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The Grenada sentinel. [volume] (Grenada, Miss.) 1868-1955, November 29, 1918, Image 1

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— GRENADArMTsSlSSIPPlTFR1DXYT NOVEMBER
mrnm
NO. 26
VOL. LXVK
, 29, 1918
AN APPEAL FOR DATA
ABOUT GROVER
CLEVELAND.
To The Press:
I should be grateful if friends of
Lhe late President CleVelahd who po
sess published addresses or
critical comment of historical value
concerning his policies or character
or letters to or from him, or personal
recollection^ of incidents connected
*with his life which Would'-bo ef in
terest in the preparation of a biog
raphy would communicate as soon, as
•practicable with
other
William Gorham
lice, of Albany. Any such comment
'letters and accounts*of incidents will
be acknowledged ah'd will'be careluD
ly returned if the sender so desires.
It is tny hope that, Mr, Rice, -aided
by such material and by His own al
ready existing collection, nia,y feel
disposed to ur.detake a biography'■ of
Mr. Cleveland "ridi rifg The ' enSuihg
year.
. The s affsemblyd c#»nqiezyT*y
publications and i'p.cprdfs ; pow ; ^|^pos
ed to. b.e b^qpg^u■togetbyr^vill. 4e
ppsited ultimately in th'e state libra
ry at Albany for tlxe use of Dr. John
H. Finley, who some time ago invited
Mr. Rice to collaborate with him or
whoever finally may prepare a defi
nite and documental biography. The
ollcetion thus deposited will also be
of permanent value because of its ac
cessibility* to anyone who in the fu
ture my desire to obtain for
cal or other purposes knowledge of
Mr. Cleveland's traits and his opin
ions and administrative recon
public questions.
Mr. Rice was a secretary to Gov
ernor Cleveland in Albany and was
later, by President Cleveland's ap
pointment, a United States civil ser
vice commissioner at Washington
and is now a New York state civi)
service commissioner. He was asso
ciated with Mr. Cleveland fror/i fSS2
onward and was always an esteemed
and devoted friend.
Inquiries concerning the requests j
and suggestions made in this letter
may be addressed to Mr, Rice at his
residence. 13f> Washington avenue,
Albany, or at the capital, Albany.
FRANCES F. CLEVELAND PRES
TON. {Formerly Mr:*. Gvcve
Cleveland.)
19 West 44tn Street. New York
November 12, 191S.
I
,.
T
on
1
City,
_Bt
RULINCS ON TRADING
IN COTTON.
Recently the War Industries Bcardj
Committee on Cotton Distri b Wi>
made it prohibitive for further specu- f
iative short selling in the cotton mar-;
xet. allowing only short selling in the 1
lorm ot he aging against the actual
purchases ot corton, or v.o liquidate
° n n^- t0nl r f K t 5 ' ,1 . .
modified bv the following tolwram j
received by the Dallas Cotton Ex
change from Washington. D. C., origi-!
natmg in the office of the Committee :
on < ettor. Dist.ufo.i, and to»\4ear;
up many questions winch have con- i
fronted the cotton trade since the |
promulgation of the order. Its modi-!
ficatiomis in the lorm oi permitting!
riiori .-Y.Ui.g iO! tae {-aspo-ie cf sc.a i-j
dies between tne .\ew tori: and the I,
NeW Oi'ians market, as well as that of!
Liverpool, but it places certain re
strictions in making this allowance.
Following hre the various questions I
which Lave been pat up to the chair-j
man of this committee by tiie various |
cotton interests of the South, with !
the answer from Chairman Brand: j
Question 1. Are straddles between j
months in the same market permit- j
ted Answei. Yes, but if sale is I
made first then the purchase must
follow immediately.
Q. 2. Are straddles between New
York and New Orleans permitted?
A. Yes, but if sale is made first then
the purchase must follow immediate
1
!


Are straddles between New
York or New Orleans and foreign j
markets permitted? A. No. Not if
the American end of the straddle is a'
sale.
)y
Q. ,3.
4. May a speculative short in
terest in existenc on Nov. 12 he
transferred to another month
another market?
chase against the short
followed by immediate
other month or in an other market.
5. May a short interest for
foreign account in existence on Nov.
12 be transfeiTcd to another
or another market?
purchase against the short interest is
followed by immediate sale of
other month or in another market.
Q. 6. Is it in order to sell hedges
for Canadian account with proper af
fidavit following? A XT ~ —-—-•
Q
or to
A. Yes, if the pur
interest is
sale of an
Q
month
A. Y'es, if the
an
fidavit f<yk>wmg? A. No, except in
the case 'of Canadian mills,*• which
must be required by their brokers to
furnish -an affidavit that the sale is
not a speculative short sale and will
not be converted into or maintained
as a speculative short sale.
Q. 7. If futures are sold against
spot cotton and spot cotton after
ward sold must futures be bought?
A. Yes. , t
Q. 8. Is it in order for a man to
open a straddle interest in the market
and then sell his'long interest, leav
ing his short Interest outstanding?
A. No. *
" > *
<J. 9. May a broker in putting
through a straddle between months or
between markets hrst sell, provided
he makes the purchase of another
month or in another market immed
iately thereafter? A. Yes.
Q. 10. Are affidavits required
from brokers putting through strad
dle orders in respect to the sale end
of the swaddle? If so will the com
Jttfidly. furnish the form in
which such'-aflfdavits shall be given?
A. Y<js. ,
Q. 11. May a general affidavit be
given by a spot hrm cqyfeing all sales
they may make during the contjmd
ance of the resfciction against specu
lative short selling? A. Yes.
12. In straddles between New
Orleans and New York must'an atfi
darit be. given for the sale end of
the transaction? A. Yes. The pur
chase., against the sale must be made
immediately thereafter.
v , Q. 1.3. JV^ay a. producer pf .cotton
sell, against a prospective crop? A.
•Yes.*•«» ' 'V M' 1 V'
r 0* 1 14. May orders be executed
from spot firms to sell at the close of
the market in anticipation of pur.*
>kas&.of spots? A. No,..
Q. May -a
'manufacturer or
hgarHstbis unsold s
A. Yes.
i v .Q, vf, JC-. a turWgit mercharrf
fchjp l'lilted 5$u^si^ellt»gaiu.sthTrlSR'iSPOR®
J.ffvj'g' a }ofi anch hous-AjUt:. representa
Thriqmrr liases of spot cotton ,jn the
L nited States and have such" sales
canned in tli£ name of the
house? A. No.
mittee
of
1
Q.
j
or * yarn's
er chant sell
of goods?
foreign
to
5,
all
it
led
... . bv m , canr ' °' j
par,mental publications in tne form i'day
o/ b'vh'kini and circulars o*.
T nt,k*icTiy. These 'publications usu-; Ev
* ■
EMPLOYEES DEDICATE P
ENTS TO FREE USE.
a
/ti
rty-four of the
■i s
to tne Uuited States PatYTR' -tThTi
during the fiscal year 1918 for letters
patent on inventions of employees of
the United States Department of Ag
riculture were granted and were dedi
cated to the free use oi' the Govern
ment and the people of the United
States.
cc
The inventions described in these
ayplk ations and patents may tie used,
manufactured, and sold by the Gov
t and the people of the United
without the payment of royal
er other feej to the inventors
e:xt«es.
ernme..
States
or'
n. 0 farmers' ar.d the gen- j
lie are «'iven 4 infcrmation con
i*e inventic
1 a I nu
corn mg
U
CO
ally contain, in addition to a descrip- j
tion of the invention and its operation
illustrations and comments on their
advantages.
p?
NEGRO FARMERS BUY
PURE BRED CATTLE.
' ..
f Dairy-extension forces in North
Carolina, working through the local
1 agent in Sampson County, have plac
e4i j ie ad of pure-bred Jersey cows
v -j^' n ne <r ro farmers. It is said to be
the first organized effort to place pure
j T' } ' ed for 6* m V> use °" nQ ^°
iheso animals were part of
a carioau purci.aseu bv the <lairy-ex
: tension men a Ohio. fh negroes
fnid *ah 'averace of $100 a head for
i the Jerseys. The cows were secured
| only from herds in which milk pro
duction and butter-fat content were
ver y Hjj_ j->, and were much better indi
v ; ( ; : , a ] s than are ordinarily brought in
I, ,
*
I
|
!
j
j
j
I
of
to
. j
j
1
1
the
te
ing
or
Nov. 25.-—Soldiers
of protect- the
them and
other •
ing
continued
; allowed to
Iff lo take other forms)
1
LCLD'ERS SHOUL HOLD
TO INSURANCE.
hin^ton
-ailors holding government insur
ance were urged by Secretary Mc
Atioo today to keep up their policies
aider the war as a means
in;: their families, and to give
! the right to convert it into
forms to be provided by the govern
MV
I V Ct:
n n


ment
The insurance may be
for five years 01 converted within that
time. If policies
iansc. the
j of government insurance never can
be regained,
for
tor
ons
er
TM
_n __
HOW LONG THEY LIVE.
Bears and dogs live 20 yeas, foxes
15, lions 70, cats 14, squirrels, hares
and rabbits 7, hogs, 30. A horse
has been known to live 62 years; their
average age is 25, sheep ten, cows 15,
camels 100, eagles 104, ravens 11, tor
toises 107, swans 360, elephants 400,
whales 1000.
may
on
tion
the
The
ilne
has
of
the
the
they
is
of
1917 to July,
50 deaths, from July
1918, 25 whites, of whom 8 were
male and 15 females,
years of age, seven were between 70
and 8°, five were between 60 and 70,
three were between 40 and 60, three
were between 30 and 40, six were un
der one year of age. Five died Af
paralysis, three of "Pelagru," two of
heart disease, fifteen of various di
One was 85
seases.
Negroes 27 deaths, fifteen males
and twelve females, five died between
70 and 90 one between 60 and 70 ten
between 20 and 45, nine between five
and fifteen, one between 1 and 5, one
was hung.
Four died from Tuberculosis, five
fom pneumonia, fifteen of various
diseases. The average death roll
was 125 per thousand.
by
the
ti
—i
or
in
be
of
A.
of
ness.*
A PROCLAMATION.
■ WHEREAS, we should count it an
inestimable honor and priceless privi
lege to be able to contribute our ener
gies towards freeing the world of the
menace of the Hun, and
WHEREAS, an ample supply of food
and feed are essential to the contin
ued succes of our people at home,
vital to winning the war: and
WHEREAS, on the 12th day of Sep
tember, 1918, and on previous occa
sions, so many men are called from:
the farm to the colors,, creating a
shortage of.labor; anc)
WHEREAS, the boys of Mississippi,
by the vigorous applications of their
energies can be of inestimable ser
vice, both to the Statg and Nation, by
the production of food and feed, and
the peformance of other necessary
labor; and - . v , . , r
WHEREAS, t r he boys bf Mississippi'
should be aroused to a full eoncious
tlieir opportunities, and
should be impressed with their duties
f«id great responsibilities during the
present world crisis, and so effect
ually organized tli'at ^YHeV Tan do
their full share and duty in helpihg
win tffe w'ar; - *
K
■of
of
i ' ;
I. Thlkilibre G: Bilfco,
Govtrrsor of 'the.-iStatffJof Mississippi,
any .Ex-Qfitce Cjiair
Council of Defense,
December 6, Registration Day for
the boys of Mississippi, who will lie
under eighteen and not under eighi
yeas of age or, the first day ofcJanu
ary, 1919; and call upon these ho
to come toward and register, as did
the patriotic men of the State on June
5, 1917. and c»n September 12, 1918;
and urge each teacher, the County
Superintendents
County Councils
County Demonstration
all other interested persons, to see to
it that all boys of proper age are as
sembled at their school houses, in
their respective districts, and prop
erly registered for the production of
food and feed, and for the perform
ance of other necessary
caused to show good and
reasons why they can not render such
service.
IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF I
ve hereunto set my hand and
led the Great Seal of the State
j Mississippi to be affixed, this the first
i'day of November, A. T) i9l8
THEODORE G. P-ILBO G. VERNOR.
Ev the Governor JOSEPH W-t PO\V
nyffi **Qf t.b.rt St4te
oeclare Friday,
s
s
of Education,
of Defense,
Agents
the
the
and
labor,
sufficient
or
j
caus
"
01
j ER, Secretary of State,
IS
FARM MOTOR TRUCKS.
The question as to
horses
trucks
whether
the
the more efficient and eco
the
motor
sic
wagons
or
re
nomical has already been solved by
most progressive farmers, but some
figures compiled by the department
of agriculture may be interesting as
substantiating their views, or m de
ciding the doubtful few. J 11 1918 the
cost tor hauling in wagons from farm
to shipping points averaged about :>l)
cents ii ton-mile To wheat; 33cents for
torn and 48 cents for cotton.
. j hauling by motor trucks
j tors the averages were 15
1 wheat or corn mid 18 cents lor cot
ton. T hese figures,
weekly news letters of the
ture department, were obtained from
1 eports made by correspondents of
the bureau of crop estimates.
by
t
For
or by trac
er nts for
as
printed in the
agri cul
ed
it
its
it
In 1916 a similar inquiry showed
that the average cost for wagon haul
ing - was 19 cents a ton-mile for wheat
or coin, and 27 cents for totton.
Wagon costs in 1918 were higher, but
motor costs were materially lower
than even the wagon costs of 1996
because of the increased efficiency of
the motor trucks. Costs for wagon
and truck hauling are shown to vary
• with the conditions in different sec
tions of the country. Wagon haul
ing costs less in Lhe Pacific states
t.han anywhere else. Motor truck
hauling costs the least in the north
central states and most in the Rocky
mountain
ai
1 .
states. The
length of haul made by trucks from
farm to shipping point was 11.3 miles
for wagon hauls, nine miles. A mo
tor truck made 3.4 round trips a day
over the longest distance, while wag
ons made 1.2 round trips on the short
er haul.
average
as
of
a
the
the
to
sia
There will always be need for
horses, but on large farms the time
may not be far distant when the wag
on will be as antiquated a part of the
farmer's equipment as the wooden
plow. Regarded first as the indica
tion of the "gentleman" farmer or
the school "agriculturist", the motor
truck and other gasoline-driven equip
ment has steadily gained in favor.
The increased efficiency of the gaso
ilne engine in recent years, of course
has contributed much to the change
of attidude.
the intensity of competjon following
the war and the growing influence of
agricultural schools and the" ideas
they epresent, the immediate future
is likely to see a still more gneral use
of motor equipment on farms.—In
dianapolis News.
15,
23,
near
With the increase in
the
Otho
DESK REMINDERS—Keep up with
your appointments and collections
by its use. ..Price $2.50. ..You might
forget" one time and lose ten times
the price of this handy article. The
Grenada Sentinel.
ti
NAT 10 NAL 4 SONGS.
I
ed
"The Man Without a Country" is
historic. We cannot parallel him 1
with a "Country Without a Song,
for there is no land so little or so
poor that it has not some national
music. Yet by strange circumstances
it happens that one of the greatest of
lands, and the one supremely famed
as the Land of Song, comes perhaps
nearest of all to being destitute of a
lta*iy, it is true, lias a rr.UiUtiiue 01
true national anthem,
songs, iOik songs, potriotic sengs and
wnai not, from -the,-immortal ' banta i
Lucia,"..oi Naples in the. i.outh, to
the .exquisite melodies Of TyYol at the
north. Naples has also her famous
"Tricolor, ' or ' La Noeca de TTe
Colurei" celebrating'the beauty of the
standard-of green and white and red.
an
the
a
by
»f
at
.(How many lands there are which
have tricoiored flags!,) i'loremt;. has
"Hie Volunteer's .F^reyveU," or "L'
adsliy del \ OiUntarfo," which like the
K pipolitaii "Trice yr," .is a w'hr. songi
agamst the b.ated Austrian. • Nor is
Ytalia Tfre'k-i.nfwithout'}vatrrioric mu
*fk-. which years o'T*Austrian tyranny
have pot-been able : to silence. One
■of the longest ami.-most, elaborate of
almost a cantata, is
"Ch Beik
I
turn to two compositions which divide
that honor between them. One of
these is the "Royal March," or "Mar
cia Reale," which was composed by
Gabetti in 1834. It is a
work, admirably
.1 to its use, which however, is
No words have
ever been written for it. nor indeed
patriotic,, son:
the "Beautiful lstria."
or
lriria' of the land beyond the Adria
tic, where the stately reins '
attest the classic, gloi
of Pola
es. of. the Ro- j
»• 1
man empire.
None of the
considered in the light of a national
anthem for all Italy, and so we must
s
can, however, be
Giuseppi
spirited and stately
adapts
purely instrumental.
Q
wou ! it lend itself to vocal render
ing. It is played on all official occa
sion and is the only really official na
tional music of Italy.
j
j-' 1
more popular, bc-: ;o
is "Uaxabaldi's
uei Caccia
fihis famous mar
ably
Iraniej.
song,
it u a
cause
vik Guer;
of
gether unworthy. It came into ex
ter.ee in the Italian War of Libera- n
ked
of
liym
tori t eiie Alpi.'
tun Ijric, beginning with the thrilling
" i li.ri To Ar.msF has often been
called - the "Marseillaise'' of iUvy, a
distinction oi' which., it is not alto
IS
tion in 1859, before the treachery of
Villa Franca turned the fruits of Sol
ferino and Magenta into Dead sea ap
ples. The brilliant and stirring mu
(1830-67). and the equally fine words
sic was composed by A'.essio Olivieri
were written by Professor Luigi Mcr
cantini of Palermo.
It was first sung and popularized
gade, toi which reason it received the
by the volunteers of the Alpine bri
r.amo which we have quoted—a cir
comparabie with that
"Marrieilai.se" re
But it came into
and was renamed
t umstance
through which the
ceived its name.
the
to
fullest popularity
as it is now
Garibildi," in I860, when the Thous
of Marsala essayed
popularly known, "Inno
and Red Shirts
their conquering campaign under the
lead of Gai
s
v
hv
ildi and hi3 lieutenant,
Admirably adapt
Francesco Gnspi.
ed for either singing 01 orchestration,
it has become the popular patriotic
:them of Italy, although never offi
cially authorized,
its words is directed *ag
it is perfectly adapted to use
ai
As the spirit of
nst Austria,
sed
present war. [ in
Leon Lansberg in New York Herald. |
in the
i
the
the
and
pies
-- * —
RE IS TOLD THE RISE AND
FALL OF PRUSSIAN EMPIRE.
1 .
which now
The German empire,
appears to he rapidly disintegrating
result of the revolution, was es
my,
was
As
my"
as a
tablished Jan. 1, 1871, by the states
of the German Confederacy. It was
a direct result of the Franco-Prussian
war, in which Prussia was aided by
the other states.
The first movement toward estab
lishment of the empire was made by
the king of Bavaria, who in a letter
to the king of Saxony, on
1870, proposed that the king of Prus
sia be nominated as emperor of Ger
Dec. 4,
The empire was founded on con
elusion of treaties between the North
German confederation and the grand
duchies of Baden and Hesse (Nov. as
15, 1870,) the king of Bavaria (Nov. mon
23, 1870,) and the kingdom of Wur
temburg (Nov. 25, 1870,) and was today
ratified Jan. 29, 1871, at Versailles, so,
near Paris. will
or
son
the
some
the
is
many.
The North German confedaration,
formed in 1866 at the invitation of
the king of Prussia, included Prussia,
Saxe-Weimer, Oldenbug, Brunswick,
Saxe-Altenbufg, Saxe-Coburg-Gotha,
Anhalt, the two Schwarz burghs, Wal
deck, Lippe, Lubeck, Bremen, Ham
burg, the two Mecklenburgs, Hesse,
Saxe-einingen and Saxony.
The first chancellor was Prince
Otho von Bismarck, who assumed
office in May, 1871, and resigned in
March, 1890.
William I died Marc! 9, 1888. He
44
?
was succeeded by his son, Frederick
III. The latter died on June 15,
the same year as the result of a can
cer of the larnyx. He was succeeded
by William II, the monarch who
held responsible for the great war.
Ancient Germany successful resist
ed the Romans in the third century,
In the latter part of the eigth centu-'
I ry Charlemagne subdued the Saxons'
and was crowned emneror. < At the
extinction of his family, in 1911, the;
empire bec ame elective and was sub-!
sequently obtained by the House of
Hapsburg (from 1437 to 1804.) The
confedaration of the Rhine was form-j
ed in 1806, the Germanic confedara
tion in 1815 and the North German
confedaration in 1866.
is
1
so
of
a
i
»f
•r:.
ALPHABET.
THE GROWTH OF THE
Latin is far and away the most im
poitant of all aphabets . ... It is
derived from the Chalcidian type of
the Hellenic, ::o called because in use
at Chalcis, in Euboea, an island of the
Aegean, whence migrated one of the
several Greek colonies planted in
southern Italy. As the oldest Italic
scripts—copying the older method of
the Creel
and as th
colbnists won!
yound-signs igxd numerals,
good wa.rant for fixing the date of
the intro
—r v ad from right to left,
i st thing aimed at by the
1 be the use of common
there is
fi
ciioxx of the Greek alpha
bet into Italy at about the eighth cen
tury before Christ. The various de
rived scripts—Umbrian, Oscan, Etius
can and others—have all, the Latin
alone excepted, passed away. The
dominance of the Latins
brought about the abolition of every
other alphabet than their own, which
becoming the alphabet of the Roman
empire, and then of Christendom,
cured an everlasting, supermacy. It
was the vehicle of Greek and Roman
culture to western Europe,
Both Y and Z were late importa
tins from the Greek into Latin, being
used only in Greek loan-words to
denote sounds peculiar to the Greek;
hence, as the? most
j ultimate
se
arrivals,
of the
Some of our letters are of
recent
their appearance at the end
alphabet.
little use; K makes C superfluous, and
Q and X are of no more service to us
than they were to the Romans. So
j that, for praotira! purpo
j-' 1 *-';' ci: 4 y-threc lettei
ses,. we have
s wnerewith
irty-two sounds.
. phahet, like oui mMb'
;o
k.
ouv
v
is ever . t war wi f h
to the bewilderment
and foreigners,) is
Ir.oni the lack or consistapt
ess, so workable a set
of signs has secured a footing which,
roade firmer by the art of printig, is
n °f likely tobe disturbed by and pro
cesses o 1 phonetic change which mar
ked the course of spe
of printi
cations in handwriting*
guish the remranshin
c .u
J o
nur.
it!C]
school (h
what it i.
rule. Never the!
01
1
uren
h. To that art
?o due those modifi
vhich distin
is
of past
present times. As has been seen, while
Germany remained in fetters to the
cye-distracting Black letter, we freed
ourselves by the adoption of the clear
Roman type, hence the disappearance
save in legal documents
show art-books of the cramped hand
which prevailed down to the sixteenth
century. So the handwriting of today
(good, bad
an«
and a few
indifferent) . . .
and
which we learned
at school through
the stages of "pot-hooks and hangers"
to the
andest
nourishes of
copy
book "maxim'-'." is derived from the
iy' the m inted alphabet.
'o*'" of the Alphabet,"
s am
v or n e
hv Edward Clodd.
FOllfffO
r;
"BLACK MAMMY.
* >
The respect and affection with
which the negro woman who has nur
sed the childrefi of a Southern family
[ in the United States is regarded, by
| members of such a family,
through
i more than one generation, is made
evident in the scrupulous provision
made for her comfort as a member of
the household, in the privileges she is
granted, in the defence shonwn her by
adults and minors, in the children's
meek submission to her rulings, in
the autocratic sway which shr exer
cises over the other domestic "help,"
and in the prominent place she occu
pies in the literature of Dixie.
There was 110 such thing known as
my, for, m a large degree, she never j
was without her freedom. Even
technically, it was the custom of
Southern families, under slavery, to.
scant freedom to their old servants.!
As a usual thing, "Aunt Martha'' and;
"Uncle George," as the negro "mam
my" and her husband were, perhaps,
emancipation for the negro "niam
commonly known, served without
wage, but, in lieu of it, they were
granted an allowance. In this re
spect, as in others, they were treated'
as members of the family, not as com
mon "help."
So they are regarded and treated
today in thousands of Southern homes
so, very likely fo many years to come
will they be treated. It is not im
probable that they have a daughter,
or a son,who also 'belongs", to thp
family^ In the course of tfme the,
son will be the "Uncle George/' err,
the daughter will become the "Aunt!
Martha," and the "black mammy" of
some other home, for they are never,
"taken in;" almost invariably theyj
grow up" with the members of thi
family who eventually adopts one cr
the other of them.
Black mammy." is a famih.*"*
character in Southern fiction. She
is necessary to lhe environment cf the
44
U
4-a
Sag
Wil
has given
of his ne
with other
tribute to
been said, of
With
characteristic Southern home.
of liam Lightfoot Visscher
her name to a collection
gro dialect poems, and,
is writers, lias paid glowing
• j everything that has
1 her gentleness and fidelity,
can ue said, in appreciation of her
the man or woman of Southern up
bringing is retain to agree,
may be differences 0:1 other points,
the; below Mason and Dixon's line, and
among Southerners above it, but
of those who have been "raised" by her,
I with reference to the many fine "*iali
ties there is no difference • \ng
j those of "black nur^ ofiri.s
• *
There
xn Science Monj
v 24.—Lo; d Robert Ce
cil wneiL-tVshed by Tne Journal and
the World correspondent the status
of the kaiser in Holland said:
"The kaiser entered Holland as an
unarmed German civilian and is en
titled to remain as long as he does
not do any Harm. At least, that is
thP Dutch government's opinion."
Asked whether the kaiser could be
extradited, Lord Robert-said:
if he has committed an extra
dictable offense, but you would never
get a court to say he is not a political
offender. Under both British and
American law he.is entitled to asy
lum."
Real and Unreal ir. Revolution.
Asked whether the kaiser is only to
n by physical means, Lord
Robert answered: "Yes, unless we
asked the Dutch to surrender him as
a matter of courtesy."
Lord Robert declined to
>e
if the
Allies proposed to ask Holland to do
this. Asked whether, he replied:
"We do not know how he abdicated.
We are only informed by the de facto
government of his hr
Then, he is living 1
in Holland, where the crown
joined him."
Commenting on the revolution in
Germany, Lord Robert said:
very difficult to be sure how
is real. The revolution
by extremists,
formed without
did an 1 :
.the new
tro! of t
ing abdicated
is a private person
prince
"It is
much
was caused
government
Hindenburg
He accepts
yet the
them,
thing.
•.me and
iUTT.V, \
remains
bile
in con
perma
goyernment
all
denar tin
be all fr;
ts
ht.
1 -
xu
ne
V.
v. d!
i€;
J J _ i
U c.
I
1 >
liC _
Food c;u:cx Dulch
Questioned concerning plans by the
Allied eciiferen -e lienHiiig settfem'ent
of peace prelimi naries, Lod Robert
replied:
Ml
. ^ V 4
Ie.
t ;•
"icr, it is possible to
y we pro
pose to lay down a form of definite
international
lines of settlement
agreement on broad
such as Turkey
! r over subjeet
races, that Germany will not get her
colonies back, and so forth.
"These peace preli
agreed on, details could be
out at a conference.
German acceptance would be
tion of German soil; a No for
ment of terms."
Referring to Holland, Lord Robert
said: "The political
land is obscure, but
Trolstra is ngit:
food prices."
not to retain pow
saries being
worked
Guarantee for
occupa
fulfil
ration in Hol
ood will solve
mg wholly on
c: *f
it.
_it;
OSCAR LAME FREED BY STATE
SUPREME COURT.
Indictment Against Jackson Man Im
i"rocured, Is
properly
Ruling.
Oscar Lamb,
business
tormeny engaged in
toe uecision ot Di
vision B ot the Supreme Court of Mi
sissippi, was this morning set free.
His case, which has attracted wide at
tention, was for the alleged
licre, by
iS
receivng
or embezzled property in connection
with the failure of the Bank of Sallis
in Attalla
Mississippi,
caunty,
April 23rd, 1917.
On a change of venue from Attalla
county, Lamb was convicted in Janu
ary, 1918, at Grenada, and sentenced
to a term of ten
on
years in the State
his case
penitent:
y. He appealed
and assigned a number of errors. The
Supreme Court rendered a lengthy
opinion in which it held that the in
dictment against him was improperly
j procured, and improper and undue in
fl uen ce had been exerted
thcl^j • of Atta!Ia c0 „ nt
-n,. n ^ 1
t , Thc „ Sup ' eme . Ccurt ff ls0 5 eld ,;h «
,'V ""s "° offense charged against
Eamb in the maictment, and that the
evi dencc introduced for the State
wholly insufficient to sustain
viction.
before the
was
the defendant discharged.
The above is taken from the news
columns of the Jackson Daily News
0 f Monday.
. The case attracted much artenUon
The de f e ndant was represented ' bv
j , Robert Powoll -r l
■. ™ .f e * 0111 d Teat & Teat
while the State was represented Cow
J es Horton and district attorney Al
l en -
* The writer watched the case pretty
closely while it was beng tried here
and would have been surprised had
the verdict not been reversed.
FOR SALE—Uhl Steel typewriter
. desks, the kind you see advertised
in Saturday Evening Post and Sys
tem. Price $25.00, stocked by The
Grenada Sentinel.
a con
The case was reviewed and

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