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The weekly echo. [volume] (Lake Charles, Parish of Calcasieu, La.) 1868-1876, December 23, 1875, Image 1

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LAKE CHASLES, PARISH OF CALCASIEU, LA., THURSDAY, DECEMBER 23,
1875. _
the weekly echo
Puhlislieii Every Thursday Morning,
-AT
CHARLES, LA
Terms of Snbscriptiou.
One copy, one year............$1 50
One copf, six months,...........00 75
One copy, three months.........00 50
f'ingle copies,................... 05
Payable invariably in advance.
4 "advertising.
Per Square, (10 lines or less).....00 75
Every subsequent insertion......00 50
Announcement of candidates for
office,....................010 00
Trench $5 extra.
EBusiness Notices, 15 cents aline.
-Obituary Notices 10 cents a line.
Advertisements sent in for publica
Hi on, when there are no directions, will
be inserted in English and French, and
when time is not limited-, will be con
,tinned Until orders are received ; and
«Charged accordingly •
'■Liberal discount to those who adver
tise by the year or quarter.
No credit will be given for Advertising
-or Job work, except by special agree
ment.
Cards, stating merely the name,
business and place of residence, with
jpaper included, Twelve Dollars per
atiimum.
Ci. PI DUPONT,
wir«
F. A. GLASS,
Wholes. He Gvoe&v
STR \ND, OALVEBTON.
LOUIS LEVEQUE,
Attorney at Law.
OFFICE, LAKE CHARLES, La.
Will practice in all the Courts ot the
Eighth Judicial District, composed of
1he Parishes of St. Landry .and Cal
,• iMi'eu
Pel). 3, 1H72..-1.V.
(M-iOT'iGE IT. WELLS.
V ^t H r » e y n t b a W,
JM'* Charles. Calcasieu Parish. La.
Practices in 'Calcasieu, "h Landry,
La fn vet to and Cameron Parishes, La.
Feb. 15. 18(18.—ly.
F. ''
A. «ALL VUC*HER,
ATTORNEY-AT LAW,
bake Charles, Louisiana,
Will prnctiöe«ii this and adjoining
parishes, and before the Supreme Court,
at Opelousas. marl3 3m
JOSEPJÏ M. MOORE,
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELOR AT
LAW.
•Office formerly occupied by the late
1 iw firm of Swayze A Moore and Moore
& Morgan.
OPELOUSAS, LA.
Will practice in th£ Courts of the 8th
Judicial District. Octll) ly.
... —.—— — - J ----—— -----
j E W IS & BRO.,
Attorneys-at-Law,
-OPELOUSAS, LOUISIANA.
. THOMAS H. LEWIS, of the above
firm, will regularly attend tne Sessions
Of the District Court of Calcasieu
parish. 7
1RREOL PERROiMN,
At tofnoy-at-Law,
Practices in the Parishes of St. Lan
dry and Calcasieu.
Office—At OPELOUSAS, LA. 7
Ä S. D. R E A I),
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
Leesburg, Cameron Part»!**
xxmiaiANA,
Offers his servie es in District and
Parish Courts, for Calcasieu and Came
ron Parishes. 3*1" D
TOEL H. SANDOZ,
NOTARY PI
)p«lov
5
IS
of
to
rel
the
lc
i'c
der
*
81,
0
UR HOME JOURNAL
AST»
RURAL SOUTHLAND,
No. 88 CAMP STREET, NE'V ORLEANS.
JAMES U. HIMMELL, Managing Editor
and Publifbe«.
Dr. H. A. SWASET, Agriculiurnl.
K. C. KKRH. Mi«cel nneons
D. DENNETT, Ti.v cling und Industrial.
Trrwh r-n 1875—#2 50 por annum. 4
copie» lor $10, arnl 1 tor get er up of the elnb;
5 tn 9 copies at $1 30 each, to to i# opie
at $2 20 raoli, 20 to 50 copies at #2 each, and
one to the getter up ol the club; 1$ cent»
postage additional mu t. accompany eueti
mime. Cagh in advance always.
The names for a club need not all come
from one po-toflice.
N. A. »LAMMAS.
GEOBGE DOCKTEE
LLAMBIAS & DOCKTER,
COMMIES IO N MER CEA N7 S
AND DEALERS IN
v
Western and Northern Produce.
No. 115 Old Levee St.,
NRW ORLEANS,
Agents for S. P. Soule's celebrated
CITY BEER. * may 4 '72-y
«AINES A BEEF,
27 & ISO Common Street,
NEW ORLEANS,
Impoi'tei'3 & Dealers in
Earthenware, Hardware,
Glass, Cutlery,
Tin, Clocks,
Plated Ware, Japan Ware
&c. &c.
ASSORTED CRATES FOR COUNTRY TRADE
ALWAYS ON HAND,
April 13th, 1872 - ly.
McSTEi & VAMJE,
IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN
Eorci^n & Doüiestic
D K Y GOODS,
IS Canal and 125 Common Street
Now Orleans.
(April 13th, 1872.
PEKSEVEIIANCE
R 1 C E M ILLS,
Eos. 12 and 14 Elysian Fields Street;
Opposite the Ponchartrtrin Railroad
Depot, Third District,
New Orleans.
O UR MILLS ARE SUBSTANTIAL
LY built, expressly for. the purpose
of Rice Milling, with all the new im
provements and appliances, with suffi
cient warehouse capacity to meet any
demand for receiving and forwarding
RICE, centrally located to railroads,
shipping, ferry and steamboat landings.
We will guarantee our milling and
yield, both as to quality and quantity,
to be unsurpassed by any rice mill in
this State.
Our "turn out" has always been from
104 to 114 lbs. cleaned Rice to the bar
rel of rougi», which is about "twenty
percent." over any mill in this city
and country.
We will pay particular attention to
the separation all lots of rough Rice
received by us.
Onr obarges for milling are as follows :
lc por pouud, cleaned, for Nos. 1 and 2
Uc " " No. §
i'c " for polishiug horso mill
Rice
No deviation on the above prices un
der any circumstances. -
Sacks furnished free of charge.
SIEWERD A KIP,
Address, Look Box 383,
New Orleans, La.
nugByl
Co.
IMPORTERS ANt) WHOLESALE DEALERS
* . IN
DRY GOODS
11 and 13 Magazine at., and 79,
81, 83,85, 87 und 89 Commons!,
Iee2F72*ly Now Orleans.
far Hale,
>RED POUNDS or mo
viiieh is useful ff
uh as boxing ma
il.
.
all
R.
pr
■n
as
and
cess
und
our
of
mail
4
S
:
il. P. TO UN O. WILL CLEGG.
M. F. YOITitfG & Co.,
t J
VERMILIONVILLE, LA.,
APOTHECARIES, DRUGGISTS
—AND—
GROCERS.
'
DEALERS TN
PAINTS, OILS, WINDOW GLASS,
SCHOOL BOOKS, STATIONERY,
PERFUMERY, FANCY
ARTICLES, ETC.
ALSO,
DEALERS IN FURNITURE, PURE
LAMP OILS, AND GARDEN
SEEDS.
i
O R DER S
»
ATTENDED TO PROMPTLY.
WHOLESALE and RETAIL
LOWEST CASH PRICES!
Orders for Drugs and small p»ckages
sent to Lake Charles at our expense.
. March 21, 1874-n2yl
.THE
"EMPIRE" PIANO.
We have been s llinjj the "EMPIRE"
Pinno for ihe p.ij-r ft w year» in nil i art- «•! Ibe
ünifrfl S ate-, an.! to the ejili e nUi-tn<tion of
all pureba er«. The reason« for this are very
«impie —
FIRST—
They are darable: this is the most essential
quality.
SECOND—
They are Mai»n»6ie»t in Tone: rich fol'.
and espeeiallv noticeubie for ibeir beiuii.ul
Siagin» Qua ity.
THIRD—
They are Reasonnhln in Prie: not a cheap,
poor Piano, but sell a-d carefully made in
every part, and jdart-d at such a figure as can
not fait to please all purchasers who ilesire a
R. ALLY HJOD PIA.YO AT A LOU PRICF.
fourth— 5
They have very at'racive and handsoinely
fin-shed case* in v rieft» »ry es, suited to ah
tafto». All hive carved legs, an I every im
pr r- oent desirahl.- in a modern Pian» For»*
■n addition to which we have introduced »be
celebrated
"AGRAFFE"
attachment in each Piano Forte.
TO THE PIANO TEA DE.
Wo can commend the
" EMPIRE "
as h-inf a met desirablo and attractive instru
ment to s 11. its Low Price und t e qualitv o!
remaioine io goodoroer. make the "EMPIRE"
Piano an especial favorito with dealer*.
WM. A. POND & CO'S
Parlor and Chapel Organs.
These Organs, although but a short while
before the publi*, have mot with such beany
and unqiraliiied approval t at their entire sue
cess is already secured. (treat care has been
taken to combine, in tho-e instruments, beau y
und volume of tone, with an attr.v live appear
mi'«. The 1006*18 «« pipe-like as can be ob
tained in an instrament of this class The soft
stop* a e deli-inns for their purity and refine
character, while the full organ if «rand and
5mpoMiig in its s norit.r.
Alter tluborate props ratio-, we have Just
completed new and very beautiful ea«e* for atl
our style*, end are prepared to fill orders with
The very best and handsomest
Organ at the lowest price.
jjS®-LlllEKAL Ti RMS TO AUENTS.-«$,
Purchasers who nro st a distuuce from ony
of our agent* will reçoive prise liste ugd cata
logues upon », plication.
Mann's Na w Method for the Piano Forte
Is the latest and heat book for Elementary
Instru-tion for thi iusu unmet, It
combines the excellences of »11
other wore*; is sys-emalic,
progressive and pie sing.
A gr-at he p to both
teacher and pupil. Price, >2 50.
WM. A. POND & CO.
Established over Fiity Years.
Keep constantly cm band the largest and most
complete Bsiortuium ol American ami F. reign
Sheet M"*lc, Books, Inrtrnments, and MuHck)
Merchandise of every «'«cripii.m. Orders by
mail will receive prompt and care'ui attention.
Correspondence wi»h the Trade ullcitvd.
WM. A. POND é PO.,
547 Broadway,
Bircn-h Store. 39 Union Square, N. k.
je24 Am
IIHNDLER,
FASHIONABLE BOOT AND SHOE j
MAKER, *
«1» PRICPt?,
m, tom&U
of
to
to
at
"
by
lic,
tbe
aie
the
not
If
yon
the
"
Mr.
Mr.
not
the
of
to
its
was
ate
j
McEnerjr to McMillen.
From the New Orleans Times.
New Orleans, La., Dac. 9, 1875.
Hon. W. L. McMillen, Senator elect of
Louisiana :
Dear Sir —I have rend, with re
gret, vour opt-o letter addrenpe«! to
me, tiirmigh the Arfsnrinted Pres«,
dated 3 'esterda v, in whieh you ex
press the opinifMi that the strHggle
of the.people of Loaisiann, for the
right of self-government, has been
determined against them, and an
nounce the withdrawal of your
credentials as SSeuator. and tender
to the people of Louisiana, through
me, the*tiUHt committed by them
to your hands.
iu my judgment, based upon all
that has occurred since the incep
tion of oqr difficulties, von have
seriously erred iu the conclusions
at which you have arrived.
You address me as "Governor
elect of Louisiana." If I am
" Governor elect " since 1872,
what estops me as the choseD Ex
ecutive of the State, and vests that
right .in a usurper? The means
by which this has been nceoin
p!i>hod are well known to the pub
lic, and they uever have received,
tiud never can receive the ap
proval of the American people.
In November. 1872, the govern
ment, of which I tuu the official
head, was elected by the people of
Louisiana. The result of the elec
tion was legally ascertained, and
declared by the Legislature, of
which you were a member, and in
which there was a quorum o» le
gally elected members in both
branches. Iu January, 1873, I
was inaugurated, and aeted as
Governor until I was prevented by
tbe arm of the Federal Administra
tion. unlawfully exercised agaiust
aie tbroiign the military power of
the nation. The right to act I
still assert- and that right I can
not and will not surrender.
You were elected Senator by the
Legislature of the State in 1873.
If your credentials were valid then,
they are valid now. *In your letter
yon say, "The Senate, to this
date, lias held the question in
abeyance." Then, why withdraw
your credentials and abandon your
trust while the Senate, the only
power competent to judge of their
validity, has never passed upon
them ?
But you state that other aud
equally competent parties have,
practically and finally, determined
the question, and you refer to the
" Wheeler adjustment," the reso
lution of the Louisiana Legisla
ture acquiescing in, but not ap
proving the acting government of
Mr. Kellogg, the action of the last
Lower House of Congress to the
same effect, aud to the seating of
Mr. Morey, on the 6th inst., upon
credentials signed by the person
who is acting as Governor of
Louisiana. In mj judgment, yonr
interpretation of these matters is
not sound. They can not possibly
bear on the issue of the legality of
the State government, because,
1. The Legislature of Louisi£ia
of 1875 had no constitutional powe r
to displace a State goveri ment
elected by the people in 1872, and
inaugurated in 1873, or to retire
its claims, or to substitute for it a
usurpation.
2. That Legislature did not de
clare the validity of the Kellogg
Congress,
where the question of its legality
was pending, should settle it.
3. Eveu. this resolution 6f suffer
ance, which expressly tcilheld «*
" lh»gg g
State
jority wQfe
ptl right
the
wise of
louse
approval of t
ment, was p
ate of wo
usurpers, as dest
UI,,
fteeril Hi ' it
•• : • •
de
the
tbe
in
If
of
' •
has
the
Gih
do
ler
of
the
tbe
his
the
I
to
no
at
eral
to
_
I
I
r
a
the
Wheeler Congressional
tee. Passed by a Legislature
composed, it was signed
uHsrper Antoine as
Governor, approved by the
Kellogg'as Governor, and promul
gated by tbe usurping Hecretary of
State.
As its best, it recognizes the exist
ence of a de facia, not the legality of a
de jnre governmenöfeand was passed,
signed, approved aiwPproranlgated by
the very naurpeD» whose legal n*s.tnn
you seem to think it recognizes. What
provision of our law. State or Federal,
constituted thi« usurping government,
tbe judge of its own legality or author
izes the supervision of a de jure in fa
vor of a bastard de facto government ?
It must also be remembered that the
advocates of this adjnstment declared
that it referred solely to the difficulties
growing ont of the election of 1874, and
had no reference to those of 1S72 ; and,
besides, that the Wheeler Committee,
in their report to Congress, declared
that they had not investigated the elec
tion of 1872, and that their resolution
recognizing Kellogg they based not on
facts or law, bnt on their surmises aud
opinions of what the people of Louis
iana were willing to accept, and of
which they knew absolutely nothing.
If they had sought the desires of tho
people, they could have found ample
evidences iu their stubborn and heroic
resistance to two years of oppression
and wrong, in the forma 1 resolves of
every parish and community in tho
State, and in their imposing upheaval
of September 14, 1874, which swept
away, as with the hand of fate, every
vestige of a hated usurpation.
As to the action of Congress, I need
not remind you that the House im
peached Judge Dnrell because of tho
' • midnight order," aud seated Gen.
Sheridan on the official returns, which
evidence my election ; that the Senate
has refused to admit Mr. Finchback.
has announced that the Kellogg gov
ernment was not elected, aud that tho
declarations of the Lynch Returning
Board were false and without the sem
blance of integrity. Logically and le
gally, there is but one conclusion from
the findings and fiction oi Congress,
and that is the overthrow ff the usurpa
lion. In seating Mr. Morey, on the
Gih in it., the House did not recognize
Mr. Kellogg other than ae acting Gov
ernor. They expressly expnuged all
that would imply their recognition of
him de jnre.
I therefore, as Gove» nor elect of
Louisiana, iu the name of tbo people,
do deny that their right to govern
themselves has beeu lost, either by
their own acquiescence or by the Whee
ler adjustment of the Louisiana House
of Representatives, or by any action of
the Federal Congres».
Oy the 6th of Jauimry, 1876. a con
vention will be held iu this city, and
tbe people 's representatives, many of
them already elected and instructed,
will demand of the Federal Govern
ment the overthrow of the usurpation
which its Executive alone Im» created,
and whose official head, Mr. Kellogg,
has confessed his inability to maintain
his position for a single day without
the bayonet aid of its author.
This demand w ill be intensified by
tho appalling fact that the usnrpatiou.
through its election iawsand Retumiug
Board, wield» the absolute power of
aelf-pi rpetuation, iu defiance of the
popular will, and that resistance on the
part of the people may jeopardize, in
the next election, the ncace of
-
Regretting your cm
your position as Senator, I have no op
tion but to accept the màgî
I will garth with appoint yonr i
In conclusion J would add, that i
myself, I will uever abandon thei
to which the jxwple of I*>uisian* have
called roe. So long aa I have life and
strength I will continue to battle to tho
utmost for their inutiouable right of
eclf-govurnmciit. Before th*> prostrate
form of my «trickon State I shall »till
hold the aegis of the Constitution, and
no alien, nor domestic hand shall strike
at her liberties unresisted by me,
t'itb a still unfaltering confidence ia
justice and good faith of the Fed
eral Congre« ■ and the people of tho
whole United Stete«, IÄ »ever »saw«
to appeal to that justice and that faith
nutil I shall have secured to Louisian«.,
vbieh alone is dsmkfi te hcr,
sh« wid never mrmmdm:,. id
o role of the bwlrdly
of her own sovorèi«»
to retastist, very
ôMÎient • rvvnt
Te>»!s MriBI
i oi hi

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