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The weekly echo. [volume] (Lake Charles, Parish of Calcasieu, La.) 1868-1876, July 22, 1875, Image 1

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VOL. VII.]
LAKE CHARLES, PARISH OF CALCASIEU, LA., THURSDAY, JULY 22, 1875.
[HO. 20
THE WEEKLY ECHO
Published Every Thursday Morning,
-AT
lake chaules, la.
Terms of Subscription.
One copy, one year............ $1 50
One copy, sis months,...........00 75
One copy, three months.........00 50
Single copies,................... 05
Payable invariably in advance.
ADVERTISING.
Per Sqv.are, (10 lines or less).....00 75
Every subsequent insertion......00 50
Announcement of candidates for
office.....................$10 00
French $5 extra.
Business Notices, 15 cents a line.
Obituary Notices 10 cents a line.
Advertisements sent in for publica
tion, when there are no directions, will
be inserted in English and French, and
when time is not limited, will be con
tinued until orders are received ; and
charged accordingly.
Liberal discount to those who adver
tise by the year or quarter.
No credit will be given for Advertising
or Job work, except by special agree
ment.
Cards, stating merely the name,
business and place of residence, with
paper included, Twelve Dollars per
annum.
LOUIS LEVEQUE,
Attorney at Law.
OFFICE, LAKE CHARLES, La.
Will practice in all the Courts of the
Eighth Judicial District, composed of
the Parishes of St. Landry and Cal
casieu.
Feb. 3, 1872.— ly.
GEORGE H. WJELLS,
Attorney at Law,
Lake Charles, Calcasieu Parish, La.
Praotices in Calcasieu, Ft. Landry,
Lafayette and Cameron Parishes, La.
Feb. 15, 1868.—ly,
FRANCIS D. CHRETIEN,
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
[AVOCAT]
LAKE CHARLES, LA.
Practices in the parishes of Calcasieu,
Cameron, Lafayette and St. Landry.
aug2-3m -
P A. GALLAUGHER,
ATTORNEY-AT LAW,
Lake Charles, Louisiana,
. •
Will practice in this and adjoining
parishes, and before thoSnpreme Court,
at Opelousas. marl3 3m
JOSEPH M. MOORE,
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELOR AT
LAW.
Office formerly occupied by the late
law firm of Swayzo & Moore and Moore
& Morgan.
OPELOUSAS, LA.
Will practice in the Courts of the 8th
Judicial District. Ootl9 ly
PEWIS & BRO.,
Attorneys-at-Law,
OTELOUSAS, LOUISIANA.
THOMAS H. LEWIS, of tho above
firm, will regiHarly attend tne Sessions
of the District Court of Calcàsien
parish. 7
pERREOL PERRODIN,
Attorney-at-Law,
Practices in tho Parishes of St. Lan
dry and Caloasien.
Office— At OPELOUSAS, LA. 7
S. H. R E A H,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
Ueiburg, Cameron Parish,
LOUISIANA,
Offers his services in District and
Parish Courts, for Calcasieu and Came
ron Parishes. jol3 ly
JOEL H. SANDOZ,
notary public
for the PARISH OF ST, LANDRY.
Office -Opelousas, La.
fob 28-Cta • .,
HENKY TRICOT7.
ETTGEXE BOI8SBA
TRICOU & BOISSEAU.
Importers and Wholesale Dealers in
Hats, Caps, Straw Go o d g,
SADIES' AND MISSES' TRIMMED
HATS of every description.
88 Common Street,
New Orleans.
May 4, '72—6m.
N. A. IiLAMBIAS.
GEOBGE nOCKTER
LLAMBIAS & DOCKTER,
COMMISSION MER CHA NTS
AST> DEALERS IN
Western and Northern Produce.
No. 115 Old Levee St.,
NEW ORLEANS,
Agents for S. P. Soule's celebrated
CITY BEER. may 4 '72-y
GAINES & REEF,
27 & 129 Common Street,
NEW ORLEANS,
Importers & Healers in
Earthenware, Hardware,
Glass, Cutlery,
Tin, Clocks,
Plated Ware, Japan Ware
«fee. «fee.
ASSORTED CRATES FOR COUNTRY TRADE
AT,WAYS ON HAND.
April 13th, 1872- ly.
McSTEA & VALUE
IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN
Foreign & Domestic
H R Y G O O H S,
)8 Canal and 125 Common Street
New Orleans.
[April 13th, 1872.
PERSEVERANCE
HI C E MILLS
Nos. 12 and 14 Elysian Fields Street,
Opposite the Ponchartrain Railroad
Depot, Third Distinct,
New Orleans.
O UR MILLS ARE SUB?TANTIAL
ly built, expressly for the purpose
of Rice Milling, witli all the new im
provements and appliances, with suffi
cient warehouse capacity to meet any
demand for receiving and forwarding
RICE, centrally located to railroads,
shipping, ferry and steamboat landings.
Wo will guarantee our milling and
yield, both as to quality and quantity,
to bo unsurpassed by any rice mill in
this State.
Our "turn out" has always been from
104 to 114 lbs. cleaned Rice to the bar
rel of rough, which is about "twenty
per cent''over any mill in this city
and country.
We will pay particular attention to
the separation of all lots of rough Rioe
received by ns.
Our charges for milling are as follows :
le per pound, cleaned, for Nos. 1 and 2
" " No. 3
Vjjo ' ** for polishing horse mill
Rioe
No deviation on the above prices un
der any circumstances.
Sacks furnished free of charge.
SIEWERD Jk KIP,
Address, Lock Box 386,
angSyl New Orleans, La.
Wallace & Co.
IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALE DEALERS
IN
DRY GOODS
11 and 13 Magazine sfc., and 79,
81, 83,85, 87 and 89 Common sfc.
deo2l'72*ly New Orleans.
For Sale,
O NE HUNDRED POUNDS or more
of OLD TYPE, which is useful for
sawmill pnrposes, anoh as boxing ma
ohmovy.eto., which wo will sell cheap.
Apply at tho Weekly P<%o office.
in
g,
in
K. P. YOÜHG.
WILL CLEGG.
M. P. YOUNG & Co.,
VERMUilONVTLLE, LA.,
APOTHEC ARIES, DRUGGISTS
GROCERS.
DEALERS ET
PAINTS, OILS* WINDOW GLASS,
SCHOOL BOOKS, STATIONERY,
PERFUMERY, FANCY
ARTICLES, ETC.
ALSO,
DEALERS IN FURNITURE, PURE
LAMP OILS, AND GARDEN
SEEDS.
ORDERS
ATTENDED TO PROMPTLY.
WHOLESALE and RETAIL
LOWEST CASH PRICES!
Orders for Drugs and small packages
sent to Lake Charles at our expense.
March 21, 1874~n2yl
THE
"EMPIRE" PIANO.
Wo have boon selling the "EMPIRE"
Piano for tho past few years in ail parts of the
United S ates, and to tho entire satisfaction of
all parchasers. Tho reasons for this are very
simple—
FIRST—
Tboy are durable : this is the most essential
quality.
SECOND—
They are Magnificent in Tone: rich, fell,
and especially noticeable for their beautiful
Singing Qua ity.
THIRD—
They are Reasonable in Price: not a cheap,
poor Piano, but well and carefully made in
every part, und placed at such a figure as can
not fuit to plen8e all purchasers who desire a
REALLY QOOD PIANO AT ALOW PRICE.
FOURTH—
They bave very attractive and handsomely
finished rases in v rious styles, suited to all
tastes. All have oarved legs, and every Im
provement desirable in a modern Piano Forte:
addition to which we jpve introduced the
celebrated
«AGRAFFE»
attachment in each Piano Forte.
attachment in each Piano Forte.
TO THE PIANO TRADE.
We can commend the
"EMPIRE"
as being a mo't desirable and attractive instru
ment to Srll, its Low Price and the quality ol
remaining in good order, make the "EMPIRE"
Piano an especial favorite with dealer*.
WM. A. POND & CO'S
Parlor and Chapel Organs.
These Organs, although but a short while
before the public, have met with such hearty
and unqualified approval that their entire sue
boss is already secured. Orest care hat been
taken to combine, iu these instruments, beamy
and volume of tone, with an attractive appear
anco. The tone is as pipe-like as ean be ob
tained in an instrument of this class. The soft
stops are delicious for their purity and refine
character, while the full organ is grand and
imposing in its sonority.
After elaborate preparation, we have just
completed new and very beautlfal cases for ail
our styles, and are prepared to fill orders with
Tho very best and handsomest
Organ at the lowest price.
jMr-LIBSKAL TERMS TO AGENTS.
Purchasers who are at a distance from eny
of our agents will receive prie« lista and cata
logue« upon application.
Mann'« Naw Method for the Fiauo Forte
Is the latest and best hook for Elementary
Instruction for this instrument. It
combinée the excellence* of all
other works; i* systematic,
progressive and pie »slug.
A great he p to both
teacher and pupil. Price, 92 50.
WM. A. POND k CO.
Established over Fitly Years.
Keep ooustantly on band the largest and most
complete assortment of American and Foreign
Sheet Music, Books, Instruments, and Mn.lcsi
Merchandise of every cescriptioa. Orders by
mail util receive prompt and care'ul attention.
Correspondence with the Trade »elicited.
4 WM. A. POND A CO.,
541 Broadway,
Branch Store, 30 Union Square, N. Y.
J*34 Bin
c.
SCHINDLER,
FASHIONABLE BOOT AND SHOE
MAKER,
AT REDUCED PRICKS,
LAKE CHARLES, LOUISIANA.
'All kinds of Boot and She« work don« with
neat«»«» and dispatch. tank
TI»e Next Cangreu.
of
From the Commonwealth.
Ever aince the elections resulted
in giving to the democratic party
a majority in the House of Repre
sentatives of the next Congress the
radical party has been delighting
itself with the prophecy of discord
in the ranks of the majority. We
have been amused at these efforts
of the radicals to get consolation
from their defeat by the honest
men of the country at these elec
tions.
Bat it is not the part of wisdom
to rest in security when there is a
possibility of danger.
We have observed in the South
ern press lately a disposition to
agitate a scheme for what is known
as "internal improvement" before
the next Congres**. The ground
on which it is to be placed is, we
agree, very plausible. The reason,
the justification, is the severe suf
ferings, the oppressions, the out
rages which the radical party have
inflicted on the Southern States.
The war, like the " Let ns have
peace," have alike been Pandora's
boxes, filled with the direst evils.
From these grievances the South
hopes to be relieved, and iu the
recoil from iron-heeled oppression
to comparative liborty, or at least
tho hope of liberty, has induced
the people of the oppressed and
subjugated States to seek some
means for restoring what is called
prosperity to the white race. .
Under the late teachings, the
false doctrines of the radical party,
whenever a want exists " the Gov
ernment " is to be applied to for
its supply. The Government is to
be looked up to as the fouutain
out of which everything wanted is
to be had, and instead of a con
trolling power, limited and re
stricted by the Constitution, it is
made now a sort of country store
where anything can be had from a
pin to an anchor.
The Southern people desire the
all
Im
the
ol
an
The Southern people desire the
Government, if we read some of
the Southern journals aright, to
set on foot all sorts of measures
for constructing canals, railroads,
docks, wharves, and whatever is
essential to the carrying trade.
That these improvements are
needed we will not stop to discuss.
That the Federal Government has
the authority under the Constilu
iion to undertake any such enter
prises, we deny. Tlie traditions
of the democratic party, from Jef
ferson's day till " the last of the
Presidents,' hare been against the
power of the Federal Government
under the Constitution.
It is a very easy effort to stimu
late the feelings of aid to the
South. We feel, as we write, how
difficult- it will bo to repress fos
tering a legislation which has in it
both mercy and justice. But this
is not the epoch in our history
when the democratic party can
commit itself to emotional legisla
tion —legislation which is asked
and sustained on the plea of senti
ment The Federal Constitution
must be reasserted in its primal,
original integrity as the supreme
law oveç Congress, President, and
people. The first, the stern, sol
emn duty of the democratic party
in the next Congress will be to set
np the Constitution of the United
States on the pedestal where the
fathers placed it, and whatever
has been hung on it, or about it,
to hide its features or disfigure its
form, must be swept away by the
power of that Roman virtue which
the democracy professes to oherish
and obey.
All the infamies which have op
pressed the South for tho past
years have had their origin in the
teaching of the radical party that
the Constitution was a " covenant
with hell."
The democracy must resent this
insult by making this covenant
exactly what the convention of the
sovereign States whioh ordained it
intended it to be.
We trust that our Southern
brethren in the next Congress will
calmly consider if this is the ap
propriate time to begin agitation
of questions, or the adoption of
measures which in themselves are
of such a questionable constitu
tional character as to invite objec
tion from those democrats in tho
North who, in order to spare the
South from outrages, have stood
by the strict construction of the
Federal Constitution as the only
safety for that constitutional repte
sentative form of government
which the radical party has so
often tried to destroy.
It does seem to us that if dis
cord is ever to come among tho
majority of the next Congress,
pray do not let the nnlimited
power of Congress, the higher
law, over and above the intent and
meaning of the strict construction
of the grant of power to the Fed
eral Legislature, be the Trogan
horse on which this discord is to
be admitted into the councils of
the party.
The Sontb.
The great problem introduced
into our politics by the admission
of the colored people to the enjoy
ment of equal rights with the
whites is slowly working out its
own solution. So far the influence
of the carpet-bag element, sup
ported by the Federal power, has
been able to maiataiu the color
line unbroken outside of Arkansas,
but there ate not wanting indica
tions which point to a growing dis
content among the colored people
with the present system. The re
sult of the carpet-bagger's success
has been a course of dishonest
legislation which has disgusted the
honest republicans of Uie Sontb.
Wisdom and forbearance on the
part of the democrats will in time
break the solid phalanx of the col
ored vote and free the South from
the nightmare of carpet-bag gov
ernment and Federal interference,
which at present crushes out the
energy from the Southern people
aud impedes all progress.— [N. Y.
Herald.
How to Kef.f a Situation.—B e
ready to throw in an odd half hour
or an hour's time when it will be
Accommodation, and don't seem to
make a merit of it. Do it heartily.
Though not a word be said, your
employer will make a note of it.
Make yourself indispensable to
him, and he will lose many of the
opposite kind before he will part
with you.
Those young men who watch
the clock to see the very second
their working hour is np—-who
leave, no matter what style of
work they may be in, at precisely
the instant—who calculate the ex
tra amount they can slight their
work and yet not get reproved—
who are lavish of their employer's
goods—will always be the first to
receive notice when times are dull,
that their services are no longer
required.—[Exchange.
Australian Race Horses Com
ing to America.—A. J. Bryant, the
President of the Pacific Jockey
Club, is in receipt of a dispatch
stating that Bowers, a noted horse
man of Sydney, will start this w me.
for this oity with two of the best
Sydney race horses, which he
brings over especially to enter for
the $30,000 four-mile race lobe
given by the Club next fall. One
of them, named Jump, is & very
fast horse, of great endurance, has
beaten everything that haa con
tested with him in the Colon? and
latterly bad to be handi-capped to
get a race. The other is also a fast
and game nag, but bis prowess haa
not been so fully demonstrated.
The Sydney horses are recognized
by tnrfmen as among the best in
the world for long races.—(San
Francisco Bulletin.
A clergyman in on© of onr East
ern cities was met by a soedy-look
ing man with a flask of whisky in
his pocket, who inquired : " Sir, is
this the nearest road to the alms
house?" "No, sir," replied tho
clergyman, pointing to the bottle;
" but that is."

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