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The Greenville times. [volume] (Greenville, Miss.) 1868-1917, February 06, 1875, Image 1

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jlishtd every Saturday
it
BY THE
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Jt publication. No proof
1 until paid for"
RLLE THREE.
JU.Y, HALF-YEARLT AKb
( YEARLY BATES:
Ml CI H
ilils
I OCCPIED,
are .: i 8 12 20
tree. 10 15 80
in Column 18 25 85
t Column ... 25 40 75
iron 40 75 125
V Regular Advertisement
paid at the beginning of
irter.
j RULE FOUR.
torlal Notices, except
)ompaning the first Inser
ui advertsement, will be
2o cents per line; Obitua-
same. Simple announce-
deaths or marriages free,
f who wish to indulge In
Vermed "personal notices,"
equlred to pay In accord-
the nature of their art!
RULE FIVE.
AKKOUKCtKO
' dates:
CANDI
and District .Offices, $20
inty Ofllees:.. ............... 10
it Offices 5
RULE BIX.
sfrom transient customers
r written, for Job work, ad
r, or subscription, must be
anted by the Cash to obtain
n. Accounts of regular
ersdue and presented the
icb month.
,st of Comt Terms.
V to tiansfer the counties of
a and Coahoma from the
lith (II) to the twelfth (12)
Ml District, and tue county
Jlore from the twelfth (12)
I eleven h (11) Judicial l)is-
tnd to tlx ue times ror hoi'
the Circuit Courts in mid
et.
2. Bo It further enacted.
e Circuit Courts of the Kiev-
Irtlulnl District shall be hoi
I continue for the times as
Iter stated should the busl
the Court so long reiilre.
i county of Bolivar niin
2 on the flrst Monday of
and September aim continue
tuUUlul (Iii.vh. -
ie county of Washington
lining on the third Monday
,'lt and Bcptemiier. and con
ventv-'our Judicial days.
t county of Issaquena com-
tr on the soventli Monday
e flrst Monday in March and
her, and continue twelve
1 1nvs.
s county of Sunflower com
g on the ninth Monday after
st Monday in ninrcu auu
be-, ami continue six
I days.'
e countv of Leflore, common
eleventh Monday after the
Iondny in March and Scp-
!, and continue twelve juui
ys.
ibved March 20, 1374.
m OF SUPERVISORS.
)lar meetings are held by the
j of Supervisors of each coun
lie 1st Mondays of January,
July, August, ana uciooer,
ay continue in session 4 days
I lOllglT.
(lancry District; continue 0
In Tunica, 0 in Coahoma, 0
Mivar and 12 lu Washington:
today (5th) January, Tunica
(12th) " Coahoma
m nmii " llollvnr
(20tli) " Washington
ndny, (Oth) April, Tunica
" (13th) " Coahoma
" (iOth) " Bolivar
f" (27th) " Washington
ndny (Oth) July, Tunica
" (13th) " Coahoma
1 -nnn " Mnllvnr
(27th) " Washington
rtiday (Oth) October, Tunica
(13th) " Coahoma
(20st) " Bolivar
(27th) " Waslngton
ncerytlou" will be held In
lens County 14th District,
h Mondays after 4th Mon
f January, April, July and
ibe,r. -
ierms of the Supreme Court
mmence on the 8d Mondays
Hand October.
Town Council meets regular
1st Tuesday of each month
I. MOBEIS
Wholesale Dealer lu .
2IGN AND DOMESTIC
VINES, LIQUORS,
;aro, Tobacco,
ETC.
1ECT IMPORTER OF
:rr.ia Wlr.ss, Chan-
;r.ti, Gr&ndys, Etc.
berry St.. 0kekvillb
4. ' Mlii.
vol. r.
G. A. PULTON,
BLACKSMITH.
BlacksaatifclaK sirs Horse
SbSttlMg.
ALL MANNER OF
Machine and Boiler
Work done expeditious and
skillfully.
tShop on Mulberry street.
North of Washington avenue.
Green vine, ov.-t, un-iy.
COAL! COAL
WSTl will deliver coal anywhere
In lh city, by the wagon load at
Eighty Centra Box:
AT THR--
"fTARD In any quantities at
15 Cents a Ditt.
Coal Yard on Central arenut
near the Wharf-Ilnat.
J. M. WHITKHILL 4 CO.,
Ity H. B. Putnam. Agent.
nQv21,'74iil0-tf.
Beat and Shoo Storo.
I- II AVE Inst receirel a largo
stock of BOOTS AND SHOES,
Or best quality and latest styles.
And have secured ono'of the brick
buildinjrs now boiuir' built by I.
Isenberg, ou Mulberry St., where I
win iteni in oopta ana snoes ex
clustvelr. Until this store Is som
ploted. Customers are inviled to
call at in v store corner of Wash
inrton and Locust sts.
I also have a choice stock of
Dry uoous, urocories, etc., cheap
for cash. nov7,'7.j i.uoodmam
8. C. ELLIOTT. W. O. WKTHKBBH
Elliott d Wotecrbcj,
BLACKSMITHS.
nAOzxi7n cno?
tlAn thnronnhljr mcparH to mannCia
lur W'ugoiu ml CsrrUKc, of njr ctjrls awl
diMlrn.
-KmeoBtiiiillv na hswl snd ftirsilcsl
rcilucei n!c everything la (heir liar nfbnsW
hum, trlrelwl rrniu lh nmt mutrrul Ihemsr-
ketairimu. Awo new uunriu, wagou, as.
umnviiiF) aot. i, iei-ni.
EM DITLCR,
SILVER 8 M X X II,
Op
)
OREKNVILLK, MISS.
Tl?SPF.OTFITr.f.V InAtrma the
nubile that he Is prepared tore
fiuir yu utiles, uiocks anu jeweiry,
n the most perfect manner, guar
iiiiwiuK PBiiRiuution in an cases.
AuifUst 27, 1870-qr
J. LENQS5IGLD,
Dealer lit
Flour, Eaooa, Zicxd,
Meitl, Corn, (sugar, Coffee, .
HolttHseH, Cobaeco,
Tin and Wooden Ware,
uoTiorjo,
CROCKERY,
Jug and GIj:j Vtre.
A.. IS. FTNTJLY So CO.
DKAUiltS IX
DBU G
AND
TTEI)ICnJE3;
PERFUMERY, TOILET SOAPS,
Paints, Oils, Dyes, Class.
ALSO
SODA AND rurSHAT.
WATERS
On Dranglit aallaEottlu.
Corner Washington Arenne and
Mulberry streets,
Feb 6-(TO. GREENVILLE.
G. EtIOG
. DKALIS IN
Faclly Grccsrlcs,
OonfseUenrics,
CANED-PRU1TS,
PICKLkS ft PRESERVES,
WINES & LIQUORS,
TOBACCO & CIGARS.
Also at my bar
NICEST DRINKS
are mixed by nersons who know
exactly how they should be prepar-
eu. aisu are nepi on nana.
HAVANA CIGARS,
of the richest fragrance. To those
who desire a quelt Saloon, good
Drinks, and fine Cigars, wt say,
Try s7 Cdccn,
Ou Mulberry Street.
Greenville, liisslsslppl,
July 6th, 1873-tf.
W Ay Ay Ay v ty V a
GREENVILLE, WASHINGTON CO.,
TV Eefc&ScM Frtttfts.
All over the North and West
eminent and lire-tried Republicans
have expressed their condemna
tion of the gross outrage perpetra
ted upon Louisiana and upon lib
erty by the recti) t military seixnre
of her Legislature. The question
has come home to thoughtful men,
to those whom the Administration
cannot buy and cannot intimidate,
Is it better that the Republican
party or the Republic itself shall
perish f And the answer is as em
phatic and as universal as the
response to the signal gnu from
beleagnrcd Sumter in 18ei. To
show how wide-spread is this re
volt agaiust Grant's last tyrannous
attempt to crash s sovereign State,
we have but to open the pages of
any Republican paper of character
and Indncuce. Tbey speak with
but oue voice that of unqualified
aud blistering condemnation, of
this great Iniquity. Amongst the
many who have, uttered their pro
tests agaiust the oat rage we take
the following from the Morning
Herald and Gazette, of Utica, New
York. It is a Journal older than
the current century. It is pub
lished in one of tho citadels of the
strength of the Republican party,
of which it is one of the honored
and trusted organs. Its senior
proprietor and mauager is Hon.
Ellis II. Roberts, the present rep
reseutative in Congress of the
Oneida district. This paper rep
resents au Intelligent constituency
and supports the cause of its party
with ability. In this able and In
fluential Republican journal of
the 19th January there is an edi
torial headed : " Reconitruction
o Falturt t " from which we clip
the concluding paragraphs, for the
especial perusal of our readers i
"The people of Louisiana do
not believe they are governed by
au administration legally and fair
ly elected. Hence, we believe,
arises all the trouble in that State.
Ueuce tho White League Hence
the Cooshatta massacre. Hence
tho Pcnn iusurrcctiou. Hence the
iutliuidation of the negro. But,
we are told, if we let these fellows
hare control of the State govori
ment they will redouble their out
rages. Thoy will ostracise all who
were not rebels with them. They
will grind dowu the negro and
frame their laws to his destruc
tion. Why, then, did you restore
these men to citischship after the
rebellion ? Why did you not hang
them, throttling them and their
perpetual treason together? "Why
did you graut amnesty to them,
tnus enabling them to hold the
offices which you now fear to en
trust to them? Haviug dono all
this, you must take the cousequen-
ees, though the heavens fall. If
they aro lu a majority there you
must pass over the State govern
ment to their coutrol, or you aro
yourselves the traitors, commit
ting treason against the constitu
tion, which you framed to suit
yourselves.
"Events have demonstrated to ns
that these meu ark in a majority
iu Louisiana. - That being the case
we believe that if tho control of
the State is surrendered to them,
ss our constitution requires it to
be, there will be an end, at once
and forever, to all trouble In Lou
isiana. There will be no end to
the trouble until that is done.
Oh, but the negro must bo pro
tected in his rights ; the new re
bellion must be crushed, is the re
sponse. True enough; but the
negro can never bo protected in
his rights until the white man is
granted those rights which belong
to him. The 'new rebellion is
not a rebellion aaalnat the Union ;
it is a rebellion agaiust the glaring
injustice of the Kellogg govern
mont, which' is forced upou the
people of Louisiana by the army
of the United States.
"But the White League, shall
we let that govern Louisiana?
Yes, if it has a majority of the
votes. What then will become of
the poor negro ? The enforcement
act protects him. If the whole
machinery of the State govern
ment were in tho hands of the
White Leaguers, the negro would
not s'uffer ss much as he does now.
The enforcement act makes intim
idation aud violence agaiust the
negro an ofleuse agaiust the Fede
ral laws. The Federal courts will
protect him. The Federal mar
shals will follow close after those
who persecute htm. The Federal
army, If need be, will see to It
that this lair Is enforced to tho
letter; that no cltlsen is deprived
of any right that belongs to him.
"This Is the only possible peace
able solution of the Louisiana
question. It Is the only constitu
tional solution the only oue that
carries oat the Republican policy
of reconstruction." .
Ai GatiiM f tie Conspiracy.
New York Herald.
In Louisiana the case is bad
enough ss it is, but suppose that
out of these even's should come a
colludon of the people with the
troops. What then? It would be
a collision that would arise from
popular fury, tut the citlsens are. It
Is clear, resolutely resolved against
the resort to violence. It would be
au outburst of popular passion over
riding the restraints of better judg
ment Therefore it would not be
resistance of the sort thst suddenly
arose In September. It would not
surrender at any formal show of au
thority or In any spirit of discre
tion. It would fight. Somebody
would be hurt. Naturally the peo
ple who wpuhl be most hurt would
be the small force of United States
troops on the spot, compelled to
face a whole population of resolute
and desperate spirits. The troops
would be driven out and the people
would hold theetty. Grant would,
thereupon, "take command In per
son." Me wouiu concentrate an
the available force of the govern
ment and endeavor to take the city;
but he" would probably fail, for In
support of the people of New Or
leans would Immediately rally, to
light their battles over again, the
whole of the population of Missis
sippi, Alabama, Georgia, Texas
and Arkansas, and the men who
once marched under the Confeder
ate colors. We would be in the
presence of a new rebellion, fomen
ted by the Executive; and the
President would call on Congress
for troops and money. Would
Congress vote them? There can
be no doubt of It. It must be re
membered that this Congress still
represents the principles and the
party that the country has repudl
ated at the polls, and In the chance
of a new conflict aad a revived re
bellion It would see the hope of a
renewed hold on the nation, It
would vote the President the hun
dred thousand men he wauts, and
If within a year from this time
Grant has command of one hundred
thousand men the next election for
the Presidency will be held at the
Greek kslends, or whenever else
His Excellency may please. By
all means, then, let there be no con
fllct, for that Is the thing that is
most desired by the military sat
rapy of the White House, which
has Grant In Its hands.
Fiit Type-Settiafr,
Mr. John R. Pepper, a St. Louis
printer, recently set 7,695 ems of
solid nonpareil In Ave hours. In
1805, en the Jackson News, a paper
published by E. M. Yerger ami
John W. Ward, Mr. Thad. Potter,
a black-eyed, nervous, restless
wretch of a printer, set one hund
red yards of solid long primer in
twelve hours. His Honor John
McGill, now Mayor of Jackson, but
at that time foreman of the News
office, will cheerfully qualify to the
above assertion.
If Mark Cheek should be so for
tunate as to secure the contract for
carrying the malls from Memphis
to Vloksburg, he would punctually
fullfll his contract. But this, we
fear, will cause his bid to be reject
ed, for the shysters at Washington
can get more money from those
who do not Intend to' carry out
their contract than from Captain
Cheek, who has never lost a trip
on his contract from Memphis to
.Napoleon.
A magnificent ruin bn Tuesday
night prevented the minstrels from
coming to time with their perform
ance. The raiu about six o'clock
was terrific. Up to that hour the
boys bsd fondly hoped that there
wouldn't be much of a shower,
JBut when the last great avalanche
of water came, the curtain fell and
the boys tossed up the sponge. The
elemental opposition was a little
too strong.
The Khedive of Egypt has just
presented to General Sherman's
daughtsra set of Jewels valued at
three hundred and fifty thousand
dollars, In return for advlos given
him by General Sherman, and for
which that old brick, (unlike his
communder-in-cblef, U. S. 6.) re
fused to receive any compensation.
Now if the tawny Egyptian will
make a pass at Us he will did that
we are not ' stuck up " like old
Tecumseh. We will furnish him
with all the advice he requires at
half the above figures.
" Wo pledge the Rcpublicsn par
ty of Mississippi to economy and
reform," said tho platform upon
which Governor Ames was elect
ed. The Republican Legislature
redeems that pledge by voting
dowu every measure of practical
reform, and by the passage of a
bill to provide for an army of ruf
fians to provoke riot and blood
shed and to further .plunder tho
people. In the light of such acts,
It would seem that the platform
was a dolaiisi asi a euarc.
t
MISS.
SATURDAY, FEU. CI, lSTrt.
JtL
The fast ef air Rtrnt War.
Mr. David A. Wells has furnish
ed the Cobden Club of England
with an essay upon the erpenses,
income and taxes of the United
State. We copy the following
stateuitnt of ihecat of th Rebell
ion :
The whole cost of the war to the
Northern and Southern States from
ISol to 1S4 is estimated as follows :
Lives, 1,000,000; property, by des
truction, waste, etc., $D,000,000,IK.
The gross enpenditiires of the Uni
ted States fiomJune 1861 to July
1800, S.,792,2.7,000. Of this the ac
tual war expenses were about $,-
312,237,000.
The expenses of States, counties,
cities and towns in tlir) Northern
States, not Vrpresented by funded
debts, have been estimated al $o00,-
0 )0,000. The increase of State debU
on the war account was $123 000,
000. The Increase of city, town and
county debts Is estimated at $200,
000,000,000. Total war expenses of
tj)6 loyal States and the National
Government, $0,105,237,000.
The estimated direct expendi
tures of the Confederate States on
account of the war were $2,000,000,-
000.
Aggregated estimated expenses
of the war to the country, North
and South, $8,165,237,000.
The total receipts froin all sources
during the second year of thenar
were Joss than $-12,000,000. Tho ex
penditures were $00,000,000 per
monthat the rate of $700,000,000 a
year.
' ASkarpTrickr
VatMsgtta Gtmetuiiaos, Osaritr
. s, tarsal.
Washington, D. C. Jan. 24.
Among . the desperate measures
suggested to save the Republican
party and perpetuate its rule over
the Southern States, is the proposi
tion which wss broached In the
caucus of the members of the House
last Friday night hy Gen. L. Hurl
but, of Illinois, that the Republi
can majority should take advan
tage of their opportunity, and at
this session Appropriate money
enough to supply the arqiy for two
fiscal years ItiHteud of one, as has
been the practice since the founda
tion of the Government. This pro
position, which almost borders on
revolution, finds special favor urn
ong tho cnrpet-tiaggers, and the
mure extreme men like Butler and
Morton. The Idea (it Is allegod)
first came from the Immediate
friends of- tho President, who, it is
authoritatively stated, indorses the
Hchune, aud is auxious to see il
carried.
The party lenders, who are driven
aluiofct to the verge of despair, feel
Unit unless they have free swing
with tho military in the South,
thore is no prospect whatever of be
ing able to carry a single Southern
Stute in 187H, and that, In fuut. un
less the dliiirent rotton Republic-tin
Htnte governments are misttilned as
to-day In Louisiana and Mississip
pi, not one ortiiem will be in exist
ence us soon us the neoplo slinll
have n chuncs to express their
opinions at the polls.
This Is how Bismarck lookod
when meeting his enemies in de
bate in the German Parliament:
"His gigantic frame fairly trem
bled with pnssioiii his gray eyes
flushed, nnd heavy mousUche
bristled ; a paper ho took up during
the first speech, for purpose of rel-
erence, vibrated visibly Jn the pns
sloimtc grnsp of his sinewy hands,
and ever and anon Ills closely but
toned uniform btcamv tense almost
to splitting across his huge chest,
as he sat hack his shoulders and
threw up his licud, reitrdinghls
foes with that Implacable glance
which never fails to shake the
strongest nerves, when he durts It
at on oljoet of his hatred or con
tempt. In the course of nn experi
ence neither brief nor ordinary, I
have seen many remarkable men
at moments when they have been
expected to labor under excitement
of the most vehement description ;
but I have never yet witnessed the
consciousness of unbounded power
expressed in the pliyslquo and
bearing of a human belugas I saw
it In Prince Bismarck. As he stood
forward, facing the house, the na
turul sternness of his aspect accent
ed by the natural rigidity of his
military teuue, he looked to mo
like a Colossus, unquestionably ca
pable of bearing upou his mighty
shoulders cares and responsibilities
that would.crush a common mortal
Into powder."
l .- - . M
"We can't undertake to run State
governments in all the Southern
Htates," said Mr, Lincoln. But
what was difficult to "Honest Old
Abo" is Just as easy as rolling offa
log to his degenerate succes-or.
It would be nice If a few regi
ments of United States troops
should surround the Htatehouse this
morning aud admit only those
whom tbey plossed to tbelegiala-
II. k.ll. Tti.t'a a ' -rtlln
la I rxtoUta-fl Jxa 1. 1 r
(times
Goad Xews far the Cows.
.Who has not secu the barbarous
operation of boring cattle for the
hollow horu ? Ami who ever saw
it and did not rejoieo that ho was
not a cow? Well, tho cattle will
be glad to hear that this barbarous
custom is about to be done away
with, aud that it was a practir.o of
senseless cruelty. Professor Crcsy
is the friend to cattlo who has ex
ploded the "hollow-horn" hum
bug, lit! tells the "cow doctors"
there is no such disease as tho
hollow bom. The professor has
cut opcu innumerable horns and
found them all hollow. Tho cure
practised is.to.bom iuto the horn
and iiiject somo remedy. Now, a
littld common scuse ought to teach
anyfarmcr that every horu Is as
hollow as Ames's head. Horned
cattle will be glad to hear that the
surgery of the gimlet is uot neces
sary to their health, as scarcely
any of them ever get tliayugh life
without being horribly bored.
i .
SckaoImatcs-w-Tlkfre They Are.
Colonel John Forsythe, Editor of
the Mobile Register, thus congrat
ulates an old friend on the occasion
of his elevation to a Bishopric:
"Rev. Dr. Thomas M. Dudley, nf
Virginia, recently of Baltimore,
has been elected Bishop of Ken
tucky, to succeed Bishop Cummins
wbo was deposed for Insubordina
tion.'' Ah! Tom, my boy, do you
remember the 1 Dovlls of the Uni
versity of Virginia? What Jolly
times those were I Now you are a
Bishop! Harry Teulman is a
Judge. Otey is out West dealing
faro. Not lohg we picked up Pt
tertcn on the streets, dead drunk,
and forwarded htm to Mississippi.
Arnell, of Tennesfrf, turned radi
cal, went to Congress, and died.
War moth made Kennurd a Su
preme Court Judre of Louisiana.
Thompson was killed leading an
Arkansas roglineut at Shiloli. All
are struggling to keep our n'mes
above watei. Yon n lone are Bish
op, my dear Tom! From the news-
paper omces or tue uuir, iroin Hu
tu ro banks of the West, from luili-
clal .seats, from tho studies of pro-
lessors ana tue ccctesiusties, we
take off our hats and cheer for the
.new Kentucky Bishop ns the lies!
uftniit.i ri.ii.tsa. i.t-i fvii inur iiiiaii..ii
piHiiuu iiinrw ii lfr,il t-s. a Hiiviicuii
truest friend and purest spirit old
Virginia ever gave uirtti in."
Merrill and Sheridan have pn
raded tho statement that In some
parishes iu Louisiana, tho white
pcoplo had pledged themselves to
no longer employ those who per
sistently and blindly voted to ruin
thcic. 'TIicbo military statesmen
thought this was very outrageous
on the part of tho white pcoplo ot
Louisiana. What , then, do I hoy
think of their mastor, who in his
impotent- malico agaiust William
Cullien Bryant, tho oldest and no
blest Republican editor in tho
Union, withdrew the government
advertisements from tho New
York Post? Mr. Bryant was a
Republican editor when Grant
was hauling wood. Mr. Bryant's
grent ability contributed to c!c
vato Grant to tho power he now
abuses. But Mr. Bryant, like cv
cry other independent Republican
has dared to condemn the Louisi
ana outrage,' and consequently lie
is made to feel tho wrath of the
offended administration. It is a
pitiful proceeding ou tho part of
the President, hut tho grand old
editor soars far above petty spite,
and tho Post will live and com
mand respect, even though its col
umns benr no olllclal patronage,
We huvo this to say in regard to
a telegraph to connect us with the
pcoplo who livo remote from this
headquarters of civilization this
gem of the bottom and queen of
tho swamps. Wo want nothing
to mako us a perfect jewel of a
city so much as wo need a tele
graph. Wo can get it so easy if
wo can get the business men of tho
town to sail iu for it. How wo
fretted nnd languished for news
during the Interruption of navi
gation hy tho ice. Important
events wcro transpiring in the
world beyond us of which we
anew noining. wiiiio wo were.
thus shut off, the merchant was
buying cotton iu tho dark, and i
litklng hundreds, perhaps thous
ands of dollars without a fact up
on which to base a calculation.
Ono of our merchants had goods
detained four weeks by tho Ice
barrier, when a flash of tho wires
would have sent hi gd career
ing over tho railroad to Memphis,
and he would have received them
within thrse or four days from the
date of M" order. Ills losses have
been fr niore thou ho would be
expected to contribute to tho se
curing a telegraph, lit view of
these things, the vexations, delays
and losses wtich result from our
unreliable mall arrangements, we
urge our business wen to bestir
the li tls cv.r-ct t:!
iv o. sir.
STEAM PLANING WORK
SAW AND GRIST MILL.
Urrriitiltc, 31iss.
NB. JOHNSON & CO.,
("ontrutors. Ituildent, ie..
regttoctnillv inform the nublin that
tnrougii tno agency or tue aoove
works, we are prepared to compete
with builders in any part of the
country for the construction of
houses or bridges, and guarantee
sMiiKiaction in pricesami quality oi
wort, unr
LIJMBRR YARD
InGrecnvillo l now well stocked
with choice varieties of seasoned
rINE AND CV PRESS j
which we offer at reasonable prices.
Plans and sneclrteatioim for hous
es lurnisiieti on application.
UNDEETAKBE,
A supply of both
Metallic and Wooden Cases
t
1
ot ull
hand.
sizes constantly kept on
Our Wood Coffins in cot uo in
Imitation of Metalics, and look full
as well. Cost from III) to $10. ao
cording to size mid trimming.
10.
J8
rns
00
3
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9
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52
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7)
in
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a.
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tr 9
c
5
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e 5
ft
ft
99
O
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Elliott & Fousse,
TIN, COPPER,
AND
Sheet Iroii-lVokera.
Guttering:, Spouting and
WELL. DUX VI27C
Done on 1iort notice.
ALSO DEALERS IN -
Cooking and heating stoves
PSrWe keep on hund all articles
generally round in a lirst-ciuss
TIN-HII01.
Cush paid for old Brass, Copper
Lead ami iron.
WASHINGTON BTRKET.
Bet. Mulberry and Locust.
scpr. in. '7-1.
SALOON!
32
KENNEDY & HANWAY.
, Bestct
WLYES $ LIQUORS
Puro HavanaTlgars,
Cull.orniu Wines,
f airer lleer. Etc.
ociO Mam (Street. Oreeuville, Miss.
Sale of School Land.
BY VIRTUE of the aiitiiority
vi..fii in ma. and in pur
suance of an order of the Board of
Supervisors of llie county or wasn
Ington, Htste of Mississippi, I will
oflcr at public sale and lease to tho
hiohoat bidder, at the door of the
Courthouse, on Monday, February
. .a im7,-. i i. l.. il.
jj H. u. Ji7tt, m.Minl IIIIIURt 111
county aforesaid, described as fol
lows, to wit:
Section Hi, township 18, range 0,
west; section 1(1, township 18, range
n.west. J. W. PfLriS.
County Superintendent KJuoutlon,
January 2, 1875. 224t
L. WILCZiriSKI ti CO
DFALMISIK
Bxy Cooda
AND
GROC Ell 1 13 &,
BOOTS and SHOES,
' AKD
PROFESSIONAL.
F. VALLIANT,
ATTORPi BY AT LAW
GREENVILLE, MISS.
Practice in Washington and Twa-
quena counties, and in the United
Mates Courts at Jackson. apit
ClI AS. W. CLARKE. JOHX W. SU1IXIS-
CLiBES It SHIELDS,
ATTOBXEYS AT LAW
On Walnut street, near the Courf'
House Greenville, Miss.
W. A, 1IAYCRAFT,
ATTORNEY AT LAW, '
UREENVILLE, . - MISH.
Makes the payment of taxes, tedsc , -
tion, sale and leasing of lands
speciality.
W. A. l'EKCT.
W. O. YCKOEK
Percy Ct Tcxgcr,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW.
Greenville, Miss.
W. K. TKItTU. D. M. BVCKKE't
TRIGG Ac BUCKNEE ,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW,
Greenville............. ....... .Miss.
Office tit Bank Building, Main t.
up-stalr
g W. FERGUSON,
JaTTOKJIETf AT ItAWf
flTIUi rKACTICE 10 the
la the Csart
fV of
Tuuica, Coaumaa, Boliva ,
Waaliiiictuu and Immtucub Csaatic t
aud attend to the sale, purchase an t
leasing of plantation sua payment t f
taxes. '
W. uTrbcliM. Jothaa Sklaarr,
Phelpft Cl Ciltlaner,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW
tlrceavltlo, Bias
erWill nraclice In the H. ti.
Courts, Supreme Court and thtf
Courts or Washington, Bolivar and
Sunflower Counties. foot. S.'74.
f. A MOXTOOKBBY.
a. . Hooaa.
ATTORNEYS AT LAW, '
Rivkrtox, Bolivar county, KU.
W.8. fARIBH,
ATTORNEY AT XaVtf
Maverbvillb,
InMMiasM CMBljr.
. October 8,'74-nB.
Dr. N. C. Skinner,
OFFERS HIS
PROFESSIONAL SZtiYICES
. TO THIS
Citlsens of ChrecaTiU
AND THE
County at Lirro.
Office at his dwelling on Maid
Street. may 23, 1874.
jyt. J. L. YOUNG,
DENTIBT.
Having located In Greenville1
respectfully informs the cltlr.cn
thereof anil surrounding countrv
that ho Is prepared lyattend to ail
the duties appertaining to his pro
fession. Those favoring him with
ihclr patronage may rest assured
that their work will he done In tho
most thorough and skillful manner
mid none but the host of materials
used, -p
Olllcont the residence of W. Hi
Whcaticy, near the Court House.
Parties desiring to be visited at
their residences in the country,
will lesve word al the oflce or st
Fiuliiy's Drug Store; octl7-6m.
Worthington, Buckrser & Co
BAr::iE;:3r
GREENVILLE, MISSISSIPPI
Transact a General ,
Banking StLSiacCSs
Collections made and proceeds
remitted, on day received
fRny and sell on commission
all kinds Bonds, Sorlp and war
rants, men 22, 187S.
E. VVIHTK,
CABINE? X2AC3&
A5D
UPIIOLSTEREa ,
DEALER tit- .
A LLkluds of Farnltore, Mattresses
ac. Bneclal sttentton paid to all
kinds of n Duirs. all kinds of Matties
es mado to order.
Locust fit. between Washington if.
and Main
GREEK V1LLK.MI&3,
nich 1, 1873-0m.
Arthur o'cc::::::j,
FASHION ABLIS
EOOT TTAHre
. BHOP OW
irrjUBzstBT STsnrf, ?
QreenYille, . . I'r'r'-
June 6, 1874-uU.
Livery & Clio C:
AKt
Fcsa crcrs
THE nndorslgnsd hereby sneans
' to the public, that tisy Uvs U
ken charge of their
ON WAHHINOTCJ AVIir- i
Best of attention rivea be
ENTRU8 rrD TO T .
STOCK for sale on tai v
ly.
- - , ( . '

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