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The Greenville times. [volume] (Greenville, Miss.) 1868-1917, March 14, 1903, Image 2

Image and text provided by Mississippi Department of Archives and History

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85034374/1903-03-14/ed-1/seq-2/

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DOCTORS.
G-PAYNE M. O. SHIVERS.
PAYNE & SHIVERS, M. D-
PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS.
Oflee over Clert-s drag store, W.UUrg
gtaUala. Telenoone
J. D. SMYTHE, M. D.
PHYSICIAN AND SCKGEOtf
OBoeupeUlr. or.r Brill's store, WsatalM
4m A. Telephone M.
C H. JONES, M. D.
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON,
loatk SnelbT street, owntuii.
E. C. SMYTHE, M. D.,
PHY8ICIAN AND SUBGKON
Offloe or Brill'. tore, """lSEifSo.""
ea WMktWrtoB svenue. W -"
WALDAUER COTTON CO.
COTTON FACTOR.
Liberal adunoee made on eonsigonwuu.
Don. W. Wa.blngton ave.
HenrvT.Ireys. John O. Archer
HENRY T. IREY & CO.
COTTON FACTORS;
Liberal advances mds on evBiignmenti.
PhoaeHo.C7. . Main Mrerl.
COST A PRETTY SUM.
Ceremonies at Durbar Required Ex
penditure of $10,000,000.
J. L BELL, M. D.,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON,
Offlott Pbelp. Building. Phone JM.
0 W. STONE, M. D.,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON.
OSeet Weinberg Bonding.
Residence Phone .
HOWARD T. BTEWAUT, D. D. 8..
BIGGS DI8BA8B.
JBS8B V. BOS WELL, D. D . 8.,
Crown and, Bridge Wort.
ORS. STEWART & BOSWELL,
DENTISTS.
Office over Brill's.
ItODH Distance Phone 520.
DR. J. S. BROWN,
DENTIST.
Dental Parlors uver Frank Binder's,
Washington Avenue.
DR. J. E. YOUNG,
DENTIST.
Dental Rooms over Fluley's Drug
Store. Entranoe on Walnut street
E. P. ODENEAL, M. D..
Has resumed practice. Office In
Welnbunr Building;. Pbone
LAWYERS.
LBROY PERCY R. B. CAMPBELL
PERCY & CAMPBELL,
ATTORN EY-AT-L A W.
OUijm Bank Bollding, Greenville, Miss
The Making of a Society Play
By CLYDE FITCH,
tad Am.rlckn Drama!!.
Lara Cimi Pral.nl for So gaeeaa
fmllr Carrrlsr Oat a SpeotaeU
Which Waa lalqae la ha
Aasala l World.
m. .v.. .i. maimirlrwnc of the
T IIOW l.UV I v
' ffurbar has gone, people are counting
the cost. Including we oui m
dian government will have to pay, the
expenditures Incurred by the Indian
princes and chiefs and the English
governors and lieutenant governors,
it Is safe to say that at least $10,000,-
000 has been spent in luriusxuug
spectacle unique in the annals of the
world.
The Indian government's Dill Is iiKe-
Jy to exceed $3,750,000. The cost to
TwH Ourmn oersonally has been very
great, for a large number of gnests
were entertained ry rum ecurcijr o
his own expense.
The expenses at the native princes
and chiefs vary greatly, from the $500,.
000 taid to have been spent by the
Nizam of Hyderabad to the $50,000,000,
Inr which sum the minor chiefs were
able to make but an indifferent dis
play. When it is remembered that the
number of these princes and chiefs
reaches nearly 100, the total expendi
ture can easily be calculated.
The governors of Madras and Bom
tiav and lieutenant arovernors of the
several provinces found it possible byJ
the exercise of cnrerui European su
pervision to keep down the complete
coat of their oamps to about $75,000.
Of the various events the procession
durbar was undoubtedly the most im
pressive, and th review of the retinnea
of the native chiefs was the most pic
turesque, while the natives appreciated
the fireworks most of all.
The ball in the Dewaninm was the
most gorgeous teene. as the investiture
was the most stately, but the weari
some state entry into Delhi was very
remarkable as an example of organiza
tion. It is wonderful that no accidents oc
curred during the long procession of
elephants, carriages, horse and foot
through the street.
Lord Cur?n is to be warmly con
gratulated on the result of his hard
work.
I nevencaricature particular society people in
my comedies. It would be bad art as well as a
well rather vulgar thing to do. As art it ties one
to some one or two marked traits or mannerisms,
and if you have smiled at them once they bore you
ever after. No, society resolves itself into individ
uals, and the best one can do is to make your society
individuals in a play typical of the time and place.
I draw types of the people as I find them. H
I have any success in "modern" plays it is because I
seek to set forth what I see and know in New York,
NewDort. Lenox, London, shipboard or wherever
one's fancy compels one to follow in the footsteps of fact.
When "The Climbers" came out people were forever identifying
the characters with this person or that; several silly people, I under
stand, rather plumed themselves on being the originals of some of my
people. All nonsense. It was like finding the likeness between a couple
of Gainsborough hats at the horse show nothing more, I assure you.
Our American society, or, if you will, our rich, our very rich, our
new rich and our old rich, our county rich, our city rich, form a mass
whoUytclistinct in a hundred ways from the rich people of other coun
tries, and so furnishing finely differentiated dramatic material. Modern
culture tends to making a gentleman and lady much the same the world
over, but not quite the same. The comedy of manners lives on these
subtle distinctions of time and place and custom or habit that tell you
a man is English or French, or that a woman is American.
These things, however, are the domes 01 tne matter, it wc uu
man being that they cover, and it the human being at whom the
dramatist must aim.
In the making of "society" plays, there are fads and follies that
present themselves, and they are to be treated with satire and so fur
nish humor. Society's sins are the human sins, and are to be treated
as those of other human beings in their degree and their consequences.
i a ,v.ic h U done in France or Germany or Italy, for
VVC tiilHUJi - ---- ...
instance, where are subjects of ordinary conversation to which we can
not allude in comedies of American me.
The trend of the drama is away from the older conventions and
tending toward the human and real. Stories will be worked out more
and more simply, but none the less powerfully, and all the more truly
and convincingly. There will be less complication of plot. There can
never be an entire absence of artifice, but it will be less obvious. And
the stories need not be all disagreeable. Life is not so. Why, then,
transcripts from life?
i "Why is the drama of middle class life no longer welcome to
American nsnastrs?" I have been asked.
It may be that it is because, in a country of aspirations after wealtn,
our people would rather see the successful people in their own land and
f Mi.fT land nk-tured on the stage than the poor and
their rtrnjsta which they know only too welL It is human to like to
Inok on trlitter out of a gray life. But make strong, good plays of mid
dle class life and they will be produced. It is, I think, a good deal
matter of the plays written I mean the good playi.
t.V.lhomas. A. J. Bom.
THOMAS & ROSE,
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW.
Offloe over Helms A Blum.
ftm Montgomery.
Allen Montgomery.
MONTGOMERY & MONTGOMERY,
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW.
Offloe over Brill'., end at Belionl, Miss.
w. Shields. Van B. Boddie.
SHIELD & BODDIE,
Attorneys-at-Law.
Rosenfield Bollding. Greenville, Miss.
J. M. CASHIN,
Lawyer and Notary Public.
jfflce over Cttiiens Bank, Greenville, Mi
CHURCHES TO RUN A STORE.
TJsrlqaa Thank Offering; of a Borelty
Dealer of Bbelton, H. Y. Glvea
Profit, for Two Week.
As a thank-offering for the best
Christmas trade he ever had, Charles
8. DeForest, a novelty dealer of Shel
ton, will turn over his entire store to
the local churches for two weeks, says
a New York Times dispatcb from
Derby, Conn. There are six of these
churchea, the First Methodist, Congre
gational. Baptist, Church of Christ,
Church of the Good Shepherd, First
TTnits Hjm. and fit. M&rv'a Roman. Cath
olic church, and they will take entire
charge of the store and divide the prof
it. A specially large stock of goods'
been laid in for the Durooso.
Attractive young women from tie
churches win act as salesladies and
the pastor will be in charge of the
cashier's desk, while little misses from
the Sunday schools win open the doors
for the patrons and conduct them to
the various department. Thechurch
ea expect to make more during the
fortnight than they would in six
months with the ordinary fairs end sociables.
The Christian Citizen
By REV. G. CAMPBELL MORGAN.
Leader in the Northfield Extension Work.
PERCY BELL,
Attorney-at-Law.
Building, Greenville, Mias.
C.H. STARLING,
Attorneys-at-Law.
: ItoienOcld Building.
J. T. D. KINNIS0N,
Attornby at-La w.
LELAND, - - - MISS.
MONEY TO LEND ON IM
PROVED FARMING LANDS
IN THE MISS
DELTA.
I will Inml 50 norcent of values
nlnrAfl uftpr insneotions at 8 Der-
font internal, navahle aDDUallv. 5
o 10 years time, instalment iouus
or time loans.
Z. N. ESTEs JK,
ATTORNEY AT LAW
EQUITABLE BUILDING,
MEMPHIS,
TENN.
COTTON FACTORS.
B. Crittenden lroj Percy
0. B. CRITTENDEN & CO.
COTTON FACTORS.
Liberal advances made'on consignments.
Phon aNo.N.
EDWARD HOLLAND.
COTTON BU5TER.
Offloe In Wilcxiniki Building.
H. G. VINCENT.
Office over J. C. Greenley's,
Main Street.
STANLEY HENSHAW.
Office over Frank Binder's.
Washington Avenue.
Trier
i reflection
dainty, no I
.charming as the
mellow glow that
come from
CORDOVA M
VaxCasdles
Prvptrod in any eclat linU
to nmnnouiM who hu
ronndiDaT In dining
room, onwuii
. bod room or ball. Bold
k. eaam wharf. MaUU UW
?V tUNDARD
no reflection so 1
Whatever of Christian energy a man may pos
sess, the world still stands in need of. To the man
that says: "I take no interest in civic life, I am
dead to the world," my reply is: "If you are dead
to the world, then you would better be buried."
We want no dead-to-the-world Christians. We
want real, live, earnest, active believers in and fol
lowers of the principles of Christianity. Those old
Puritans, who saved England and made you, carried
thpir relitrion into their daily lives, and they estab-
WshfA on a firm foundation the state that to-day
you call your country a country the thought of which must arouse
in the soul of each of her citizens, unless the soul be dead, the fondest
emotions.
Though those Puritans are judged to have been stern and preju
diced in their Christianity, yet we grant they builded well. To-day,
that old zeal and steadfastness is needed in public life, and the duty of
each citizen lies plainly before him. The country stands in need of the
aid that every right-minded, intelligent citizen has it within him to give.
CHRISTIAN MEN AND WOMEN SHOULD GET TOGETH
ER AND SHOULD ORGANIZE FOR THE FURTHERING OF
RIGHTEOUS GOVERNMENT. In each community, if there labored
a band of workers bent on the conscientious carrying out of just laws,
a national conscience eventually would become recognized. In each
community such a company of workers is needed, and will be so long
as there is war to fight, so long as- the drink evil exists, so long as
immorality flaunts itself, so long as the god of mammon reigns in men's
hearts.
Utr mar devastates, vou should take your place in the ranks
of those that stand for peace. So long as drunkenness reels upon your
streets or hides behind saloon doors, you cannot afford to be "dead to
the world." So long as the gambler plies his trade and corrupts youth
with the habit almost as hard to break as the one of intemperance, you
must not be "dead to the world." So long as woman's purity is assailed,
you cannot be so cowardly as to De aeaa to tne wona. so iunS
dishonesty and incompetency noia sway in me aamimsirauuii ui u
affairs, YOU MUST AWAKE AND DO YOUR DUTY AS CIT
IZEN.' ...
Pliny, the younger, in writing to the emperor concerning tne eany
Christians, described them as people who sang hymns about Jesus and
paid the taxes. That is not a bad ideal. There are people that pay
their taxes but neglect the hymns, and these do not appeal as models ;
then there are some singers of hymns that neglect the taxes, and these
also fail as examples. This is a nappy comoinauon ikj ounvj
HYMNS AND
PAY TAXES. i, jj? - .
. -J I
We Trust the People,
THE next 30 days should
witness brisk and contin
uous sales if the weather
is nood and the crops in the field
can be harvested. Realizing the
necessity for immediate reduction ,
of stock we have made our prices
accordingly, and during that
time have determined to sell our
entire stock
BeW Cost
Of All Winter Goods in the House.
Men Look Well When They I3uv
Their Clothing From Uo.
High Prtces Knocked Out by Our
Now is the Time Buy.
Cents will puxhase what dollars
forn erly did at th :
Mississippi Stolen
We shall net attempt to quote prices, for everything in
the house has been reduced and it w )uld take the entire
issue of the newspaper to inform you? but come and ex
amine. It will pay you, as there arc
BARGAINS FOR ALL
and they are bound to go. Other storas are attempting
the same kind of sale, but our goods and prices eclipse all.
tton'sississippi Store,
Washingtct Avenue.
THE OLD RELIABLE
POl'DER
Absolutely Pure
THERE IS NO SUBSTITUTE
2Z
0,3 art, SUjW kiA. S
"DrTjTr. "VS.0TS65.
Also a Cat Load of -
L8ip,i6l-Mi8LmB,PlailaliiaiiiWapiM
At prices as Low as Memphis or St. Louis. If
yon wantanvtbing in Live stock, come and Eee us.
Ill H 1
10D
ic
tat.
diss.
A
TIME

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