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Perth Amboy evening news. [volume] (Perth Amboy, N.J.) 1903-1959, February 08, 1907, LAST EDITION, Second Section, Image 10

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cl tbe New
Perth Amboy Evening News
' founded 1871 as the Perth Ambny
Republican.
8Ml lndepenrtnnt newspaper, published
every nftemoon. except Sundays, bj
the Perth Amur Rtxninu Newt
Company, No. 2S4 State street, Pertt
Amboy, N. J.
t. LOGAN CLEVBiNQKR .Mditvr
D. P. OLliSTRAD . .Business Manager
TERMS nr SUBSCRIPTION,
hi JEvenino News Is on sale at news
stands and delivered by regular car
Her In Perth Anilmy, South Amboy
Woodbrldge, Roosevelt, Totlenv!ll<
f and surrounding towns tor 6c pel
week.
Long Distance Telephone .IS
Mntered et Poet Owee as second-class
matter.
VO OUR READERSIf you do not Ye
oeine your paper regularly, we would
consider it a favor if you would re
port the matter at once.
We attention paid to unsigned communica^
tions.
‘ '■ _ LABE L>
/ FIRE ALARM BOXES.
•1—Raritan Copper Works.
{•—High and Lewis streets.
7—Madison avenue and Pi turnon street.
18—Market and First streets.
•6—Smith and High streets.
5f—New Brunswi. k avt\ and New et.
7—State and rimith atreeta
48—Buckingham ave. and Hartford ml
46—Comirferce and J'Yont streets.
47—High and Washington street*.
.■ $4—State st. and Buck, ghfim ave.
•It—Hall avenue and * arks street.
H7—State and Wayne fi cot*.
•8—Near Unhod Loud Works.
•2—Washington and First street*.
48— New Brunswick ave and Kim st.
14—Smith street ami Watson avenii*.
•6—Commerce and Ski to streets.
72—Front and Smith streets.
78—Water and Gordon streets.
74—Kearny avenue mid Gordon street.
■9—Smith and Herbert streets.
•8—>Woodbridge road and Washington st.
P4—Lehigh avenue and Stanford street.
86—Near City Hospital.
84—Maurer.
To send In an alarm, open the door of
the box and pull down the lever and let
6o, ones only. Stay at box until firemen
rrive.
y BP1CIAL CALLS.
1 tap—Break in circuit. 2 taps—Drill
/ and fire alarm tent. 3 tuns—Fire out. 6
HH'1 taps—Police call. 13—Call for Wash
ington Hose. 11—Call for McClellan
Engine Company. 15—Cali for Prc 1
tection Hook and Ladder. 16—Call for
•Eagle Hose Company. 22—Call for
Lincoln Engine Company.
MEW STORK HERALD* WEATHER
« FORECASE.
In the middle slates and New Eng-{
land today partly overcast ro cloudyi
■weather will prevail, with slightly
higher temporature and light to fresh
Variable winds, follow, il v light or
moderate snows. On Satin day, over
cast and milder weather will prevail
with fresh variable winds, preceded
by snow in the northern and rain or
enow in the southern districts, and
on Sunday partly cloudy weather,
with slowly rising temperature.
‘ FRIDAY. FEU RF a'ry”
• The government is about to ap
propriate $1,200,00(1 to dig out a
meadow and swamp in South Jersey
In an attempt to make a harlxir sim
ply because a band of capita lima have
bought up the surrounding territory
and the railroads would like to have
a terminal there. It seems to be a
fad nowadays for the railroads to
Belect their own loeation for shipping
and then get tile government to dig
to it and make a harbor for them. In
the meantime important ports like
Philadelphia, Camden and other
points along the Delaware river, io
Bay nothing of Staten 'Island sound
\ and vicinity, are apparently ignored.
1 f The offleial statement made by :)<■
ft Forest Grant, of the new terra cotta
combine and published in tin- NEWS
yesterdny, has little that, is new in
It, the account, of the formation of the
new concern, having been published
In this pa pew from time in lime, it
Is gratifying to know, however, ill
yect from the lu.nl if the company,
that iho men who have been laid off
Will be out of work but temporarily
and that more employes are to be
put. on in the ncwr fill tire.
Hb f With a juvenile court, and a wo
man as probation officer much good j
Ought to he accomplished in 'his coun
} ty among the boys who have begun
w to go astray curly. Mrs. Williamson
Should receive all the encouragement
possible and to that end both N”W
Brunswick and Perth Attaboy should
make her a special officer within their
f respective jurisdictions as Is re
quested.
The request of the teachers for
, more pay should not be lost sight of.
Perth Amboy is going n receive a
big increase in the state appropria
tion and some of this should go to
those who train the minds.
Sleighing in this vicinity is now
the best; it has been for years and the
young people are making the most of
It. With the continued cold weather
it will last for some tithe yet.
The “city beautiful’’ has taken firm
hold of some places and actual im
provements are being made to that
end. Few cities have the advantages
of Perth Amboy for beuut’.f'dn" thelT
surroundings. Several hundred dol
I
Fancy Vests
The new and nobby fancy flan
nel Vest, made with three large but
tons, patch pockets, the very newest
creation in the Vest line
Special at i.9S
TT^yAVE you tried a pair Ot
the inter-woven Hosiery?
The neatest and most durable
Stocking made,
25c a pair.
Gannon & Sheehy
192 SMITH STREET.
Look for Sign “G. & S.”
make us as beautiful as we are busy
and progressive in the Industrial.
Everyone in a position to know
anything about it declares that there
is to he great activity in building
here this spring. That sounds good.
We can stand all the prosperity that
enu possibly come our way.
There are quite a number of side
walks about the city that need the at
tention of iho property owner.
EDITORIAL COMMENT.
Briggs in tile Senate.
The election of Frank O. Briggs by
(he New Jersey legislature to succeed]
Dryden in the United States senate is
not a cause for congratulation in the
party that strove to get rid of Dryden. |
Aside from the fact that lie is Dry
den's residuary legatee, his conduct
at the time of the Mazet committee’s
Investigation in New York city sev
eral years ago would not recommend
hint to any one hoping for better con
ditions in the public service. In un
covering the practical side of political
connections with contract work Mr.
Frank Moss discovered abundant
signs that the Crokor family could
get into anything that was worth get-1
ling into if municipal permits, in-1
spections, etc., were involved. At the
time of the changes in the motive
power of the Third avenue railroad
there was a prodigious debauch of
graft, which resulted ia the wreck
ing of tho unfortunate company. The
exactions made on it by Tamamny of
ficials before it could receive per
mission to open streets, relay tracks,
install mew equipment, etc., were so
stupendous that the company sank
under its burden of blackmail.
One of the things that. Frank Moss,
counsel for the Mazet committee,
sought to discover was the conditions
under which members of the Croker
family h.ud been admitted into part
nership of stocksharing in the Roeb
ling company, a concern which was
supplying equipment used in the con
struction work of the Third avenue
company. Mr. Briggs was treasurer
of the Roebling company at that
time, a# he is now; ho was believed to
be in the habit of visiting New York
city several days every week. The
hooks of ihe company should have
shown what per rentage of the Roeb
ling stock had been acquired by Cro-j
ker interests and what. If anything,1
had been paid for it. This might have
thrown light on the cause for the con-|
nection of the Roebling company writh'
the Third avenue construction. But
Mr. Moss was unable to get hold of
the books of the company or to And
Mr. Briggs to put hint on the stand to
tell what he knew about this matter.1
During the life of the investigation
Briggs kept out of the reach of the
' subpoena servers of the Mazet com
mittee.
This subpoena dodger is now Unit
I ed Str. •. senator from New Jersey.
~HANSON REALTY
CORPORATION
j New Idea and a Square Deal
i Will build at Fairniount Park,
Borough of Metuchen, N. J.
i
I House to suit purchaser on rea
sonable monthly payments, not
| to exceed renting rates. All
j conveniences such as Gas, Elec
1 trie Light and City Water.
Homes at Cost Price.
i In the most healthful climate in
the State of New Jersey, good
School, Churches of all denom
ination.
For particulars call at
Office: 194 HIGH STREET.
Perth Amboy, N. ,J.
MISS MARMARA HENRY.
6036 Forrestville Ave., CHICAGO.
Miss Henry says: “Before I bepan using Danderine
my hair was fallinp out in great liandsful, and 1 am
pleased to Hay that Danderino not only stopped it at
onee, but has made my hair prow more than twice
an long as it ever was.”
Mrs. Eloise Atherton. Little Rock. Ark., says: “It
i« surt ,Jy remarkable the way Dandorine improves
the hair. It has made my hair prow ten inches long
er in five months and it is potting thicker and lc/hp' r
all the time. I believe in pivlng praise where it is
line, and you can use my name as reference if you
FLORENCE RFSSJELL,
Age O years,
2lfl Mohawk Street, CHICAGO.
Since it has become generally known
that Dftndorine causes luni* to prow just
as abundantly on the heads of children as
it does on thoaeof matured persons, many
truly marvelous cases are coming: to onr
notice. Little Miss liussell. whose photo*
praph appears above, is certainly one of
j the remarkable ones, lb r beautiful hair
is over thirty inches lone and her mother
says that -DANBEKINR GREW EVERY
t»i m <-»ci *rn • •
I I
MISS SELMA HASSELL,
:!778 North 4 tel Court,
Miss Hassel Buys: "My hair would
reach bclcnv my waist when I beiran uslmt'
your Damlerine. li was also ruled and spilt
tine at the ends. Now it is ov«*r loot
lonsrer than it ov«r was ami it has r*>ealncd
its orieinal rlel> blond color. I used tho iouic^
,...,.•,1 *. ,i f in. ittliu; -,: 1 i,i vilinr"
DANOERINE is to the hair what, fresh showers of raiu and sunshine are to vegetation. It goes right to the
roots, invigorates and strengthens tiiem. Its exhilarating, fertilizing and life-producing properties cause tho hair to
grow abundantly long,strougaud beautiful. IT IS THE NATURAL FOOD OF THE HAIR, SCIENTIFICALLY
CHARGED WITH NEW AND GENUINE LIFE-PRQDUCIiNG ESSENCES UNHEARD OF BY OTHER
MAKERS OF HAIR TONIC. NO Wat all druggists in three size-. 25 cents, SO cents and $1,00 per bottle.
rnce P Toshowliow (illicitly Danctoe/n* aots. wo win semi a largo sienids tree iiv return mail to :eiyoir wl- - s--n'lk lids nilv'-rcliemenl
rUtUl to tbe Knowlton Daudt*riue C’o., Chicufo, with tbair uitfflo ami address aud L*.'a oeuts iu .silver or stumps to pa.. t>ostucc.
The public need not feel elated over
the choice.—New York Press.
The Inconstant Things!
Her—Men are all flirts—you can’t
trust one of them.
Him—Mors so than women?
Her—Well, X should say so. I'm en
gaged to three of (he nicest men I
ever knew, and I’ve found that every
one of them is flirting with some other
girl!—Cleveland Leader.
Leave "WANT” advs. at branch of
ficer_ 'MU
Taking Issue.
“You will live to regret talking that
way to me!” tearfully spoke Miss
Peachley.
“I sincerely hope not,” replied Miss
Tartnn. "I should be awfully sorry to
live till the world comes to an end.”—
Chicago Tribune.
The Grammatical Prisoner.
"And when he said skiddoo what dio
you do?” asked the judge.
“I skiddid, your honor,” said th?
prisoner.—Judge.
The Friend in Need.
Jackson (sententionsly) — Ah, my
boy, there's nothing like a friend in
need.
Samson~T don't agree with you.
He's generally a thundering nuisance,
for he’s sure to want to borrow some
thing.—Tit-Hits.
Unfailing Abundance.
{•Advice is something strange, they say.
f! There Is an nec l of special care.
-The more a person gives away
The more he always has to spare.
, Wnfiblmiton Scar. |
GERMS CAUSE DYSPEPSIA;
IFYOU DON’T KILL THE DISEASE GERMS THEY WILL KILL YOU. PEPSOIDS DRIVE THE GERMS
01it or xur cTnMir:H AIMD REBUILDS IT. WRITE FOR A FULL SIZED BOTTLE—FREE.
A noted physician of Pittsburg, Pa., in
a recent letter to Dr. Oidman says:
“Inyour prescription known as ‘Pepeoide’ you
have givon the medical, world the greatest ami
most, valued discovery in raediciue of the present
OSntnry. You have at. last solved the problem
that hue baffled tho skill of the beet physicians of
recent timor, how to cure permanently all
Acute or Chronic Stomach Diseases known as
Dyspepsia. Indigestion /•ifcnrrb of the Stomach
and Digestive Wonkno-fr I have used your pre
scription. ‘I’epsoids,' in hundreds of cases with
out a si ngle failure. I attribute the succoseof your
germs of the stomach cannot resist Pepsoids.
Your thoory that most Stomach Diseases are
brought about by multitudes of nofarious dis
oaeo-oreeding germs must bo correct, judging
from the remarkable results attained from tho
use of your ‘Pepsoids.*-1 consider ‘Pepsoids’ the
best and most valuable remedy yet discovered^
for tho trcatmentof stubborn stomach ailments."
Pepsoids cure Dyspepsia and all
Stomach Diseases, in a ne-v way, by re
pairing the wornout lining of the Stomach
and at the same time, destroy all disease
Kr#»#»rlinor trprnK. Tivsnensia and 'die worst
forms of Stomach Disorders once cured
in this way never returns. ———
Pepsoids are sold at drug stores atSOc. abott*:
on an absolute guarantee or money refunded.
If you have not used Pepsoids before,
we will send you a 50-cent bottle FRKE.
Send us your name and address and you
I will receive promptly, a full sized bottle.
You do not obligate yoursolf to Day a cent.
All we ask, after Pnpsoidshave cured or greatlj
bonefltted you is, that you recommend Pepsoids
j to your friends. Try Pepsoids to-day—they JjAh
Irmrpvnn. Vio Chemical Co.. Chioairo. Ill' A
Sold and Recommended by F- KILLENBFRGER. 247 Smith Street
Muslin Underwear Sale Continued this Week I
With Additional New Stock
I BEST BARGAINS EVER KNOWN.
Corset Covers—of fine lawn, standard 25c value, each. 14c
Beautiful nainsook, lace aud ribbon trimmed Corset Covers, values up
to 75c, each .. .. 37 .
GOWIIS—Good Cambric tucked Gowns, 50c kind. 29c
I ... U
Fine Nainsook aud Soft Cambric I„ace, Embroidery and Ribbon trim
med Gowns, values up to 1.50. . 77c ,j I
A Manufacturer’s sample line, no two alike, values up to 2.00. 95c
. * ‘_ r :r t
_ _;__ - *
Women’s Trimmed Hats
Formerly up to 7.50
at 1.98 . 5
Saturday 10 a. m., we place on sale without reserve, the balance of our ! •<> j
stock, Women’s Trimmed Hats, values rip to 7.50 and they
should cause a scramble, at... .1.98 j
- * - - — -- - -- ■
Women’s $3 Shoes
Reduced to
1.85 -
To effect a speedy Clearance of all broken lines, Women’s Famous 3.00
X Shoes, we marj: them....1.85
104-106 Smith, st,
m 1 , >
/X- jjlfc - .
1
1— ■ e
-jk w ANY people doubtless will ask what prospects there are
|Yy| 0f ACTUALLY ATTAINING the north p<>Je after
I y I Peary’s latest experience. The distance Pearv covered
I JL from his base toward the pole was about 280 miles, and
/ there still remained about 203 miles. Thus ho traversed
between a half and two-thirds of the distance* between the northern
coast of Grant Land and the pole. It seems that Peary himself thinks
that the year was an UNFAVORABLE one, in consequence of the
mildness of the weather. It is not so much the mildness/of the season
as the wind afid currents which break up the ice AND MOVE IT.
IT IS IN THIS WAY THAT THE EXPLORER IS MOST HAM
PERED IN HIS JOURNEY ACROSS THE DRIFTING POLAR ICE.
One consequently must be prepared every year to meet similar con
ditions in the north, and sledge journeys across the polar ice, there
fore, arc always more or less difficult as compared with sledge jour
nevs ALONG THE COAST of arctic lands or across the inland
ice of Greenland. One cannot expect to cover such great distances
daily in the north polar sea as is possible, for instance, during journeys
over ice along coasts, and this is the case even if one travels across the
nolnr spa IN THE BEST SEASON, which is the early spring.
Later in the summer the difficulties are greatly increased, as the ice is I
then broken up in floes, with channels between, which are not soon
covered by ice, as the temperature of the air rises too high.
*. (t K <
But what makes the sledge traveling across the nbrth polar ice so
difficult is not only the open water lanes and channels, which have evi
dently caused Peary much trouble, but it is also the UNEVEN SUR
FACE of the ice which is formed by the ice pressures piling up the ice
into “pressure ridges and hummocks,” as was especially experienced
by Markham. These are difficult to cross with heavy sledges, which
generally have to be carried.
We thus see that a sledge expedition across the ice to the pole from,
say, Grant Land, Greenland, or perhaps some still unknown land to
the west, stretching farther north, will have to cope with GREAT
DIFFICULTIES. None the less, I am of the opinion that an expe
rienced sledge traveler like Peary, with an adequate equipment and,
above all, with good dogs AND PLENTY OF THEM, will be able
to accomplish the task.
n »t *
A sledge expedition across the polar ice from the NORTHERN
MOST KNOWN LAND to the north pole and back again is not at
all an impossibility, and if AN Y man has the necessary qualifications
to carry it out it is certainly Peary. May we hope that we soon shall
see this expedition carried out, one sledge expedition from the west
northward nml one “driftin.cr exnedition” from the Berine- strait ?
PEARY’S LA$T WONDERFUL EXPERIENCES GIVE US GOOD
HOPE OF FURTHER SUCCESS.
The Crime of Lobbying
Should Be Stopped by Law
By Governor JOSEPH W. FOLK of Missouri.
□IEIIE should be a law making it a crime for any one FOR
COMPENSATION to lobby with the mbmbers of the legis
lature. All persons, of course, should be permitted to appear
before committees and makearguments for or against meas
ures
permitted to file printed arguments or briefs with members of the legis
lature. But in order that publicity may be given to what is going on I
it should be provided that copies of the printed argu
ments or briefs be filed in the office of the secretary/
of state and SUBJECT TO PUBLIC INSPEC
TION.
The sunlight of publicity is the greatest prevent
ive of corruption. This measure would not prevent
the average citizen from talking to members of the
legislature about measures of public interest. It is
only PAID LOBBYING that it is intended to pro
hibit. It has been urged that such a law would violate the right of free
speech in preventing any person, even though a professional lobbyist,!
from talking to members of the general assembly. The right of free|
speech is a sacred right, but the right of the people to have their laws
! untainted by VENAL INFLUENCES is also sacred. 1
A man cannot talk to a iuror trvimr n tn Viitti n 1 ,mir
the case. The right of free speech has its LIMITATIONS. This is
one of them, and interfering with legislation is another.
THE RIGHT OF FREE SPEECH CANNOT EXTEND TO OB
STRUCTING THE ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE OR THE COURTS
OF LEGISLATION.
Rockefeller Is a Type of j
American of Tomorrow
\ By Actln* President H. P. JUDSON of the University of Chicago.
^^^^EOPLE don t look on the RIGHT side of Mr. Rockefeller.
He has done wonderful things for education all over the
country and, from all appearances, WILL CONTINUE
' v them- He has done great things for Chicago in- doing
t ein fV" the university. Chicago does not realize what benefits have
come to^^in this way. Mr. Ro*kefeller has done m$uy things in the
cause of <%toation which have NOT BEEN MADE PUBLIC. He
has given 1%e gifts to the Harvard Medical school, Yale university,
the nitersit^jif ^ irginia and to Johns Hopkins. Numerous dona
tions have ne^neen announced. THERE IS NO OSTENTA
11(1)X TX. t'Mr‘ RockefeHer does. He is extremely
Tnown4 and d0e* 11 ijk f° haVe h'8 Philanthropy talked about or
IN SHORT, JOHN 1^ROCKEFEL4ER IS THE TRUE TYPE OF I
THE "AMERICAN OF T<^)RROW.. rYPE OF
READ THE fVENIHG KEWST

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