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The Grenada sentinel. [volume] (Grenada, Miss.) 1868-1955, September 19, 1868, Image 1

Image and text provided by Mississippi Department of Archives and History

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85034375/1868-09-19/ed-1/seq-1/

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Advertisements inserted at $1 50 per Square j.
ti lines or less) lor the first and 75 cents for |
• ach subsequent insertion.
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*1 SO 4 8. 10
2 75; 7 14 18
4 00 9 18 25
B 25111 22! 32
0 60 13 261 39
7 75 151 30* 4G
9 00 17 34
17 00 30 501 75
25 00 45 75l 100 i\ 140
30 00,55 90 120 P 160
r
Ono Square,
Two Squares,
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Four Squares,
Five Squares,
Six Squares,
i Column,
i Coltnnn,
f. Column,
1 Column,
2 .
35
45
C.5
I""
I
Transient advert Dements must be paid in
•dvaneei ... , r -
All bills for advertisements for any ongth of
time uot exceeding three months, considered
due alter the first insertion. Advertisements
inserted for a longer period tlmn three months
Biust be paid for quarterly in advance.
Obituary notices over ten lines, charged for
*s advertisements
No continued articles published.
Fifty per cent., additional for double column
.advertisements.
Local Notices 20 cents per line, and Person
al notices, when admissible. 10 cents per line.
Job-Work of every description done
neatly at Memphis prices, on short notice
business connected with this office
Letters
■should be addressed to
J. A. SIGNAIGO.
Grenada, Miss.
FtfBLIC LEDGER,
ruIlMSHED
%
afternoon,
EVERY
Except Pumday,
BY
1 Whitmore and F A.Tylor,
I
I'llder the firqi and style of
WIIlTMOllE & VO.
AT
13 ,15.4 D/.SoV STREET, MEttriTIS.
TUE rUttlJe LEDGER is served to city
-snbs.-riWrs bv faithful curriers at Fifteen Cents
i„-r week payable weekly to the cam.
!»W. Eight Dollars per annum, or Seventy
tiwu Cents per month, in
By
*.rs.
aUvaiti*
I
•Tho Public Ledger lus the
fAirj/ctt Daily CiEttlation,
Hie .State of Ten
Of any ]>•,!>•-? published in
nessett.
OVK JOiS DEEl'AUTMNT
Is comi.b'tn, and U tho largest, establishment
„f the iuncl in tlra Southwest. W« employ
none but capable workmen, an* turn out the
bast of work at the most reasonable prices.
WHITMORE & CO.
4ftw4f*t
GfiOCERIES! GROCERIES!
friovus
Wte would respectfully filiform * t
nciiallv. that having bought
and J.'VofliU'e stock. "I H. II.
and broupA t on larg«*. »<l*
' u> fur*
uur linn,.Mini
Wr
<1 lb** juihlif go
out. fli* 1 Grocery i
Ml HUMAN, Ksq.
tlilioim) supplies
1,ti
•TV tllill'.
, I.
ill tin* Ui'A'EST CASE KATES.
hi hand
PORK,
SUGAIL
MOLASSE&
CORN.
LIQUORS,
NAILS,
BUCKETS,
BACON,
HAMS,
COFFEE,
FLOUR,
SALT,
VINEGAR,
AXES,
BROOMS, &c. &c.
Wo. have »!«o a Wagon Yard and Cotton
Warehouse, and will purchase, advance
and ship cotton.
\V'tcan tic found at tho brick botiso
pied by R. H. Sherman. We Die determined
to sell"cheap nnd please all who will give
call. All are invited.

RE A COCK & POWELL.
43 Am*
M LEAN i WILLIAMS,
J)ept>t St., second House east oj Pub lie Square
GRENADA, MISS.
Wholesale and Retail Grocers.
Their Bar is at all times suiiplied with
Lest brands of Foreigu and .Domestic
toied, Brandios, Wines, Ale, ^c.
43 ly*
WM. .1. PATTI80N. JAS. M. JAMISON
ros. HOY.
JOSEPH HOY & CO.
Succcstor 8 to (jirrolt , Hoy <?• Co.,
COTTON FACTORS %
AND,
GENERAL COMMISSION
MERCHANTS,
No. 36 Perdido Street,
KEW ORLEANS.
T am again Agent for Joseph Hoy <fc
wait upon planters anil business
ut points along tlie tines of the Mississippi
tral and Mississippi and Tennessee Rain
Bagging, Ties anil suppling will be
to patrons. I will make liberal cash
on rotten ready for shipment. Grenada
be ray central point. nuUJetters, or
addressed to at this place, will
prompt attoution.» Iu my temporary
to other points, the operator will
all telegrams for me, so that any pressing
mands may have immediate attention.
July 23rd I8t58 3m. JOHN POWELL.
. and will
T X
i. rorr.sTA
v
L. PODESTA & CO.,
WBfllesale Grocers
and dealers in
LIQUORS,/WINF, ALE, rOUTER,
TOBACCO, CIGARS, ETC.,
No. 55 Madison str/'ct
(First door east of Second,)
Memphis,
. All orders for family and plantation
plies prymptly filled.
t
-s»s
w

"t
Grenada
J
j
Club Rates*
The Sentinel will be furnished to clubs at
l ha following low* rates:
112
5 Copies to one* address, one year
30
iovernmcnt
| Terms—$3 per year in advance.
of Our Fathers.
The White Man's
r. A. 8I«NAI«0, Proprietor. !■
32.
15
2<y
40
No be takon unless accompanied
with the Cash'-'
GRENADA, MISSISSIPPI, SEPTEMBER 19, 1868.
NO. 11. ,
YOLUME XIY.
l
GRAND
TOURNAMENT!

U16
THERE will be a GRAND
TOURNAMENT given at
Grenada, on THURSDAY,
15 th DAY" of OCTOBER,
at which the Gauntlet is laid down to
all tr ue Knights. Prizes to be nwar d
ed as follows:
!
1
Prizes,
1st Prise. ono double case gold watch and
chain, Valued at $250.
2nd Prize,
nod at $150.
gold wnfch vnl
fine saddle and bridle, vnl
doublet*
3rd Prize,
ed at $60.
The Knight taking tho most number of
will crttvrnthe Queen of low ami beauty.
rings
Tlie Knight taking the next highest number
of rings, the 1st Maid of Honor.
The Knight taking the next highest number
of rings, will crown the 2nd Maid ul fl
All Knights must Appear in
the ring
IN FULL COSTUME.
1 HE TRACK
Will be
THREE HUNDRED yards
IN CIRCUMFERENCE.
The distance One Hundred from 1st
to the last ring.
The lances will be of
SOLID 'wood
TAPERING EACH WAY FROM
THE CENTER.
All disputes will be settled
by the Judges.
JUDGES:
COL. JAS. R. BINF011I),
COii. j. z. GEORGE,
coil. J. K. RUSSELL,
GEN. W. F. BRANTLY,
gen. E. C. WALTHALL,
J URGE E. S. FISHER,
J UDGE R. D. McJiKAN,
COL. A. S. PASS,
J. T. GARNER, ESQ. '
COL. A. P. DUNAWAY,
COL. J. W. BOOTH,
MAJ. W. II. FORD. r
II.
The Rules customary at Tournaments
will be adopted.
Knight's Entrance Fee
Entrance to the Tournament.100
All communications addressed
CAPT. W. A. BR(J*VN,
JOHN S KING.
Corresponding Secretaries.
810
on,
occu
COOFKEVILLE, XiaBIgUPFI.
Having thoroughly renovated, amt
Baker IIousc, the undersigned begs leave
i to his friends, and tlw
public generally— that ho L prepared to
nidi them tho very bast bote! accommodation.
Give us a cull. Wm. BAKER.
45tf Proprietor.
u« a
Aug29-5t
DISSOLUTION.
THE Firm of Lakv.B™., ih dissolved by
tuai consent, to-data from July lltli.,
Lake aud A. W. Lake retiring.
Square
A. W. Lak«,
GEO. LAKE,
W. S. LAKE,
RICHARD LAKE.
the
Wins
New Firm.
THE undersigned have this day formed
partnership under the firm name of Baku
and will continue the same business conducted
at the old stand of
JAMISON
by the former fir
Lake. They are authorized to settle all
standmif eluims and to collect all dues
W, H. LAKE.
RICHARD LAKE.
old firm,
nod-tt.
BAKER HOUSE.
announce
<fc Co.,
furnished
advances
will
telegrams
receive
absence
re-forward
de
WATCHES, CLOCKS AND JEWELRY
r..,
r.v, k
Repaired to order, by
!■
AT BISHOP'S OLD STAND.'
Citation Notice.
J. M. Gills, formerly Murphree To J. S.
R. G. 8. Q„ and Vrunklin Murphroo, of
tSfcar, Texas.
YOU are Iteroby cite J to .bo and
fore tie Probate Court of the county of
busha, State of Mississippi, to be houlen
Courthouse in and ior said couuty,
first Monday in October 18148, to show
if any you can, why tho petition of
York, Adm'r of Solomon* Rlurphree
Bale of tho lands belonging to the ostate
decedent for distribution among the
distributees of said decedent, should
^Bvorder of tbo Court August -1th
uo7 4t TH0S. WARD,
MAUATAK8
Tknn.
sup
sep21~l)*
tention
the
son.
they
change
tution
days
shouts
on
night,
not
Obey
was
is
obey
your
it
in
it
you
the reveille.
TRANSLATED FROM THE GERMAN.
Hftik! I Wr the tramp of thousands,
And of armed men the hum :
Lo ! a nation's hosts have gathered
Round the quick alarming drum— •
buying, "Come,
Freemen, come!
your heritage be wasted," said the quick
alarming drum. - t
Ei
"bet mo of my lieart take counsel;
War is not ot life tlio sum!
Who shall stay and reap the harvest,
days •shall comeV
ltut the drum
Win:it tint autu
9
Echoed "Come!
Death shall reap the bravest harvest,"
said thcsolaum sounding drum.
the coming battle.
What of profit springs therefrom?
" conquest—subjugation—
Even greater ills become ?"
But tho drum
Answered "Come!
to prov
promptly answering drum.
("What if. 'mid tho cannon's thunder,
Whittling shell and burstiug bomb—
When my brothers lull around me,
Should my heart grow cold and numb V
But the drum
Ariswored "0
Better then iu death united, than in life a
recreant—'Come. 1
"But win*
What if
it,' 'said the
You niuat do the s
>.l—hoping—fenring—
tmubting some,
Thus thee nnswen
) in faith, i
'Till a trumpet voice proclaiming,.
Said, "My chosen people come!"
Then the drum,
l,o! was dumb,
For the great heart of tho nation, tlifobbing,
id—"Lord we como!"
PENDLETON.
Eloquent Trmrnlim of hk Speech at Harljori
From the Boston Post.]
The foliowiug is the concluding
portion of the speech delivered by
Mr. Pendleton before a large Detno
e
cratic masB meeting at Hartford :
>' I say that the true polioy of the
United States is to pay the bond
holder exactly what wo promised.!
This is the only way to relieve the
burdens of the country ; to make it
easier for tho people to pay their
taxes; to make it oasier for thorn to
gain a living. Do this aud prosperi
ty will again return, your fields will
again be fertile, your iudustry will
flourish. The republican party is op
posed to this whole system. They
aro iu favor not of paying off, but of
fuuding the bonds. Acoording to
their plan tho funded debt would
have forty years to run at four nnd a
half percent, interest—payable, both
j principal nnd interest, iu gold; and
I the bonds shall not le subject to tax
ation, neither, by the States nor by
jibe federal government. Well, gen
tlemen, I object, with gold Btauding
at 140—perhaps
vert those bonds into gcildybonds now,
will add ecveu huudreH
14.">. If you con
millions
you
of dollars to the amount of the debt;
you make it impossible to pay
If it amounts to
tlie
debt in five years.
82,500,000,000 aud you pay four per
cent, only, it will amonut to 8100,
(1(10,000 a year in gold for interest.
I f you pay this sum for forty years
you will, at. the end of forty years,
have Aiid 84,(100,000,000, and at_ t'.ie
end.will still have the debt of 82,500,
000,000 besides. Forty years! Why
how many of you will live that time?
How rnauy, even of your children,
will be alive at tlie end of forty
will have
to
00
Year by year you
years:
to go on paying this fcnormouB
amount. Year by year it will come,
out of the blood nnd bones and toil
and sweat of your children. Do you
kuow what a national debt means?
It means that the rich shall be richer
and the poor poorer. It means that
capital shall be exempted from taxa
tion, aud the laborer bear all the
burden. It means for those who la
bor for tbeir daily bread, scant cloth
brown bread, and no meat.
, that capital shall pamper idle
ness in luxury, but that squalor sliall
preside over the cabins of the poor,
and that his daily struggles for daily
bread shall make his life a constaut
death. I see before me to-night
many a young mau, and I, can see
his beatnitfg eye tiud intelligent face
the hope that lies at the botton of
***. He is willing toUbor on for
retUtcdtlm • few years, and to b 9 pe that lit w
tn he able then to trade on tlie capital
traveling Kffiieii fijs industry and frugality have
fur- , |l c ) lus his day dream
sa vcu - ", m B
his night dream. Ho sees a snug
| 10inc lighted up with t* smile
„ love, and noisy with the prattle of
fant tongues—made sacred by
of a wife aud a mother—
George
m;
means
a Co
Bros*,
Win.
out
of the
presence
surrounded within and without
those rays of contentment which
plenty and prosperity shed. Young
men, are you willing to give up those
cherished hopes ot the fu ure
to consent ior all your lives that
tion shall take from you
what is necessary tor your food
elotbihg? [Voices-,* No no never
No, gentleman, do not yield to
siren voice, winch persuades
to extend the deb and rein* the
terest. Pay tho debt and save
interest. That will answer
purpose That wtll ifisure yo*
ture. [Immense appaus-J i
tlemen, passing awhy ftu.m this
jectof thematend interests of
■3
u29tf
J. A.
Lono
appear be
Yalo
at tlio
cause,
Darnel
dec'd for
o( said
heirs and
n6t be
1868.
Clerk.
tention to this fact—flint the great race,
pole-star of the Deraocr*tie party is civil,
Constitatidn of thqUnited States, from
[Applause.] Do not, xny
citizens, in the heat of -this a rduous
contest, do not fbrgetthikt great les
The republican faarty believe
can ainead it; that they can
change it and make it a bjetter consti
tution than out fathers made it in the
ot old. ["Never, never," and
shouts of appliuse.] I charge it up
you, Democrats who are here to
night, never tgconsent cither to its
abandonment qr its degradation. Do
seek to amend it; d o not seek to
ehaugeit; do Inot seek to evade it.
Obey it. [Immense Applause.] It
good enough for yo air fathers. It
good euough for you. If you
obey it, it will be good enough for
your children for a huodred years to
Study it, understand it. Harry
about with jou, asal iving presence
all the waits of your daily life.
Take it to your home, read it your
wife, teach it to your children; put
upon your family altar,that when
you bow your head ita supplicating
prayer it may be there next to the
image of God hitnse If. [Immense
applaus.] Do this, and theu in HU him
own good time you will be able to
raise it up to that place and power to
which the brazen serpent in the wil
derness was raised in otder that the
plague might be stryed. Do this,
and you will be able t® rear it up to
that high n)
the Ark ortho Couvemautwas reared,
rouud which the unse«n legions of
the Almighty kept wa«-d aud guard,
that he who touched it with impious
hands should die. [Renewed ap
plause.] Remember, fellow-citizens
that the Constitution contains within
itself all that is good iu the experi-j
of the past,and all that is,it
hopeful in the prospects of the future.!
It is the ark of safety in the midst of!
the flood which is upon us. . It may! he
be tossed in the blaeka ess of darkness
upon the weary waters for wany days, j
but it will rtet upoa tkie mountain top
at- last; the sun will white; the dove
will leave it Dever to a-eturn, aud, now
then emblems of purity, liberty;
and peace, she will seek to rebuild her
habitations amidst the scenes of her:
former life. [Cheers. [] I do uot des-|
pair. I have hope-it* the aspirations j
of men. I huve faith in the!
fellow- and
as
record
military
with
he
peace
seek
mind,
to
right
oothing
to
never
the
name
mities
issues
made
the
a
repeat
come.
the
loved
He
in
he
acc of ho nor to which
e rices
providence of God. I know that the
pathway of history is strewn with :
the wrecks of empires and peoples,
and constitutions and liberty; aud ihj
ay be in the providence of God that;
this country of ours will follow in
the wake of all the motions that have
gone before. If it sliall be so, let it |
not bo owing to the faults or misfor- j
tunes of the* Detxiocratio party,
[Great cheering] IT it must be so
let it be known that it was the party
of our love that stood to the last, 1
with heroic virtue to the principles of ;
civil liberty. If it must be so let us,
my fellow-citizens, take consolation
in tho thought that in the eternal
circles of God dea'h is but the pre
cursor of resurectioo; and that the
same principles wbic b hasten nations |
to decay oontain within^ themselves
the spark of living fire which secure
undying youth to oi*r immortal race.
[Great applasn.]
" Time writes no wrinkles on its lair young
brow, ...
Such as creation's Jem beheld, it sees thee
progress still onwa-rd and upward,
higher and still higtaver,
Higher; as the eagle when he
takes his flight in li»e face of the sun.
Higher; as the atars, when in their
courses they encircle the footstool of
the immortal tlirt»no! Higher; as
the soul of man when it puts aside
this tenement of clay, and seeks
throughout all the agea the home of
its futherand its God.' 1 *
The concluding sentences of the
peroration were ggreeted with cn
thusiastic cheering, and Mr. i'endle
ton took his seat amid prolonged
applause.
of "Campaign lives of Seymoxr and
Rlair," in drawing to a conclusion
his rapid sketch or the Dife of Maj.
c, Mr. antaMubU
: -
the
la
It
iu
face
Itis
for
1
have
aud
snug
ot
the
Amidst the wrecks of time its
"And from the sky serene and far
A voico falls liku a Falling star,
Exclfi^ior !'*
Frank -l».
Brief Memoir ef His life.
Mr. David 0. Oroly, the author
tn
by
which lowing summary ofi bis traits as
vea i e ,l ; u his public and private life
those ^ beai<1 e 8 exertiog
aud h|m6U , f pro f eB8ion »| lyi Gen. Blair
taxa. uw , U, h a8 a speaker
p f or t | ie Conservative cause, liis
and ^ ^ extended through several
] especially in Connecticut,
tins tirst S ot iu t-lie reaction which
you ^ ^ ^ the country,
w- a | wa y S lad a oiear purpose
the mail , taiue d ii
your ? Mnd.and in the
fu- b.sUu.y, ^ ^ #f po#ce /
object was tin: suppression of the
sub J 80 lely. The
the States, the degrade
the supremacy of military over | wor
have received no countenance
his Resuming with ripened
career.
him than his own shadow during all
friend.
is,it is patriotic. These whom he re
garde as Northern rebels now, he op
poses with as inuoh fire and force as
he did Southern rebels id the past,
His address is singularly popular
j and unaffected.
the humblest and serene among the
highest. His personal power almost
amounts to magnetism. He can mold
men to the purpose he wishes,
reticent, he is yet prudent. Euipbati
cally, he possesses that equilibrium
of all the faculties known as common
j sense,
,T '
expanded couvicliqps his position
statesman, and adding to it the
record second to none: of eminent
military qualities, he has labored
with voice aud pen as gtreuously as
did with the sword to realize in
you.
of
I
that
pute
Do
it?
you
We
peace the benefits he felt force' to
seek by war. So orderly has been his
mind, that hohas always known where
stop. Believing in the negro's
right to bo free, he helped give his
freedom. Notkdng less would suffice;
oothing more was required Devoted
the Union, zeal and intolerance
never tided him over into disunion in
the name of Union. He has never
prostituted the name of liberty into
proscription of the white race, the
name of anti-slavery into the enor
mities of negro supremacy, The
issues of the war unaccomplished,
made him a radical. The issues ot
the war finally accomplished, left him
conservative.
To speak of his magnanimity,
bravery and populaiity would only
repeat the recofd of his soldierly
Sherman kept him closer to
t
if
the war*, and always had him fouhi,
second in pommaud. His officers
loved him ; his men worshipped him
He xas never defoated. Successive
promotions in rank and power flowed
in on him. lie gave to each advanced
responsibility a more brilliant dis
charge than the preceding one. No
fraud taints his -hands. No tyranny
stamps his record.
In war he was a relentless, sleeples®,
always victorious enemy. In peace
he has proved a thorough, alhforget*
ting, wholly-truBting, magnanimous
Ilia record is its consistent as
lie is accessible to
Is T ot
His life has been almost n romance,
Converting a State to freedom, and
: then saving it to the Union ; the hero
of two wars, and deserved'y eminent
ihj i» both; a business man of the high
est iwtegrity of mind and temperance
of habit; an orator of great ubility;
a statesman of rare faculty and tore
| sight ; a man of indomitable will ; bis
j ttaits are all positive to the highest
degree. In greatness, in clearness,in
combativeness, in statesmanship, he
is a veritable Andrew Jacksoo. We
1 have given his record. Further to
of ; reason from it would be supereroga
tiou. The country knows him, and
above all. his comrades iu arms
revere and love him.
•— J " T .
B- H Illll S AllVlCC to 111® NfJ?rOC..
| -
j Hon. Benjamin H, Hill delivered
| 0 „„ S p ec R a t the City Hall in Augusta,
Georgia, on Friday evening, 21st ult.
| discussing the reconstruction
measures in the usual line ot argu
nient, he talked for a long time
thee ^ negr0e9( j n t he course of his ro
' marks saying :
I iqt is my duty to* warn you
- | it t , m( ^ you tu ru a .deaf ear
iwhat 1 have spoken to you; if you
I will be deceived ; if you will hate
| white people : if you yourselves will
I provoke a war of races—I warn you
he that destruction is iu store tor you.
sun. . When such a war comes, if unhappily
their it should, tho whites, North
of South, will unite against you. I
as | letters from the North almost every
aside ! day, saying let the contest come;
seeks will fight it out. Ult, in y colored
of friends, that a voice from heaven could
tell you that the best triends you
the on earth are these Southern people
cn- these people who have been raised
with you. It:s strange to me
y 0 u can bo made to believe anything
else. The radicals, have tried
white people and failed with them
mil now they are failing with
colored people. I havfe studied
history of your race for tout thousitou
years. During you! slavery yon
joyed mote advantages and happtucss
than ahy of your race elsewhere.
and ^ wa „ t to preserve your advantages
;U)( j happiness iu freedom, you
Maj.- preserve your kiudly and natural
that
its
to
author
life :
exertiog
has
speaker
ef
several
which
purpose
ii in
prose
Tht
re
ex
degrade
are no* as
let the future historian say
you got your freedom
begqp to deteriorate. Preserve
characters, improve your race,
houest and just, aud freedom
prove a blessing to you. If you
your back on your friends, on
who mido this country, what wt
yiJnr talo ?
tend to have peace-,t. is to our
terest to have peace , b J
wage war if yon will follow
if you will hate our people at the
stigation of carpet-baggers, teo
yo«. 1 aese are words
sti ikol deep into your hear,
:lThe wTr^?r C om W °a e il part/
re*
soou as
with
4. knew
sight
1
my
long
ed uur
you
not
louger.
clasped
walk
from
tion.
the
bad
heavy
storm."
|j
These are uot tk rests, my
colored friends: they are words of
counsel, and warninii, and wisdom to
I do 'not know what is to become
the ooniitry. There, never were so
whites and blacks aseetuhled to
gether iu one government, *s freemen,
before. Whether it will stand or tall
do uot know. Philbftnthirrfl say
it cannot stand. 1 wei't dis
with them. Well, what then?
you exyect white people to quit
Do you expect them (6follow the
carpet-baggers in their disenfranchise
of intelligent people? That
won't do. Never! never! If
would prosper and be happy,
you must come to us ; come to
gether ; it is your interest to come.
understand this question better
you df—we know our rights,
we know yours,"
i:i« a
Midnight Hide on a Cow
Catcher.
and
I
Robert
other
merest
A writer in the Oneida Circularr
describes a singular adventure.
'/The train was to start at 11:45,
it wanted but a few minutes of
time As I stood there in the
darkness within a few feet of the hiss- nie
rtonster, my heart begau to fail
, and I almost resolved to abandon
the hazardous undertaking. What
I should lose my hold andbe thrown a
in front of tluit crushing mass of
machinery? What if there should be
souiething on the track? Such tested
thoughts kept whirling thnugh my
iniud" and I hesitated. Suddenly the study,
hell rang. Hardly realizing what I i an
did, I hastily left the dark recess and
stepped ou the heavy franework in I
front of the engine. By means of a yond
stout leather strap I bound nyself on w h
by passing it round my body and
under one of the strong ba;3 OT the
.--catcher, • While 1 was thus eu- the
paged the train liaiilel't the depot and
with rapidly increasing steed was a
passing through the city. I had some
fears lest some of the flag men at the
street crossing should discover me and the
signal to the engineer; for I well
knew that if II. should become aware
of my perilous situation lie would
s^pp the train and take me off. My
t&rs were groundless. The strong
•dare of the headlight directly over
~ nm a c my position, by contrast, 0
almost invisible to any ODe in front.
Passing tho last crossing with a p
rush andl roar, we sped on through
the subrubs, uud|iuto the open country.
The city lights disappeared one by
one in the distance, and we were fairly
on our way. It was a wild night.
The light of the moon struggled with
diffieufty through the clouds which f
were driven before a strong wind from
Now and then an
-w
that
the
;
the
the
It
^
must ^
re^ ,

as
the southwest.
opening would illumine the landscape
wtth a'suddcn burst of silvery light,
to be immediately followed by almost
total darkness as the heavy cumuli
rolled up in masses ol'inky blackness.
The cone of light froth . the dazzling
lens above me would then cut the
darkness in its onward rush with
startling clearness. Now flashing up.
the rooky sides of some mountain
<'orge, illuminating rock tree aud
shrub with almost daylight distinct
: anon losing itself in the surround
emerged into the
ness
ing darkness as we
op'en country beyond ; then shooting
along the rails ahead, making them
look like glistening threads until they
disappeared in the darkness beyond.
"Mile after mile we sped along. I
had become somewhat used to my
strange position, but it required
stant attention to prevent my feet
from slipping from the lower bar of
the frame on which I»was standing,
At best T haj but a partial foothold,
aud the constant jar of the engine on
the short curves would almost throw
me off. In passing through the S.
mountains the road was very rough
aud crooked. The ponderous engiue
bounded along with now and then a
sudden side lurch in its seemingly
mad effort to plungo into tho black
chasms which yaued ou evhry side.
In one of these sudden movements
the buckle of my strap broke, and
ly saved from instant death by
wedging my hands between the bars
of tlie cow-catcher and clasping them
underneath.* I must hold on now for
dear life. Once I opened my mouth
to scream, in the hope that li. would
hoar me. A second thought eon
vioced me of tho utter uselessness
attempting to make my voice heard
atkhwt distance above the roar of the
engine. Even when standing on the
foot board' it was with difficulty that
could hear each other. My only
hope was that my stiffening fingers
would hold on for tlie remaning
miles. An occasioned glimpse of
country showed me th»t»we had gone
two-thirds of our distance, and
fortunately passed
Twenty minutes
con
wo
was on
eu
you
your
be
will
turn hegt points
men ® an d I should ba saffi.
passed the mountains,
in and iho road b.eLe straightor
^ smo()thcr Aa we emerged from
t-unnei tm the spur of the mountain,
« si U ^ r dowQ tba Une ,
in h ^ dl; ? t of the C , wpres8 .
fo&d ;, lliere perfectly straight
j thrc9 miles, and I had an unobstructed
^ Brighter and brighter
tho^he headlight till it-seemed tc
also most
demoniac fierceness. Although
knew there was uo dauger,yet the.
of that pouderuue creature
thundering toward me, shot through
mouiciitary tiirill of horror and
involuntary clung closer and closed
ejes as the train rushed past. A
whistle from oureugihe announc
uur approach to L s, aud I assure
it was music to my ears. T could
have held on fifteen miuutes
louger. As the train stopped, 1 un
clasped my beuumbed fingers and
stepped-to the ground, hut could uot
three steps, my* legs were so stiff
being sc'rnig in a cramped posi
At last I reached the side of
road and sat down. The mood
long been obscured; and a few
heavy drops betokened^ the etoning
storm."
a
A Mart yer to Science.
His Wonderful Life and Tragic Death.
From a Boston letter we hare the
following interesting story of the life
death of a young man :
I wonder, did you ever hear of
Robert Keonicott ? Some one told
the brief story of lira life, the
other day, and it is well worth re
peating, though I can gibe you the
merest skeleton of a sketch. He was
of die well-known editor of the
sob
Prairie Farmer, aud a resident of
Chicago. In his boyhood''he mani
tested an engrossing love of natural
history, gave his whole wind to its
study, and a very powerful nnd brill
an t mind it waB. I am not wed!
posted in the dates of this subject, but
think lie had passed but little he
yond hismajority, say in 1860 or 1861,
w h en he set forth on st> exploring ex
pedition through »hc wilds Off the
Northampton country. He ascended
the Missouri river to its Bource,
traveled alone through regions where
a wbite foot had scarcely if ever
trodden, thoroughly explored the
Russian aud British possessions in
the Northwest, aud carried on a cam
paign of investigation against beasts,
birds, and reptiles and insects. He
visited Sitka, then a Russian post, and
remained there for a short time. He
inoculated the Russian officers there
stationed, many of whom were
0 f high culture, with his passion for
natural history, and taught them to
p UrS ue the studies in which alone he
pound happiness. His experinces
almost rival those of Munchausen in
dangers and difficulties. No peril
daunted him no obstacle discouraged
Once, far in the wilderness, he
f oun d himself destitute of the pins
w ; t h which bugs and t'sieh"
paled, and withorrt a moment's hesita
tiorf be set out and made a journey of
five hundred miles through the snowy
solitudes of Sitka to rplenish his -tuck.
During one of his visits to this place,
I think in [863, he heard of the war
of the rebellion. Instantly he started
and for the East, made his way
men
him.
are mi*
0T er
tn the army in Virginia, associated
himself with the Sanitary Commission,
aD d labored faithfully in the cause of
humanity till j.ee's snrrendeV.
Without a moment's delay, after that
eT eut, he turned his steps agaiu.to the
Northwest and buried himself jn tlie.
wilderness- A little more than a
some travelers in that b!eak
I
young
of fi ve d' alone. His sbort life was not
without fruits, however. He had
established a intimate connection with
on t j, e 0 j5 0era 0 f the Smithsonian In
9 tituve, who were filled with wonder
S. j n g admiration of his energy nnd love
0 f science- His contributions to the
va binet that institution
a incalculable value; and his good deeds
live afte.r him in the acts of others
w hom he taught to love science. Not
l 0D g ago—before the Alaska purchase,■
i lftwcver —p ro f. Raird.of theSmith
I' gon i ani received a string of birds from
by a Bussinti officer stationed at Sitka—
bars a g en tlemau whom Keonicott had
spared with his own zeal in the study
for 0 f mitnxal history-wliich the professor
affirmed no museum could duplicate,
j> ro f B a i r dhas boon solicited to write
eon- a biogrhphy of Kennicott, and
of v ; ew of bis travels in Alaska ; bqt he
heard d ou ]i n es the task, pleading want of
the nnd suggests that Dr. Simpson,
the Chicago; should undertake the
that wot ) [ , \
only
fingers
ten
the
gone
had
the
minutes
year ago
region came upon the figure of a
man sitting, edmpass in hand, before
of the scene of his recent ex-"
a map
pioratious, which he had drawn with
a stick upon the snow, dfead. It was
Kennicott., who died as he had
were of
in*
a re
It is beauty's privilege to'kill time,,
privilege to kill b^juty.
Counterfeit virtues are often a mre-e
popular currency tliau the genuine.
and
the
, of
The
for
grew
glare
and time's
A Forget-Mk-Not for Foor'Men
kbn's Gravf..— We heard a South
ern lady, whotwns reduced to peouuia
want in London during the war,
that Adah Menken w*as the only
of her countrywomen she could
ask,for assfstsnce with .any hope of
success. Sho applied ip person to
iho "Star of Astley's," and received
tho entire contents of bet purse in
"her lap, winch was no inconsiderable
London ComovotitanfA
r y
say

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