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The St. Charles herald. [volume] (Hahnville, La.) 1873-1993, May 04, 1918, Image 3

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85034322/1918-05-04/ed-1/seq-3/

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Help
YOU
HELP
FEED
yourself
-/4
rr'-l
**7j^
DEPT. OF
AGRICULTURE
great need for home gardens calls
for more work in every back yard
Home Food Plots Like These Help Table and Pocketbook—They Help Na
tion, Too.
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life
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to
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IS!
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The obligation of every man, woman j
find child out of uniform to help feed !
tymself will be greater in 1918 than in
1917. Therefore the home gardening
and canning activities of last year must
be repeated."
This is the message of the United
States Department of Agriculture to
every family. Those who cannot pro
duce, can conserve and save food.
There must be no backsliding among
experienced gardeners ; they must re
peat their contribution of food. Ab
sence of novelty must not deter those
who tried gardening for the first time
In 1917 from capitalizing their increas
ed knowledge and skill. Those with
experience must make every seed count
—to get satisfactory returns from their
work with hoe, rake and watering can.
There must be no slacking off. Gar
dening Is everybody's business, but in
1918 everyone must attend to that busi
ness.
And now a word of caution. Don't
try to raise more than you can use.
And water systematically all spring
and summer. A few square yards
well tilled will yield more than a half
acre allowed to run to weeds.
The department advises strongly
against effort by amateur gardeners to
produce truck crops for sale. Such en
terprises commonly prove unwise, bur
densome to all concerned, and not in
frequently financially unprofitable.
Much precious seed and fertilizer—
to say nothing of time and labor—were
wasted last year in such undertakings.
The government's home gardening spe
cialists believe that best results will be
attained if each family attempts to
raise only enough vegetables to supply
its own table and to afford the surplus
.AST YEAR'S RECORD MUST
BE SURPASSED THIS YEAR.
This (1917 home gardening)
■ampaign . . . stimulated, it is
•stimated, the planting of from
wo hundred to three hundred per
•ent more gardens than had ever
tefore produced food in the
'nited States.—From annual re
,ort of the United States Seore
ary of Agriculture.
U'^S-OEP'T. OF AGP.C^TURE
HOWlT(S)*GROW
PS
PARSNI
Sow parsnip s^T In drills from IS
inches to 3 feet apart d '*P^" 8 "
the method of cultivation < ^
time of the last killing frost in s r £
The seed should be sown ratlur thic k
lv and later thinned «ntl the Pnnts
lire about 3 Inches apart In it r
l,S l,, " t SÄ ground (luring the
I,led, but may be
>art in the rows
jj • I ->nr -t iin uro **i '*
Ti
Its
usually
winter and dug as m < < • ,,. u -l ed in
harvested In the autumn. P-nUd
ui,,ist sand and
Cellars. • M, 1 ' S I ' )V 'freezing, so as a rule
' igested. j
„tomi in pita <»r root
iple consider this
root improve*
It i
!, ft in the ground
SALSIFY.
spring a!
Ing frost
carrots *
«et *1 is »
f salsify during the
if tin- last kill
manner as for
One ounce of
()U t the time
in the same
r parsnips,
equired to plant
100-foot, I
j which its members can dry, can, or
! store for later home consumption.
The gardener who has provided for
the immediate needs of his family and
its canning and drying requirements
therefore should devote attention to
fall crops of root vegetables such as
potatoes, beets, late turnips, carrots
and parsnips, which can be stored eas
ily for later use. It also would be well
to give attention to the production of
mature lima or other beans which can
be shelled and kept in bags.
Help on Home Food Plot.
The garden specialists of the Depart
ment and of the State Agricultural col
leges stand ready to help everyone
make the greatest possible success of
his home garden and to assist in the
canning of surplus food.
With the co-operation of the press,
the department will carry the garden
ing advice of Its specialists directly to
many millions of readers. To supple
ment this "Food From Yonr Back
Yard" series, of which this article Is
the foreword, the department has is
sued two new' war garden bulletins for
every home gardener who wishes to
help feed himself. They are:
"The Farm Garden in the North,"
Farmers' Bulletin No. 937. „
"Home Gardening in the Souft,"
Farmers' Bulletin No. 934.
"The City and Suburban Vegetable
Garden," Farmers' Bulletin No. 936.
Your postal card to the Division of
Publications, U. S. Department of Ag
riculture, will bring your free copy.
Read these articles as they appear.
Study the handbooks around the winter
lamp. You will be ready to deal with
soil and seed as soon as spring weather
permits.
row, and this will be sufficient for most
families. After the plants are well
established they should he thinned suf
ficiently to prevent their crowding. The
cultivation should be frequent and
thorough.
Salsify may be dug in the autumn
and stored in banks or pits or in the
storage room in the basement, or may
he allowed to remain in the ground and
(lug as needed.
IN 1918
Every family must help feed
itself.
Fresh vegetables must be
used to lessen home consumption
of staple foods needed by
troops and the allies.
More food must be canned in
homes than ever before.
There must be a war garden
in every back yard fertile and
sunny enough to grow vege
tables.
Every seed planted must be
made to count in the food supply.
—United States Department
of Agriculture.
SPRAY FOR FRUITLESS TREES
Those Who Neglected This Work Last
Season Will See Folly Next Sum
mer, Says Orchardist.
Spraying fruitless trees is a heart
less job. but those ajiplo growers who
failed to spray their trees the past
season because there was no fruit on
them will see the folly of this neg
lect next season, if the predictions of
one progressive orchardist comes true. j;
s
Advice
He Gives It to a Raw
Recruit in a Fatherly Way
(Copyright, 1317, by the McClure Newspa
per Syndicate.)
■longed to !
By M. QUAD.
When Mr. Bov ser entered bis family
drug store the other evening he found
a middle-aged man dr<
uniform to show that
the army. The druggist saw that Mr.
Bowser was working up a fatherly i
expression of face and was 1 ik• ■ 1 y to '
have something to say, und he gave
the soldier boy the wink.
"So we have a recruit here?" said
Mr. Bowser a minute later.
"Yes," was the reply.
"I am glad to see you, sir," con
tinued Mr. Bowser. "I am glad to see
you In that uniform. It shows, sir,
that you love your country and arej
enrolled among patriots, instead of i
skulking from place to place to keep !
out of the army. Due would say, from
reading the papers, that at least one- i
half of tb*' American nation was com- ,
posed of cravens. It did not used to be
so in my time. We had trouble in keep- '
ing the young men out of the army in- j
stead of getting them into it."
"So I have heard, sir," replied the j
soldier.
"I want to give you some little ad
vice, if you will take it kindly. Fut
your heart into the work."
"I have, sir."
"Be ready for drill any time drill
Is ready for you."
"Yes, sir; I shall be."
"The trouble with a raw recruit is
that he gets homesick almost imme
diately he is in the army. Fight
against it. You can conquer that as
you conquer the foe."
"I shall try my best, sir."
"You may want to see your dear
old mother, and have her pat you on
the back, but you can't see her; and
If you make n good fight of it the
feeling will soon wear off. Even the
bravest men have been known to be
homesick at times."
"Others have told me the same
thing," said the soldier.
"You may want to see the hens, the
hogs, the sheep and the old spotted
cow, but conquer the feeling. Tell
yourself that you are In the army to
stay until the foe is conquered. If you
hear a band playing 'Home, Sweet
Home,' do not let your eyes fill with
tears."
"No, sir; I will keep my eye dry."
"That's the way I like to hear a
man talk. There's another tiling. You
will be under officers fresh from West
1 in a khaki 1
&
m
h.
m
à
a
is
m
m
rz
m
§
£
:K
%
yH
s
Ü
"Keep Right on Until You Have Removed a Dozen."
Point. They are great hands to boss |
and put on style. You must know there j
j; au j t abtut
is a great gulf between officers and
privates. You may be cleaning your
rifle, and preparing to slay half a
dozen of the foe, when an officer will
come up to you and call you a son of
a sea cook, a skunk in the brush and
lots of other hard names. He does not
do it to be mean, but it's only his way,
you see. Do not sass back, but smile
as you look at him. He will become
ashamed of himself and walk away."
"Yes, sir, I will do that," replied
the soldier. "I shall want to knock j
him down, but I know all about that :
gulf and I shall keep my temper. You '
are very kind, sir, to talk to me as
you do."
"Oh, that's all right," replied Mr. I
Bowser, in his off-hand way. "I wish
that I could talk to a thousand of you
raw recruits. It might save you much i
trouble.
"You have been used to lying in bed '
until nine or ten o'clock in the morn- !
ing, *nd then coming down to find j
your coffee and toast and fried eggs !
and bacon all ready for you."
"That's the way, sir."
"All raw recruits are prone to find
their rations," continued J
in mind and
Mr. Bowser.
tlii;
do
Ii<>
t kit*
k. It
will du
> you
no good if
y. >
u
do.
You
may
;im*li
the
fried
oy
sto
rs r<
Miking
l„r Vi
>ur c
iilunei
. but
r* *]
MOI
nher
the
gulf.
Uiich
■ Sam in
tends
to £
Cl'ii Vi
>11 wel i
, but
there
will
he
îii
ncs 1
iVlll'Il 1
I'iri'iiim
lanct
- lire
vent.
If
tin
■y dt
■ni oui
i a rat
ion 0
f raw
tur
ni]
0 yo
u, eat
them a
uni si
IV !l„!
liing.
I »<
» m
>t pi
■ warn!
It ring 1
1! »out
camp
. an 1
kin
S the
■ „liier
men if
y< »u
are n*
it en
!
i j.- r
'
i
!
i
,
'
j
j
titled to butter, scrambled eggs, gulden
bacon. French fried potatoes and Java
coffee. There is always enough kick
ers about to start a rebellion if you
speak encouraging words, and your
dear old mother will hear that you
have been shot as a mutineer instead
of dying as a hero in battle."
' You are very good, sir," said the
soldier, as he winked at the druggist
1 with His other eye. "1 have eaten as
many as 30 scrambled eggs at once,
but I shall learn to curt) my appetite.
Ii salmon and milky coffee is good
mnr
ri
wS
, TfTxrw!,WT/mrrn
Si
n
i
Uniform.
Dressed in
Khaki
enough for me and if the 'tutors are
boiled with their packets on no one
will hear any crumble from me."
"It may happen," said Mr. Bowser,
as he wiped a tear from bis eyes, "that
you will got a letter stating that your
dear old mother is dead of pneumonia.
She got it by going out in a blizzard to
bring in u handful of wood. Her last
thought was of you. She gasped out:
'Oil, my son!' or something of that
kind, and was off to that happy land
where soldiers are never seen."
"Yes, sir, I shall expect such a let
ter."
"But do not let It shock you too
much. If you weep over it, turn your
back to the other boys or go off into
the brush somewhere. Set you teeth
hard together and do not give away."
"That will be me, sir."
"And now about a battle," continued
Mr. Bowser, as he swelled out his
chest. ''Be on call at any moment.
Take your place in the ranks and see
that your rifle is loaded and the bayo
net on tight. You are going to charge
the enemy. Do not be surprised if half
m
I
j
i
to
as
It
| your regiment is wiped out. Pay no at
j tention to groans and screams of the
j
:
'
I
i
'
!
j
!
J appendicitis.
wounded, hut press forward anil give
the foe your bayonet. Strike hard and
strike home. Do not be content with
removing a single foe. but keep right
on until you have removed a dozen.
Then you can come back to camp and
have something to brag of."
"Yes, sir, I shall kill at least a
dozen." -
"Perhaps you know something
about soldiering?" suggested Mr.
Bowser, as he detected a faint smile
on the soldier's face.
"Well—well—or, I ought to. I think,
as I have been 20 years in the regular
army."
Mr. Bowser had wasted his time,
lie stood with mouth open, while tiie
soldier went out with a salute at the
door, and then the druggist said :
"Bowser, a few of us are trying to
raise $100 for the Red Cross fund.
Will you put your name down on this
list for a $10 contribution?"
Ami Mr. Bowser wrote liis name on
the list, and handed over the $10 an*!
went home to keep so quiet the rest
of the evening that Mrs. Bowser won
dered if he was developing a case of
j
j
j
j
j
j
I
j
if
1
IMPOSSIBLE TO
HOOSWINK SPIES
Every Army Secret Is Quickly
Learned by the Army Intel
ligence Service.
SURPRISES ARE FEW
American Troops Taught Lesson When
German Airmen Felicitated Divi
sion on Move Which Had
Been Kept Secret.
Paris.—The Intelligence or spy serv
ice of the riviil armies now facing each
other in Franc*- lias developed into a
wonderful mechanism. Underground,
on tile ground and above the ground
the system of surveillance, listening,
patrolling, spying and reconnoitering
Is in incessant operation night and
day. Spies have performed astonish
ing feats. It may almost be said that
I no important movement on either side
j is unknown to the enemy. The size
i and composition of opposing troops are
thoroughly known, as well as the
names of officers, their degree of skill,
the hold they may have upon their
men and the manner in which they co
operate with other commands.
Surprised by Airmen.
A high officer attached to one of
the American divisions now in train
ing in France tells of the surprise to
which he was treated by enemy air
men. Tiie division had been establish
ed several weeks in camp not far from
tiie battle line. Every evening, pre
cisely at 8:30. the division was in
spected by parties of German airmen,
who flew in regular formation at a
fixed height. The regularity of tirls
aerial inspection became a byword
among the Americans. They set
their watches by the airplanes of the
enemy.
On a certain day the word was cau
tiously sent out to commanding officers
that the entire division would move
on the following day five miles to the
eastward by a little south. Tiie coun
try was muddy, and an early start was
to be made. That evening the air
planes did not appear at 8:30, anil the
Americans began cracking jokes among
themselves, finding fault with their
watches.
At 10:30, however, the Germans ap
peared, flying low and dropping a num
ber of suspicious looking bags of small
size, which were made distinctly visi
ble by the searchlights. The soldiers
were ordered not to touch these bags,
as it was feared they might be a new
form of trick bomb. Early the next
morning one of the bags was opened.
It contained a printed circular in Eng
lish reading somewhat as follows :
Causes Overhauling.
"Greetings to the officers and men
of the—American division. May yon
a
of
for
for
Ö
■ç
^ 0
o
a
ear
e-■
«r;
n
ryv
r
Vt
7*
A Printed Circular in English.
have a pleasant time going through the
mud tomorrow morning to your new
camp, five miles east by south."
Needless to say the entire system of
communicating intelligence In t.ie divi
sion was overhauled, and every man
connected therewith was constructive
ly held up and dissected as a possible
spy, without revealing in the slight
est degree any information showing
how the Germans may have obtained
knowledge of the order.
French officers told the Americans
that this incident had been repeated
many times in its essential features,
all along the front.
MULE'S AIM IS ACCURATE
Twice They Have Smashed Timepieces
Carried by Farmer Living ir>
Indiana.
Greensburg, Ind.—Edgar Craig, a
j farmer residing near here, is looking
j for another watch following an en
j counter with a node.
Two months ago while Craig was
j working about one of the animals, tha
j animal kicked at him and smashed ids
j watch. A few days ago Craig had a
I similar experience. In neither case
j did Craig sustain injury.
Is
of
ALMOST BLIND
FROM DIZZINESS
This Virginia Lady Tells of Con
stant Suffering From Dreadful
Backaches, Permanently
Relieved by Cardui.
rt I til. I ha
y* ar ... I c i
wl,.i trea t'd i
dit in*', which
1 suffer* d
Bis ai-1 f.-lt !
- fur I was t
ally unable to
: all that time.
iso, of
1*X1 t
I been
Sled In
lit
I
1 r.
.v step
>Ul'i b*
I'd
Norton, V.v— Mrs E S.
this pin* e, wri *■> : ••],, ,,h
seemed to p t in !
married aS ut a ;
und gave tic it
do r.ie any g,„
f**r about 4 mo
bave o »me r. ii,
off that I u as r
out of bed duru
I could hardly wa.
painful ai ii a drag,
most blind from dis
dreadful backaches
and sever*' pains .
In the Birthday AI:
urged me to take it .
tie With s. Kdi beließ
gained hope of rer
use of 2 or 3 botti*
better that I was aille to get. up and
go about my work. My improvement
was steady and after about the 3rd
or 4th bottle, I was entirely cured
and the cure has been permanent . , .
For the past seven years I have had
perfect health and my work has been
a pleasure."
Try Cardui, the woman's tonic, for
your troubles. It is safe reliable and
of proven merit. All druggists.—Adv.
v. is
al
iav »
ru ver ceased,
ad of Cardut
anue and friends
. . 1 used on*- bot
ial results that I
»very. After ths
b I felt so much
Philosophic.
John Tyndall, the English scientist,
philosophized walking home across tha
marsh at night. There were crabs in
the marsh, and crabs in the bundle he
.vas taking home.
He said to himself : "I shall eat
these crabs in the bundle, change them
into the body, blood and brain of John
Tyndall, and use the resulting energy
for scientific thinking.
"If I should fall into the swamp and
drown, the crabs would eat me, and
they would change the body of John
Tyndall Into the body, brain and en
ergy of crabs.
"I can eat a crab and use it for phil
osophy.
"The crabs can cat me and use raa
for thetr crab life."
LEMONS WHITEN
THE COMPLEXION
ANY WOMAN CAN MAKE UP THIS
CREAMY BEAUTY LOTION
FOR A FEW CENTS.
The Juice of two fresh lemons strain
ed into a bottle containing three ounce*
of orchard white makes a whole quar
ter pint of the most remarkable lemon
skin beautlfier at about the cost on®
must pay for a small Jar of the ordi
nary cold creams. Care should be tak
en to strain the lemon Juice through a
fine cloth so no lemon pulp gets in,
then this lotion will keep fresh for
months. Every woman knows that
lemon juice is used to bleach a dark
ened skin and remove such blemishes
as freckles, sallowness and tun and Is
the Ideal skin softener, whltener and
beautlfier.
Just try It! Get three ounces of
orchard white at any drug store and
two lemons from the grocer and make
up a quarter pint of this sweetly fra
grant lemon lotion and massage It dally
Into the face, neck, arms and hands.—
Adv.
Chane« for Promotion.
A first lieutenant In the depot troop*
has many negroes in his company.
They have an idea that a sergeant Is a
high officer.
One negro said to the lieutenant one
day: "Sergeant, you sho is good."
i he officer responded, "I am not a
Bergennt."
"I know, boss, but some day
will be."
you
Important to Mothers
Examine carefully every bottle cf
CASTORIA, that famous old remedy
(or iufuuts and children, und see that it
Bears the
Signature of j
In Use for Over 3Ô years.
Children Cry for Fletcher's Castori*
All the Amount.
"Well, Ilardupp, did you raise any
thing on your promise to pay?"
"Sure; I raised a smile."
WOMAN'S CROWNING GLORY
Is her hair. If yours is streaked with
ngly. grizzly, gray hairs, use "La Cre
ole" Hair Dressing and change It la
the'naturul wuy. Price $1.00.—Adv.
The United State:
$20,000.000.0110 f„[- n;
fh)' war against Germany?
ippropriating
I carrying oa
To keep clean i
Pierce's Pleasant
late liver, bowels
nd healthy take Dr.
Pellets. They regj
nnd stomach.—Adv.
Strange h*
of spare tim*
thing.
w a f'
ow with plenty
eems to do any
Wben Your Eyes Need Care
Try Murine Eye Remedy
Vo Srnartlne — Just ''7e Comfort. MJ cpr,>, .1
Dro gg'.Bt* or mall. Writs* f- r Free Hr- boo»
ML KIKE EXE IiEiIE3)g CO.. CHICAGO

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