OCR Interpretation


The Ouachita telegraph. (Monroe, La.) 1865-1889, January 15, 1870, Image 1

Image and text provided by Louisiana State University; Baton Rouge, LA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85034336/1870-01-15/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

THE TELEGRAPH:
PUVLIUSED EVERY SATURDAY AT T
gopLS OioMUITTa PraRsIS LA;
a. WP. MCVLAA.NIEI.
E ITQa- AN P POfPRIETOR
Tersi or Subscription.
The rollowng rates of sabsoription will be rigidly
adhered $o.i all.case5:
tsne copy, one year - - - - $8,00
sOne copy. rx maonth. - - - 2,00
tzsjt1e copept - - - 10 cernt.
Any person sending us fre new Bash subeoribers.
to the same post oso., will be entitled to a copy or
* &'Hw TsL.oaoHru" gratis, for one year.
«^ Subscription price invariabyl in advance. .
Tariff ofAdvertisinga Rates.
.Adverttsments willibe inserted at OneDollari and
Pifty Cents per square of one inch of apace. or less.
;}'tbhiieSt. andTevOnty-fiv C(ents for cach cohnc
qucut tinesbtiod, fdr any .timeo inae' ouomontn. Four
eogerperioda as follows :
O150. 6w -QUAIWS. I 2 o 1 o o s 00.
One.. . . 3 75.7 009 00013 00 2U 0
Two... .I 750 12 00 15 0 22 ont :i100
T haw. ..*:.:.... W 1 171.. II1 0 3' 00 4) 00
.oar .............15OIr' 22' 20 1 3a 3i) 50 00
Five (i Column.).... .11 1i ou 26 0f- 300^ 4- 5II 6,J O)
Ten ( Column )1..."t 30 00 45 00 55 00 75 o -1r 3)0f
Fifteen ($ Column. I ,45 00 lit 510 5 O 101) 0(4I) C0
Twentyt-one (1 Col. ) 55 00 75 00 90 uu1135 n0020 00
1liroteesatoal EQarbe.
- --"---^----- ---'---------~----
Ors. Calderwoud t& Richardson,
A kVI I2G associated themselves in the practice of
Et Mioine and Surgery, offer their services to
'ha citizens of Monroe and vicinity. They can
be fiord, ,whn not professionnlly engaHged at their
sfoy, ppseite the Catholic Church. at all hours, day
and night.
j H3petial attention given to Chronto Surgical
cases.
Monroe.Jano as ieee v2n37:chv3n40: Iv
ISAIAH GARRETT. FRANKLIN GARIRETT.
GARRETT & GARRE:TT.
ATTORNEYS AT LAW
Corner Wood and St. John Streets,
(Opposite llocorder's Offce.)
MOYROB.........................LOFISIAV A.
Aulnst 5. 1883. n46-tf
A. L. SLACK,
&°LTOIRIMWY T V AWe
MONROE, LA.
PRIIACTTC in the Parish and District Courts as
follows:
OauohiT Parish. Monroe; Morohouse Parish,
Bentrop: Franklin Parish, Winnsboro.
Mounroe, Aug. 26. e186ee. 5:17
R. REcn.aarDoi. Jas. D. MicEtEKr.
RICH.ARDSON & McENERY,
.Attoz neya at LawL, ,
MIONROE, LA.
DILACTICE Ia aU the parishes of Nforth Touisiana,
n. tie supremoo Corrt at Moorn., time Fed .esl
Coarta, and in the Land Office Department of tihe
svaerel Government. n19-tf
sest R'EIiERY. S. D. Al'EMERY.
J. & S. D. MteENERY,
£Tif OMN~8awO £U M.&W j
MONROE, LA.
PRACTICE in the Parisreh and District (nurs tf
Dsclists Morehouse, Franklin. imehlrsud. Culd
wells`ad Cmtahosia Parishes, in the Supreme Court
at Monroe. and U. Si. Courts.
(t Partisular attentioo paid to business in the
Lend Opract cMnbeh. and the: Landi Office Diepart
ount onithe atenuri e uotrumoi itt. noo:tf.
e. i. LTORISON. W. W. FAGUIIR.
olerrison- Farmer,
. T TORNRYS AT LAW,
1Moulro, La.,
Will practice in the Parish and District
Courts Di te Ia ricshes of thnarciith JIorelsocoe,
Frarklin, CclCaldwell , a andion.
Alkn in the Supreme Court of Louisiana
and in the United States Courts,
n41:vS
F. . Trnads. Rt. G. COmIc.
ATTORNEYS AT LAW
MWonroe, La.,
Will practice in the Courts of the 12tlh Jldi
cial District, cocmpused of tihe parishes of More.
hounse, Ouachita, Caldwell, Catahoula and
Franklin.
And also in thle Parishes of Jackson end
Union. v4 nr33
$M WOtmn RcJdordaaon, Aiobt. iF..lemi.on
RtICM.U RDSO.V # JE.'TIISO.A,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW,
MOTERGOEJ, ThLA,
ptACTICE In the Courts of Catahonla, CarldweI
I Fraznklin, Ouachita. Morehounse. IRichland. Carroll
and Miadison. to the Supreme Conn t: of Lonisiaua.
In the tuited States Court-.sand in time tI.,m.nu (jtice
Department of the Goe-rnment. Spedatl attention
paid to the collection of claimus. mrtO-u e:!:,
DENTAL NOTICE.
H AVING determined to fettle permanently
in Monroe for the purpose of practicing
my pro tession, I can be fo lnd at my office
oppositte the south-east cornrr of the public
square, in the house lately occupied by the
Land Office, at all hours. My family will live
in the same building. IHaving had a very
Jlarge.experience in all the ditfterent branchesl
of my profession, the treat ing of children's
teeth and all the diseases of the teeth of adults,
and the extracting of teeth and arranging ar
tificial teeth; I feel justified in saying that I
am prepared to do anything in any department
of my profession as well as can be done any
where, and at reasonable prices.
N. F. McCRA1W.
Jan. 6. 1869. nl :tf
J. PINJOINF2Y MMlI'I I.
Cottonx. F'2actor,
COMMTSSION '1IRCHANT,
-AND-
SGENERAL PURCHASING AGENT
NO. 100 GRWVIER STREET,
KZW ORLMAK5.
Jao. W. WArtnanW *.. ...ool -Xeepm
J. St. Una, i*.. -... rumch'g Dept
Ir Gen. Thomas iT. Scott and Mmmj. San
ders D. Oliver are with J. Pickney Smith, and
will give their personal attention to the inter
ste eof their friends. nl 2-tt
L AlIES AND MISSES' HATS AND
Bonnets mado to rimer at
J. HAY MAN & CO'S.,
T)e8itrd, Corner 2ad Street.
dosproe.,14i n37. t
U -. va4
"ENGAGED IN THE DEFENSE OF AN HONORABLE CAUSE, I WOULD TAKE A DECISIVE PART."-Jurwea.
Vol. V. Monroe, Ouachita Parish; La., Saturday, January 15, 1870. No. 17.
otclis, cl)ooalse, uerctlante, Cr.
Ouachita House,
(CORNER OR DSIAED & THRiltD STLEETS,)
MONROE, LA.
J. L. HUNSICKEIt, Proprietor.
HIIE bovo named Ilotel so long and favorably
1known thtroulc"hout the country has been refitted
and newly inruished, and is now omiplete in every
department.
Thi Prop-ietor pled es himself to spare nn efforts
to make ail ciorufortable who may fsavor Liw with
tlir patronageo. i: tf
.NEIV HOTEL.
LEWIS HOUSE,
(Opposit Catolwic Church and Female Acadewm,)
M1*ONROE, LA.
.T9. J. LE IrIS, PROPRIETOR.
TVUE Proprietor. forterly of the OUACIIITA
1 HOt't , infolrms the i.pblice that the
large and commodiols residence of Col.
Itobt. Richardson has been purchased !!
and handsomely furnished. and Is now
complete in every particular, as A First Class Hotel
A onpl naecommodations. good fare, and conven
eat location. Board coasonannlble anS
Cuachita Female Academy.
T HE FALL SESSION of this Institution
will open on the Third Monday of Sep
tember. 'iThe Rector will be assi-ted by an entire
new corps of efficient and experienced teach
ers; he, itherefore, assaures the public, that no
effort will be spared on the part of himself and
asistaris, to render A' * Academy worthy of
he confidence and support of all who advo
cate a thorough. and liberal coarse of educa
lion.
For further inforumition, goply for a catalogue
to
REV. T. B. LAWSON, REcTon.
N1 ure, L~a., Aung. 18, 18619. n4:: tf
LOUISrIA NA
State .Serr1.irl ar"5
MIL11 ARY ACADEMY,
ATON ROUGE , LA. Founded and
B supported by the State of Louisiana. Fpr
particuiifrs, address
D F. BOYD,
Snpe'rintetdent.
Ba:ton Ronge, Ls,Oct. 30 18ti69. n18;ly
SAIDDLE AND SHOP s
SHOP.
t RESPECTFULLY inform my friends and
Sthe public generally, that I am prepared to
i ianufacture
SADDLES, ITHARNESS,
and everything in my line. I-have a gootd stock
of mteri.ls ott hand which I will aell at Res
sonable Prices.
P'ETER EZEL1UE.
February 3, 18.9. u20:tf
EDWARD BURNETT. CHAC. DONELLV.
BURNETT & DONELLY
BRICKLAYERS AND BUIJILDERS,
GRAND STREET.
1 AVTNG permanentlv Incl.ted in Monroe.
L otfer their services to the people of the
town and vicinity, in the crection of houses
chimneys, walls, tooths, montumente, &c.
Materials will be furnished upon reasonable
terms. when desiredl, and at shurt notice.
October 16, 1869. n4 ly
C. 13ý1FENSCITEN,
Watchmaker and Jeweler,
MONROE, LA.,
nTHEALalt IN
S Clo C Ic F4 aI nC1
JEBYEORY,
Of 13very TJescription.
All work in his line executed with neatness
and dispatch, rnd guaranteed for 19 mont!ihs.
CHAS. BO)FENSCHIEN.
Monroe, I.a., Feb '4, 1869. n23
FOR SALEI
J. L. KKET.AIKOXER
[Ins, at his CARRIAGU FAC
TORY, on 1)cSisrd Street, a fine,
stork of handsome buggies, and car
riages made to triner, especially for this mar
ket -CH-lEAP FOR CASH i!
Blacksmithin g and repairing neatly execut
ed at this shop, joining the Factory.
1.H.. ItlAXER, Z. a. ULOCKER,
New Orleans. Trenton.
MAXEY & BLOCKER,
TRJNTON, LA.,
RECEIVING ANjD FOR1VA.T:T DING inarchants
and 1 ealers in Dry Goods, Gr~nCries, DOnt. ShoeRs
Clothlnig W1estern I'romdre and lIIonta tiont Suplhlies.
Te h-tven erected a largi. WAREHOtUlS E on tin,
Ibmnk tif thte river anti are prepared to store aU freight
or cotton at lot rates.
I'e reepectfully solicit the patronage of the pnhltic.
fh;,l,.t arkd i rtiti !, ti far cstttoc. .a:5l
GOVERNOR'S MESSAGE.
Governor Tarinoth's annual
message was submitted to the
Legislature on the 5th inst. We
select the following extracts from
the message. lbeing all of the doc
unlent we consider of interest to
the people of the State at large:
POLITICAL.
The strongest tendencies of the
American people, as manifested
not only in the war but equally
in the late popular elections, are
personal freedom and national an
thority, the largest liberty to the
individual and the amplest and
fullest obedience to the govern
ment. With the vindication of
the natural authority, and tile res
toration of peace, these tendeln
cies have become more fully ex
pressed in the laws of the land,
and as they are recognized by the
whole people, liberty of opinion,
of speech and of action, and pro
tection to life and property shall
become the heritage of every
American citizen. I congratulate
you, gentlemen, upon the good
feeling that exists among the
people of both races, and the
cheerfulness with which they are
accepting the new order of things
and the earnestness with which
our people are adldressing them
selves to further and protect the
great interests committed-to theirI
hands. A beneficent Providence
has aided us in the restoration of
our fortunes by granting an abun
dhant yield of the lproducts of the
soil and unprecedented health
among our population.
My congratulations ended, al
low me to call your attention to
the grave matters of interest that
wrill claim your careful considera
tion anld judicious action during,
the present session of your hono
rable body.
FINANCES OF TIE STATE.
The financial condition of the
State claims your careful consid
eration. It is such as to emabar
rass my adminiistration, and the
credit of the State, as tested by
the prices commanlaede by her se
curities, is not satisfactory. *
A wise use of the State credit,
sustained by judicious legcislation
and administered by faiitlhful olli
cers, is all necessary in the prem
ises. Wte have not always used
the credlit of the State for practi
cable and feasible purposes, but
still, if need be, iun great works
of internal improvements, under
Iproper checks and restraints, her
credit might be safely used to a
much greater extent than has
been already done. She is amply
able to pay her debts. Why should
her securities be depreciated?
One vital cause of this is to be
found in the legislation of the
State. Inheriting a large floating
indebtedness with the matured
couponls fromi 1S61 to 1SiS, you
found your financial condition
critical, and were complnlelled to
levy the one per cent. tax for spe
cial plurlposes, and at the same
time the general tax of one-cquar
of one per cent. To lighten the
burdens of taxation, you, in yourl
last assion, authorized each of
these taxes to be paid in matured
coupons and warrants of the Au
ditor of Public Accounts, consun
ing thereby so much of the reve
nue of the State as to leave
unprovi(led for the interest on a
large portion of your pulblic secu
rities and the Treasury of the
Stlate without suflicient funds to
meet tile current expenses of the
governmncnt.
The law was defective, either
in the amount of tile tax levied,
or else permitting warrants with
out limit to be substituted for the
tax. But a more potent cause of
our financial embarrassment and
depreciated credit than evenm de
fective legislation will be found
in the maladmistration of the
Audlitor of Public Accounts, who,
taking advantage of this law and
the necessities of the people, has
prostituted his office by practic
ing extortion u1pon individuals
i and fraud upon the State. The
conduct of this officer has been so
reprehensible in its character and
so damaging in its influence upon
tihe finqncial condition of the State
that I shall at an early day make
it the subject of a special mes
sage to your honorable body,
that you may take such action as
the ends of justice and the pro
tection of public interests may re
quire. The fiscal year ends on
the thirty-first of)December, which
prevents my having the reports
of the financial oifficers of I he
State in time to present in mny
message either a full exhibit or a
full disscussion of our financial
affairs. So soon as these reports
are received I will lay before you
mIny views as to the best method
of providing for the liabilities of
the State as they mature.
TIHE LEVEES.
This is a subject of great mnag
nitude and difliculty, and one of
primary importance to the State.
No matter what plan may be
adopted for the work, nor through
what agencies, public or private,!
it may be done, an adequate and
permanent levee system should
embrace in its sphere of opera
tions at least the three States of
Arkansas, Mississippi and Louis
inna, and will for its success de
mand the hearty operation of said
States. This is indeedl a work of
so much magnitude, and so gen
eral in its interests and relations, I
as in my judgment, to demand
legislation and aid from the na
tional government. The millions
of acres of fertile land permanent
ly reclaimed by such system of
improvements would, in its annu
al return of revenues to the coun
try, amplily provide both for the
construction and maintenance of
the levees. Looking to this end,
I recommend that the Board of
Public Works be authorized and
instructed on behalf of the State
of Louisiana to bring this subject
to the attention of the Legisla
tures of MIississippi and Arkansas,
andl before the National Congress,
and to solicit from them such nac
tion and co-operation as may be
necessary in the premises. In
the meantime the levees of Louis
iana demand your prompt atten
tion: I cannot too earnestly comn
mend this subject to your c nsid
eration. Next to the peace and
order of society, it is the most
important matter that yon will
consider during the present ses
sion. On the erection of these
levees depends the p)rosl)perity of
three-fourths of the total popula
tion of the State, they being
necessary for the protection of at
least twenty-five parishes which
furnish more than three-fourths
of the revenue for the support of
the governmuent. The 3oarcld of
Public Works will lay before you,
at an early day, their annual
report, showing the condition of
the levees, and containing the
estimate of their engineers, to
gether with their reconinienda
tions thereon, relative to the work
to be d(lone in the current year.
I recommend the assessment of a
special tax for levee purposes, and
in order to meet the immediate
wants of the Board, I suggest
that you authorize the hoard of
Public Works to issue certilicates
of indebtedness. bearing interest)
to be paid as rapidly as this tax
is collected.
PUBLIC EDUCATION.
You need no lengthy and la
bored discussion to impress you
with the importance of edIucation.
Without it the duties of a citizen
are difficult, andl we who have
enfranchised a race and have
taught that Americani citizenship
is the crowning glory of our lRe
publican institutions, Imust appre
ciate that education is the first
and most indispensable want of
the citizen. Self protection and
self government alike demand
the enlightenment of the masses.
The report of the Superintendent
of Public Education will show
you the impracticable character
of the present law. The machin
cry is cumblrous and expensive,
so mnuchso that it has proven a
ftilure. I respectfully suggest
that the plan be simnpliiedl, the
districts enlarged andl powers and
discretion of the State Board in
creasecd. With these changes in
the law, success is possible, but
will even then (lepend largely on
a faithfill administration thereof.
Your attention is respectful
ly called to the claims of the
Military AcadZey, which is tem
porarily located at Baton Rouge
since the burning of its buildings
at Alexandria; and to those of the
Centenary College at Jackson.
PUBLIC IMPROVEMENTS,
Several private bills, looking
to the construction of railroads
and canals in the State were
passed by your honorable body
during your last session. Some
have been aplproved by me and
become laws. From others I have
felt it my duty to withhold my
approval. These various enter
prises give some promise of suc
cess, but have not progressed as
ralpidly as was c-xpected.
The New Orleans, Mobile and
Chattanooga Railroad Company
have not begun the work of con
structing their road on the west
side of the river. The difficulty
ot olbtaining engineers, and the
illness of those employed during
the summer months, have delay
edl until recently the completion
of their survey. They now prom
ise an early completion of the
road, makiag connection .etwveen
this city and Houston, the rail
road center of Texas.
MISSISSITPPI AND MEXICAN GULP
SHIP CANAL.
The construction of dredge
boats and furnishing them with
machinery has occasioned -some
delay in this important improve
ient. The work is being vigor
ously pressed forward. Three
large dredge boats are now en
gagedl in the work of excavation,
and in a few days two more pow
erful dredges will be added to the
number. An early completion of
the canal is confidently expected.
I3MTMGATION.
Population is a prime want of
the State. With less than 800,
000 . souls within our limits, we
could easily sustain ten times
that number.
No section of the Union in fer
tility of its soil, the variety and
value of its productions, the salei
brity of its climate, and the genial
and hospitable character of its
people, offers larger inducements
to emigrants from our sister States,
or from foreign countries. The
repo-t of the Commissioners of
Immigration will inform you of
the result of their labors for the
past year. I am happy to say
that this bureau is fast becoming
self-sustaining, and will not need
an appropriation for its support.
I am not prepared to suggest any
additional legislation on the sub
ject, believing that a faithful use
and hearty support of the agen
cies already established will com
pass the desired object.
Ben. Butler's long letter to the
venerable, hale, hearty and robust
Philosopher of the White Hat on
the policy of vengance comes to
us in full. The question discus
sed is whether the South, like an
oyster, shall be eaten raw or in
every style. The party by the
name of Butler is very fond and
alfectionate in his appeals to the
illustrious author of the great
standard work of the age on po
litical economy. The views of
the hero of Fort Fisher may be
imagined from the following ex
tracts from his letter: "My dear
sir, * * white and black *
flag * country * * darkest
hour of its history. Contrast, if
you please, my dear Mr. Grecley,
Tennessee, with * Texas *.
Do not, my dear Mr. Greeley,
mistake the difference ". One
or the other of these views of ours
must be wrong, my dear Mr.
Greeley . My dear Sir, and the
'Tribmule, that powerful engine *.
I shall be happy, my dear Mr.
Greeley, to continue this corres
pondence *. Franking privilege
n not yet abolished *. MyI
dear Mr. Greeley." - Courier
Joun ,al.
FALSE PRETENCEs.-The pre
ten'lerl reason why Attorney Gen
oral Hoar is shelved, is locality.
The true reason is, that he has
expressed opinions of the uncon
stitutionality of certain acts of!
Congress, and does not like the
Radical plan of sunbjngating the
'Judiciary. This killed him off.
Centralization is now almost su
preme. Farnsworth, Dawes and
Bingham are alarmed, and enter
protests as boldly as they dare.
But it is too late. The Republic
of Washington is sacriaced to the
demon of RIadicalismu.
Advertising RgiiegulaioI
Transtent advertesement must be Opa for i
advance.
Caids oe a aJM character-when sdmitasbths
will be char Q doable our regular adrsteug ·ratse
A~ll advert fite ent to this office, when ne
otherwise ordered, will be Inserted til fWbid.P' si
charped secrdicngly.
No fractions of squares counted a, such, btt thry
will be charged as whole seqcdrcaln every instance.
Obituary and Marriagenotice. will be charged as
advertisements.
t[ Professinalt cards 00 per a mu 6 mounths
"12,50, In advance.
AGENTS
The following Agents are authorized to act for
the Traona aPH :
Tardrrew & C..................... New Yo.
'Wharton & Ce.................... .lNw Orleans.
Mcintyro & Co...............
Prank Michani................... ""
John JpanIey......................
ADVICE TO THE GIBLS.-DO not
estimate the worth of a young
man by his ability to talk non
sense, nor by the length of his
mustache.
Do not imagine that an extra
ribbon, tied about the neck, can
remedy the defect of a soiled col
lar or an untidy dress.
If your hands are browned,by
labor, do not envy the lily fingers
of Miss Fuss and Feathers, whose
mother works in the kitchen,
wvhile she lounges in-the parlor.
.If a dandy, with a cigar be
tween his fingers, ask you ifsmok
ing is offensive to you, tell him
emphatically, "Yes." The habit
should be, even though the odor
may not.
Do not waste your tears on the
imaginary sorrows of Alonso and
Melissa, nor the trials of the dime
novel heroines. Seek rather to
alleviate the woes of the suffer
ing one on earth.
If your dress is inconveniently
long, and a gentleman steps upon
it, don't be angry, but meekly
beg his pardon, as you ought.
Always cherish a partiality for
the snmell of dishwater. It -is
more conducive to helath, and far
less expensive than "Boquet of
Eden."
THE ELECTION OP SPEAKER.
The resignation of C. W. Lowell
as Speaker of the House of Rep
resentatives necessitated an elec
tion yesterday, immediately after
the assembling of the House. The
resignation of Mr. Lowell ivtas
not voluntary, but was forced
upon him by a vote of the House.
The election of Pr. Mortimry
Carr by a very large majority-a
vote of 51 to'26-is considered as
an indication of the 'strength of
Governor Warmoth, as be used
all of his influnence to defeat Mn
Carr, who was. numbered among
the friends and supportters of the
Auditor. If this vote be taken
as a fair test of the Governor's
influence, his efforts to' procure
impeachment of Auditor Wickliffe
will prove abortive, and it would
be well for his Excellency to look
to his own household.-N. O. Bul
letin.
THE SUPREME CoURT.-The Su
preme Court of the United States
hesitates
1. To declare the Legal Ten
ders unconstitutional-which al
most everybody believes is the
conclusion necessarily reached by
that body.
2. To declare the Missouri Test
Oath unconstitutional-a conclu
sion everybody sees it also must
have reached.
The Court is evidently reluct
ant to do its inevitable duty, over
awed by threats in Congress, we
were about to write--but does not
this hesitation encourage the
Drakes, and others in Congress,
to try to degrade the Court, and
courts must do their d. des fear
lessly, without regard to conse
quences, if they expect to be
respected and powerful.-N. Y.
Express.
At Milwaukee, a few nights ago,
a German laborer named Weber
gave his wife a fifty-dollar bill
for safe keeping. Not having had
so large a sum in the house at one
time for years, Mrs. Weber natu
rally felt very solicitous about its
safety, and after much thought
secreted it in the bowl of the
coffee-mill, as a place nriot likely
to be spied out by burglars. Her
husband, on rising next morning,
ground the coffee as usual, and
with it the precious earnings of
months. The poor woman swoon
ed on discovering the mishap,
and has been confined to her bed
ever since the unfortunate occur
rence.
MARRIED. - One cold winter
night some twenty-five years ago
a couple appeared under the win
dow of a squire in Washington
county, New York, and called for
him. The squire got out of bed
and asked what they wanted.
"Wanted to get married." 'Glar
ried and be darned," said ' the
squire and shut the window. It
was a short ceremony but they
considered it sufficient and they
are living together to-day as man
and wife.

xml | txt