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The St. Charles herald. [volume] (Hahnville, La.) 1873-1993, March 02, 1918, Image 6

Image and text provided by Louisiana State University; Baton Rouge, LA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85034322/1918-03-02/ed-1/seq-6/

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ns
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- ! Fcff» r
Ui-ts in tit - L
: ><lnev 3 and i.
s kind of tide
,P !• M .
rated.
J i \ve v
on t.-.f,
A
Dr. I'
•lit de m»
ut
-ch-s—
> lier
• lueys in (lie
ik and v.'/e
meat once a dav, ij
i- nt, a!-.) i
rad crystals are
tue joints, "i tiir
A umation s, t
U we wish to k<
0 -t condiii; -n a <
table.*, wiih onlv li
t!>• most 6iîitah'lo. Drink plentv <.f pure
" at, r. take .mûrie three lit. ■- a day for
a month. An-u-ric is many times more
I>- 'ent than lithia and dissolves uric
am i a* hot water does sugar.
Fend 10 cents to Dr. Pierce, it you wish
to obtain a trial package of Anuric.
■ tMKTox, Tknn.—"I wi-b to sav that
1 suffered from backache and kidney
trout de for some time. 1 could hardlv
no any kind of work. 1 heard of Dr
1 lore.-s Anuric Tai.iets so I tried thorn,
and they cured my backa.-he. I hop«
people who are troubled with backache
will give Dr. Pierce's Anuric Tablets a
K 1 hi trial. They do all that is required
them—they will not fail to beneiit."
itliss Lrmine Ruth Moser, R. f. d. 2 .
Milton. N. C.—" I suffered very muet
with my back and limbs. Had some de
rangement of the kidnevs but after usina
Anuric I obtained relief and have hac
no trouble since. I cheerfully recommend
tue Anur.c Tablet.s to a 11 who suff er Iron:
too mu -h uric acid in the svstem —Capt
»V. G. Graves.
For free medical advice write Dr V M
i teree, Invalids' Hotel, Ruffalo, N. Y.
CA/GET or CAKED UDDÇK w CGWi
'ill'-----p-ev.-tm-by f.- ■l.i - . w teni«
to purify tire bk...land upp; ,ug
Or. David UolH-rt - . 1
eadger balm p lv
Ik, . y •' s..i.rhintf and h-sli;./ -it:; moot
Æk. o 1 ^. t i -'- H-nt f..r sor- .i s .,.1 in
i' ' " «. - . .
\ r-U-rlimrian. -..ml fui
ir«*»* btn»kU*i >n Au uitiov In Cows
if no dnalor in jroar tm»n, vri'F.
If. Clcs Roberts' Vet. Co.. 100 Grand Avenue, Waukes.ta, Mil
m
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POWERFUL,
PENETRATING
LINIMENT
Qyickly healing and sooth
ing the pains of Neuralgia,
Headache, Rheumatism, Cuts,
Bums, Sprains and Bruises.
35c and 70c bottles at your
t druggists.
A. B. tldarli c, . be.
Sltrati, Tttu
HUNT'S
LIGHTNING
OIL
Cuticura Soap is
Easy Shaving for.
Sensitive Skins
The New Up-to-date Cotlcnra Method
SHIP YOUR CATTLE^
HOGS and SHEEP
!o CARR SMITH & SONS
Live Stock Commission Agents
National Stock Yards, 111.
Write, wire or phone for special information
A nOnpCV TREATMENT. OWes qnlck relist.
Mf 1 Uni/s wl ' goon reraores swelling end thorl
■ breath. N««r heard ot Its eqnnl tor dropsy.
F JM.1TJ It. Trtsl treatment sent FaCI. by mall,
k? Write to OR. THOMAS C. CREEN
Bank MSa.. Bos 20 . CHAT*WORTH, U,
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No Dead Line for This Minister.
Who said there was such a thing as
a dead line in the ministry? Rev. S.
Swann, an English clergyman, has
Just beaten the athletic record of I,leu
tenant Miller, a Dane. lie did
six successive half miles, cycling,
walking, running, paddling, sculling,
and swimming, in 20 minutes, 30 2-5
seconds, excelling the Dane's record
tty throe minutes, lacking one second.
The winner is fifty-five years old! If
Se can preach as well—and as quick
ly—as he can go through these success
ive locomotion stunts, he is some
preacher'
"Cold in the Head"
B an acuta attack of Naaid Catarrh. Par.
ions who are subject to frequent "colds
'n the hsad" will find that the use of
HALL'S CATARRH MEDICINE wUl
build UP the System, cleanse the Blood
and render them less liable to colds.
Repeated attacks of Acute Catarrh may
lead to Chronic Catarrh.
WALL'S CATARRH MEDICINE Is tak
»n internally and acta through the Blood
«i the Mucous Surfaces of the System.
au DruKirists 7® c - Testimonials free.
tut© 00 for any case of catarrh that
HALLS CATARRH MEDICINE will not
Cheney A Co- T oledo. Ohio.
The Softest.
"Why is it," queried the fair widow,
'that they always say a nmii Y>lne*'
'or a woman?"
"I suppose," growled the fussy bach
elor. "it's because pine is about the
mftest wood there is."
A HINT TO WISE WOMEN.
Don't suffer torture when all female
•roubles will vanish in thin air after using
•Femenina.'' Price 5 0 c and > 1 . 00 —Adv.
g,,.,,,, folks learn from an expert
,„c,- Others never recover from it.
to the politician whose nerve
become affected. _
;s Need Cars
tve Remedy
» Co-ufort. 60 certs
ÉJOÎÎ CU.. CHICAGO
' wvC
g WHY MALiŸ SOILS 7\
jnr • .- * /jj <-> ■>> r* Q i
fiio.. i; o j-'LJ 4 j
lined
4
)
§ ""il iS < oil»!...,;:/ -.,. 11 ... 1 V, ,• b Q
V or tire ems. T . .1 o. Ilion £
Q k.-.-ps the temp I' - -le.va il
C
O
JOvCXr
o*o :• o*o*o*o#c «yo^o-x
RIGHT USES FOR SXIM !VSILK
None Should Be Wasted as It Fur
nishes Maximum Amount of Food
to Human Beings.
AH skim milk should he used—none
wasted. It should l'uruish tin* mnxi
i mum of food to human beings and
i does this l etter when used direct, as
j cottage cheese, prepared buttermilk,
or other by-products, than when fed
i to animals and converted into meat.
! Surplus skim milk, of course, may be
UM*d eeononiieaily to feed hogs. Vet
1< 10 pounds of it. which will produce
! 1Ö pounds of cheese, produce only
! 4.S pounds of dressed pork if fed with
! corn. Skim milk, if made into cottage
cheese, furnishes nearly seven times
as much protein and m arly as much
; energy as the dressed perk it would
\ produce. Of course the nie t nourish
ment is obtained when skim milk is
; used direct, either f >r dhinking or
! cooking. As far as possible, therefore,
i skim milk should be used for human
food and only the excess fed to live
i stock.
SUCCESS OF ONE CREAMERY
One at Grove City, Pa., Cited as Ex
ample of Influence of Well
Managed Plant.
(Prepared by tha United Statee Depart
ment of Agriculture.»
I The creamery at Grove City. I'a., op
erated under the management of the
j dairy division, bureau of animal in
I dustry. United States department of
j agriculture, is cited in the bureau's an
I nuai report as an excellent example
i of the influence that a well-managed
j creamery has upon a locality. When
i it was opened in 191Ö it had only f>4
j patrons the first month, but at the
j close of the last fiscal year it had
1579 patrons, from whom 37S.OOO
pounds of butterfat were purchased
during the year at a price well above
that generally prevailing. In addition
to the manufacture of 425.0S4 pounds
of butter, the products included 139.
58Ö pounds of cotton cheese, 1,004,020
pounds of condensed skim milk, and
5,441 pounds of casein.
PRACTICAL SMALL BARN PLAN
Building Is Inexpensive to Build and
Will House Three Milk Cows
and Two Horses.
This barn is very practical for the
man with a small place, and is very
inexpensive to build. It will conven
iently house three milk cows and two
work horses. There is ample storage
for hay and grain and things are ar
ranged so as to be handy for the work
man. writes W. F. Frudden of Iowa in
Kimball's Dairy Farmer.
A good way to build it would be to
run the concrete foundation walls up
a little above the floor line. This is
the modern way of doing things right.
/IT TES. AUC/
Cat/ J An/.a
Fzcd Aurt
Aur/
Uxor imu * I
7-7- 5
rrzo !u.c/
Plan for Small Barn.
It keeps the wood parts up away from
the moist ground. An lS-hy-30-foot
structure such ns this is very easy to
build. I hardly think that many farm
ers would have to hire skilled carpen
ters to do the work of construction.
Such a building could be put together
in a very short time or could be d-me
when the other work is not so rushing.
HORSES FOR A SMALL FARM
Moderate-Sized Animal Is Favored for
Cultivating Between Fruit Rows
and Other Crops.
Horses will always have a place in
the small farms, where much cultiva
tion between rows of fruit and planted
crops is necessary. For such work on
the deep, mellow loam farms tin* mod
erate-sized horse will be the favorite.
DEVELOPMENT OF GOOD COW
Use of Right Kind of Sires and Breed
ing Heifers at Right Time Are
Most Important Things.
The following are things that go to
make good cows: Good breeding (g-uod
-ffres) ; proper development of the heif
ers; not breeding heifers too young'
liberal and proper feeding; accurate
'coords ; good care; healthy cows.
t
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.V: 0 ! - E MEMBERS IN Pi G CLUBS
7\ --
Q i 3 i g
j With Consequent influences en
reaaes Seen in Many States
en sequent influcn
Meat Prcneetion.
••a hi à Mai, Ar! a s, l'ai .rira
G Iiakui.a. K entlieh y. Foui d.-ma
Ma bu.-etts. N» l.ra- l;a. N-.i'lh < 'aro
lina, « »klalmina, « t-egeii ami 'I ■ \ s
Tie* numn r of m- nl.ers reported
showed au increase of 1 IS per cent
and 11 ow is nearly .".< 1 , 001 ».
I'inaneia! aid hy bankers helped
largely to tnake tie- dabs successful.
As an insiaiiee. b:uile-rs in Arkansas
last year furnished pun-bred j igs te
\
m
m
v?.? % *?**$&& £ qr
mm
Fig Club Bcv Preparing His Prize
Wiener for Show Ring.
1.Ç00 of the 2.100 pig club members
on <1 per cent interes bearing Hops
As the notes run from 12 to 15 months
the pigs themselves will pay for tle-lr
cost.
That the pig clubs are influencing
meat production is indicated by plans
In several states to have clubs send
carloads of fat bogs for competition
nt fairs or stock shows, after which
they are to in* marketed co-operatively.
ORGANIC MATTER AIDS SOIL
Humus Formed When It Decays Helps
Hold Available Food Till the
Plant Can Use IL
Organic matter serves many pur
poses in the soil. In decaying it helps
make pinntfood in the soil available
as well as that in the organic matter.
The humus formed when it decays
helps hold the available plantfood till
the plant can use it. The organic mat
ter makes the soil more friable and
less likely to puddle and cake into
hard lumps. It also reduced erosion.
The organic matter plays a most im
portant part in the soil and as it de
cays it needs to he added quite often,
The best form in which to add it is as
manure, and the land should every few
years he put into some crops as grass
es or legumes which also add organic
matter.
REJECTION OF POOR HORSES
List of Vices That Should Cause Ani
mals to Be Cast Aside as
Unfit for Work.
For any purpose the following vices
should cause the horse to bo rejected :
Balking, backing, rearing, kicking,
striking with the forefeet or running
away. Less important vices arc:
Throwing the head up nr down, shy
ing, scaring, breaking loose when tied,
resting one foot upon the other, grasp
ing the bit between the teeth, rolling
with the harness on, or switching tha
tail over the lines. Occasionally the
last-named vice causes tin* horse to
kick, in which case it becomes danger
ous.
NECESSARY FEED FOR FOWLS
Many Pouitrymen Give Regular Supp'y
of Sour Milk or Beef Scrap~
Grit Is Essential.
Many pouitrymen can give the fowls
a regular supply of sour milk; if not,
a hopper of beef scrap should be placed
where tlie fowls can get at it. noppors
of grit and oyster shell are also neces
sary. Don't forget the green feed.
Mangels are one of the best and most
convenient forms that can he used.
TOOLS FOR SAVING OF LABOR
Exceedingly Important That Com
mercial Grower Should Have Right
Hoe, Cultivator, Etc.
Are you certain you have the most
efficient tools for the saving of la
bor? This is an exceedingly important
question to every commercial grower.
An enormous amount of time may be
lost by not having the right hoe, cul
tivator, drill, etc.
ATTENTION TO WORK HORSES
Animals Should Be Permitted to Get
Poor From Lack of Care Dur
ing Cold Weather Season.
t Work animals should not be allow
! ,-d to vet poor from lack of can- dur*
! Ir,;, the v inter, but then* are probably
i mure animais injured at this time by
j aver-ft edU'.g than under-feeding.
TH îâisM llfÄD
u i y » i L i ü y ss i ii Ü h h
Mow Americans Cad Defeat
D ! 0 C v ! * C i . 2 v. J K u ! y 61 •
! Î1:i t ::
and M
v and
» r •
Appre :
A-i Who
■t.- Ita
W < 1 !
Ssve »
Grav
5 Dan;,;
t » fnhh
ni
of l-> l to th
d toll i :i -o r;- tint
who f: .1 to <• mpb-t- it was to lose
his ; ,1 1 . y tin- sword.
A number adv- nuirons spirits lost
tli.-ir I ; - : : ' N m Hi - aftenipr to i;. p a
serial L'"iiig l'or.'V-T t-> amuse the ec
centric m-iaarch, but one y- ung man
finally won tie- fortune and tin- daugh
ter by wearing out. the very <oiil of tin
king with the story about the locusts
carrying off the i-orn. "And then an
other loeii-t came and - : ; r ti • 1 off ji ri
ot h--r grain of corn," <■:■•.. until
the king del : led lie had had enough of
Mil- story.
America—in fact, the wh-fe world.
Is dealing wirb an "ec.-.-ntric" monarch
today. This inonar-'li wants the impos
sible, and everyone wla, refuses to give
it to him must los. his head. T! re
Is "!.e v,:,- to -! div.-i tie- peoples of the
World from 'Ids me
Kaiser UVhe'm can h- -vorn "'if. if
he eame.r h .-ru-h-d hy on, tr -tm n
dolts I,low. And tile government at
W -hingt. -n l.-.s • , ut ■: ■
n : .-v and iff many A neu ; us
who have It. .Tust a mete matter a
quarter :■ day from ev.-rv wage 1 artier
in tie- United States would mean bil
lions of dollars every year to buy guns
and food for soldiers, and ships to
carry them across tie* Atlantic to de
feat the sinister purposes of the kaiser
and his crew.
A quarter, like the grain of corn. 1*
not nnn-h in itself, but millions of quar
ters every day mean victory for right
eousness and humanity.
Going Away Off.
Sloanie Williams, son of Thomas A.
Williams, who recently removed to
Montgomery, Ala., from Franklin, and
the son of <'apt. Iff 15. Ghenowelh.
former coroner of Johnson county, who
enlisted In the medical corps at Ft.
Harrison, and was sent to Honolulu,
Hawaiian islands, for base hospital
training, were playing.
Sloanie started an argument by say
ing "My papa ami mamma and I are
going away off."
Young Chenoweth replied: "So are
my papa and mamma and me."
Sloanie took the matter in hand and
announced: "Well, I bet we arc going
the fari liest."
Chenoweth immediately objected,
and the argument waged furious. Fin
ally voting Chenoweth asked yotmg
Williams: "Well, where are you going,
anyhow?"
Williams was nnnhle to answer, and
the physician's son quick to show his
superior knowledge, answered: "Well,
wherever it is, I bet it isn't as far as
Tlalieujali, that's where we're going to
move to."—Indianapolis News.
Soap for Wounds.
Common yellow soap. 1 in* kind used
by hoi;*owives |u washing clothes and
dishes, has been found to he a wonder
ful cure for wounds in French hos
pitals and its ti-;r lias spread to the
British medical stations. A solution
is made from a cake and injected into
soldiers' wounds, evert in the latest in
stances into the d 00 pest bullet holes,
where it lias proved itself to lie a su
perior antiseptic to hydrogen perox
ide ami most other germ killers, am!
in addition a strangely effective heal
er of torn tissues.
Wounds treated with soap need few
er dressings and lessen pain fat
more than do wounds treated with
other antiseptics. These facts greatly
expedite the work of the surgeons,
who can handle more men than when
using other solutions.
What the Girl Said.
Being in charge of the complaint de
partment at. !h»* local post office, I had
a rather Amusing Incident occur a few
days ago. The blank used in filing a
complaint required answers to about a
dozen questions, as, for example, date
of mailing, contents, nature of com
plaint, as loss, damage or rifling. A
young lady carne to the window and
explained that stir* was to receive a
parcel containing medicine from an
out-of-town doctor, and same was long
overdue, according to advices regard
ing shipment received from the doctor.
So I proceeded to have her answer
the several questions on tin* blank
mentioned. When I read the que-,
fions, nature of complaint, site replied,
'Stomach trouble."—Chicago Herald.
Perfect Explanation.
Little Bobby -Wliat do- "I tn.w* n 1
bounds" mean, da !? ffxplnln !i tn
me.
l);td (burled lit new'-pnper) Kang.i
too xx i t h rheumatism.
Vtoro Careful.
"The German Mihuiatlm-M lmv<
taken again to Inkin - neni-.il hipn
"Yes. th -y ktiti.v Me- r 1 • nimbi t
ill» gtiUa."
Nei*vo 'ii s H e a d a
Four Bottles of Périma pF k
a\ t,/ «•<» — .»i«*' ■*> — levé
Made Me Well*-'
t -
VSlfcxïKIKIL' BT »K n: ^
fi Cans- t
Thnnk
You
EmnVJb
Mr a iff Ye Hill. LI tu- '
T.-ri. -s us :
,-;e.,
»'hi
•T canne* t 9 ' w m
at,
! Mil
fere i in ;i - pc- t t <-'v
1 avc a t •■.;! • t j !m
r ve.
it *.
no re!.-, f ov.ty for .t
was 1 ■ j c n a con»! if<o"
■ rt ti
i fia>
„ '„o,
r.s if my brsiti was pressing «I
and po nervous I co 4J not .jrt mv
rest at night. Would have Mot-'n-j
npeiis : n-i then so weak tb it I could
not do my work. I begun t-> tnh>
Peruria. Have tak--n four bottle* of
Peruna and have gained in strength
and flesh, and can say I am a v eil
thank you
Recovery
v\ man. 1 * "
tor my recover»
Those who object to liquid medi.
cine:. . m v me feruna t .blets.
r,
q
LUCKY STRIKE
CIGARETTE
Y OU'LL enjoy this real
Burley cigarette. It's
full of flavor—just: as good
as a pipe.
IT'S TOASTES*
The Burley tobacco is
toasted; makes the taste
delicious. Y ou know how
toasting improves ihe flavor
of bread. And it s the
same with tobacco exactly.
/?
'A
'OF
Wc
8m
ft
Gu
ranteed by
c/0
Obviously
"< 'nine
HI,"
.s;i j«|
the first
Ilea, as
ho
hopped ft
Olll
li«» hi
own beat
's fore!,
;
''come o\
<*r :
mi join me ;
t a si i
Ht
game of r
uir. f
"Golf."
• • \ «
liiiiiM*
l lll<* S»
enml 1!
OJ1,
hastily t
; i r m
n ? ii t
* or 1 1 >* « » t
a ; "u It
ru
In the fe;
Ini
ILirmim : i r <
We go
nfl
to play g.
•i r v"
"Why,"
s;i ii
th.'
fits) ill ;|
"t,\ef
on
[he ly tix,
»! »•«
Illpx'.
.laek ,
• ' 1 . Ml,
rn.
Flat Inis
Keep
Busy.
1
m :tl
aid I'll g
•1 stale
«»ii
uiy gttrii
it \\
Olk
luring tl
te Mini
«•r.
Benson
nils
1 'o
• \\ b y ? II
lient \
• »ii
fot :* viiiiw s
tiol el
? Void.,
rs Sint
and
hvp,

eilte-; at,
1 \\ 1 ll-t
To Prevent Grip
o___ m ____ - . . i
Fortify tho System Against Winter Cold
Tlie strm.t! witlisfnii.l ||„, Wiol.-r Col, I n,-ttor than the
Weak. If your IIIinhI is not in „ healthy comlithtn and
docs not circulât» properly V our Rvsten« u,;n 1,
to withstand tho Winh-r J*?" t»W CS.ÎÏ h ' " ' 8
and younger |x-oplo who aro weak, will Iw st're'iiith n ' t
S,s.......*......... .. ...........
Grove's Tasteless
chill Tonic
fltinf niiiM Hit* wi'll It i » < » w 11 t, .
..... i ikon............ à i:i 'z ; ,f
up lilt'wlittlo nynteiii Hum It.Hilyii ,' t|,p T MUl nM
I'olih ihpI fJrip, K «M»»*
Wfo on avoir row Noprf
Toko G "»
VymKrnimmmmnvnv ■ , ..p..—^
» ttonmraf Ionia
Fluid Fuel.
ho
"I liant to see ah-, ,li,>1 tibolis
from
;
Hie I'.-tee
of tho o.-irth,** ri»
ihirkoi
îhd
Ht
<1.1 -|,, |>t i.
oiiizon.
"t II e
mise, you mean
ti-1
îtoîic
drinks?"
ru
"No. I
don't draw lltc 1
no
i
tho
nfl
l.o;il!l, «,!
1 lie na(ion Is to 1,
' i
"C^,
•rvotl
W'*'Vo *o,
to shm tlown on
th
' , h
;. : '. n
di ll as u
ell as 1 Ile tlou ing
1."
Kx
ell. tilge.
Hooray !
Hnslmnd At | : ,s| 1 |,:ii
o
m
tr:ny
eottl met.
1 In- dogs of m ar I
HI \
e e!
-iSOli
»ii
the V oil
1 t om 1 lie door.
Many
ii It lows are said
to
be
rtlintl V
1 *os »i I »1 y 1 hn ! 's w h \
they
are
IVIt lowH.

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