griffin, B. F. Cockrill. John
Overton and E. R. Elliston, against loss as sure
ties upon certain liabilities of said Association,
specifically set out in said trust deed, I will pro
ceed to sell, by request of sakl securities, to the
highest bidder, at the Fair Grounds, near Nash
ville, on
Saturday, Jan. 10, 1S74,
at 12 o'clock jr., all the Iamb embraced in raid
trust deed, and bcimr all the real rstated owned
by said Tennessee AcricilitT and -Mechanic
-Association within me air uromi inciunm..
together with all the improvements Ihercon, up
on the following terms, viz One-third of the
purchase money in cash, and the balance in two
equal instalments at G and 12 months, by note,
with approved security, and Itearing interest
from date, and a Hen retained upon the land,
and improvements sold to secure payment
thereof. The sale to bo free from the equity o
redemption.
dec5 td MICHAEL VAUGHN, Trustee
MUSIC BOOKS.
JUST PUBLISHED!
THE A3IERIC.AJS-
elwol Header I
Book 1. I'or Primary Schools. Price
;i; cts. or i.uo per uoxcn.
The first of nn excellent serie of GRADED
SCHOOL MUSIC BOOKS, by L. O. Emsrson
inu w. s. xiiuen.
E3IERS0K'S SINGING SCHOOL.
Price 73c. or 87.50 ncr dozen. Is .1 com
plete, cheap and usef.il book for Singing Schools.
Clarke's Dollar Iustr'r for Kccd Organs
Clarke's Dollar Iiistrnclor for I'lano.
Clarke's Dollar Instructor for Violin.
For becinners and amateurs. Full of useful.
instructive, and at the same time brilliant music.
FATHER KEMP'S
Old Folks' Concert Tunes
Price 40c. or 8.1.G0 ncr dozen book.
Sung everywhere with great applause from old
and young.
Sold everywhere, bent, poslpaw, lor retail
price.
OLIVEK DITSOX & CO., Boston,
CLLAS. II. DITSOX & CO.,
711 Broadway, Xcw York.
dec20tlsat&wcdw"twtf
LEGAL SALES.
CHANCERY SALE
FOR
WEDNESDAY, DEC. SI, 1873.
IN PURSUANCE OF A DECREE OF THE
Chancery Court at Xahville, in the case of
1 A. Trcppard and others vs. B. 1.
Waggoner and others,
I'vill sell at public sale, to the highest bidder.
At the Courthouse at Uiuhville'al 12
o'clock m. on Wednesday, Dec.
31, 1873,
the following described property, viz.:
1st. A tract of 157 acres on the Utiena Vista
turnpike, about four miles from Nashville, Da
vidson county, Tenn., 011 which b situated a
two-story Brick DweI!Iiig-hon'; -jud other
houses, said tract beginning in tho centre of
White's Creek, the northeast comer of n 210
acre tract; thence up the creek north 2S deg.
west SO Mles; thenee north 15 deg. west up tho
centre of the rrsck 1 1 poles; theHce south-Til deg.
west 13 iKles to a stone In the eastern margin of
the Buena Vista pike; thence south 77 deg. west
25ii poles to a stake; thence south 1 deg. west
joles to a stake; thence due est 11 poles
to a hickory tree; thence south lljj deg. east 57
poles to a rock pile; thence north tW,y deg. east
312 poles to the beginning.
2. Atrnctof210arresadjoiningthe above (both
being in the 23d District ot said county) on the
north side of Cumberland river and west side of
"White's Creek, beginning at a stone marked .
L. V., the northwest comer of a tract llonging
to the heirs of Geo. Boyd, dee'd; running thence
north 72 deg. east 101 8-10 poles to a stone iu the
mill race; thence south 70 deg. east 31 poles to a
stake in the middle of said creek; thence up the
middle of said creek in all 151).; and 8-10 poles
to a stake in the middle of said creek, opjKwite
the south side of the branch which runs into
said creek between an old tavern house and a
brick building formerly occupied by R. M. Ew
ing; thence south west 320 poles to a stake
in W. J. Drake's east boundary line; theuco
south 32 poles to a white oak marked as a cor
ner; thence east 120 G-10 iole to a beech mark
ed as a comer; thence south 31 8-10 poles to a
dead sugar tree; thence east 1 10Ji poles to an
ash marked as a corner; thence north IJf deg.
cast 51 7-10 poles to the beginning.
TERMS OF SALE Ten ncr' cent cash.
and the residne on credits of 1 and 2 years, with
interest from day of sale. Notes required with
approvedsecuritv and lienretained.
.NAt llA.Mt.lj lSA.Vir.lt, ilR.,
dccl(),l"l&3l Clerk and Master.
SLATE ROOFERS.
F. J. JONES & CO.,
PRACTICAL SLATE ROOFERS.
Wholesale and Retail Dealers In all kinds nf
American Slate. All orders promptly
attended to.
OCicennd Yard cor. Vino & Chnrcli !.
Particular attention paid to Overhaultns 014
Jy 6m 1 Roofi.

xml | txt