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The Grenada sentinel. [volume] (Grenada, Miss.) 1868-1955, October 29, 1920, Image 5

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85034375/1920-10-29/ed-1/seq-5/

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PAGE SIX
THE GRENADA SENTINEL
FRIDAY, OCTOBER* 29 1920
WE ARE OFFERING EVERY AKTin.F. HAN
ALL GENTS' FUR
NISHINGS GOING
ALL MEN'S, LADIES,
BOYS' AND GIRLS'
SHOES
= w
I
PLED IN OUR GENTS FURNISHING

AT
m
% off
CASH
% off
CASH
AND SHOE DEPARTMENT

S
\
§
AT

20 Off For Cash Only 20 Off
BEGINS OCTOBER 26TH ENDS NOVEMBER 6TH
j§ We are making this special offer for io days only, at which time we are giving you our profit. Our mer
! chandise has been purchased prior to the peak of advances, and you can find good bargains in any of these
H articles far below today's market value.
Our 5tock Must be Reduced in 10 Days and no Lower Price can be Expected
DON'T WAIT!
NOW!
Save 20 cents on Every Dollar Invested With Us During this Sale
ONLY A FEW OF THE WONDERFUL BARGAINS OFFERED
$ 16.00
$ 12.00
$ 8.00
$20.00 Hanan Shoes for
$1 5 .oo Walk-Over Shoes
$10.00 W. L. Douglas .
Alt 'Work Shoes Reduced SO per cent
f . -
MEN'S SUITS AND OVER COATS
$80.00 SUITS
$65.00 SUITS
$50.00 SUITS
$35.00 SUITS
—BOYS' CLOTHING REDUCED—

LADIES' SHOES
M
$64.00
$52.00
$40.00
$28.00
$20.00 SUEDE BOOTS for^
$16.00
$18.00 BROWN KID BOOTS for___$1440
$15.00 BLACK KID BOOTS for_$12.00
$10.00 BLACK KID BOOTS
= ■
I
$ 8.00 K
HEATH BROS
= *
| —ONYX HOSIERY 20% OFF—
| Don t forget to see the Wizard Foot special
1, 1At 111 our Shoe Department October 28th
1 30th. FREE EXAMINATIONS MADE
i
$2
00 SUITS
$20.00 SUITS
$15.00 SUITS
_$ 20.00
_$16.00
_$ 12.00
to
GRENADA,
MISSISSIPPI
m
mrt
llll
Hi 1
mum i I
THE GRENADA SENTINEL
I
I
1
!
O. F. LAWRENCE, EDITOR
L. M. LAWRENCE, PUBLISHER
GRENADA, MISSISSIPPI
$1.50 Per Year in Advance}
-$ 1.00
SUBSCRIPTION
Six Months_
t
Advertising Rates Furnished on Application
Entered at the Post Office at Grenada, Miss., as second class mail matter.
THE OFFICIAL ORGAN OF GRENADA COUNTY
NATsONAL DEMOCRATIC TICKET j
Tor President:
JAMES M. COX
of Ohio
For Viet-President:
FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT
of New York
Presidential Electors:
State At Large:
R. H. HENRY, of Hind*
HENRY MINOR, of Noxub*e
First District:
F. D MELLEN
WiiAT WILL BE ON THE TICKET j
NEXT TUESDAY
Besides the names of the preeiden I
tial electors, fire proposed constitu |
tio :al amendmments will he on the
,
' ;y ( '
ticket to be voted next Tuesday, the!
Court Judge and
probl^ps in the hands of a eommis- j
sion sitting at the State Capial. Let's i
will be three seis of electors,
Dernocrcts. Republicans and Social
ists. 7
The i
- Democratic electors are the
on the ticket.
firs:
amendment,
F ;
wing each prop
constitution, will appear the
words "fr'or" and "Against." An
marked with pen and ink opposite
these words is the only way for the
jse
to
X :
,
voter to express his preference.
The first amendment appearing
the ticket is one which virtually takes
the working of the roads out of the t

Gli
bands of the boards of
and placse it in the hands of the
State Highway Commission. May tho i
supervisors ,
;
Lord save us from committing that
sort of an error. The method of work- J
ing public highways is bad enough
now, but the people of Mississippi cer |
tainly do not want to place their road
keep these matters where we can i
reach them. There is too much cen
tralization already.
The second amendment should be
voted for. It provides for the elec
j Second District:
THOMAS E. PEGRAM
Third District:
J. S. SAVAGE
Fourth District:
WALKER WOOD
fr if th District:
JAMES LEE BYRD
Sixth District:
J. E. DAVIS
Seventh District:
E. H. REBER
Pnghth District:
C. N. HARRIS, Sr.
j tion of the Levee Commissioners in
the delta section of the State by the
I people. The mailer of handling levee
| |)rob!ema has been a source of tra(le
and barter between the politicians
, and the bankers of that section for
these years. In a number of instances
i
tax law to the women, a thing
absolutely necessary if the women
are to exercise the right of suffrage.
t s ould be voted for.
Tbe fifth amendment relates to the;
pensioning of all Confederate soldiers
and their widows, and of course will
it has been shown that the treasurer
chosen by the commissioners
has
made thousands of dollars
of
out
This should not be. We
have heard it charged that some oi
levee funds,
the levee commissioners under
la
term,
sor of the present governor'was
the
administration made $75,0lK) out
: oi levee matters during the four-year
It is a fact that the predeces
pre
sented a large purse, said to have
beep $10,000. when he retired from
off * ce ' an( l the main contributors to
t * r,s P ursa were delta men and former
• attaches of the levee boards.
i t0 confer f be right of suffrage^ on the
of Mississippi. That \as al
,
The third amendment is intended
; v/omen
rea ^ y been done by federal amend
ment * but Mississippi should give her
to the amendment,
The fourth amendment extends the
1
I carry.
I to show the most generous care and
1 consideration for those who carried
! the banner of the Lost Cause.
Mississippi has never failed
■o
Mississippi Railroad Commission for
the authority to increase its rates at
the meeting to be held in Jackson
next Thursday.
HE TELEPHONE COMPANY WILL
ASK INCREASE OF RATES.
t
The reading public is aware of the
fact that the Cumberland Telephone
and Telegraph Company will ask the
Looking to the creation of senti
ment to back a rate increasq, the
Telephone Company has been running
a series of ads in the newspapers of
the State setting forth the reason:
why the proposed increase should be
granted. The advertising of course
has been appreciated by the press
and possibly has made some converts
among the newspapers to the idea
of
a needed increase. One of the mo ; •
persuasive arguments for the
crease is that a large per cent of it
will go to the employes. In answer j
to this it might be asked: Where did
the revenue for the other two in-!
creases given since we entered the
j
Speaking for ourselves, we do not
m
war go?
know whether the company is en
titled to an Increase in rates or not.
If it is entitled to an increase, it .*
should be allowed to make it. But
we are frank to say that the out
ward evidence, all the circumstances,
are against the justice of the in
crease. Too many of the public serv
ice corporations pay almost fabulous
salaries to their presidents, general
counsel and the other higher-ups. j
When the higher-ups cut their sala- J
ries, the public will have a more open
i n*ir.d as to figures submitted on earn
ings. It is awftilly easy to juggle fig
uges. If there Is anybody in Missis
sippi who knows what the salary of
the president of the Cumberland Tel
be
the j
Mississippi public by giving the in-1
formation. We wrote the president J
of the company for this information, ers
but for reasons which he deemed suf
flcient, he failed to give it.
The Railroad Commission has a so
rious question to consider. In deal- of
ing with it, the Commission should
not forget the people who gave them
their commissions. It should be just i*
ephone Company Is, we are confident
that he would confer a favor on
to all and should hear in mind that
prices have started downward now,
and that a rate increase would not
conform to the spirit of the hour.
o
Senator Harding said in his Des
Moines speech, referring to the
League of Nations and the Peace
Treaty: "I do not want to clarify
those obligations. I want to turn m>
back on them. It is not interpret a
tion but rejection I
seeking."
Yet, Taft, Root, Wlckersham and that
ilk of statesmen say that Harding is
for the Treaty. Maybe so. But it cer
am
tainly is unfortunate that
Harding
does not know bis own mind or is
unable to speak his own mind,
o
This much is settled, regardless or
w hether Harding or Cox is elected,
and that is that the League of Ka
tions is certain of ratification. Can't
Of course there will
unquestionably be some reservations,
nevertheless the treaty, will be rati
fied just about as Woodrow Wilson
wrote it.
keep out °T
j
in the process of read justment of
the affairs of the country, organized
j labor is a very important factor. It
has a patriotic duty to perform. Un
-o
THE DUTY OF LABOR.
questionably the price paid for labor
has had and is today having much
.* to do with bigh prices. A large per
cent of the people of the country
think that both capital and labor have
played h—1 during the pa3t tbre
years. v
because money is the most powerf
weapon known to civilized humanity,
j There can be no debate about the
J proposition that but for organization,
labor would have been ground under
the feet of organized capital. Every
toiler is entitled to not only enough
for 8Ver 7 day consumption, but
enough to lay by something for the
future. But to get this, labor should
be willing to do its part, to carry its
Part of the burdens of society. The
organization of even labor can be ov
erdone. Just now the organized print
ers of the country have on a move
t0 work but hours per week,
while at the same time demanding
Pay for 48 hours. For the purposes
of this article, there is no use to de
bate the righteousness or the wrong
ness °f Ibis demand. The question,
i* seems to us, is, for labor to ask
1
Capital is more powerful than labor
1
I
S
|
F J
\
who in the end must pay for the
ceptance of this demand and how the
general public will view it?
ac
There
•ire a great many more people who
are outside of any union than there
are on the inside. It may get to the
point that the outsiders will
for self-protection,
the sufferers?
organize |
Then who w ill be!
ness which has run rough-shod over
the people and w^ho has as little
We have no sympathy for big busi
con
science as h—1 has of balmy breezes. !
But the great body of the folks are
not big business, neither
are they ;
Thus it is that 1
right thinking, patriotic, honest men
of both classes, both
members of unions.
in the unions
and out, should do some every-day,
old-time, honest thinking and acting, j
o
Fred Sullens remarks editorially in
the Jackson Daily News that coffee
has only very recently dropped off 35
per cent is price, yet nobody in Jack
son has seen proper to quit selling •
coffee at S and 10 cents per cup. Aw-i
fully hard to shake 'em
high prices.
ioose from j
j
o
Election next Tuesday
The Progressive Farmer is teaching !
|
in
o
some mighty good doctrine to the
farmers just now.
l*U|
J. I. T
1
JUST
IN
TIME
DISINFECTO
1
A Powerful Disinfectant, Germicide, Antiseptic and
Insect Destroyer,
For the PREVENTION OF DISEASES and for the
extermination of
MOSQUITOES. FLIES, FLEAS. BEI) BUGS.
ROACHES. CHICKEN MITES. IICE, ETC.
This Remedy Possesses Great GERMACIDAL Power
Removes Offensive Odors, Kills Germs and Insects
Purifies the Air in Living Rooms, Hospitals,
Public Buildings and Closets.
Manufactured and Guaranteed by
SOUTHERN DRUG CO.
SHREVEPORT, LOUISIANA
For Sale in Grenada by Fatherree Drug Store, Sec- 1
on d Class Drug Store, Corner Drug Store |
J PFIPEaipiifflPFl^
J#
The Jackson Daily News goes after
the candy seller, and one of the local
dealers
lays the blame for the high
price on the manufacturer. The drop
U the price of sugar cuts no figure
j D the price, the Dally New.
says.
| The manufacturer answers that while
sugar has gone down,
it constitutes
only one-third the price of candy, but
that those who buy it must pay for
the fancy box and the ribbon
and
that boxes have advanced 40
! since April.
the box and the ribbon
per cent
The Dally News
says
are all moon
; shine
anyway, and that the candy
should be put up in plainer style. The
observations of the Daily News leads
us to inquire who Fred Sullens is.buy
ing candy for. 7
tainly not out of town?
His good wife is cer
-o
Vote for Cox and Roosevelt; if you
do not, do not try to slip into the
next Democratic state primary.
-o
People are calling on the govern
just now' to save them from the
results of their own folly.
-o
For many reasons the presidential
election next Tuesday is of unusual
interest. The result has a world-wide
(significance. The women of the nar
tion are participating for the first time
in the country's history.
l*U|

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