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Perth Amboy evening news. [volume] (Perth Amboy, N.J.) 1903-1959, September 29, 1903, SECOND EDITION, Image 1

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i /Amboy Evening news.
f VOL. XXV. NO. 44 ' PERTH AMBOY, N. J.. TUESDAY', SEPTEMBER 29, 1903 SECOND^EDITION
SCHEME TO DEFEA T
MA \0R VIEHMANN FOR
SENA TE NOMINA TION.
Four Names will be Placed Before the Convention to be Voted Upon
on the First Ballot—No one Knows what the Next Move will
be--Gannon, Quaid and Si/zer Said to be in League to De.
\ .... )
i feat New Brunswick's Mayor.
W Democratic politics, as far as the
" nomination for State senator is con
i cerned, is well mixed at present and
V it all depends which one of the numer
ous candidates a man favors as to
which one he thinks will win. The
harmony and smoothness which mark
ed the Republican convention, will
not bo a feature when the Democrats
meet. That much is certain. One
who is known to be well acquainted
with the inside workings of the party
told a representative of the Evening
News that without a doubt there
would be four names placed before
the convention for the first ballot.
These names would be George A.
y Viehmann, John J. Quaid, George
Silzer and Bernard M. Gannon. The
News informant stated that although
Mr. Gannon had positively announced
, that he was not in the race, he has
i yielded to the demands of his friends
~ in this end of the county and will
allow his name to be presented at the
i convention.
After the first ballot, there is no
I one who can tell what will happen.
^Jt appears that George Silzer, the
lounty chairman, at present, has the
big end of the stick. His main object
is to defeat Viehmann. To do this,
he has played his cards well and,
according to the News informant,
there is some sort of an agreement
between the Silzer, Quaid and Gannon
forcqs. The county chairman’s plan
is to have the three names presented
in addition to Viehmann in order to
split tiie votes as much as possible.
The vote on the first ballot will show
the comparative strength of the differ
ent candidates and it is thought the
combined votes for Quaid. Silzer and
Ganuon, will far outnumber the Vieh
i mann vote. One of the three names
presented by the triumvirate will be
withdrawn, perhaps the one having
the smallest number of votes. In this
way the Silzer forces hope to finally
settle on one candidate and keep all
the delegates who voted for one of
the tnree opposed to Viehmann, in
line.
In this end ot the county, according
to the News informant, the delega
tions will be soild for Gannon on the
first ballot. This is anderstood to
mean Perth Amboy, South Amboy,
Woodbndge and Carteret. Regarding
the published reports that the Ganuon
forces would swing to Quaid on the
second ballot, the News representative
was told that it was just as probable
/that the Quaid forces would swing
I P, NYGREEN,
Successor to L. Albert & Co.
^Photographic Studio...
Everything in Portrait, Landscape
and Interior Photography.
Building. Perth Amboy, N. J
-SEXTON’S PUZZLE.
This picture repr sents the name of a
City. Can you guesa it?
The first tag returned from t>e bal o ns was
returned by i^eter McKeon, of Carteret, N. J.
]
]
]
i
\
e
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I
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I
I
GRAND PRIZE OFFER.
The prize for to-dav will ho
I IMPORTED TOOTH BRUSH
*> ----
with the Gannon men. It was further
definitely stated that the enrire dele
gation from the Amboys, which means
the Gannon men, was ready at any
time to vote for George Silzer. It
was declared that Mr. Gannon would
willingly step aside in favor of the
county chairman. It was pointed out
that, after Gannon, Mr. Silzer was
Amboy’s choice.
When asked why it was that Mayor
Viebmann was so opposed here, the
reply was that local Democrats conld
not forget that in 1896 Mr. Viehmann
called the Democrats of that time,
fifty centers. But the greatest reason
for opposing the New Brunswick
mayor is beoause Mr. Gannon is so
popular here.
w. cTtHT
CONVENTION
TOMORROW.
County Delegates will Meet in
this City to Discuss their
Favorite Subject.
SIMPSON M. E. CHURCH
The local branch of the Women’s
Christian Temperanoe Union is busy
today preparing for the annual county
convention of that organization. The
session, which will continue through
out the day, will be held in Simpson
M. E. church.
In the morning at 10.30 o’clock busi
ness will be transacted, reports will
be heard and the president, Mrs. H.
S. C. Garrison, will give an address.
The afternoon will be given up to the
reading of papers by the different
members and remarks by the State
President. At 7.80 o’clock an address
will be given by Rev. E. A. Boom, of
Warren County. Tne meetings prom
ise to be interesting. A large number
of delegates are expected.
EAGLES PUNNING
FOR ANNIVERSARY.
Growth the Ath'etic Club Has
Been Wonderful—Popular
Organization. s
The Eagle Athletic Clab members, 1
at their meeting last night, deoided ■“
to postpone the nomination of officers -
until the meeting next Monday night. '
At that meeting tne officers will bo *
nominated and they will be installed ,
on the first of the year when the club »
will also hold a banquet in honor of *
she club’s anniversary. It will be a *
?reat occasion for the members have *
leen the club grow from a small band *
,o a large and influential society.
AUXILIARY^MEETING. \
The regular monthly meeting of the *„
jadies Auxiliary to the City Hospital
Association will be held at Mrs. G.
). Rnnyou’s on Thursday, October ►'
st at 8 p. m. A full attendance is J
equested. /
Mrs. C. W. Sneatli. Sect’y. ^
__
TEETH AUSOUND |
An people live at the pit sent lime it i>
ery essential that tt e ieer.it he brushed *'
verv day. by using our Antis ptic Tooth
fa8h you will keep the teeln bound, £
realli sweet, and pievent decay. Large
ottle 25c.
'arisen’s Prescription Pharmacy £
■ -- ---
lockaway. Blue Point Auctnyio *'*.
and Shrewsbury vjulClb
.obsters » Soft Grabs |
Telephone Call 200, L. 2.
WORRELL sT^Tsmith Street.
\
HORSE IS
FRIGHTENED
BY TRAIN.
Was Standing at Lehigh Valley
Freight Station When
Started off. j
PEOPLE SEEK SAFETY
Animal Dashed Dow i the Avenue a'ri was
Stopped With Difficulty—The Wsgon
was Badlv Damaged and had to be Laid
up for Repairs—Horse was Spirited and
would not Stand,
Many people on New Brunswick
avenue had a narrow escape from be
ing run over yesterday afternoon,
when a horse, attached to a light run
about, which had been left outside
the Lehigh Valley freight station by
James Nash, took fright at a passing
train andj dashed wildly down the
avenue.
Mr. Nash, who is a member of the
NevC Jersey Produce Oo., had driven
to the station on business. . While he
was inside talking, a train passed and
the horse was frightened at the noise.
The animal started out on a gallop.
When finally caught, it was found
that the carriage was so badly smash
ed that it would have to be laid up
for repairs. No one was hurt although
tllfirft Wfifft BADProl norrnur puonnno
PUSHING THE WORK
ON NEW SYNAGOGUE.
Contractor is Endeavoring to Get
Evei thing Ready for Cornerstone
Laying by Sunday.
The work on the new synagogue for
the First Hebrew Mutual Aid Society,
which is now being built on Madison
avenue, is being pushed with all
possible speed by the contractors, who
will try and have everything in order
for the laying of the corner stone,
Sunday afternoon.
VAN EMAN—WILKIE.
At the Fifth Avenue Presbyterian
jhurcli, New York city, on Monday,
September 28th, by the Rev. J. Ross
3tevenson, D. D., Annie McIntyre
Wilkie, only daughter of the lute Rev.
Aaron Wilkie, M. A., to Rev. John
W. VanEman, of Perth Amboy. N. J.
Mr. VanEman was connected with the
Westminster.
SIGNS BEING REPAIRED.
The Newark Sign Company have a
arge gang of men at work this week
n Perth Amboy. They are repairing
ill of the company’s signs which were
ladly injured during the recent heavy
torms.
VWV’»’*’v'*'r*V%r*
. .♦. .♦. .♦. Sfc .V. >. >. >; .V. .♦. .♦ ♦ ♦ ♦: .♦. .V. .V. .V. .V. .V. >. .V. .V. .♦
I opening!
e: a n *
^ K
.* — *
k: •>' >
• Vaudeville Entertainment I
'V A
I £* COLUMBIA HALL I
* ♦ f
: Saturday, October 3rd £'
: -—-:
! See Saturday’s Paper for Program £ '
» The show will be in charge of Billie Musgrave who has prom- |
| Ised to bring a strong combination for the grand opening.
► \
WILL LOOK
FOR OTHER
QUARTERS.
Forum Meeting Last Night
Found they Could not Secure
Room all Year.
CHANGE IN MAGAZINE.
Monthly Pub'ication will be Altered—To
have Colored Cover—Features for
Each Issue—Foo'ball Subject Discussed
—Many will goto Nsw Brunswick with
Team Saturday.
At the meeting of the Young Men’s
Forum, held In the lecture room of
Simpson M. E. church, last night, the
committee, who had charge to inves
tigate the proposition received from
Mrs. Bayard, at the last meeting, in
regards to the luring of one of the
rooms in the house in Water street,
reported that they could not get a
lease for a year on the rooms as the
present occupants of the house them
self could not give them the assnr
ance.that they could stay there more
than the winter. It was decided that
the committed Jjook elsewhere for
rooms. * _
I o
The subject q ** itting out the next
issue of the 'x®rnm paper, “The
Forum,” was next taken np, and it
was decided that commencing with
the coming issne the paper will be a
twelve page one with a different
cover design every month. It was
also decided to change the style of the
paper and the coming issne will be a
camp issne.
The resignation of Harry Rnnyon
as editor of “The Forum,” was re
ceived and accepted, Francis "A. Sea
man was elected editot to fill the
vacancy. Ralph A. Beers was elected
financial secretary to fill the vacancy
caused by the resignation of Parker
Runyon,
The report of the treasurer was read
and it showed a good balance in the
treasury. The report in regards to
the paper, “The Forum,” also showed
that the boys had made money for the
three months that it has been issued.
At the next meeting a debate between
wo sides of the Fornin will be held.
Many of the members signified their
tntention last night of accompanying
the football team to New Brunswick
Saturday, when they play against the
Triangle football team, of that place.
The last meeting in October wTill be
an open meeting for anyone who cares
to attend. Arrangements will be
made for an entertainment on that
night.
Harry Barter. Robert Colton and
Frank Post were admitted to mem
bership last night and the applica
tion of eight others, for admittance,
was received.
For real estate see page 2.
S. J. MASON,
Civil Engineer.
102 Smith Street.
NEW BRUNSWICK MAN
APPOINTED RECEIVER
FOR CLA V COMPANIES.
Petition of Patrick White & Sons for Appointment of Ancillary Re
ceiver for Penfield Works in New Jersey is Successful...
Judge J. Kearney Rice is the Man Named-Mr. Mr.Oepue has
not Been Notified of the Appointment.
WELL KNOWN
RESIDENT
DIED TODAV.

Terence Quinn Passed Away at
his Home in Smith Street
Civil War Veteran.
RESIDENT 30 YEARS.
- %
Terence Quinn died at his home,
88 Smith street, at 6.45 o’clock this
morning, at the age of sixtv-one years.
He had been a resident of Perth Am
bov for over thirty years and was one
of the best known citizens. Mr.
Qninn has been suffering with asthma
which is believed to have caused his
death.
Mr. Quinn was born in Northern
Ireland, and came to this city when a
bov. He settled in Philadelphia
where he secured work and remained
there until he came to Perth Amboy.
At first he was employed on the Le
high Valley Coal docks, but later
opened a store at 88 Smith street,
which place he kept until a short time
ago, when he retried.
Mr. Quinn served in the 24th regi
ment Pennsylvania Volunteers during
the latter part of the Civil war. He
was in the campaigns at Chambers
burg and Harper’s Ferry. He was
the last surviving member of the first
band of coal trimmers who came here
when the Lehigh Valley opened the
docks. He was a member of the
Catholic Benevolent Legion, Forest
ers of America, Court 58, and was a !
charter member of St. Peter’s Benevo
lent Association which has since gone
out of existence.
Mr. Quinn is survived by a wife
and six children, Mrs. William Halla
han, Mrs. James White. Miss Annie
Quinn. Arthur, Charles and John
Qninn.
The funeral will be held from his
late home Friday morning at 10
o’clock, and later from St. Mary’s
Roman Catholic church, Center street.
Interment will be made in St. Mary’s
cemetery.
LOCAL FIREMEN
ARE NOT ALONE.
New Brunswick Company WII not
Have New Apparatus to
Take to Allentown
The Perth Amboy tire laddies are
not the only one§ who will be dis
appointed at not having their new file
apparatus to take to Allentown. The
following from New Brunswick tells
of the feeling there:
“Members of Washington Engine
Company No. 1, have been greatlv
disappointed by learning that the com
pany on its trip to Allentown, Pa., i
5n October 7, will probably not be
iccompanied by its new engine as the
nakers have announced that they will
lot be able to finish it as the company
lesires by that date. ”
DAMAGE SUIT STARTED
The 95,000 damage suit of Thomas
lowley against John VanDenrsen. in
vliich he seeks to recover for an
.lloged slanderous statement made by |
he defendant, he claims in the pres- |
nee of the Board of Freeholders,
vhich has greatly injured his reputa- §1
ion, was commenced yesterday.
Die Annex Restaurant
113 SMITH ST., adjoining Ho'el Onr.ial.
I0W OPEN., Newly Fitted
Table de rtote and a la Carte
>inners 3E?C, from 11 a 111 to2 p m.
deduced rates to regular Hoarders. Bill of fare
cli .aged daily. \ W. J. Mastersou. Prop .
► -
Judge Kirkpatrick, in the United
States Court at Trenton, yesterday,
appointed J. Kearney Rice, of New
Brunswick, as auxiliary receiver for
the Gr-at Eastern and National Clay
companies, of Perth Amboy, for this
district, replacing ttie Continental
Trust Company, of New York, appoint
ed receiver for the companies in the
suit of the Standard Vitrified Conduit
Company. 1 he trust company con
tested the appointment for an auxil
iary receiver on the grounds that such
would not result for the best interests
of the concerns.
The appointment is a result of a
petition filed w/ith the court in behalf
of Patrick WlVte & Sons, who are
creditors of tleiclay company, which
is one of the Pe\field concerns. The
interests of the lobal concern in the
adjustment of the affairs of the clay
company are such that the court
deemed them worthy of more equal
representation and tht ancilliary re
ceiver is the result. It is understood
that an effort was made to have a
Perth Amboy man appointed reoeiver.
In conversation with a News repre
sentative this morning, Mr. Depue,
of Newark, who has had charge of
the White’s interests, sud that while
he had not been officidfl notified of
the appointment of JudOT>»iPA°e a* re
ceiver, he had every reason to believe
that it was so.
__ —
GLEASON GETS 90 DAYS
Patrick Gleason, the old character,
who, as told in the News several days
ago, was given a night’s
polio headquarters, was tak^^^J^Pi
station honse last night at a ltrt^iour.
The old man had been drinking a
little and being already greatly en
feebled he was in a helpless condition.
The Judge gave him ninety aavs, say
ing that he did so becanse the old
man would if not looked a fter, oer
tainly suffer from exposure. Gleason
enjoyed the distinction of having his
picture taken before leaving for New
Brunswick.
TOES WERE MASHED.
This, morning while working at the
Raritan Dry Dock Co., a Scandinav
ian, who lives on Broad street, had
three toes mashed. A large piece of
timber fell on the man's foot, badly
injuring I lie members. Dr. Ramsay
tressed the injuries.
A Dancing Class
will be opened at DEWEY PARK
state street, SATURDAY NIGHT, with
i reception. Classes will meet
TUESDAYS and SATURDAYS
during the season.
Music by Prof. Steinhauser.
Cents 25c Ladies lOc
WEATHER.
Vie forecast received at the local Sigaal
arson is for fair and rising tempeature.
\ HIGH TIDE.
SEP. € A M. P.M OCT. A M. P.M.
28 V.4S 2.10 2 4 41 4.83
3) | 1.40 3.00 3 5.23 5.34
Oct. 1 | Isi 4.04 4 6.01 6.14

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