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The St. Charles herald. [volume] (Hahnville, La.) 1873-1993, April 13, 1918, Image 4

Image and text provided by Louisiana State University; Baton Rouge, LA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85034322/1918-04-13/ed-1/seq-4/

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PRODUCERS AND
THE GREAT WAR
Sharo of Support.
ML' MUST MAKE SACRIFICE
'pared
Full
i
ÎSFSCE
cf Na
tion Are at Stake—Troops Must
Be Kept Fit to Bring the
Final Victory.
By BEN F. M'CUTCHEON.
This great
war in which
the United
State*
s now is
; an active and
determined
parti.
ipant i*
» a war of the
whole peo
pie.
It is m
it being waged
in the in
tcrest
of any
one class or <•
omtiination
of ela
s.ses. i
To present am
1 future in
terest
s of e\
cry eiriz* n of
tlie nation
«.re a:
and because ol
this there
can b
c mi div
ision of duty .
,r resp.msi
biiity.
. As a
plain matter
of seif-'ie
1'eiLse,
every
man, woman
and child
must
should.
*r a fair sliai
■1; of duty
and respousil
aility ; must be
1 willing to
make any sacrilice the circumstances
demand; must practice the thrift that
works for the conservation of labor and
material—in a word, must he prepared
to co-operate with the government at
Washington in the most wholesome
and effective manner possible.
The United States has been at war
with tlie German empire almost a year.
Despite the fact that great strides have
town made in the nation's vast under
taking, many citizens, particularly
those in isolated parts of rural sec
tions, have not yet had the war
"brought home" to them forcibly and
with the full meaning of the possibili
ties of victory or defeat.
Farmer Much Concerned.
The American farmer, however far
removed he may loo from the centers
of war activity, however vaguely the
war has been "brought home" to him.
Is îis much concerned with the outcome
of tin* great struggle as any other ciii
xen.
America went to war with the impe
rial German government partly be
es use the kaiser and his advisers re
fused to let this nation send to Europe
its vessels laden with the products of
American farms and fields and factor
ies. The imperial German government
cruelly sank these vessels and murder
ed American sailors. Assuming that
the German government had not been
called on account for its open violation
of international treaty right-—for there
v;as an understanding that neutral ves
sels should not he sunk without warn
ing and not then imle.sk they contained
contraband of war destined to the en
emy—what would have become of
American shipping in general?
The answer is that none of American
products would have reached the for
eign markets. The war has vastly in
creased the foreign demand for Amer
ican farm products, and the prices the
producers are receiving are the high
est they have received in many years.
Igo, the war is being waged very largely
fn the interest of the American produc
er of foodstuffs, making it possible for
him to enter his goods in the foreign
markets, which, because of war condi
tions, have been forced to rely almost
entirely upon the American producers
for the necessities of life.
Men Must Be Kept Fit.
With conditions, intolerable and de
structive to the American producer,
brought about by the arrogant German
government, the United States, after
subjecting its patience to the severest
test, took the bit into her mouth
and entered upon the task of preserv
ing her rights and the rights of all who
live under her Hug. This nation has
called many hundreds of thousands of
young men to the colors, many of
whom already are in the war zones of
Flanders and France. Other young
men—sons of the soil as well as sons
of the city—will he called to strengthen
those who already have donned the
Jibaki of thé army and the blue of the
racy. Their voyage across the subma
rine-infested seas must he safe-guard
ed; their bodies must be kept strong by
ilie proper nourishment while on the
European battlefields and on the war
;
!
j
I
!
!
I
j
j
REBUILDING THE ROADS IN FRANCE
ass,
id
M
%
W"x~
2«.
Photo t»
It twàaiàrn N>wro«p».- Ln!on_ >
French soldiers rebuilding a road which was completely wiped out during
ïerman bombardment in the Aisne. Due to recent victories of the allies,
e district Is well behind the firing line and is, of course, lu the hands of its
titful owners.
si:
i[is 1
are
striving
: to
keep the seas
i <'T
ell t
•) t
rain
e bet we
en
the American
I r
odtlC
er
and
the buyer
s of Europe;
Mi
, ir !
ten]
til !
nust l.e
conserved—in a
(
mi.
the
y rn
ust he
kej,
it fit to bring
VI <
•tory
tu
1 th.
* eau.se
of
the American
I r
odtle
er.
And
the
•so who rem
•i!n
at home real
1 7A
> 1
res
iponsibillty
In
keeping with
th;
ai ui
><'»n
the
endang
ere(
J shoulders of

Herb
•an
nu
inhood
in
the fighting
ranks. By thrift and saving, hy sac
rifice, if need be, they are called upon
to form tin* second, but none the less
important, line of defense. They can
net engage in tlie actual business of
lighting, but their government has the
right to expect them to aid in support
ing the American lighting forces by
lending their money to the cause.
Kd-l-T-l-Pd'FF-PF-Hd-*:'4'd-l-+F'M''iF+
t SCHOOL TO ASSIST IN %
t TRAINING DRAFTED MEN %
Jim ___
S Decatur, 111. Milliken univer- is
sity here is preparing to co-op
A. orate with Unde Sam in the <$*
4* training of drafted men !>v offer- T
•J» T*
•s. im. ' special courses along lines 4
T suggested hy the Federal Hoard t
f *1"
+ of Vocational Training. It is 4*
planned to train conscripted men J
•F in the second and succeeding jk
draft In about fifty occupations 4
4* necessary to war work at the 4j
5 school. It is proposed to send 4.
4« the drafted men to the schools j
4, wholly or in part, as early as 4.
+ April or May. with a view to
4> completing the courses which *
+ tin* government will outline ln J
4» September.
Boy Captures 165 Moles.
Eugene, Ore.-One hundred and six- i
ty-tive moles, whose skins were worth j
a total of $35, were caught in traps
hy Glenn Bailey, a fourteen-year-old
hoy living east of this city.
TANKS ARE FEARED
BY ARMY OF ENEMY
Increasing Use of ''Chariots of
Assault'' Causes Alarm Among
the Germans.
ADOPT NEW DEFENSE METHOD
Counter Measures Regard Cannon as
Best Suited for Repulsing Mon
sters—Hand Grenades Consid
ered Useless by Authorities.
With the French Armies.—The alarm
with which the Germans view the in
creasing use of tanks and "chariots
of assault" by the allied armies in
their attacks is indicated by the fol
lowing rules, which are taken from a
general order, dated November 27,
1!)17, captured from the group of ar
mies of Caudry;
"Obstacles—-Trenches of a minimum
width of from 13 to 1GV 2 feet and a
depth of at least ten feet, also a very
thick mud, constitute very serious ob
stacles against tanks. Freshly plowed
land or barricades are easily crossed.
"It is not worth while constructing
obstacles ; it is preferable to attack.
Guns Are Essential.
"Methods of attack—Artillery: Tanks
on the march should be attacked by
the artillery before their entry into ac
; tion. even if there is not a great chance
! of hitting them. The essential thing is
j to forbid the enemy infantry to follow
them; it is necessary that the enemy
I infantrymen fear the zone over which
! the tanks are advancing.
"To attack the tanks themselves, the
! only reasonable method is to place the
I cannon in the advanced zone of the
j battlefield, so that they may be able
j immediately to put the tanks out of
QUITS SOCIETY FOR NURSING
i
j
à
*
*
m
!l.»
Mrs. Herbert Shipman of Hashing
ton, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Edson
Bradley, has exchanged her {ilaee In
Washington's most exclusive society to
serve as a trained nurse In France,
and Is now on her way to the front.
Several months ago when her husband
left the rectorship of the Church of
the Heavenly Best in New York to be
come a chaplain at Spartanburg, S. €.,
Mrs. Shipman began training in a New
York hospital.
action by direct hits. Every shot which
hits the mark kills several men of the
crew and often sets fire to the tank.
The artillery sections which are held
in reserve back of the front do not
know what is going on, and in general
arrive too late to be of use.
"The cannon, in principle, should bo
placed far in advance; thus the enemy
is not able to surprise us.
"The commander of the front line
troops should he responsible for the
placing of antitank cannon. Pieces
mounted on auto trucks are very use
ful, if the roads are good.
Infantry Should Be Repulsed.
"Infantry—The line of battle must
not be opened, except to allow Intact
tanks to pass; the troops may seek
cover, but should not fall hack. It is
necessary that the tanks should be
put out of action back of the line. The
main thing Is to repulse the enemy In
fantry. Several posts should be de
tached behind the front for the de
fense against the tanks.
"Armament — The most efficacious
weapon against the tanks is the armor
piercing bullet. It is feared by the
crews of the tanks, because ft pierces
the armor and produces at the same
time a great Harne, which frequently
sets fire to the fuel reservoir.
"The host method of attacking a
tank is to attack it from the rear, be
cause it is not easy for its crew to fire
from behind, and because the rear is
tin* part the least protected. Street
fighting against the tanks is very fa
vorable to the infantry ; tire troops
shelter themselves in the houses, let
the tanks pass, then open fire with ma
chine guns and rifb's t >;.i close range.
"Hand grenades, cm; >yed one at a
time, are useless. Ii is necessary to
employ a concentrated charge (several
cylinders grouped around a central
grenade), and throw It under the tank;
but this is not easy to do.
"Light trench cannon (minenwerfer)
are efficacious when they are fired
from a feeble angle ; good results
have been obtained by the fire of iso
lated pieces.
"In general, the tactics to employ
against the tanks must be made the ob
ject of theories and practical experi
ences; the tanks will thus lose their
terrifying effect."
I
j
NEWS FOR LOVERS OF CHEESE
Ripest, PAost Delicious and Most Per
ishable Limburger Now Made in
United States.
Seattle, Wash.— Limburger cheese
lovers who have felt bereft since tho
supply of their favorite food has been
cut off hy the war are finding comfort
in the fact that "the ripest, most de
licious and most perishable limhurger"
now is manufactured in the United
States in quantity sufficient to supply
all demands.
At least this Is tlie announcement
of the food administration at Wash
ington in a letter to the Seattle cham
ber of commerce.
"Grocers and butchers, start a
henlthy cheese department—It will
help win the wat," says the food a.«*
ministration.
j
HAHNVILLE, LOUISIANA.
A STREET IN PARIS AFTER THE VISIT OF GERMAN GOTHAS
pff'.lü IÎI .
'•gi- j-ä';- Va -, }
:?-îX
K nw
I S
• ■ • •
V : : v ;
»>
Jk wmm
1
:.:5
m 1
§1
S3» ft
t
_ '--o, ■ v
m
f KÀÏ
m ** .
Sil
,<si ^ ÿSi i pii ■ - -
Iho damage .-.-m-. «I by a kiK»-pcuml mrp. do dropped tr
r..... ........ ,v..r. r.v the torped........ ami t:.e OUI
—J V ,
1 .ot ha
•ois in l'an
la r.v 30. tir
in hired.
les mnuv foot deep Were 1
RED CROSS LINER FLÖR 1 ZEL WRECKED ON REEFS OhF uAlc n-n,-E
liL——''t
â. , l | y .. l l gi'
L
5TT3S
333
..
~ o3ÿ»« x
t5C_i
' -0- Y *
V
%
* »
'ipm
ert v-fotir survivors, all who \\ • : e h; i of the ship company or KT>, wore taken 1 rom tiii
•'lorizel. whi.-h struck a '■<• ■!' m rh of ('ape Have. N. F. diirii.u a l-rri!ie blizzard. The •
th" crow ,iie I'rospi 1 o. v ,■.. h was sent by rim govi nmictit to the scene with sp*<'ial liv
zol is shown here as an i-e break r in New T ork la "bur.
avm g appar:
AN UNUSUAL BILLET
Jr*
:n
fa
r a
I'll
■MS ■>
r
Billets for soldiers who fight on the
western front can be anywhere. But
the strangest place that any fighter
had to put up for the night mi the
fighting lines is shown in this .British
official photograph. A great concrete
tan! which turned over in it bom
bardment is being utilized by the Tom
rules and they have made a real cozy
home of tlie huge cylinder. They tire
shown here going In for a resl. The
picture is an excellent reminder of
the old lady who lived in a shoe with
her immense family. This home is
just as different from the average hab
itation as the shoe, and the family of
Tommies who lodge here is equally
immense.
Early Ur? of Coal in Britain.
Some say that real was used by the
ancient Britons; at all events, it was
an articl» of household consumption to
some extent during the Anglo-Saxon
period ns early at S52 A. D. It eer
tainly was known there in the thir
teenth century, its j< evidenced by a
•harter given in 1230 by King Henry
III to the inhabitants of Neweastle-on
Tyne for the winning of the numerous
coal mines in that region. It was.
however, not until 17*10 that the Paris
ians got English coal from Newcastle.
Subsequent coal mines were discov
ered in various parts of France, nota
bly in the departments of Pas-le-Calais
and 1 he Loire. In America the depos
its near Richmond. Va., were discov
ered in 1701. and mining was begun tn
1701, while anthracite was first pro
4'vced In 1703
WINE FOR THE POSLUS AT THE FRO^T
F &
m
fi 15»»,
pi
i
m.M
S! S v
Wi:w U an imporiant part of 1! • daily . mi. ns s rw d to the Fremd»
sobli'-rs. 1 lie above photograph shows solde rs tilling barrels from tlie tank
cal w iii'li has just arriwd trom tic wine regions in southern France. Tiw*
barrels of wine are tin n seir forward to tie* men in th tr. mdies.
DO NOT FEAR GERMAN POISON GAS
%
/r.
/ r TgCW..
•m
V*e>
s
y.T'
m
&'
; 'i iM
y.
m*:
11
>5
Photo b)
Walern N e v.ntw r l'
'■'•KV//»/
'Il.ese American soldiers are wearing the marvelous new Kas mask
adopted by our army. Each man In the group sent Imme a copy of the,'
photograph. Just to show how our fighters have sunk their Individuality In.
the combined fight for human Justice and liberty. ,

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