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The times. [volume] (Richmond, Va.) 1890-1903, July 02, 1901, Image 8

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«
WHEAT IS STEADY;
SO ARE STOCKS
Scam Production Will Break All.
Former Records.
STEEL STOCKS STAND STRIKE.
Dn!y Small Depression Caused by Labor
Troubles-Produce Market Active at
/*. Good Prices— Supply Less
Than Demand.
.Produce reports to the Richmond Grain
tni Cotton Exchange, reviewing the grain
trade of the week, se.id:
•'YThea* exhibited surprising strength
fluring a portion <if the week, and the
cause cannot be earfly located apart from
Sl .score of shorts caused by reports of
large- purchases from Eurcpe. particularly
Fnajrce. Every effort was made to find
this new demand, nnd exporters were most
liberal in making offers and terms which
■would secure business, bad it been present,
bJt not a single reply was received, and
the conclusion" reached was that this par
ticular French <3emn.nd was a myth got
ten up by speculators .to influence values.
"The splenddd promise in this country
almost assuring v. cr»p largely In excess
of TOCWXKMXIO bushels, has caused a volume
of short seiliupr, which easily over-reached
the mark and caused a situation that
would easily load to n sharp up-turn in
prices, should an untoward feature be
6udd«nly introduced.
"Tiif. Richmond market shows 5 1-2 cents
over Chicjtsso, and S 1-2 cents over St.
LrOUiS. '
"Karly July will witness a large aug
mentation in the lojhl receipt of ■wheat.
A few small lots of new wheat were
eoJd yesterday a.t 72 and 73 cents per
"bush/pf. This was the lirst wheat sold on
the Richmond Exchange this season.
The grain receipts yesterday, wore ex
ceedingly light: Wheat, S3O; bushels; corn,
1,071 bushels.
The visible supply of wheat last year
was 47,242,0 M bushels against 31,O»,<»0 for
this year.
Richmond Produce Market.
Watermelons continued to arrive yes
terday from Florida and the prices
dropped to from $2. to $C 5 a hundred.
Last season the first shipment of South
ern tvjuernxslons was received on June
Sth. This season, on account of a short
Florida crop and the high prices offered
by the Xew York market, the iitst ship
ment did not> reach Richmond until" June
29th.
The market is wrll supplied with can
taloupes. Fancy stock brings from $l,nQ
to $2 a crate, while off stock sells at from
SI to $1.26.
Tomatoes from Southern points are
plentiful, and choicp sell from $1.50 to $2
a crate. The nearby crop, which is norv
being harvested, will be sufficient to sup
ply the local market after this week.
Hanover tomatoes continue to bring
fancy prices.
Potatoes are scarce and high. Fancy
Virginia stock yesterday sold from fl.To
to J2 in car-load lots.
The receipts of spring chickens con
tinued light, and prices held up to from
IS to 20 cents a. pound.
Eggs came in more plentiful yesterday,
and .prices lowered on account of the hot
■weather. Best nearby sold from 13 to 13
cents a dozen.
Fresh country butter sold for 12 to 14
cent*,
Veals. 4 1-2 to 5 1-2; lambs, i to 5 1-2;
sheen, 2 1-2 to 4.
Onions. J2 to 52.50 a barrel.
Country ham?. 10 to 12; sides 9 to 10;
shoulders, S to 9.
Chic«ens are liable to be lower after
July 4th.
The general produce supply is not in
excess of the demand, as the commission
men clean up almost every day.
Stock and Bond Gossip/
Local Investors a.nd speculators in
stocks demonstrated little activity cither
in buying or selling yesterday. An un
certainty regarding conditions" obtaining
caused inertia in sympathy with the New
York market.
There was much interest manifested in
etee' stocks and the probable result of
the strike of the members of the Amal
gamated Association at some of the
United States Steel Corporations, causc-d
by failure to sign wage-scale demanded,
and traders in that stock seemed willing
to bide their time until the meeting of
the directors of the corporation to-day,
•when the question of declaring a dividend
on the common stock will be. decided.
Basing their opinions upon privaie dis
patches from Xew York, local dealers' do
not contemplate any serious break in this
etock. It is, however, nervous, and fluc
tuated somewhat yesterday.
As advertised in another column,
Messrs. Scott & Stringfellow are offering
for sale a miscellaneous lot of stocks of
Richmond banks. These securities will
jbe sold at Richmond Stock Exchange at
(public auction on Tuesday. July 9th, at
.12:30 P. M. It is rarely that such an
opportunity to purchase shares in local
banks presents itself.
The banks of Richmond liave been very
conservative in their management, as evi
denced by the large surpluses and undi
vided profits they have accumulated.
Although the rate of interest which
these securities return are small, they
bts non-taxable, and are considered gilt
» edge investments.
The absorption of the Richmond Loco
motive Works by the American Locomo- ;
live Company will place the six per cent, j
bonds of the former corporation .-amontr
the gilt-edge securities and will prob- ;
ably produce an advance on thp present i
Quotations.
| ANDERSON,
710 MAIN ST.
GAS RANGES,
OIL STOVES,
GASOLINE STOVES.
BEST MAKES.
LOW PRICES.
OVENS,
I STEAMERS,
; OIL and
j: GASOLINE.
■■ i 1i 1
j 1 1
ANDERSON, 710 MAIN.
< TINNER,
I PLUMBER,
| STOVES and RANGES.

4$ is the time for recreation and rest. Music is both restful and soothing, especial!}- when emanating from pianos that are f)
tone true (correct and sweet). Just what you'll find in those HIGHEST GRADE PIANOS.
STEIISTWUIY, KJXriLBJa, KIMBALL, HAINES, 5
5 HARDMAN, STANDARD. £
4* They are honest pianos— the best that money can buy-and sold at honest prices- the lowest that good pianos can be jajk I
y* sold for, Sold on instalments. DON'T these facts interest you?
THE rs> JS> f=>
t 1 you can play | in all woods to
S isthemost -^ the piano like jg^ match your piano.
«S entertainin 9 an artist, who -^ Come and hear
0 \Z> mstrurr >ent »J* has spent his •» jt and see j ts
T O yet invented. O life studying. *-^ wonderful work. j£
# " i W- With the We have the *T J
£ P± /^ /* V
J^FtiiJ^ BOX - LiTofyou 6 . % !
„ )S Z ii^^T^tPHOPHOHES. tbe very .atest thing. P.ays either large or smal. Record, You nave J |
the choice of either and both. Cheap, too, only $25.00; all the latest Records, loud and strong, ,
1 1 i««n« 103 EAST BROAD ST J!T!L I
COMBINATION OF
COAL COMPANIES
Corporation With Immense Capita
to Control the Output of
Bituminous Coal.
(By Associated Tress.l
CLEVELAND, OHIO, July I.— The
Leader to-morrow will say:
"Before the first of September all of
the big companies producing bituminous
coal will have been gathered into one or
ganization, similar to the United States
Steel torppration. The capitalization will
bo enormous, probably second only to
that of the big steel trust.
••From what can be learned work upon
the big coal trust has been under way
for a greater length of time than any
of the other industrial combinations. J.
P Morgan, the advocate of coalition,
first started in with his coal combina- j
tior.s three years ago, making the first j
movements along the line of controlling
the products of the Ohio and West Vir
ginia fields; At that time he obtained
complete control of the mining property
in- the Hocking and Shawncc Valleys.
One year ago ail of the coal properties
in the. Pittsburg district, which ship coal
to the lakes, were collected into one or
ganization known as the Pittsburg Coal
Company. About the same time the same
interests which ship coal from that ter
ritory down the river, was formed a com
bine, which has since been known as the
Monongahela Coal Company. About the
same time it became known that M. i
Hanna and others in this territory ha-]
about completed the absorption of most of
the coal properties in the Massilion di.s.
trict. The West Virginia coal production
is virtually owned by one company, iiic
Fairmont Coal Company, which in turn
is the property of the Baltimore and Ohio
Railroad. The other interests in the ter
ritory are all owned by the Xorfolk nnd.
Western, the Chesapeake and Ohio or the
Pennsylvania Railroad, all of which, with i
the Baltimore, ami Ohio, form one bis
railroad company, being owned by one
company. 'Hie Monongahela, the Pitts- i
burg Coal Company, the Fairmont, the
Hocking and the Massilion Coal Company
are all to be collected into one big or
ganization.
The aim of "all this is to effect a com
plete! monopoly of the bituminous coal
property in the territory of the Missis
sippi and north of the Ohio and Potomac.
MANY DEATHS
FROM THE HEAT
(Cont:.-:ucd from First Page.)
to mitigate against effective work.
In many cases horses had to be ob
tained from contractors to draw wagons
and ambulances.
Although the Weather Bureau shows
that the maximum OS. this does not in
dicate the heat on the streets. Many
thermdmteers registered 10S at .1:10. and
ail of them over 100 on the street level.
•If the heat was killing on mankind it
was wor.*e on the horses; they dropped
right «nd left. At one time there were
eight dc;id horses lying on Broadway be
tween Twenty-third and Forty-second
Streets. There were fourteen horses
prostrated in the vicinity of Madison
Square alone.
The rush of the crowds fo the parks
ami the seaside resorts to-night was un
precedented in the history of the city.
Numbers of men who boarded the cars
carried blankets, in which they intended
to roll themselves and sleep on the sands.
IN PHILADELPHIA.
Fourteen Deaths Reported and More Than 100
Prostrations.
fßy Associated Pr.esO
PHILADELPHIA. PA.. July 1.-Phila
delphia and vicinity to-day experienced
the highest temperature ever recorded
in this city, the Government thermome
ter on the top of th postofficf? building.
170 fec-t fr.om the street, registering 102
degrees even. At Cramp's shipyard, the
prostrations were so numerous that the
five thousand men employed there were
relieved from further duty at noor.-.
At Baldwin's Locomotive Works, the
Mid-Vale Steel Works, and numerous
other places scores of heat sufferers had
to quit.
Reports, from all sections of the State
show that th<» temperature was exceed
ingly high. Tn some places the record
was broken and in other places it was
equalled. Up to midnight fourteen
deaths were reported, and upwards of
one Hundred persons were treated at hos
pitals for heat exhaustion.
NO PROMISE OF RELIEF.
j To-Day. According to Weather Bureau, Will
Be a Scorcher.
dlr Assoolatod Press.)
WASHINGTON. D. C. July I.— The hot
■weather continued here to-day with un
abated fierceness, the climax coming- in
the afternoon, when the local record for
i this early in the summer was broken, the
"Wsather Bureau thermometer recording
102 degrees. Fortunately there ivas not
much humidity in the atmosphere.
There were twenty cases of heat pros
i tration reported and one resulted fatally.
At S o'clock to-night the thermometer
had fallen to 90 degrees, with every prob
! -bility that it wouH not fall greatly be
low that during the night and that to
morrow would b<» a. scorcher. There
seems to be -no prospect for any reli»f
for the next forty-eiffht hours for *.'v.s
vicinity, Bey©»« tfcat length of tlm« *&«
j Weather Bureau officials make no pre
dictions.
The present hot wave started in the
west June 20th, and to-day the Weather
Bureau officials re pore that high .tem
peratures are receded in most sec.i is
east of the Rocky Mountains and many
places west of tham. Rains, most of them
moderate in amount, have fallen in many
places. Thunder storms have occurred'
in West Virginia. lowa and the Lower
Lake Region. By to-morrow relief is
promised in the Middle Mississippi Val
ley, the Lower Missouri Valley, the Up
per Lake Region, and by Wednesday in
th? Ohio Valley and possibly the western
part of the Lower Lake Region.
For the next forty-tight hours along
the northeastern const the prospects
favor more hot weather.
In Cincinnati.
'(By Associated Pross.l
CINCINNATI, July I.— The spell of tor
rid heat was broken this evening by a
squall. The storm came suddenly from
the southeast and the wind blew at the
rate of 00 miles an hour for a. while. This
was followed by a thunderstorm and tha
thermometer dropped to 75.
There were, five deaths i'rnm heat, mak
ing a total of 12 deaths for the week.
la Chicago,
CHICAGO. ILL.. July I.— Five persons
dropped dead on the streets here to-day
from excessive heat, and many were so
much overcome that they had to be re
moved to hospitals. Many may die. At
noon the temperature in the Weather
Bureau was 03. and on the streets over
ion. A severe thunder-storm at 1 o'clock
brought relief, and the mercury dropped
•_'O degrees.
At Other Points.
(By Associated Press.)
PITTSBfRG, PA., July I.— Eighteen
deaths from heat were reported, making
twenty-seven, in twenty-four hours.
ST. LOUIS, MO.. July I.— The mercury
reached ICO to-day, according to the
Weather Bureau records. Six deaths from
heat were reported.
XEW YORK. July I.— At Newark, the
mercury touched 100 at '2 o'clock this af
ternoon. This was the maximum. Late
i to-night the reported deaths were four
| teen in and about Newark.
! LOUISVILLE, KY.i July I.— With a
| maximum temperature of 07 there was
i two heat prostrations at Louisville io
| day. Increased demand and a break
■ down of machinery at some of the local
ice factories has caused a shortage of il'e.
BOSTON*. MASS.. July A.— The sigh for
a coo! breeze again went up in m.my parts
of New England to-day. To-night the
atmosphere in Boston was more oppj^s
sive and the thermometer higher— So ;.t 11
o'clock— than during the hot weather pptll
of a week ago. Heat casualties in i3os
j ton were numerous, with three iJeatlis at
i the hospitals and six critical cases.
ST. JOSEPH; MO.. July I.— The long
drought and heated spell was broken to
night by a heavy rain and a rapid chop
in temperature.
LINCOLN, NEB.. July I;— Lincoln tot
an inch or two of rain this nurning.
■ breaking a drought existing since June 3d.
Tornadoes Reported.
(By Associated Press.)
DES MOINES, IOWA. July 1.-Torna
does are reported- near llolstein. Cam
bridge and other lowa, points, but details
j are lacking. Communication with Cam-
I bridge cannot be secured from here.
A LYNCHING IN VIRGINIA.
i Negro Hanged by Mob to Dridjje Over
Meherrin River.
(Special Dispatch to The Time?.)
LAWRENCE VILLE, VA., July I.—
j This morning between 1. and 1
J o'clock, a mob of about one hundred then
j called upon Deputy Sheriff Chas. Mitchell
and demanded of him the jail keys, which
Mr. Mitchell refused. They then proceed
ed to go to the jail and went direct to the
! cell in which Joseph Walton, a negro,
I was confined, who was charged with an
• attempt to commit criminal assault upon
I the daughter of Mr. J. H. Clark, who
J lives near Trlpletfs, in this county.
The negro was taken from the jail, tied
■ t'*> a jumper and taken to Gholson's
j bridge, over the Meherrin river, about
j- four miles from here, lie was then tied
j with a plow-line to the arch in the mid
i die of the bridge and allowed to swing-,
i and it is supposed that he was shot, one
j shot taking effect in the forehead.
He was then cut down and swung un
der the bridge and at present is swinging
about twenty-rive feet from the water.
A very little noise was made by the
lynching party and there is no clue what-
I e<ver as to who the parties are, all being
j masked and perfectly organized.
Fields Lewis, a negro convicted of
house-breaking and sentenced to two
years in the penitentiary, was in the cell
with Walton and made his escape in some
j The crime for which the negro hung
I was committed last Thursday morning.
"tt alton was living with J. H. Clarke, a
white planter. About 2 o'clock screams j
were heard from the room of Miss Kate
Clark, a young lady seventeen years old.
A ladder had been placed against the
window of the young lady's room and
tracks leading therefrom to a cotton
patch, fitting the negro's feet, were found.
After a thorough search Walton was
found hiding in the cotton patch. •
Miss Clark said she felt some one's hands
on her feet and when she called out the
negro jumped head first out of the win
dow.
Mr. Powers Recovering.
Mr. W. A. Powers has been confined
to his residence for the past ten days
from the effects of a painful accident:
While handling a heavy case of gtiods at
the •ware-rooms oi.-Prewry-.Hughes Com- ;
-pany.he received a sever© blow on the
ankle by the case falling on it. He hopes
*• Ye out in ft feir day* .
ELEVEN KILLED
BY SINGLE BOLT
Only One of Party of Twelve Escaped
Instant Death and He is Prob
ably Fatally Injured,
(By Associated Press.)
CHICAGO. ILLS.. July I.— Crowded to
gether in a little zinc-lined shanty under
a North Shore pier, ten boys and young
men and another man met instant death
by lightning to-day. They had left their
lish lines and sought shelter from the
fierce thunder storm that deluge the
northern part of the city about 1 o'clock.
Ten minutes later their bodies lay, with
twisted and tangled limbs, "like a nest
of snakes," as the men who found them
said.
Twelve sought the shelter, and one es
caped. Twelve-year-old AVillie Anderson
is injured, and lay many minutes before
he could be drawn out from the dead
bodies. The dead are ail from the fam
ilies of comparatively poor people, and
comprises a party who were fishing and
seeking relief from the heat of the day,
accompanied by a number of boys, who
had come to wade and swim on the
beach.
GLOUCESTER FOR MONTAGUE.
Resolutions Instructed for LeCato for Lieu
tenant Governor.
(Spc-i.-il Dispatch to The Times.)
GLOUCESTER COURTHOUSE, VA.,
July 1. — At a mass-meeting of the Demo
crats of Gloucester, held here to-day. \V.
E. Wyatt was elected chairman and Mr".
H. L. Bridges secretary. Mr. Marj-as
Jones offered a strong resolution instruct
ing the Gloucester delegates to vote 'or
Hon. A. J. Montague as long as his name
shall be before the convention. This was
adopted, as were resolutions instructing
for Senator LeCato for Lieutenaht-Gov
ernor and Mr. Ellyson for State chairman.
The following delegates to the Norfolk
Convention were chosen: A. M. Pointer,
Maryus Jones, J. H. Seawell, Dr. \V. F:
Jones, 11. L. Bridges, J. N. Tabb. W. D.
Pointer, C. H. Mews, G. A. Miner, G. T.
New-bill, J. T. Mills. T. S. Anderson, B.
A. Rowe, "W. W. Williams. J. N. Stubbs,
L. p. Basye, \y. c. Aherron, R. A. Fitz
hugh. R. T. Gray, J. L. Farinholt.
After a good deal of discussion the pres
ent -County Committee were re-elected.
Delegates were chosen to the Senatorial
Convention for the Thirty-ninth District
and instructing for Hon.* J. X. Stubbs.
Delegates were also chosen to the conven
tion for Gloucester and Mathews to nomi
nate a candidate for the House. A reso
lution to instruct for Hon. George V.
Hundley met with such opposition that it
was withdrawn.
MEMORIAL WINDOWS.
Three Beautiful in Design to Be Placed in
Monumental Church.
The stained-glass memorial windows to
be placed in Monumental Episcouai
Church are expected to arrive some tin.c
this week, and will be placed in position
up.C-n their arrival.
The windows are in memoriam or Chief
Justice John Marshall. George D. Fisher
and his two sons and Sishop Charming
Moore. The Marshall window will repre
sent Moses the Law-Giver with the tab
let of Commandments in his hands. This
window will be on the left of the organ,
j while on the right the window in memory
of George D. Fisher and his sons, repre
senting the Angel of the Resurrection,
will be placed. On the left of t.ie chan-
I col will be the window in memory of
Bishop Moore, in design a representation
of the Saviour delivering the Sermon on
the Mount.
— i
\ Branch Historical Papers.
The first annual publication of the John
j P. Branch Historical Papers of Randolph-
Macoii College has boon issued by the
Everett Waddey Company, of Richmond.
The purpose of the publication is to in
crease the interest of the students in the
study of history, and to present the his
torical data of the college in accessible
shape. The papers arc edited by Prof.
Dodd. and Mr. Branch pays for the cost
of publication.
There is a paper on "Rev. I)eVereux
I Jarratt and the Beginnings of Methodism
in Virginia." This is followed by a sketch
and letters of Leon Powell, of-Prince Wil
liam county, one of the Revolutionary
leaders.
KOGE AND ANTI-HOGE.
Two Sets of Republican Delegates from I
Roanoke.
(Sppclnl Dispatch to The Tidies.)
ROANOKE. VA., July I.— The Republi
cans had s.tormy ward meetings to-niffht
when delegates were elected to the Ci.y
Convention, which meets to-mnrr.vv night
| to select delegates to the State Conven
tion. The anti-Hoge men ca.ptured four
out of the five wards, but Hoge followers
will contest two wards. Two sets of dele
gates -will be elected from Roanoke— Hoge
and anti-Hoge.
— ■ — ■ — «—« — -
Made Sick by Ice Cream.
fSporlal Dispatch to Thf Timr>s.)
GLOUCESTER COURTHOUSE, VA.,
July 3.— Three visiting lawyers from ad
joining counties were made very ill here
to-day by eating ice cream. They are'all
better now.
Some people were overcome by tha hCift,
but received no serious injuries.
__*
Thomas R. Moor Dead.c
(Special Dispatch to The\Tttnes.)
GLOUCESTER, COURTHOUSE, VA.,
Jul J" }— Mr - Thomas % ■Moore.Xone of the
old and valued citizens Of thlq county,
eisd at £is toss soar Sisra iJita aJisrssc-a.
EXPECTED KiSE ;
DID NOT COME
(Continued from Seventh Page. 1 ) 1
the Continent. 200 bales: stock, 44tr.f>25
bales.
Consolidated-Net receipts. IS.aoi bales:
exports to Great Britain. 5.061 bales: to
the Continent. 2<X> bales.
Total since September Ist— Net receipts.
7,253.7!<4 bales; exports to Great Britain.
2.007,2i!ft bales; to France. 707.137 bales;
to the Continent, 2.430.50;! bales.
PETERSBURG, VA.. July 1.-(Re
ported by Martin & Son.)— COTTON—
Firm at Siic.
GRAIN AND COTTON EXCHANGE.
WHEAT- Richmond> Va - JllI >' *■ mi -
Longherry 7- 1 (fiiT,
Mixed ..'. 7^ ®t;;
Shortberry -& #73
No. 2 red 73
Virginia bag lots 65 ©73
White (ay.) bag lots 50
No. 2. white /GO
No. .1 white ' 40
No. 2 mixed 47
No. 3 mixt'd 4iH \
OATS—
No. 2 mixed .TJ''.
No. 3 mixed 32V t
RYE 55 @60
CHICAGO MARKET.
CHICAGO. ILL.. July I.— Continued hot.
weather throughout the Southwest
caused excitement In the corn pit at the
opening-, anfl a grand scramble tn buy.
but later on reports of rain in Kansas
th» market assumed a more rational :ono
and the close was ?c. higher. September
wheat 94c. lower, oats lie. higher, while
provisions were .vto 10c. "lower.
The leading futures ranged as follows:
Open. High. Low. Closa.
wheat-no. 2.
July ti.V's iVHj 64^4 645*
Sept. tiC-'i i! 7 !..-.'"• 65%
Dec. ...... tjS!-i (>S% 07' i <37' •
CORN-No. 2.
July 44'j 4C,ij 4t;U 4!' i
Sept 46% 4S 46Vs 46«4
Dee 4ti',{, 47% 44% 44%
OATS— No. 2.
July U7 ! j 2S "0 7 i '-7
Sept : irru 27% J7'i
May 30 S<Hi '-J'u 20%
lIRSS PORK— bbl.
July 14.0.-» 14.5-5 14.". 11.53
Sept 1-1.55 14.55 14.72' i 14.75
LARD- 100 lbs
July S.fi7'i S.o7!i S.'M'i 3.60
Sept 8.75 5.7.". SM'< B.t)7'i
Oct 3.7.-, 5.70 5.«2V7 S.CS
SHORT RIBS— IOO lbs.
July S.OO
Sept. . 5.15 5.15 S.lO S.i-!i
Oct 8.07 S.o7 ! j 5.05 8.05
Cash quotations were as follows: Flour
quiet. No. .". spring wheat, mfii'ki^c;
No 2 red. [email protected]^c. No. - corn. 44VjC. :
No. 2 yellow. iW,c. No. 2 oats. 20% c:
No. 2 white, v.oy^i'MU.t:.; No. :: white. -W?
@31c. No. 2 rye, [email protected] Fair to choice
malting, [email protected] No. 1 fiaxseed, $1.88;
No 1 northwestern. §I.SB. Prime timothy
seed. 54 M~<. Mess pork, per barrel. $14.55
@t4.00. Lard, per I<>O pounds. .?S.fUVff
S.62}£; short rib sides (loose), [email protected]:
dry "salted shoulders (boxed*. $7;l2\£@
7. -'•: short clear sides (boxed"), [email protected]'8.45.
Whiskey, basis of high wines. £1.27. But
ter steady; creamery. [email protected]"; dairy, [email protected]
lfiyjc. Cheese steady at [email protected]; easy, loss
off," cases returned, lie.
BALTIMORE MARKET.
BALTIMORE. MD., July I.— Flour dull
and unchanged. Wheat weak; spot, loft
T'V-ic. ; the month. t>T>-"iffi.7<V.: August. WY*
@G996c; September, 60%@7p(M southern,
by sample. [email protected] Corn unsettled and
higher; mixed/ spot and the month, 47-ff
47Vic; August, 47M,1747%c. : September
4~%c ■ southern white corn. -tß@4B^Jc.
Oats firmer; No. 2 white. 33%@33%e. Rye
very dull: No. - nearby, 50c, nominal.
Butter steady and unchanged; fancy
creamery, Yift-le. Eggs steady and un
changed: fresh' 13.#13£c. Cheese steady
and unchanged: large, 9%c. Sugar string
and unchanged; fine and coarse granu
lated, 55.55.
NAVAL STORES.
CHARLESTON. S. C. July I.—Turpen
tine firm at o4c. Rosin tirm and un
changed.
SAVANNAH, GA., July I.— Spirits of
turpentine firm at ol'.'^c. : receipts. 'J-OTI
casks; sales, 1.-V7l casks: exports, lo
casks. Rosin firm: receipts, 4.478 barrels.;
sale's T'll barrels: exports. 523 barrels.
Quote: A. B, C, 51.03; D. $1.10; E, $1.15;
F. .?l.Lt'>: G. $1.25: H. $1.33; I. $1.50: K.
Sl-.75; M. $2.25: N, ?ii.»'>o, window glass.
52.00: water white. $3.20.
WILMINGTON'. N. C. July 1 —Spirits
of turpentine, nothing doing: receipts. S7
casks. Rosin tirm at [email protected]$l; receipts,
352 barrels, ('rude turpentine firm at
[email protected]; receipts. 14$ barrels. Tar firm
at $1.50; receipts, i»6 barrels.
MARINE INTELLIGENCE.
PORT OF RICHMOND, July 1. IDOI.
ARRIVED.
Steamer Albemarle. Glover. ■ Norfolk,
merchandise and Passengers, Old Domin-
Steamer Winyah. Simmons. Philadel
phia, Pa., merchandise and passengers,
Clvd'c Line. m
Barge We're Here, oLng, Philadelphia,
""a , coal. Richmond Tee Co.
SAILED.
Steamer' Pocahontas. Grave?, Norfolk
ar«l James River landings, merchandise
and passergers, Virginia Navigation
Company.
Steamer Albemarle. Glover. Norfolk.
merchandise! and passengers. Old Oomin
lon Line.
PORT NEWPORT NEWS. July 1, 1001.
ARRIVED.
Barge Independent, Boston.
Barge George Moon. Providence.
Barge Pilgrim. New Bedford.
Barge West Point. Boston.
Schooner M. P. Small. Portland.
Schooner Geore-e E. Walcott. Ban~or.
Sreamer Caledonia. St. Nazaire.
SAILED.
Schooner Maud Sherwood, New Bed
ford.
Steamer Ziiluh. Amsterdam.
Steamer Campania. Avonniouth.
Steamer Orion. Boston.
Barge P. J. Carleton. Providence.
Barge Mystic Belle. Providence.
PORT OF WEST POINT. July I, IDOL
ARRIVED.
Steamship Danville. Murphy. Baltimore,
passengers and general cargo.
SAILED.
Steamship Danville. Murphy, Baltimore,
passengers and general cargo. _
PORT BERMUDA HUNDRED, July 1.
ARRIVED.
Barge Joseph 'T. Pearson, Jones, to
lead lumber.
GREAT CROP OF TOBACCO.
Colonel Cuningham Has Planted About
4,000,000 Hills of the Weed.
"I am giving most of my attention now
to my tobacco crops instead of to poli
tics." said Colonel John S. Cuningham. of
North Carolina, at Murphy's Hotel last
night.
Colonel ■ Cuningham is the largest to
bacco planter in the world. This year, he
says, he has had planred somewhere be
tween 0,000,000 and ■I.OOfcOOO hills' of the
weed. The Colonel will return to his
home to-day.
BUSINESS MOVEMENTS. -
Richmonders Engage in a Big Enterprise at
West Point.
Messrs J B. Elam & Co. and Augustine
Royall & Co. win offer for sale at noon
to-day in front of the custom-house, on
Bank Street, all the pronertv of tho
"Midlothian Mining C 0.." situated in
Chesterfield county and Manchester Thi<s
sale is to be made in accordance with a
decree entered in the Chancery Court.
The intense heat yesterday caused many
of the workmen on the various buildinjjs
in the city to retire from work a portion
of the day. There were no cases of sun
stroke reported, but the men stopped
work in order to prevent such disaster.
One of the largest enterprises— one that
may be termed a Richmond enterprise—
in this vicinity, is that at West Point, in
which Richmond capital to the extent of
little short of ?100.0flO in the improve
ments to the /water front of that com
fortable town. Thesa improvements are
in the shape of wharves, piers, restau
rants. bath-house 3. etc., and are designed
mostly-- as place&^of recreation for iScb-
Bscnd psopre, "mo prn&s . mover la th*
ED EC ™PXOI!i?FAtP
lIsEE AND 525.00 IN COLD
TOGETHER WITH
PULLMAN CAR FARE, GIVEN AWAY!
$100,000.00
IN CASH REBATE COUPONS
Will be given away by the Merchants named below, to Cash Pur
chasers. Each Person buying for Cash and securing Cash Rebate
Coupons, and presenting them for redemption to THE AMERICAN
TRADE ASSOCIATION, 821 East Main Street, before September 25,
igoi, and leaving their name and address, have the opportunity
to secure this trip.
RFMFMRFR thAt hethe D r 2? u ' cdl ? YOU SAVE FIVE PER CENT,
ntmLmULn the trip to Buffalo or not ok ALL your cash purchases.
DONT FORGET TO ASK FOR COUPONS. THE OPPORTUNITY IS YOURS
ART GOODS.
The F. Cohen Art Store. 527 E. Broad St.
BAKERS.
E. Perkinson, 2110 Pleasant Street.
BICYCLES.
T. A. Parson?, 501 West Broad Street.
B. A. Blenner. ClO N. Fifth St.
Wallace &• "Williams, 600 E. Main St.
BOOKS AND STATIONERY.
Hunter & Co., 6» E. Broad Street.
BOOTS AND SHOES.
M. Hirshberg, 1549 E. Main St.
B. B. Bowles. :>OS E. Broad St.
Seymour Sycie. Seventh and Broad Sts.
Hofhelmer's, Main Street (branch/.
Joseph Johnston. 1545 East Main. St.
Dabn'ey & Johnston. SOl East Broad St.
CLOTHING.
Jacobs & Levy. 707 E. Broad St.
K. Fisher & Snn. corner Fourteenth and
Main Streets.
M. Hirshbers. 1547 East Main St.
COAL AND WOOD.
Floyd Tyler. 908 West Cary Street, 51S
Denny Street.
Ellyson, Ladd & Co.. 1710 E. Broad St.
CONFECTIONERS.
Kaempfs, 110 North Ninth St.
A. Antoni. Ninth and Broad Sts.
DENTISTS.
Davidson's Dental Parlors, Seventh and
Broad Streets.
DRUGGfSTS.
A. H. Robins. 200 E. Mmrihall St.
Eaton's Pharmacy. Twenty-eighth and
N Streets:
A Greenwald, $W west Bro.id St.
Wm. H. Snook. 1017 West Main St,_
J. M. Blanks. Hancock and Clay Sts.
E. P. Reeve & Co.. 427 North Sixth St.
W. C. Sa under?. :50n West Leigh St.
M. Fill Seav. o^4 South Pine St.
DRY GOODS.
THE COHEN COMPANY. 11 to 17 East
i Broad St.
Jacob Lewit & Son, 1533 IT. Mai" St.
L. Lichtenstein's Sons, 103 E. Main St.
M. L. Pennleton & Co.. VenaWe and MO3
bv Streets.
M. Hirshberg, 1549 E. Main St.
W. C. Gayle, 401 Louisiana St.
Gayie Bros.. S2T. West Car>' St.
L. 11. Baroff, 513 Louisiana Aye. and cor- j
rier 2Sth and P Sts.
DYEING AND CLEANING.
The Model Dyeing and Cleaning Work 3,
412 West Broad St.
FISH AND OYSTERS.
Jones Bros., 320 North Sixth St.
Va. Fish. Oyster and Game Co., 411 N. j
Sixth St. ;
Afrw&'ftil tiJiQM (wL I liVgrA m ISC ha*g
i% v _. (f it W/% % *~ — <ti^* - I vO
For the Bride.
Our soCial object this w;;k is to interest you in the elegant and most
■ complete lin°s of beat.t:lt:i siiver that could well be shown in our store—
; among which you w:U end many tasty selections.
TV* 3ET a AFTF.R-DIKN'ER COFFEE SET 3.
<\i M> BOWLS, LADLES,
PCXCH BOVXSr, IS&S2&
I OVING (IPS. K.M\ ES,
CAIIVING SETS. FORK-.
""■ We give Cash Rebate Coupons, or, if you prefer, a 5 per cent, dis
i court for cash-
C. Ltrnisden 6c Son,
Manufacturing Jewelers and Opticians,
731 East Main Street.
m/)A *EW GUARANTEED <I>l 7
!j)3U BICYCLES £44
■"" These are not Chicago wheels.
honest OLIVE BICYCLES S3O.
Oth-r hi S h-grad« wheels, $25. Goad second-hand whesis,
$8.00 to $15.00.
ln i FcOose Sterling Columbia, Ramblif, Crescent, Humber, Victoria
<£ in\-oth-« i The Ma row or Crown Colter and Brake, S5-00. Good
Tires '" 00 Se and Machine Work a specialty.
OT r<TVTlirirn Leader In Bicycle*
B. A. BLENNER, : «<* ten**
SlONorth Fifth Street.
Betwaen Broad and Marshall Street*.
Phons 883. _____
enterprise ?»
E ska. rsJ!r°a^»|3
Point Th* South-rn Railway company
has constructed a spur track MtaJi
rectly to the park, and Wl^i£ *<£* f"*
daily afternoon trains ]"«*»%"£ *IS!?
Richmond for the benefit of those vho
may wish to spend the evening there, or ,
visit thetr families and ««*"*» T^.Jf* 1
be spending the summer at w e»t Fomt.
Senator Kyle Dead.
(By .Associated Presa.)
ABERDEEN. S. D-. July *.— SeaStfOT
Kyie aiei at 333 7. 3£-
FLORISTS.
M. M. Eby, 903 East Main St.
FURNITL'RE.
J. H. Busby, 00 Broad St.
O. B. Hopkins. 1435 East Main St.
Bailey & Bailey. Fulton.
GROCERS.
TV. D. Arwood Co., 701 N. 25th St.
Herman Schmidt. si>i E. Bro.id St.
R. \V. Gary, 504 E. Marshall St.
Sparks' I-iiurel Market. 522 W. Broad St.
A. \V. Browning, oil ii. Pine St.
J. H. Stout, 119 S. Second St.
H. ti. Ooode. 730 W. Marshall St.
B. P. Shackelford, 13ts E. Franklin St.
Puller <fc Brown, ;U7 X. Adams St.
Chas. Kins. 4'J3 North Sixth St.
JEWELERS AND OPTICIANS.
D. Buchanan & Son. 11l E. Broad St.
C. Lumsnen & Son, 731 E. Main St.
Jahnke Bros., 912 E. Main St.
LAUNDRIES.
The Model Steam, Twenty-fifth and Broai
Streets.
Richmond Steam. 318 N. Seventh St.
LUNCH ROOMS.
Richmond Dairy Lunch Room. 821 Ea3'
Broad St.
MIT. LI. VERY.
The Cohen Co., n tr> 17 E. Broad St. /
Mrs. S. A. Emms. 31S E. Brond St. /
Mrs. M. L. Wortham. 210 N. Sixth St. /
MERCHANT TAILORS. /
Ewls. filS E. Main St. /
Henry Harris, 715 E. Main St. /
Louis Ruth. 508 E. Broad St. j
Emi! Enders, 17J3 E. Miiin St. j
MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS./
THE CABLE CO.. 213 E. Broad #
STAMPS AND SATIONEPJT.
Southern Stamp and Stationery jto., L.-vt
E. Main St. M
SPORTING GOODS. 9 •
T. V.'. Tignor's Soni. 1210 E. »aln St..
1713 Franklin. W
WALL PAPERS. §
John H. Astley, Twentieth Snd Bront?
Streets. £
Catlett & Walsh. 214 N. Fifth Rt.
WIJ*ES AND LIQUC RS.
J. J. Dore's. 1416 E. Main St |
Chas. Thalhimer & Co.. Sf« T \ Broad SV
Isaac Straus, 410 E. Broad ! t.
MANCHESTER.
H. C. Beattie. 1121 Hull St. I
B. A. Nunnally. Twelfth and Hull St 3.
Jon»< & Clements. 23X1 Hull St.
J. C. Snellings, C 26 Hull St.
New -Phona Old -PhoiM
1024. 653.
I. D. BEGS,
I FIDST-CI ASS
1 / R\KFRY
■ . MJf CJL. ■* m-d m\ M V
{ / 412 EAST BROAT> STREET.
i # AIX. KINDS
Yg BREAD. CAKB3 AN© FIE 9.

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