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The Grenada sentinel. [volume] (Grenada, Miss.) 1868-1955, December 08, 1900, Image 1

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(Chancery ClerT<
The Grenada Sentinel.
j. VV. BUCHANAN, Manager and Proprietor.
''Be Just and Fear Not. "
TKItMS: $1.00 Per Annum In Advance.
VOLUME "XLVI.
GRENADA, MISS., SATURDAY, DECEMBER H, 1900.
NUMBER 22.
the
to
if
| Mississippi Matters. |
1 notes of past and current events. i
:
*
* By J. L. POWER. ^
9
NOTES OP A WEEK'S OUTING,
."77: , ,
The editor of this department left st
Jackson on Thursday afternoon, No- ,
.ember the 2ad, and reached Meridian f
just in time to take in the Mystic
tihrine. HamasaTemp e asana 1011a .
reputation, and candidates who receive
finishing touches at the hands of
Buchanan, White, Rubish, How
nu '
the
Sirs
ard, Waddell and other expert* of that
noble order are to be congratulated.
There is nothing like it. There
fourteen candidates, and they were be
ing put through in style when we had
take the 10::I0 train northward. Just i
before retiring, the temple, by unani
nnil enthusiastic vote, appropri
were
mous
ated 1100 to the Natchez Protestant
Orphan Asylum. Of course this gener
aet made them all feel better, and
better qualified them to enjoy the fes
tivities of the night.
A ride of four hours over the splen
didly equipped M. & O. took us to West
Point, where we rested and breakfasted
and left for Htarkville at 8:80.
onderfully improved since
West
Point has
our last visit. The little city has an air
of prosperity and push that is decidedly
We were especially anxious
western.
to visit its splendid public school and
Southern Female College and its vari
industries. We had the pleasure
of meeting our newspaper friend, L. T.
Carlisle, editor of the Leader, whose
paper has been a great force in the up
building of the city.
At 9:80 we found ourselves at Stark
mis
ville. and an hour later President J. C,
Hardy had us in'his buggy for a drive
to the
A. and M. College.
We spent the morning in going over
the grounds and buildings, and taking
notes of recent improvements,
found Prof. McKay in a very small
greenhouse with a very large class giv
ing them practical instruction in flori
culture. He then took them to lettuce,
mustard aud celery beds, and his pu
pils were evidently much interested.
Several had their pads ami pencils, and
and were making notes of what the
i professor said.
The new dormitory, which is nearly
finished, will have forty rooms, and will
accommodate eighty students. The
college will need two or three more
buildings of same capacity. The
rollment is 470, and would be twice
that number if the capacity was equal
to the demand for admission.
Among the most noticeable improve
ments is a reservoir that will hold 250,
000 gallons that will be supplied from
several artesian wells,
feet deep. A complete system of sew
erage is beiug constructed, so that with
wholesome water and up-to-date sani
tation the health will be greatly im
proved.
Many inquiries have been made about
Thn Textile School,
And impatience expressed at the delay
in erecting the buildings. The build
ings will be completed and the Textile
School will be in full operation by the
close of the present sessiou. The site
is very commanding; they are now at
work on the first story. The machinery
has been ordered, and, in view of the
insufficient appropriation for equip
ment, it is very fortunate* that some
$15,000 worth of machinery has already
been donated by Eastern manufactur
ers, who in this way advertise their
business, and keep it before the young
men who are to be trained in our Tex
tile School to operate the mills that are
to be erected all over our Southern
We
thousand
country. This is one substantial bene
fit that amply compensates for the de
lay so far.
Had the buildings been
rushed, these donations would not have
been secured,
building, when completed, will be
two stories—237 feet long and 78
feet
The Textile School
wide—and will
have two
towers.
In the meantime, theoretical
instruction is being gi
have entered that department, so that
no time is being lost. One of the spe
cial needs of the college is an infirm
ary, where fifty or more can be
fortably provided for in case of unusual
fcickuess of any kind. The chapel, or
assembly hall, is entirely too small. It
should be converted into offices for the
president, secretary and other business
departments, and a building erected
that would answer for a chapel, li
brary and museum. There are public
occasions at the college when 2000 or
111 ore people desire to attend all the
ercises.
students who
ex
The State cannot afford to
*»tint this college. It cannot stop where
it is. It must go ahead. Since it was
established — twenty years ago — the
Population of the State has increased
nearly half a million, and the college
must be expanded so as to mount the
wave of industrial progress It has been
a roost potent factor in creating.
T lie college lands embrace about 2000
acres, much of It a high state of experi
mental cultivation. The hay crop yields
a surplus of 900 tons for market, selling
^
at 19 per ton. In the barus we saw
some splendid Jerseys, Herefords, Hol
st eins ttud Aberdeen-Angus. The barns
are Tery pplmiHve OQd „ ngifrhtly af .
f airSt and should be torn rtown', and
others more suitable erected . Erery
thing about a college of this class
should be a model for otbe „ to copy .
None wiu u the barns
rp,
1 here are very few students in the
college from other States and
tries. Those admitted pay tuition, the
fees going to the campus fund. There
are three students from Mexico. Their
parents stopped here a few days since
on their way to New York and
thoroughly delighted. All matricula
tion fees go the library.
On the campus is a handsome monu
ment 'erected by the Mississippi State
Grange to the memory of "Capt. Put
Darden; born March 10, 1836; died July
17, 1888.
days,
tian."
con ii
were
Age 52 years, 4 months, 7
A true patriot—a devout Chris
On
of the sides is this sentiment:
"Whether on the scaffold high,
Or in the battle's front,
Tlie noblest place for man to die
Is where he dies for man."
No mistake was made in the appoint
ment of Prcf. J. C. Hardy to the presi
dency of the A. and M. College,
measures fully and squarely up to all
the requirements of the position; and
so far as I could observe, or inquire, he
has won the confidence, love and re
speet of the entire student body, all of
whom have learned of his hard' experi
ence, and how successfully he met and
mastered all obstacles in the way of ac
quiring an education. He has the
learning, culture, enthusiasm, ambi
tion and pride of State, as well as a per
sonal interest in the j'ouug manhood of
Mississippi that will make his adminis
tration a grand success. We were
specially pleased to hear from him and
from members of the faculty, that
cigarette smoking was under the ban
at the college. After the results of
this pernicious habit were fully stated
by President Hardy the young men
unanimously pledged themselves to
He
quit it; and if there is a cigarette
smoked ou the grounds or in the rooms
violation of a promise that
means discipline, and expulsion if per
sisted in. The students were reminded
that the mission of the college was to
train them for the business of life; ti.at
many of the (jreateorporations will not
K
it is in
employ cigarette smokers, and
anty company will make a bond for an
applicant where this question has been
auswered in the affirmative.
guar
_ .. . . ....
In the afternoon it was our pnv.lege
to ,j,ve the students "Eight Years of
Mississippi History, and felt comph
mented by the appree.at.ve attention
fr° m start to finish. At n.ght the
chapel was filled to see and hear Ralph
Bingham—the first of a lecture course.
He is an elocutionist, violinist, pianist
and vocalist-, whole show in himself.
e were placed to see many evi
deuces of prosperity in Starkville, nota
bly a new schoolhouse, that cost $14,
000, of which Prof. J. II. Woodard is
principal, with six teachers and an en
rollment of 225. A new courthouse is
to be erected, at a cost of $25,000. The
present building was erected as late as
1.881, but it is badly cracked, and, like
the old capitol, it "leaks even to the
ground floor." It is really dangerous,
and it will not be pulled down any too
soon. Many new and handsome resi
dences have been erected since our last
visit. Waterworks, an oiimill, and
other improvements have been made,
and electric lights will come in due
time. The Times and Banner seem to
bo prospering, and
says he is ready for the next press ex
cursion—to the Pan-American Exposi
tion, Niagara Falls and other points of
interest eastward.
The hospitality of our good friend,
Simon Fried, and his interesting family,
added immensely to the pleasure of our
brief visit.
Leaving Starkville at 2:30 p.tn. Satur
day, we were in Columbus, via Artesia,
at 4:30. We certainly felt greatly hon
ored in findiug Mrs. Gen. S. D. Lee in
her carriage waiting to take us to her
hospitable home. The General had gone
to Vicksburg on military park business.
Our first business was a visit of con
dolence to President A. A. Kincannon
and his good wife on the death of their
little son, Barksdale, who was a most
promising child, and who was taken
from them after a few days' sickness.
He was the idol of his parents, and the
universal favorite of the entire college,
for the little fellow seemed to think
that the college was in his special keep
ing. He rang the bell for chapel exer
cises every morning, and did many
other little acts of service to endear him
to the students and faculty. His fun
eral took place from the college chapel
and many tender tributes were paid to
the memory of the precious child. The
bereaved ones can take some comfort
friend Ward
from the fact that while be caDnot come
back to them, they cau go to him.
Most of the improvements for which
the legislature made special appropria
tions have been completed. The annex
to Columbus has forty-seven rooms, and
they are all occupied—two to each
room.
The infirmary is a handsome
building, admirably constructed for the
purpose, and will accommodate fifty or
more patients. The annex and infirm
.
.
ary cost $2G,000, and the cost of light
ing, heating and plumbing will be
about $5,000 more.
in the collage, and 400 of these
have rooms in the dormitories. If the
accommodations were doubled.so would
be the attendance,
thetic young miss express the wish
"that every girl in the State could be
in the Girls' College."
Liberal as were the appropriations to
the I. I. and C. at the last session, they
were not sufficient to supply other
pressing needs, the most urgent of
which is a new laundry, the one now
operation being in a low cellar, with
autiquated and badly worn machinery.
More than 6,000 pieces go to the college
laundry each week.
A library building and a music hall
are also needed. There are 25 pianos
in the buildings, and 133 music pupils.
A nice start has been made for a
library, some 2,000 volumes having been
purchased.
The industrial departments are full
to overflowing. There 170 in the sew
ing class, 132 in stenography, type
writing and telegraphy, and so in all
the others.
There are 473 girls
now
We heard a sympa
7
1 he ^ were bakin * biscuits for dinner,
U takes j ust '-• 00 ° to round, and no
8,lr P lus - School girls usually obey the
scrl P tu ral injunction to -eat what is
set be,ore them." Those at the college
have s P eciall y pood appetites, which is
tbe best>
was a s P ec *^l privilege to attend
* e cba P e ^ exercises on Sabbath morn
of ,n *' and to see near, y 500 >'ouug "omen
j unite * n l * ie service,
I .
to J s . '* IC and greatest school of its
kind on this continent.
The kitchen and dining rooms are
among the most important and inter
esting features of the college. A large
bakery furnishes the best of bread.
idence of good health.
The health of the college is in good
hands. In
large a number there are
always a few sick, but at the college
they have the best medical attention
and nursing. Three were quite sick at
the date of our visit.
The Industrial Institute and College
(
to •' ears *
" lzcd amun S thu be!it I >ubliu in
I " >-ns »» enrollment of
about 600, wf
On Monday morning we dropped in
on the white public school. Franklin
Academy, of which Prof. J. M. Barrow
has been principal for twenty-seven
This is the oldest, and reeog
ith 14 teachers. We visited
some of the class rooms and were
specially pleased with the performances
of the little tots of the first grade.
Columbus is steadily improving com
, mer( . iaU and otherlvi .
of , ine system of waterworUs . y
have to HUer mud We dropped in
circuit court. Judge E. O. Sykes presid
inR The , wa8 bein(r dnuvn for a
murder The priso ner was attired
tbe bi(fht ot fashion-patent-leather
sboeSj red ne cktie, etc. The courthouse
ig an old but Tery substantlal building.
It needs overhauling and remodeling,
The acoustics
is
is
as
to
ex
of
in
to
. She has a
don't
very bad.
Columbus needs a new city hall. She
has two good hotels, and her two news
papers—the Dispatch and Commercial—
ably conducted and well sustained.
Leaving Columbus at 2:30 Monday we
reached Tupelo, via Artesia, at 6 p.m.
Mr. Frank L. Kincannon, the popular
circuit clerk, took us to his hospitable
home. This is the home also of lion.
T. C. Kincannon, railroad commissioner.
They are brothers of President A. A.
Kincannon of the I. I. and C., and the
father of this splendid trio, Major
James Kincannon, resides at Verona.
He was a gallant Confederate, and the
Tupelo Journal has the benefit of his
graceful pen.
Tupelo has improved immensely since
our last visit. We first knew it
small and unpromising village,
now a substantially-built city of 2,100
population. It has two banks—and
there is nothing nicer in Mississippi
than the Tupelo Bank building. There
four hotels, an oil mill, a cotton
mill nearly completed, capitalized at
$150,000, a 90-inch compress, a handsome
union depot, several wholesale houses
that do an immense business—those of
Clark, Hood «& Co. and J. J. Rogers
amounting to several hundred thousand
dollars a year. Among the profitable
industries are an ice factory, a spoke
factory, a cotton scale factory, a laun
dry and an ale-bottling establishment.
It has an electric light system owned
by the city that furnishes light at 33)^
per burner per mouth, and for much
less where many are used. It has also
a big fish pond—29 acres—stocked two
years apo, and now affording trout of
as a
It is
large size. The pond is supplied by
fine artesian wells. Season tickets give
fishing privilege twice a week. If the
catch is over five pounds 25 cents is
charged.
We vis ; ted the public school and
spent several hours there. It is a large
and well arranged brick building.
After speaking of the many improve
ments of Tupelo we asked "What is the
best thing in Tupelo?" and
primaries promptly answered, "The
public school,
principal; '225 enrollment; 11 grades;
each teacher has two grades, the prin
cipal helping in all. This is one of the
schools aftiHated
and those who take its full course are
prepared to enter the freshman and .
sophomore classes of our State colleges. ■
of the
Prof. D. A. Hill is
ith the
Diversity,
Prof Hill lias been principal six year..
He is recognized as one of the strongest
teachers in our public school system.
lie is at home in every class room. lie
gives much attention to vocal music, of !
which he is an accomplished instructor. !
Three handsome brick churches are
among the late imprevernents—Baptist, *
Methodist and
Cumberlands are preparing to build.
Presbyterian.
The
It
'as our £ re at pleasure to meet
Hon. John M. Allen. He cultivates one
of the finest farms in the State, near
Tupelo, and has considerable property
in the city. We also met our Masonic
friends, Major P. M. Savery, Messrs.
Hoye, Hood. Henderson and others;
also Hon. H. C. Medford, member of the
last house.
From Tupelo we proceeded to Blue
Mountain, via New Albany. Our friend
Blakeslee had worked up
at New Albany for
but a wreck on the K. C., M. &, B. pre
vented our making connection.
audieuce
r free lecture,
I
rlth its 366 students, (
-horn are boarders. These in- i
It is worth a long journey to s
Mountain College
225 of
Bit
elude pupils from Alabama, Louisiana,
Texas. Tennessee, Arkansas, Missouri,
two from Mexico and
Cali- j
fornia. The college is in its twenty
eighth year.
General M. P. Low
monument to his faith in God and love
froi
j
It
ms established by
?y, and is a noble |
for humanity. The dormitory buildings
were destroyed by fire in February last,
and the laundry about a month ago.
Brick dormitories are now being erected
and many other improvements are be
ing made, so that by the opening of
next session it will have accommoda
tions for three hundred boarding pupils.
It has a large and able faculty, and an
earnest, diligent, healthy and cheerful
roll of students. They nre the
business. Prof. B. G.Lowrey is president
and professor of English; Rev. W. E.
Berry, business manager; T. C. Lowrey,
secretary and treasurer; Mrs. Modena
Lo.vrey. lady principal; Prof. A. II.
Ellett, teachers' training course and
public school branches.
f<
We w*
i complimented with
pro dative audience that filled the
chapel when we told the young ladies
of war and reconstruction ti
afternoon we attended a complimen
i Mountain Rifles,
Mortimer, composed of
Mountain Male
Academy. The boys put up a splendid
drill, for which they were liberally ap
plauded by the college students. They
use wooden guns, and nre anxious to
get sure-enough muskets, and wjll hold
themselves subject to the orders of the
mander-in-chief. It is hoped that
General Henry will be able to equip
them.
ap
is. In the
tary drill by the B1
Capt T. E.
the students
if Bli
At night Prof. Booth Lowrey's class,
in school of expression, gave its l'.r»t
'cital, and an interesting program de
lighted the large audience. The \
lessor divides his time between the
Baptist University and Blue Mountain.
We attended the Thanksgi
vice at Ripley. Rev. A. K. Jones de
livered an appropriate discourse. Hon.
Thomas Spight read the proclamations
of president and governor, aud made
some pertinent remarks
of so many people to attend Thanks
giving services. It is not necessary at
Ripley, nor at Jackson, as well as many
other places, to post a notice in the
vestibules, "standing room only.*'
About $25 was contributed for the Bap
tist, Methodist and Presbyterian or
phan ges
These notes are concluded in order
that we may take Thanksgiving di
at the home of our friend, lion. John
Y. Murry, Jr.
ng ser
relative of the famous fiphtinp llowles,
one of whom gave
Bowie knife, and another of
the failure
In the death of Col. VV. M. Inge at
his home in Corinth on Nov. 26, Missis
sippi has lost one of her best and
bravest sons. lie was a lawyer of
great ability. His last public service
was as speaker of the house of repre
sentatives. During the civil war he
was colonel of the Twelfth Mississippi
Cavalry, and served for a time on the
staff of Gen. Richard Griffith, as adju
tant general. Col. luge was born in
Greene county, Alabama, Feb. 22, 18: t.
Asa citizen, soldier and statesman he
has left a noble record, worthy of re
membrance and emulation.
The Carthage correspondent of the
Times-Democrat makes this interesting
i mention:
"In this (Leake) county there recently
died F. P. Bowie, a lineal descendant
of the old Norse sea kings, and a
i of
to the dreaded
•horn
ent down to fame as one of the heroes
w
—Atchison Globe.
of the Alamo. But in a lawsuit brought
a year or two since we fouud that we
had among us a blood relative of Na
poleon Bonaparte. *
ton busy to tell his trouble#,
Abstract of the Report of the Isth
mian Canal Commission Trans
mitted to Congress.
I
| H[ NICARAGUAN ROUTE IS FAVORED.
It Would Cost the Mom in Direct j
Outlay of Money, IJut Other and !
Vital t onuldrrntlonn Make it the
>lo»t UeMirahle for the l tilted !
s,ft
Washington, Dec. 5.—The following !
f the president, tri
message
it
ting the report of the Isthmia
commission, was sent to eor.gr
canal j
To the
sentative:
h: format!
Senate
nd Hot
*mit her
i of Repre
fl th, for the j
l preliminary
1 commission,
: 1
>f th
of the Isthmli
dated November 3<
1
WILLIAM MeKIKL.Br,
Executive Mansion. Dec. 4, 1900.
Abstract of the Kepor-.
The report is
17.000
document
>f about
Iniost as long i
the
president s messag
Although the
not yet completed, many of the field par
lies still being out. yet it has bee
it practicable
•ork of
ission Is
ad vi
ak
fit-lent
nt this preliminar>
nllul rind I
giving
the »,
tigati
Nicur
othvr
cSi P *an
nlc cj
A th
ugh inves
nly of the
e, but of
ommlssion
le
>t
ami P
ible
in mind the industrial, c
d military value of an
I. and also th
chines necei
the
i
inter
rights, privi
ary t*
.f a c
d f(
ii.- -
'It
introl.
•nt ami
!:•
hip of the United St.
.
all 21 w
k
ing parties were orgjnize<l and sent in
hi Held, making a force of about 220 e
jnd assistants, besides ab<
boa
1 In the various
. Meanwhile th
f tha commlsslo
various brunches ->f th* work.
Paris, when they e
details of the
r being executed by the Erenc.i
A detailed description is given
os. Along
found that
f partially const
a» good shape to-day
'topped.
labi-i
t mpl
other
rkm
tri
th;
of
.
ber
per
ducted
party
hud
pr
ect
l»»
the
I
of the tri;
the NI- ar
the ahn
-
.
etion o
haps it
-hen tl
canal is i
:
he
e all rott
nd
The building
the drecipes.
The
roi l hit
it Zeh
bo;
visited P
ittUials
ally int
sid
io
:
dux
:
d
• 1 iound th
in the
terri
al pur
f th
Th* occ u pi
I>U*
bv the U
I St
:
did
led
»t
P
provided th
i re spec
route t
;
rerelp
ibllc
ty of the i
Along th
slon found a larg
■d.
h
P*
i is—
force of
•ki
h
al line, ab
ding to the P
a I had been op
h ends. I
th e^rou to. 11 Much
'ommlsslon reports
hods of
now from 13 to :
value Should be p
it
ted
Po
ted to
P
l)
nt at l
achi
d
ti*
f<
his
th v
ill
pro;
j Am eric
rk.
dai
nd all of it is
old, so that
the plant
he isthmus.
A vi
xdo to $»
side
Iglcoi;
and his cat
a Ric
ntlment found to exist fo
nal along the Nicarag
ft re also made along the Dari
After going over the several
Ission considered the dimensions of
the canal to be built. Having in mind
the Increasing size of ocean going ves
sels. it was determined to fix upon a
depth of 35 feet ill mean low water, and i
bottom width oi 15" feet, with some in
of dimensions at certain points.
These dimensions are larger than those
proposed for any previous
While they may s
the commission poin
is not likely to be
rs, during which tl
itime dimensions is likol
A width ot 150 feet will allc
largest ships t
while the lock
permit
rong
At
Tri:
, the
al schemt
tve t
day.
t th.
h
opened
ithin
ten
e the increase in
continue
11 b
t!
h
her in
a di
shlps
S4 feet In
he clear, with a depth of 35
o I
al.
ih.
the larg
The
:
*1.
afloat
locks Is 740 f
Ith. i
Kth
feet.
Taking up the Nicaraguan route In do
that the route
ially the lin
iai c
It begj
Atlantic «»ide.
nters Lake Nici
t Brito, on the
tall, the c
:
1
down by the Nica
in its report of 1
Grey tow
the San
th
Hows
riv
m and terminates u
fte side. The distsi
is about 186 mil
fro
to
harbors required at
ost difficult ei
for the gre
The
gineering work is the d;
Juan rive
lake. The time required t
irelv
and Brito
he
* regulate
•rs of the
build the
the time
1m*
canal hing
required for the
Th,- lommissior
f thi
ys eight ye;
nable estima
uld
the
obnbly be a
milding. At le
prepi
111 be c<
rk and op
hat if work
enced imme
requtred for
Fill be about
a htrb
cn the dam should be
diatolv thereafter, the time
pleting the entire work

The commission then submits the
st of a cauul
(from Grey town to
. $82,682,000
foi
lowing es
the
Nicaragua r<
Eastern divlsi
Mi.Hie divlsi*
tfr*
u.
s
< 'arlos
I.ajas to
Las I.ajasi. $25,425.
d;.
divisio
fro
Las
w
Brit
ight
dies of railroad $7,350.0CC.
id gen
N
Total. $16
Engineer!
police, sanitation ;
$33.423,000.
'
•til con ting
•gate $;
This estlmat
i5CHti
.540.000.
ts for a
by tbe larg
al suitable for
shin
»w in
and th
In
-'it h
ding in
f the bill pen
for a double
th
off
It provid
so that navtgfatio
system be closed for repairs i
ils. If a single lockage syetf
provided th. cost will be reduced $1
owing th** bottom one-third will
luctlon of $16,049,000.
estimated cost down
of 1
t
I I
is
000. Ni
permit a further r
This would bring th
to $163 913,000.
Concerning the Pan;
mijsio
route, tl.f
al attract!
ii.
of a
be c
btnuti*
»th
ery
summit. The width of
than 35 miles
*.it is barely 300 feet abo
detailed descripti
route, the comvnl
following estimated c
nal route:
with
the isthmus is 1*
to
the
Die;
of the
gives the
plating the
ido. Aft
d harbor. $7,334,678.
.'hiding levee,
IV.
Colon c
11 arbor
$10,718,286.
Bohio locks, including excavation, $10.
u ranee
to Bohio locks,
9S2.345.
Lake Bohio. $2,786,449.
Obispo gat
Culcbta st
Pedro Mlgu.d locks, including excava
tion and dam $8,496,326.
Pedro Miguel level. $1,169,611.
Miraflore'a locks, including excavation
d spillway. $5,720,368.
Pacific level. $12,366,914.
s. $296,436.
tlon, $44,378,835.
Bohio dam. $s.50O,OOO.
Glganto spillway, $1,124,514,
the
i&rshes, $1.44S.
Channel betw
07.;.
Chagres division, $1,929,976.
Gatuncillo diversion. $100,000.
11 road diversion. $l,26?,5u0.
I
Total. $118,618,816.
Engineering, police, sanitation and gen
eral c
Aggregt
Thi
ingencies, $23
. $142,342.57
stlmute is cup
41,215 if .-Ingle 1<
adopted.
mate is submitted, based
built to Impound
pper Chag
able of reduction to
teks and a
An alternative e
having ti
ni
t
bot
he
Alhujuela d;
. This estimate
f t
ters
is $156.37
The cc
of the P
mated a
It is estim.i
e th
hat the value
ork already do
mmission repo
is esti
h
$32,934,463.
the tonnage that
.1 tl
canal will amount
Referring to the commercial
of an isthmia
k
would
03
dv
ges
the report says:
ope. the United
nal far
ate
ipared with F
"As c
States
the
h commercially
erce of Europe
f North, Central
ler existing
1- rive fro
nd

industrial)}
with the Pacific
:t h A merit
i I.
and
t
h
larg
raffle of the Unit
be constdei
al; but this fact
dvantagt
for the
1 the United S
lu
of the i
1 tribu
oes not
which
rade of
Am
h
: S
h *
indict
he rtlativ
il
dll post
Euroj
at
s
de
noon as it has l
with the west c*.
will rapidly Inc
volume of 1
eri
of Sot
•ill ai
I
■ with the
American
will quickly
pean t
Th
trade
... of the
through the canal
the total a
"An isthmu
nlty of the
■us of the United States, develop its l
d promote the co
.f the
which Europ
I will be
n
raffle
f I
the
ational and political inter
al will
rengthe
citic territor
and industri
benefits
T
entire
>e will 0
mmerclal
s will be political and
y bringing the
•tlons of
ons. by reducing the ti
sporting o
and by enablin
d central state:
erials and mark*
ries cheaply
fro
addi
:
he
to this
dustrial. I
tlo
and
clou
prod
:
:
Europ
to reach tna
of Pacific
peditiously, the
I
•:
p-.liti
.
fully
I
k
the
of the
ocial int
f every
ft-tio
•!
iai activity
U
nlted Stut
The iron
*1, th*
ti!
1
the
lunufact
he mln
the south,
products fro
etgn
••
fr« -
•■ glons. th
: :
id
tin
s will flow
• li
■ l
In an
r tradt
of all
ally
11 b
ab
rd
:h«
p"
by
la
1 th
ifle
The
ulf
hi
mpetition of
jpe In the c
he
!
: I
S'-uth A
•rtoa
:
tri- s «,f
it«
ith
the re
try will
that -f
h keen*'
0 b
■M
de of
;ht
rapidly
rill aid
The ci
al
rtv
••fit
P
teS 111
the il
Li
dtl
of i
if the
mrld."
ith a
Th
of the Mean
es. It sho
i Atlantic ;
by th-* Nl.-ii
to. This is
.d time in
an i
ful
nparh
h;
P;
b
i tha
he l
by th
offs*

.
rhe lat
Ni* •
trabl
ill
•d
o bt ...
The Ni
.
1
:h
! I
th
h
h
loi
il out that the Pa
held by th-* Fre
cession of rights
it p;
It is i
h
di'ib
omt-u
P
i*rn
The
:i
hat if
is limited.
h** Unlt
th
•d
; ;
*t
hip
ibsolt
P-rj
•ides tha
the
:h*?
nul
aft
shall i
The
Hutin of
1
1 1
has
-b
:
he French
upon which th
>f its property
No f.
ill dis
'
1 it
tl
.
i! the
.ml
teive<
being
I" •
The
dosed
hat thu
offer to
the United
had the co
to negotiate
;
ilted in
!
he property
disj
Stat

defiirt
pan}
with the United St
such n disposition.
Preside
might ol
•M
l:
It
r*osed by
.1 Stntea
1 seh
;
Hutin that th** Uni
•nntrol of the cat
irity slock ho Id
T:.
ganization.
mpany pr. f.
. h
e-incorp
in
United
ite
his
1 to
States,
■ I .
its \
ch
d of
ep
•h purcl
id
: ;
rect<
its '
'
permit
elusion
<f the c
Th
Tina l
slon arc sta
•stimated
"I. Th
Nicarag:
t of building
it $58.1100
the
;h*»
th;
of completing
U
Pant
the
al. 1
of
ulrine
til
lat
hu
prop
iiff
h
litude
in th*
• f th*
>h
) be .
Clt-3 tc
struct!
all ph
of th
.
1
two
ical
nsklerationa
height of da
h.
le
the
great
lepth of
the i
1*
al harbors, t
absence of a railroad, th*
from liability to dlsr
ain'ng to be do
"The new Pan;
o disposition to sell :
he United States. Should that
.• be able and willing to sell, tit
believed that the price would
s would make the total cos
the United States less than that of the
abs
:
he i
mptlor
imouni
canal
mpany lias
show
s property
V
I;
N
II. The Panama canal, afte
Id be shorter, have f
e than
e of th
i for a
compil
er locki
tion, w
d 1
he N
The
is the time
ag
equi
:
hrough, which Is estitn;
.
age ship at twelve ho
33 hours for Nicaragua.
he other hand, the dis
San Francisco to New York is 33'
to New Orleans 579 niiies and to Li
386 miles gr
Nicaragua. The time required t
ever these distances being greater than
ransit
anals, the Nicaragua lin*.
on. would be
tageous of the 1
lthstandlng the grea
intalning the longer canal
tent of Coloml
al. h;
s for Pant
inJ
fro
mile
pool
h
pa
the difference
through the C
after completi
he ti
of
1
United Si.
:
"111. The gov
which lies the I
lusiv*
. in
> granf
hich still
ed
. It is
ary rights
conditio
•ached with the N
The com ml
hi
ot free
int ill
o the United
that an
St;
s. except upo
nient t
r
belie*
is impracticable,
be ascertained, the c
not willing to sell Rs fr:
ill allow the United State
•r of its stock,
insiders such ;
sible.
"The governments of Nicaragua
Costa Rica, on the other hand, ar
trammeled by concessions and ar.
to grant the United States
leges ns may be mutually ag
al
h :
h
Pi
I
■hise, but it
to become
The commission
•angement inadmis
t o
I'
and
free
pri\ i
*h
I
"1
>f all the f;
ly in view
ing the n*
franchises
burning th
rcogni
f all the difficult!,
wary rights, pr
the Pi
Mcarngu;
the value *>f the
>f obtoli
il.
I

rout
Ric:
1 to the
grant cone
•asonable and
l
s which ar
the United
is of the opinion that 'The moat
practicable and feasible route for an
Isthmian canal to be
management and
States is that know
route."
ptable
he
ml
der the control.
ship of the United
as the Nicarag
The army reorganization bill
introduced in the ho
Hull expects early action.
vas
Uhairmau

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