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The Grenada sentinel. [volume] (Grenada, Miss.) 1868-1955, August 22, 1868, Image 1

Image and text provided by Mississippi Department of Archives and History

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85034375/1868-08-22/ed-1/seq-1/

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Kalb* of Advertising.
Adrortitomcnta inserted at $1 f>0 per Square
ten linen tff lewi) for the firat and 75 cents for
each attlMqueDt insertion.
i lias
H
g
*•
N> Squares
bn. S<i»are,
$1 50 4 8 10
2 75 i 7
4 OO! 9 18
5 05 11 I!!! 32
6 50; 13 20 39
7 75115 30 46
9 00 17 34 50
17 00*30 50 75
® O0|45 751 100
30 OOiSS 90 120
;
Two
a ares,
Squares.
35
Three
Four Squires,
Fin Squares,
Sir Squares,
Column,
Column,
Column,
Column,
55
75
100
140
160
Transient advurtisemeut* must be paid in
All bill* for advertisements for -any angth of
iiota hot acceding three months, considered
due after the first insertion. Advertisements
Inserted tot i huger period than three months
buat oi paid lor quarterly in advance.
Obituary notices over ten lines, charged for
as ditertisenients.
No continued articles published.
Fifty per cent., additional for double Column
advertisements.
pP* Job-Work of every description dona
beaUy at Memphis prices, on short notice
hatters on business connected vnth this office
Mould be addressed to
J. A. SION AIOO.
Grenada, Miss.
fUBLXC LEDGER,
ritnustiED
I;VERY AFTERNOON,
Except Fumday,
BY .
f, Whitmore and F A Trior,
Uuilcr the Brm »nd style of
WHITMORE & CO.
AT
MIDI.SON STRKET, MTMl'JIR.
13
thK IHiRUC LEDGER is scr««d to city
jubccribcru by faithful carriers at Fifteen Cents
...r week, psvalik weekly to the carriers ity
mail, Eight Dollars per annum; nr Seventy
five Cents yer mouth, in silvattCV.
The Tublic Ledger has tho
Largest Daily I'ircuhtiion
01 any pspeT published iu the State of Ten
uesaee.
OIU JOR DF.EPARTMNT
In oorurlctc, and is the largest orftablishmcnl
kind to the vSoutliwuat. We uUploy
none but c.ipabk workmen, and turn out the
tMt ut work at the most reasonable priova.
of tUo
WlllTMOKK 4 CO.
dome*!
New Stocli
OY
DRY GOODS!
ATLBT SWtlXO A SUMMER STYLES.
E. CAHN,
ANT SIDE OF ITliUC SQCAf.i:,
Cirenatla, 1st
11 a? jurt received a la
(Hu< k of <*v«i 7 description, £|»riiig and
i'ltf i hulling, mum#,
uiy total *udi a*,
SPRING MOUAIR,
and well assorted
ti all of tbc
JAPANESE CLOTH,
MELANGE MIXTURES,
MOIIAIK MIXTURES,
PINE APPLE BE RAGE.
BROCHE BKUAGE,
lie
; " u
PRINTED LAWNS,
JACONET LAWNS.
Au4 a complete stock of ladies' tuIsaacs' ami
children'll Uoniery.
WHITE SWISS,
CROSS BAND JACONET,
PLAIN JACONETS,
NAINSOOK
BRILLIANTINES,
PARASOLS,
FANS, &o.
Also, a I'omploto stock of
STAPLE and DOMESTIC GOODS,
CALICOES,
BLEACHED MUSLINS,
BROWN MUSLINS,
aod every description of goods generally
kept in stl first-class dry goods stores.
Also every variety of
Spring and Summer Clothing,
FURNISHING GOODS,
* L.idios' Kid Glows, Cloth Congress Gai
t*re, Cloth Lse« Gaiters, Kid Slippers, Ac.,
WHOLESALE DEPARTMENT.
/
un prepared to sell goods of atl kinds a)
loaf* at prices which
DUFY COMPETITION,
Iu any market.
M. W1LZ2. Agent.
i
who
i
43 3s
Grenada Sentinel.
•1 Trrms* -$3 per year in advance.
The White Man's tiovemment of Oar Fathers.
J. A SIGN AI GO, Proprietor .}
r
GRENADA, MISSISSIPPI, AUGUST 22, 1868.
NO. 7.
VOLUME XIV.
It. D. McLEAN,
Attorney at Law,
GRENADA, MISS
Prompt attention given to collection* in tbo
counties of Yalobuxhu, Carroll, Choctaw, Cal
houn and Jrtllahatchie; also in the United
States Coun at Oxford. uI3yl
J. C. GRAY,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
GRENADA, MISS.
nltf* )
A. S. PASS,
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
GRENADA, MISS.
,! S. I'AYN
BRYAN & PAYNE,
SURVEYORS AND ENGINEERS,
Grenada, Mum.
w. r. BRYAN.
Particular attention given to laying off
Ditches Levies and making Plantation and
Own Map*.
ffice over Peacock A Knox's store, [n J3yJ
A. F. SANDERS,
AT hie Old Stand, on Coe's Corner.
FURNITURE MADE TO ORDER,
AND
COFFINS
.
OS HAND at all times,
I
!
the
lid shall
i23ti
V'tgL. Money is what I work for,
expect it on dili'4fc>
BUFFINGTON 8c CO
! And
Wliolt-sale ami Retail
GROCERS, ,
id—

MERCIIA NTS
COMMISSION
JOHN GEORGE.
i
East side Public Square.
:
!
GUliNADA, MISS.
j
;
Wc take plcssurt Ilt BUttoum-in* to tho put,
lie that we have just tv-tmd ouoilitf largo
; " u ""j
u.
GROCERIES,
PROVISIONS,
*
ROPE, BAGGING
IRON TIES,
WESTERN PRODUCE,
ami everything tho planter wants, which is
usually kept in similar ostablishuicuts; all of
which wo are offormg at unusually low prices
We also havs a large " Brick Warehouse"
for the purpose of storing cottou, being situa
ted ou a lot remote from ally other building
wc think it the only safe place ill town testore
cotlou, which is to remain any length of time.
Wo arc now iu our largo Warehouse at the
Hnilroad depot, where wc will store aud ship
cottou, and receive and store all freight which
may be shipped to our care.
We arc prepared to buy cotton, or advance
liberally ou tho fltuue, when stored with us, or
turned over to ua for shipment.
BUFFINGTON & CO.
u42-tf
Grenada, Mits.
Gai
Ac.,
(West side of the Square.)
Boot and Shoe Maker.
a)
all ORDERS F'ROMPTLY ATTENDED
CASH PAID FOB U*UE»
3*. iy»
I
CARPETS!
i Of
CARPETS! I
t
CARPETS
ALLEN & MACKEY
89 South Clark Street , Chicago.
Have open fot- inspection tho
Most Extensive and Complete
stock
,
Ever olfered iu Chicago, of
CARPETINGS,
OILCLOTHS,
MATTINGS,
CURTAIN GOODS,

PAPER HANGINGS,
BEDDING,
FEATHERS.
Prices Guaranteed as Low
off
as in any similar establishment in tho
United States.
ilt will be for the interest of
Buyers to examine our
Stock before pur
chasing else
wliere.
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL■
.
BKYAN HALL,
No. 89 South Clark Street. n51 tf j
ing
the
ty
of
tion
the
the
;of
.tho
of
! And Other First Class Instruments.
J. BAUER & CO.
I Sole Agents for the Gold Medal
! WM. KNABE & GO'S
GRAND SQUARE & UPRIGHT
FIANOS.
Also, for the
A. 'It. GATE & CO.
EMIL GABLER,

Wholesale Agents fur
i ('AltHART & NEEDHAM'S
CELEBRATED
: ORGANS AND MELODKONS,
! HltASH AND GERMAN SILVER
band instruments,
j
Aud All Kinds of Musical Merchandise.
; 650 Broadway, New York,
AND
. Q . .
N o, 69 \Y ilSlllllgtf n HtreCt,
CROSBY'S OPERA HOUSE,
Chicago, Illinois.
Seud for Catalogue and Prico List,
u. S. ADVERTISING AGENCY,
129 Fulton Street, Now York.
July 18-ly.
up
at
Heath's ratal Wetl-Borta e
Auger,
In Hie State of MiuiuimX.
Thia is a New Patent,
an<U great improvenwnt on all Augers of tho
kind, Any ordinary well can be bored in
from three to six hours and these wells may be
sunk in kitchen, or any pleco^lesired. The
demauu for these wells is extensive and those
working those Augers Bud them profitable.
Appliances necessary to overcome all difn
cuiues will he furnished with the Auger. I
keep a specimen Auger at Grenada, ready for
place. Mr. Heath the patentee conducts a
fousdry in Memphis and will furnish and
repair Augers at Short notta^^^LL
T UI HOTEL has just been completed, mid
is furnished throughout! i most hand sme
deMor^vr^w t-n d rtho" o" whf
vor him with a cali f
Patent
WELL AUGER.
I am tbo authorized agoat to soil County
Rights to tho
or
VERANDA HOTEL
Sardis, Mik.
C. II. Richards ; : : Proprietor
it
DIVINE COMPASSION.
IiOlig since a dream of Heaven I had, ...
And atill the vision haunts me oft j .
ice tho saints in whito tobes clad, *"
The martyrs with their palms aloft,
But hearing still I in middle song,
The eeaseless dissonance of wrong; ,
And shrinking, with hid face,, from the strain
i Of sad, boaeeehingcyes, full of remorse and paiu.
I
t
The glad song falters to a wall,
The harping sinks to low lament;
Be'ore the still unlifted veil,
I see the crowned foreheads bent,
Making more sweet the heaveuly air
With breatliiugs of unselfish prayer ;
id a voice saitb: "0, pity which is pain.
, HU up wy sufferings
0, Love that wetj*
which remain!"
Shall sonla tedeemed by me refuse
To share my sorrows i
Or, sin forgiven, my gif
Uf peace with selfish unconcern?
lias saintly ease no pitying care?
Has faith no work and love, no nrayer ?
, While sin remains, and souls in darkness dwell
Can Heaven itself be Heaven, a ad look
moved ou hell ?
in thoir turn ?
ft abuse
Then through tbo gates of pain I dream
A wind of Heaven bloWs cooly in ;
Fainter the awful discords seem,
• The smoke or torment grows more thin,
tears quench the burning soil, and thence
Spring sweet pale flowers of penitence ;
And through the dreary realm of man's despair,
Star-crowned an angol walks, ami, lo ! God s
hope is there.
Is it n dream ? Is Heaven so high
That pity cannot breathe its air;
Its hanpy "eves forever dry,
_ j happy eyes forever dry,
Its holy lip* without a prayer ?
My God f My God! if thither led
'By thy free grace unmerited,
No crown nor palm be mine, but let me keep
A heart that still cau feel and eyes that still
can weep.
of
The Terrible Counter-Revo
lution Approaching.
[From tho N. Y. Herald, Aug. 8.]
The figures, ns they cotue iu from
Keutucky, are tucuuliug up for the
Democratic majority. The last re
turn, which wc published yesterday,
set down eighty thousand majority
for Stevenson, the Democratic caudL
date for Governor, and these returns
represent the country districts from
which they come in slowly, aud will
probably show larger gains, accord
ing as they are received. The result
ofthojuue election iu Oregon was
quite as remarkable au cvideuce that
the people are awake to the multifa
rious mischief which the Radical par
ty has wrought iu its admiuistratiou
of the Government. We cannot,
therefore, shut our eyes to the direc
tion Of these straws whieh show how
the wiud blows. The Republican
majority iu Oregou in IStjll wus 327 ;
the Democratic majority f r member
;of Congress (the solitary one who
'represents that Jouwg State) was, at
.tho election of the first Monday iu
June, 1868, 1209. Here was a gaiu
of the auti-lladieal party of over fif
'-^red votes tn a voting popu
latioo of about twenty thouauud.—
Taking these two States as au ex
|
ample, ve will find that the people
are uot abimdoniug their hostility to
the wuntoo and dangerous policy of
the ruling faction, whieh duriug thrqe
years of peace has increased the na
tional debt and kept up war prices
aud war taxation. The Kentucky
election has taken place siuce the
Presidential nominations of both par
ties were made; and yet so far from
the nomination of the Radical Con
the nomination of the Radical Con
vention strengthening the backbone
of the factiou, or the uomiuatiou of
Seymour and Blair weakening the
spinal column of the Democracy iu
that State, they have turned events
the other way. These results are but
the early indications (the skirmish
firo as it were) of the great revolu
tionary battle which is about to open.
If the other State elections which are
to come off between this and tbt Pres
idential contest in November should
happen to give like indications of
popular hostility to the Radical usur
atious and corruptions, who can tell
ut that the nomiuecs of the Chica
go Convention may be overwhelmed
by the weight of Radical maladminis
tration since the rebellion was wound
up by Gen. Grant that they have to
carry on their shoulders ? If we look
at the facts whieh confront the people
when they come to vote, wc find that
taxes to the amount of three thousand
millions of dollars have been imposed
upon us. We find that the national
debt has been increased to the tune
e
peace and the people had a right to
hope tor a reduction of tuxes aud the
national obligation as the fruit ot vie
tory won, God kuows with what ter
ribte sacrifices to every home and
hearth in the country. But instead
tho of the load being lightened, we are
in ca l| ed 0D to bear further exactions, to
be , . . , ' T
The submit to increased expenditures. In
those order to keep a portion of the
CO uutry in subjection, more tr^bps
difn- ,f , r
I are oalled tor. Men foisted into ^on
for gross from the Southern States, and
who really represent little
a no™ than a mock constituency, de
and rnand from the Government an ex
pensive army to nssiat iu carrying out
schetnes and ambitious which are
purely partisan, aud are positively
destructive of the peace and good of
the country. It is facta like these
whioh meet intelligent men of all
parties when they eome to oast their
mid votes, and we cannot be surprised that
sme majorities arc found' to protest em
ph*tioally agaiust a cotrtwnauee of
tUis kiud of Government.
''I
ing
■im - sn
The people demand * change, aud
it is the people, and not an; particu
who will ffiaSe th* issue of
... nartv
. " '
*" e t a PF _
and individual oafc'didfltes conut for
rerj little ill this contest. It is a
, * , , 7s.
cheep government honestl; admirns
tcred, in view of the fact that the
countr; is at peace, which the people
require. A serious counters revolt!«
tion, therefore, terrible to the politici
ans, no doubt, but good and whole,
some for the people—because ft is
being born of the people—is atFiAd.
Nothing but the marvelous activity
of our population aod the untcfltl h
sources of the countr; could ehiiMe
us to bear the present burden iff
taxation or induce us to submit it)
carr; it so long. But it is evident
that a reaction has set in, and it ma;
be that in the course of events, as
now foreshadowed, the next election
I Wit 1 result In sending a majority to
Congress possibl; in favor of repudi*
ation, but eertaiul; in favor of a vast
reduction of the present enormous
taxation. The public mind leans that
wu;. Let us have peace, real per ce,
is the popular cr;, and the popular
heartnaturall; ;earns for the fosses
sion of that prosperit; which should
accompan; peace. The result of the
Presidential election ma; be so vague
ly decided iu the conflict between the
rights of the Northern and Southern
States in the matter of franchise as
regulated b; Radical legislation as to
drift us into another civil war; but it
is clearl; the dut; of the Northern
States to set the seal em
on the issue b; their voteB and leave
nothing to chance or no opening for
conflict. The expression of anti-radi
cal sentiments ill the late elections in
Kentuck; and Oregon is but the
pcrcursor of a great counter-revolu
tion, upon ibe verge of which the
countr; stands this monreut.
election. Names
s
up
the
re
Marriage Maxima.
A good w : fe is the greatest earthly
blessing. A man is what his wife
makes hint. It is the mother who
moulds the character, destiny of the
child.
Mske marriage a matter of moral
| judgement.
Marry in your own religion.
Marry into a different blood and
temperament from your own.
Marry into a family whieh you
have long known.
Never talk at one another, either
alone or in company.
Never both manifest anger at once
Never speak loud to oue another,
unless the house is ou fire.
Never reflect on a past actiou
whieh was done with a good motive
and with the best judgemeut at the
lime.
Lot each one strive to yield often
estfo the wishes of the other.
Let self-abnegation be the daily
aim and effort of each.
The very nearest approach to do
mestic felicity on earth is iu the mu
tual cultivation of au absolute uuself
of
iu
ishuess.
Never find fault, utiless it is per
fectly certain that a fault has been
committed ; and even then prelude it
with a kiss, and lovingly.
Never tauut with a past mistake.
Neglect the whole world beside,
rather than one another.
Never allow a request to be repeated.
''I forgot" is never au acceptable
excuse.
Never make a remark at the ex
peuse of the other ; it is a meunness.
Never part for a day without lov
ing words to think of during absence
besides it may be that you will not
meet again in life.
to
mour
eD0U „l, North to avoid the WSttO, but
if Election turns upon votes ob
talned (, y t j,i g deliberate 'subversion
of liberty ' then we are for 'lighting
out out ou rjL'afi liuo."
are _ ^ m -y-
« ^ C0 | 0 red lady" advertises in a
of Chicago paper for a respectable white
nurse - address box 1415. There is
all . nice' opeuing for some she-radioal.
- . . ... .—--
that Those who preach against sin and
em- serve Satan are but very little better
of than those who denouuce intemper
auee aud go for grttt.
Ls For a Fight.— Writing of the
defeated attempt to deprive the
people of Alabama, white and
black of the power to vote for Presi
dent, tbc Norwich Coun., Advertiser
say»: "It is protended that the rebel
States have been restored to the Un
ion—we are called upon to witness
the glorious 'success' of the Congres
sional policy, and yet here is, at the
eleventh hour, a dirty trick to keep
those States out of the Presidential
contest; or what is worse to vote
them against the wishes of their peo
ple! If the Democratic {>arty per
mits itself to be beaten by such a das
tardly fraud, it will deserve to be
under foot for the next generation."
Another Northern paper says,
this iufutnous proceeding was recom
mended by Republican leaders at
Washington, for the benefit of their
party, and the press of the party
generally silent on this subject.—
Wueu the time comes wc shall be
prepared to advocate resistance to the
inauguration of a President elected
by votes so obtained. We hope Sey
nud Blair will have votes
the
?th
pet
en
by
to
'but
,
V Moderiilioa."
We clip the following from out
venereMts* yet ever vigorous colew
porarj? tie Mae on (G a.) Journal am!
Merger. Those maul; seulimenta
—o*pr6ased with such ttW.e force—
receive cUr heartiest endorsement:
We iiVe Faring a surfeit, juBt
of acDcal# fcf "moderation ' on tfie
iff
it)
as
to
ce,
the
the
as
to
it
for
in
the
the
1st
hVg
part oV Southern Waiters and speaker*,
We say surfeit beclA'tise j# mean .ft,
because it express#*, a fact, and be*
cause ho'pi Her word, does. \Ve have
ohjcct'ioh to modulation. Ou the
Bontrary we have been an admirer of
it all our life. But we like inodera- »»
tidn that is flfutual; not a onesided
affair that aay'a~ Rush I to Southern
longueswhenhonestfhdlgnation uloves
them to sharp speaking, but hot a
word for the torfeht of Jacobin filth
and falsehood that daily pours upon
our devoted heads. We did not
commence this style of warfare. After
the war closed and we bad laid down
our arms, what was the method
adopted at the North by the dcffiin
n towards its? Wet6 tie hot
arbariaus^ murderers—at the
very mildest "rebels" and "traitors"
who ought to be banished and confis
catedj at least? Has that style ever
been changed ? If so, when ? Read
the Southern correspondence of such
purveyors of hate and calumny as
the New York Tribune, Foruey'B
fS*M, and Cincinnati Gazette. How
then, can Southern men, being only
human as they are, refrain from oc
casionally retorting in kind ?
As to negro rows and riots gotten
up by Radicals, it seems to be ex
pected by the advocates of this so
called "moderation," that white meu
must not only run right away and
leave the negroes the field, but that
they must not even speak out their in
dignation at a policy and a party that
makes such things possible. If a
white man kills or assaults'a negro,
what a torrent of passion, and cursea,
and inflammatory appeals break out
ill over the Norih. If a negro kills
a white man though, or a riot ia com
menced by negroes, they ignore it and
we are expected to follow suit. Don't
condemn it, don't denounce the
uuthors and actors in it, say these so
called modcrados. because it will stir
up the negroes aud give a handle to
radical stump orators and writers. We
think this about a fair statement of
the case.
now.
no
aut
up
wife
who
the
and
you
either
the case. I
Now what shall be our policy ? We shall
say a happy medium between the
extremes of rant violence, on the one have
hand, aud an unmanly, disgraceful their
and senseless reticence ou the other,
Don't advise that which you know the
cannot he aafely carried out. Don't the
stir up strife. Don't appeal to pas- that
and invoke memories that elect
should be buried with the glories of of
the past. Don't talk tebcllion when these
you know resistance is bopeleis. But
neither lie dowii in the dirt, aud with will
hands to your mouths invite the in- this
su'ta and kicks of your enemies, race
Don't cry "peace" and "moderation" a
when moderation means a disregard
of every instinct of honor and man- that
hood, yes, even self-preservation, ity
Keep the peace and obey the law, but
see that others do so too. If the law
does not protect yourselves. \A e
would make almost any sacrifice to see The
Seymour and Blair elected, and the
country saved, but if it is necessary nia,
to secure that end, that the Southern
people should become, under the
goadings of their adversaries, even as not
Hindoos under the domination of their
English oppressors, it becomes a
question for grave consideration
whether "the game is worth the
candle." be
ple.
the
it
stons
but
ob- with repeated .allies. At last the
Dean poured upon a peiec of duck
gravy intended to be eateu with a
roasted goose. The unfortunate gen
tlemau seeing this, immediately said:
a -My good Dean, you surprise rue,
white you eat duek like a gooBOj" The
is company roared, and the poor Deaa
was so confused and mortified that he
flew into a rage and left the table.
and
better
be
at
be
the
Sey
To Gkt Riii of Carpet-Baogkr 8.
—The Washington Correspondent of
the Baltimore Gazette, writing on the
?th inst., says : A highly important
question has been mooted, and is now
being discussed in political circles
here, as to whether the Southern
States can by any constitutional or
legal means rid themselves of the car
pet baggers who have succeeded in
creeping into the United States Sen
ate, without a constituency to repre
seot, if it be shown that they do not
represent the people of the States
from which they pretend to hail.—
Prominent legal gentlemen have giv
en au opinion that it ot^ild be dote
by means of the writ of quo warranto,
to he taken out by the Governor of
each State, and thus briug the ques
tion into the Supreme Court, where
the legality of the Southern elections
oould be thoroughly tested aud de
termined.
Dean Swift the severest satirist of
his time was one day diuitig with a
company of gentlemen, one of whom
he had made the butt of his ridicjlc
Charles Francis Adams will proba
hie succeed Sumner in" At) United
, States Sedate.
' Club Bates.
The sWtikkj. will be furnished to clubs at
Rio following low putes:
5 Copies to one address,
♦ 12
one year
K
15
33
r 20 "
- No orter will ho takeu unless
40
accompanitoi
will, the Ca.-h.
Gen. Itfulrjn M. JuKrph.
^ ^ ^ serenaded u g<
Joseph, Mo., ou the evening of the
The Rule of ike Bayonet Mutt he
Checked.
1st instaud respouded by the follow -
hVg speech:
Gentlemen of Sti Joseph : , In ad
dressing the large and euthu»iastio
audience before f/ie 1 shall not insult
yoh hy calling you ' fellows," or by
advising you to throw a man in*o th«
river who happens to differ in opinion
of regarding the sentiments expressed,
»» f learn has been done by a distin
gtiished uii.itary gentlemau of this
place upon a recent occasion. I be
lieve this to be a free country, ami
a that the people will treat those with
respect who respect the people. Our
objection to the principles of our ad
versaries in this great political
paigu is that they assume too dicta
ij^rul 1 l®* 1 ® towards the people.—
They denbttnAe me as a revolutionist,
say that I wish to inaugurate anoth
er rebellion, becsausHT say it is time
the for the rule of the bayonet to be
checked. The people of the State of
Missouri and ol the whole country
are tired of being bound to obey the
dictates of their military commanders,
We believe it is time for the will of
as the people to be carried out. This
will be done. [A voice—"We'll fix
that in November.' ] Yes, we will
settle that in November, and we will
oc- do it peaceably by the ballot. The
people are now fully aroused and none
of these men will dare to defy the
ex- will of the people Those who at
so- tempt it will come to grief, and it is
meu time they should conic to grief. Un
and less checked they will go ou until
that they establish negro suffrage over
in- this State aud the Northern States as
that they already have done iff ten States
a of this Uuion. They A\u extend a
military despotism ofer all tire Stater,;
and negro supremacy as far as the
out people will allow it. This fragmen
kills tary Congress and the carpet baggers
com- that Lave got into the Senate under
and the auspices of this rump have al
Don't ready attempted to degrade the white
the men of all the States to a condition
so- of inferiority to the negro. This ia
stir the main issue. The people have de
to cided in all those States, where they
We have enjoyed the privilege of a free
of vote, that this thing caunot be ; and
cam*
vote, this thing caunot be ; and
I tell you that the will of the people
shall be carried out in spite of the
designs of these ambitious men who
have trampled the constitution uuder
their feet, and a republican form of
government shall be guaranteed to
the people »f the Southern rtw wdll as
the Northern States. But we art! told
that even if the Democratic party
elect their President and a majority
of the House of Representatives, th .1
these carpet-baggers wbo assume to
constitute a majority of the Senate,
will defeat legislation aud will impose
this ignorant and semi-barbarous
race of negroes upon the country as
a superior of the white man. Let
them dare to do it, and they will find
that the more than one mil'ion major
ity of voters who are opposed to this'
scheme Will make it impossible for
them to perpetuate such a continuing
otttrage upon American citizens.—
The people have risen iu their might
everywhere, from Maiuc to Califoi 1 -
nia, and have by their votes said they
would not have this negro supremacy
kept up in this cotmtfy. They will
not be shaken in this purpose to turn
aside the bayonet that is still kept
pointed at t'he throats of (lie white
men of the SStrth. Neither will the
Radical party ifl its hopelhss minority
be able to defeat the will of the peo
ple. I feel an abiding confidence iu
the Democratic party to day, becouse
it is right. Thanking you, gentle
men, for your vCry kind and, attentive
audience, I bid yotf farewell.
the
a
gen
said:
rue,
The
Deaa
he
in
of
de
It was Joseph E. Brown, and not
Bradley, as the types have it i
telegraphic columns, that lias been
elected Chief Justice by the Georgia
Legislature. Bradley is the escaped
negro convict, from Sing Siug, whose
expulsion the Senate is considering;
Brown is the cx-Governor, tho "rebel
renegade," who, in the utterly irre
deemable depth . of his political
apostacy and ingratitude, stands to
day without a rival throughout the
South, thank God. Brown was de
feated for the United States Senate by
the votes of the Conservative
bers. He eoulrf also bate been
jected in this lost canvass, nnd that
he was not proves a good deaf flf rot."
temtess about the Conservative body.
We deeply sympathise with Georgia.
It is a terrible misfortune for a peopld
to have such small as Joe Brovni as
chief expounder of the law and di—
penscr of justice : 1-ut to think that
the bem-h made illustrious by the
learning and virtues of ??esbtt,
Jenkins, and Lumpkin should be oc
cupied by this man, is the very cruci
fixion of the sout for every Georgian
deserving of the flame.— N. 0. Pica -
jraftc.
in ouu
mem
of
a
Mrs. Btlrdell Cunningham ii a
clairvoyant physician at Maxstlan.
To make a nice lawn, mow the
grass as often as there is any to cut.

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