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The weekly echo. [volume] (Lake Charles, Parish of Calcasieu, La.) 1868-1876, September 12, 1874, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85034325/1874-09-12/ed-1/seq-1/

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VOL. VI.]
THE wei:kly kciio
LAKE CHARLES, PARISH OF CALCA8IEP, Li., SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 187A
$>
Ï V
*
(lAINliS
27
THE wei:kly kciio
Publish' d Every Saturday Morning
-AT
)jAKE CHARLES, Là.
Terms «f ^iibacriptpon.
'Onecopy, one.yènr....--------$2 00
$y îf: ■
'One copy, six months, ........... 1 50
f ingle atopies, ................... 05
Payable invariably in advance.
ADVERTISING.
per Sqr-nre, (10lipos'or lessV.... .#1 50
Every Subsequent insertion .... 1 (K)
■Annomveeirtent of candidates for *
office.. ............. ; .. .$10 00
Trench $5 extra.
Marriage and Death' Notices $1 00
'Obituary Notices 10 cents a Kne.
Advertisements sent in for publica
tion. when there are no directions, will
be inserted in English and French, and
when time is not limited, will be con
tinued until orders are received ; and
charged accordingly.
Liberal discount to those who adver
tise by the year or quarter.
No « redit will be given for Advertising
or Job work, except by special agree
ment. jß
O-rds, stating merely the names,
business and place of residence, with
papier included, Twelve Dollars per
annum.
Announcements. — Candidates ' for
office, (simple announcement of ten
lines or less,) $10; for »'olice Jftry, 85.
In French, $5 extra.
House, Sign and Ornamental
T^YÀTIST Tils' Gr.
T have located permanently in the
town of Lake Cluvrle« for the purpose
of earning on the Painting Business
in all its branchés. Perfect satisfac
tion guaranteed.
• my litt E. CONWAY.
S rid UN S' FLRTlLI% ER
AND
eniiiilCA!
MANOFACTUElSO company
—OP— .
Xoxa- Oriortma, La..
M A N U FÄCT U It F II S
OF THE
GREAT I-TirnrAZLIl.
Sterns' Haw "Bono
S UP E n P HO SPTÎ AT E,
FINE GROUND PONE.
Office, No. 10 Chartres St,
New Organs, La.
1>p. A. i\ 1leri*Koii,
FRENCH PHYSICIAN.
n AVTNG located permanently at
Lake Ulintlos, offers his services to
j tlHvjnhubitivnts of this Parish; speciali
ty .chronic diseases.
May 4, '72— ly. K * .§
I J. ARN AULT TÜRLUCHER,
letlidnc Doctor.
Office—Llko Charles.
13-ly
Thos. R Iferren.
( find Builder.
LAKE CHARLES, LA.
I '*ij. Æ frtL*' T ■
Jobbing done with dispatch. Prompt
l 'nul personal attention given to repairs
I of stores, dwellings, etc Cisterns made
I "ini repaired. Ordohn left at the shop
I or tbe Echo office promptly attended to.
f%tâMy,
Wallace A Co.
importers and wholesale dealer
' * in .A- *, f
mr goods
II and 18 Magazine si,and 79,
> *B3,85, 87 and 89 Common at.
b

,
00

50
05
50
(K)
00
00
(lAINliS & llflliFy
27 & 1X9 Common Street,
NEW ORLEANS,
Importers & Dealer* in
Eartheuware, Hardware,
Glass, Cutlery,
Tin, Clocks,
Plated Ware, Japan Ware
d'C. &o.
ASSORTED CRATES FOR COUNTRY TRADE
ÀI.WAY8 ON HAND.
April l3tb, 1872- Iy.
A BAÏMÏAIN.
The Dr Brashear place, on the Cal
casieu River, just below Marion, (Old
Towli) with all the buildings and im
provements. and IfiO acres of land.
Terms — FOUR HUNDRED ANÎ)
FIFTY DOLLARS, cash.
Applv to
GEO. H . WELLS, Agent.
Lake Charles, La.
FOR SALE! FORSALE if
Town Lots fop Sale*
O A TOWN LOTS, situated in the
town of Lake Charles, from fifty
yards to one-half mile from the Court
House. Lots of sVarious sizes and pri
ces. Superior inducements to purcha
sers. AU persons being desirous of
purcln ring or renting, apply to
E. E. KIRBY, or
GEO. H WELLS, Agent.
August 81,1872-6tn.
E. A KING,
BLACKSMITH
AND
Wlièclwîiïlit.
Near the residence of J. L. Bilbo
Begs to inform his friends and the
oublie that he is prepared to execute
work ns above mentioned in first class
•trie. Terms cash.
myS-ly. .
UENIÎY TBtCOÜ
ETTOENE ftOtSSEA
TRICOU & BOISSEAU.
Importers and Wholesale (Dealers in
ITnts, Caps, Strnwfioosd,
LADIES' AND MISSES' TRIMMED
HATS of every description.
8S Common Street,
New Orleans.
May 4, '72—fim.
UIpSTEA & VAJLUE
IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN
Foreign & Domestic
dHy aoons,
>8 Canal rtfd 125 Common Street
New Orleans.
I April 18th, 1872.
NOTICE.
The undersigned having purchased
flit Black Bayou Saw Mill, and having
been put in good Dinning order, will
saw lumber for any one that will fur
nish him logs for four dollars per thou
sand feet, or for one-third, for three
six or twelve months,
A. J. JOHNSON.
Black Hbyttn, Caleasicu parish La ,
October 18 th. 1873.
J. COR NE LIUS RUNlÎAY, M. D.
PHYSICIAN AND SUftGEON.
Office, Lake Charles, La.
Terms of practice, CASH.
Jan 31-74.
OBEHT N. DU FA,
ARCHITECT AND BUILDER,
Bogs leave to announce to the peo
ple of Lake Charles, that he is
prepared to take all kinds of «»«tracts
for building or repairing, and also to .
furnish plans nud sped fixations, free of
charge, when the work isbrndoredhim
All Imuinw« in his lihe will.be attendee
All
to with dispatch and interest
■ febH-ly
i
I
Letter from Pulley Block.
in
of
,---- v __—----------
iy, uuder that law, just w
Soe w jR bo douo if I
Caloa8Ieu Parish, La., )
August 28,1874 )
Editor Weekly Echo :
The New Orleans Picayune of
July 10th, in a short editorial
speaking of the Avery Isbiîid Salt
Mine, says 1 "English capitalists
are willing to furnish, for the par
pose of developing the mine, the
rum of $125,000, and all that re
mains necessary * * to
perfect the arrangement is, a small
subscription here at home, * *
yet we learn the chance thus of
fered still remains without takers."
Now, Mr. Editor, let os here
stick a pio, and consider for a
moment. This salt mine is, with
out doubt, the most easily devel
oped miue in the world; there are
no engineering difficnlties what
ever iu the way; the purest (98
per cent.) crysta.inë rock salt, in
inexhaustible quantity, lies within
fifty feet of the surface of the
ground; the salt stratum is so hard
that no galleries nor interior strnc
Hires of any kind are necessary to
facilitate mining, and all that
is necessary to lie done is, to re
move the'earth above, down to the
salt, and take it out in any quan
tity you may desire; and yet the
small sum necessary to develope
this great interest can not be ob
tained in New Orleans.
Let us consider farther that, we
have a sulphur mine, here in your
parish, which is pronounced by all
who have looked into the matter,
as being an "Eldorado" of wealth;
and the writer, after careful inves
tigation himself, does not hesitate
to join in substantiating the asser
tion. Üfet, it too, can not obtain
the funds in New Orleans to de
velop« it,
Again, our much needed rail
road to Texas is iu wantof ujocey
to complete it, andgjenabl# if to
bring to New Orlen n*s, annually,
$20,000,000 of business move than
she has now. Thus, you see, here
ale three improvements of the*
most vital importance to Now Or
leans and the State, going a beg
ging. s Aml why is it the case?
Why has the grand vdley of
the Mississippi been inundated,
atm thousands of our people senf
beggiDg ? In fact, why is every
branch of industry in the State
languishing ? 1 wjll answer. It
ivS because we have been robbed;
the city of New Orleans plunder*
ed; the people's money squander
ed; and by tricky legislation we
have had foisted upon us the most
odious and oppressive monopolies,
and such iufernal concoctions ►of
laws, as the '"Free Maiket Bill,
by which the consumers and rais
ers of beef have the buying and
selling prices dictated 'to them;
the celebrated Tax Bill, by which
our projierty can be takeu from us
and.sold for taxes, whether they
ire legal or not; the Militia Bill,
by which Kellogg can and h§s had
his hired minions— called the Me
tropolitan Police—go over our
State aud depredate, aud shoot
down onr citizens at an expense
to the State of a million of dol
lars per annum; the Louisiana
State Lottery Bill, by whiedi onr
children are to bo allured into
gambling; the Printhig Bill, by
which wo are compelled to pay
haudreds of thousands of dollars
auDually to have ourselves de
famed, through the press, aud a
host of others of like ilk, too nu
merous to mention here. And so
we go; onr mouey taken from us
at every turn pf the legislative
screw, until we have none. As to
who of the members of the Legis
lature voted for these bill*, the
record will show, Pei haps some
of them would not like to have it
publicly known just now.
Look at that " Free Market
Bill;" there am not a thousand
negroes in the State who pay any
taxes. Though the sales of pro
perty so tar have been made slow
publicans are suooet-a ul
November elections.
aud !
■ Rt*
at tie I the
( mo
Still, we, Democrats, the white
; people, are told by the men who
vote for such measifres that, if we
will keep < * *
politics alone," a fafter clos* of
Republicans will join us in uiciaim
ing our State, and correcting all
the bad and malicious laws nöwi
standing on our statute books.
Bat who compose this better dém
of Republicans ? No one, so far,
has attemptéd to tell us. «Surely
it is not meant that it is composed
of those men who have voted foy
such measures as the above, nq<J
now ask for re-election ? To talk
of the negroes as a better class, is
but grim facetiae, for we know too
well how they stand in connection
with the men. who have been the
rulers of Louisiana since the in
auguration of Republicanism. To
trust to them for relief now, and
to trust to the supporters of such
measures would be suicide. An
other lease of power to such meu,
and they will own the State. None
of them; except our ovm^men who
ha ve joined them, camé to the State
with anything more than a carpet
bag, but now own plantations an
magnificent residences, purchase..
with money stolen from thepnhlic
"crib." • * ft
As some even of our prominent
men still Cling to the idea pf re
conciling the negro, let us take a
casual look at reconciliation. Iu
1868 we did ouF best to reconcile
t m; we selected the best men
had for candidates, with a spe
cial reference to their couservative
proclivities; we held meetings all
offer the* State, * and invited the
cohired people to join ns; we fore
told in the clearest manner the
present condition we are iç; we
invited, aud obtained the most in
telligent colored men to addro s
the colored people. Did they show
auj appreciation of onr efforts
then t\r reconciliation ? No, they
voted to a man against us; a mule
and forty qcres of tarnt: were a
greater inducement to them than
the welfare of the State.
Iu 1872 we tried tiie same rem
^ly again, and how we succeeded
is too well known for'me to go in to
details here. Suffice it to say that
the h'ttcr dass of Republicans
usrfrped the State government and
some of the Reconciliators joined
the®. Charity should come from
the strongest. The negroes have
always claimed to be in the major
ity, and whether they are dr are
not, no matter, they have had pag
of the government, anal
session
ask, have they ever shewn one
single effort to conciliate the
whites ? Have they ever shown
themsplves willing to accept the
doetrine of reconciliation ? Have
any of the ReoonfeilUtors even
read a reconciling plank in their
platform? No, to the contrary,
t|iefr whole energies have beeq
used to disgrace and oppress .the
whites. While onr political speak
ers were crying at the top of their
voices and from the bottom of
their hearts, Reconciliation! theirs
were crying, "if %e are not success
ful, we will wade knee deep in
blood !" «SyU we beur men talk of
voting for a conciliatory "measure
between the whites and blacks.
Have we not been working upon
the " conciliatory " plan loog
enough to see that all of our con
cessions are taken as evidence of
weakness ? Do we not see that
the effects of reconciliation are
only to redticeour intelligent white
laboring min and mechanics to a
level with the ignorant and dis
gusting uegrn ? Thd negro has
had every right, social and politi
cal, conter ted upon hhn, which
the most fertile brain of the Re
publican pally could think of;
»till ho is not satisfied, but con
tinues to howl for his rights. The
time ha* come, 1 hope, when the
white man is going to howl for his
right« too.
Tee white man, who owns the
lands, the shovel, "hoc, ax, plow,
horse, machinery, p«odUcts; the
houses, the cities a fid towns, au«l j
valuable merchandise theyl
a
to
t
, -
Vs
as
------, __
> and "let the d—*
« /»m«» At«». Ä r
I
in
«muBunt nierennuuise iney j
contain; the steam boats ami rail- *
Leesburg, Sept. 2,187-1.
Editor Woekh- Echo:
I have failed, through preoccn
pation to furnish you notes of the
Cameron world for the past few
weeks, so will now endeavor to
give it you in summary.
Two weeks since, there Was a fu
tile effort to get Up a convention
of delegates from the different
wards, for the purpose of forming
a Central Parish Committee, in
order to • call a mass meeting,
whose object should be to select a
delegate to the District Conven
tion hereafter to be called, for the
purpose of selecting a suitable
candidate for the Senate. One
reason ol its failure is apparent
above; another, in the fact (per
haps) that the prime mover was
anxious to secure only Wells
men.
There is now a tolerably gen
eral call for a mas« meeting of the
parish to take ulaoe '.at Leesburg;
on the 7th wratet, at which time
and place various matters of im
portance to the parish will bo dis
cussed. Hope yon will Re with us
to take notes.
One certain Minos, or Minor;
t ui. o., of this parish, was tried
and condemned to twelve mouths
imprisonment, at hard labor, by
the Parish Court, since mv last.
Lorenzo J. Tansy, District At
torney pro tem#» and ex gÿkmi
- — j»h Auditor, is commissioned
Vs our Supervisor of Registration,
and Johfi T. Lindsay, as clerk for
Republican party. No Democrat,
as } at known, baa been appointed.
Registration not yet cotnumtoed,
MH; , * - Read.
roads, the bank and insurance
capital, no longer intend that re-
conciliation and degradation shall
romain synonymous terms.
r Louisiana ßa« already been im
poverished, paralyzed, and bet
commerce and credit annihilated;
her public works Stopped, her la
boring clues starving: her school
money squandered, and ignoran««
aud duplicity rapidly insinuating
thcmselve» into every household.
The last legislature compels you,
white men, under penalty of
twenty dollars, to send your chil
dren to school with negroes. Whb
voted for this bill? "Reconeilia
tors", I presume.
Congress adjourned its last ses
sion without iakifig definite action
upon the "Louisiana Case," be
cause it was known we were to
have an election iu November, and
we had, hence, as early a remedy
at hand as it could give. There
fore, let tis avail ourselves of the
opportunity. Merchants, farmer;-*,
stock-raisers, mechanics and la
boring men, remember this is the
hist throw of the-dice for libertv,
houestv, yonr property, and re
spectability iu Louisiana. If you
fail this lime, nothing will bo left
yon but to emigrate, and leave
behind yon, all yon have for the
negro.
The attempt to intimidate you
by saying, if yon do not continue
to reconciiiate tbe negro aud sub
mit to your own disgrace, you will
drive the negroes away into Texas,
is but intimidation. Twenty thou
sand negroes more in Texas is
jfist what she wants, as they will
not interfere with her march of
prosperity. And Louisiana will
then, when that number of n«v
groes have gone to Texas, havo
room for that uumber of white la
.borprs and a white mau's govern
ment without doubt—both States
can only profit by such a result.
So let them go- God speed them.
'P Âespectfiinÿv
# Pulley Block.
-4jh--- Ä- -
Letter from Cameron Pariah.
I The log cabin which Mr. X*ia~
coin made when sixteen years obi,
stands in seven different eountiW
in llliuojs, and they haven't, got
through conotiug yet.
it id ~~~~
fool
wise?
tb*r*
strai
loc
mor

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