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Perth Amboy evening news. [volume] (Perth Amboy, N.J.) 1903-1959, October 15, 1912, LAST EDITION/EXTRA!!, Image 1

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WKATfTKR—And
cooler toni&hu
Wwlntjfhf fair.
EXTRA!! EXTRA!! EXTRA!!
Perth amboy Evening news. ™
TWELVE PAGES.
v
TEN CENTS A WEEK. PERTH AMBOY, N. J., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1912.
TWO CENTS A COPY.
ROO
WOUND MORE SERIOUS THAN AT
C3«
0
ITORS ALLOWED THIS
COLONEL JOKES AS
DOOTORS PREPARE
TO LOCATE BULLET
Z ...... .... .
PRESIDENT TAFT SENDS MESSAGES.
Special by United Press Wire.
Aboard Mayflower, wireless via Ellis Island, N. Y., Oct. IB: —
President Tart sent the following telegrams today to Colonel
Roosevelt and Mrs. Roosevelt:
"Colonel Roosevelt:
Greatly shocked to hear of the outrageous assault upon you. I
earnestly hope and pray that your recovery may be speedy and
without suffering.
WILLIAM HOWARD TAFT."
"Mrs. Theodore Roosevelt, New York.
"I extend to you my heartfelt sympathy in your present distress.
Earnestly hope and pray that you and your family will soon learn
that all danger as to the colonel's condition is passed.'
WILLIAM HOWARD TAFT."
Taft appeared deeply affected by the news today that Roose
velt's wound was more serious than at first supposed.
(Special by United Press Wire.)
Chicago, Oct. 15:—Doctors attending Colonel Roosevelt
issued the following statement at 1:30 o'clock this afternoon:
"Absolute quiet is what the patient needs. He will notf
be able to receive any visitors this afternoon. The wound is a
serious one, and not a flesh-wound, as at first believed."
•» ~~~———————————
Chicago, Oct. 15:—Colonel Theodore Roosevelt will do no
more campaigning this year. Positive announcement that the
injuries to the ex-President were serious enough to keep him
ff the road during tbe remainder of the campaign was made
today at the Mercy Hospital, where he was to be operated on
and the bullet, fired by a lunatic in Milwaukee, removed.
He will be taken to his home in Oyster Bay as soon as he
will be able to leave the city. He will remain at home until bis
wound has completely mended and will take no active part in
the campaign. The necessity for such a precaution was point
ed out to the colonel by the physicians. The colonel reluct
antly agreed, insisting that he felt perfectly fit.
During the preliminary to the operation Colonel Roosevelt
patiently submitted to two X-ray examinations. He laughed
and joked with the physicians.
"Carrying that speech in your pocket certainly was lucky
for you," said Dr. Ochener, the Chicago surgeon who was to
help in the operation.
"Ho-ho!" laughed the colonel, "if they would let me have
my way about it! I feel great this morning and could deliver
a speech now, if you doctors would let me get up."
After the X-ray examination the physicians issued the fol
lowing statement:
"WE HAVE LOCATED THE EXACT COURSE OF
THE BULLET AND HAVE DETERMINED DEFINATELY
THAT IT DID NOT TOUCH ANY VITAL SPOT. COL
ONEL ROOSEVELT'S LIFE IS NOT IN ANY DANGER."
The surgeons then went into consultation to prepare for
the operation to remove the bullet.
After a consultation the colonel was put under ether and
a probe was made for the bullet. .
The shooting of Roosevelt is a story that shows the iron
nerve of the former President. He insisted on speaking before
the audience at the Auditoiium, in Milwaukee, after the bul
let had lodged in his body. The colouel had hardly begun his
speech when a woman in the audience ai'ose and said:
"Colonel Roosevelt, please go back and let the doctors
dress your wound."
The colonel thanked the woman but insisted that he was
not hurt and refused to listen to the entreaties of his party.
The colonel continued with a bitter arraignment of his op
ponents for an hour and a half ,until he became weak from the
Joss of blood, and then was taken from the hall and his wound
dressed.
On the trip down from Milwaukee Colonel Roosevelt was
allowed to sleep all the way. His temperature at that time was
normal but his pulse was eighty-four, whereas normally it is
seevnty-two.
Roosevelt awoke two hours later and said he did not feel
bad. His condition, however, is admitted to be serious. Im
mediately after reaching Mercy Hospital he was examined by
Dr. Tyrell and six other doctors at which time the bullet was
located under the tenth rib and against the wall of the chest.
The greatest dagger is believed ito be from blood poisoning,
as the bullet was fired from a i^usty revolver and passed
through manuscript and other articles in his pocket before
entering the flesh. v
The colonel is resting comfortably and the doctors de
clare that at the present time there is ferory reason to believe
he will recover. 'jj i
•— (Continued on page 4.) (
K, >
WILSON SENDS
HIS MESSAGE
I Special to the EVENING NEWS.
Trenton, Oct. 15:—One of the first
j things Governor Wilson did after
'reaching his desk at the state house
today, was to send a telegram of
; sympathy to Colonel Theodore Roose
velt, one of his opponents in the con
test for the presidency who was shot
in Milwaukee last night. The tele
gram was as follows:
"Col. Theodore Roosevelt:
"Please accept my warmest sym
pathy, and my heartiest congratula
tions that the wound is not serious.
"Signed, Woodrow Wilson."
if
11
OJ
C O
B Y I
G S
INNINGS 1
GIANTS 6
2 j 3
1 I 0
BOSTON 0 1 0
0
0
6 7
2 1
0 0 0 2
0
1
£> | lO
1
1 1
TOTAL
0
4
t continued on page 4. i
! —— B—■——■
■ TrtFJDDORE ROOSEvfujlMI
[C©£25!2!H«2sysssB3l«les8*3SiMBMSiSMfi
SCHRANK SAYS
I HE HAD DREAM
* I
Special 6]/ Unite Press Wire.
Milwaukee, Wis., Oct. 15:—John
Schrank, of East Tenth strgpt New
York, would-be assassin of Colonel
Roosevelt, when cross-examined to
day, said he shot Roosevelt because
President McKinley had appeared to
him in a dream and pointed out
Roosevelt as his slayer. He told of
having followed the colonel all
through the south attempting to get
a chance to shoot htm. He said he
thought Roosevelt a menace to the
country.
"I began to think of Roosevelt as
a menace when he cried 'thief at
the Chicago convention," said
Schrank today. "I looked upon his
plan to Btart a third party as a
danger. I was convinced that if he
were elected he would plungo the
country into a bloody war."
Schrank was spirited to the coun
ty Jail early this morning as the
authorities feared an attempt would
be made to do bim violence. He
slept soundly in bis cell until 7 j
o'clock today. He Is being held In
the county Jail until the outcome of
the former president's wound is def}-|
nltely known. The penalty for!
Schrank's crime, should Roosevelt
recover, will be from one to fifteen I
years in the penitentiary.
I
Later today Schrank was arraign
ed in the district court and pleaded
guilty. He was bonded on a $5,000
bail to the next term of the municipal
f-ourt in December. I
DEMOCRATIC MASS MEETING
IN AUDITORIUM
8 O'clock Wednesday Night, Oct. 16.
GOOD SPEAKERS. LADIES INVITED.
Thst advertisement caused to be published by the Democratic Campaign Committee
NOTICE.
Members of the 7irst Ward Demo
cratic Club and all First Ward Dem
ocrats are requested to meet at head
quarters, Smith and High streets,
Wednesday evening, 7:15'p. m., to
take part in pande and banner
raising of the Wilson Club at 8 p. m.
THOS. u. SMITH, Pres.
(This adv. caused to be published by
ls( Ward Democratic Club.)
11779-10-15-lt*
NOTICE.
Democrats, Fourth Ward.
All Democrats are requested to at
tend the special meeting of the Fourth
Ward Democratic Association at their i
headquarters, cor. Smith St. and Wat
son Ave. tonight at 7.30 p. m. to make
arrangements to attend jn a body the
raising ot the Wilson and Marshall
banner, Oct. 16.
THE FOURTH WARD DEM. ASSN.
(This adv. caused to be published by
the 4th Ward Dom. Asst>.)
11767-10-15-lt*
NOTICE !
Auto Excursion to Duke's Park,
Som«rvillc, tverv Tuesday and Fri
day. Fare one dollar. New car*;
careful drivers.
C. W Eimort, 169 State S'r»«t
Dancing Every Satur
day Night at Yates' Hall,
South River, N. J.
Do You Know
that we dye, repair prese and reblo'K
LADIE'S MATS
At Reasonable Prices TRY US'
THE FRENCH MILLINERY
Perth Am boy 308 8ta-j Street
BATTING ORDER FOR TODAY'S
GAME.
RED SOX.
Hooper, rf.
Yerkes, 2b.
Speaker, cf.
Lewis, If.
Gardner, 3b.
Btahl, lb.
Wagner. 88.
Cady, c.
Wood, p
Hall, p
Special i United Press Wire.
Fenway Park, Boston, Mass., Oct.
15:—"Smoky Joe" Wood—the star
twlrler of the American League—was
selected this afternoon by Manager
Stahl. of the Bostons, to gain the ti
tle of World's ChampionB for "Bean
town," the American League and
everything "Down East" in general.
IF, "Little Joe" delivers the goods
today, as on his two previous starts,
the New York "Giants" will bow to
defeat to the "Red Sox," of this basj
ball-wild town, in the greatest series
ever staged to determine the cham
pionship of the world at baseball.
The Boston fans, crowding the grand
stands and bleachers at Fenway Park
are positive that Wood will repeat
'.z previous doses and return his
team the '.'inner in this afternoon's
fracas. Over 3?.000 " ''i^fans are
packed into the park,. , -i ggfc
One Orand Celebration if th. '..--„Rbl
win. If the New Yorkers just happen
to grab the game, the series will be a
tie at "three-all." The deciding
game will be played here tomorrow,
afternoon, if necessary.
The "Giants" Jumped into a big
lead in the first inning when they
found Wood's curves and swift ball
for seven hits, one of which was a
double by Snodgrass. Every man on
the Giants New York line-up had a i
chance at bat, and all connected but ]
two. Murray sacrificed and Herzog
forced Merkle. The "Giants" made
another run off Hall, who relieved
Wood, in the second inning. In their
half of the second, the Red Sox
dented the rubber on a home run by
Gardner. There was no one on base
at the time.
First Inning.
Giants—Devore singled. Doyle
Btngled. Devore and Doyle worked a
double steal. Snodgrass doubled
scoring Devore and Doyle. Murray
sacrificed, Stahl unassisted, Snod
grass taking third. Merkle singled
scoring Snodgrass and took second on
throw to plate. Merkle run down,
Wood to Wagner to Gardner, on Her
zog's grounder. Herzog on second.
Meyers singled, scoring Herzog.
Fletcher singled, Meyers on third.
Tesreau singled, Meyers scoring.
Fletcher scored while Tesreau was
being retired. YerkeB to Stahl to
Wagner. Mix runs, s^ven hits, no i
GIANTS.
Devore. rf.
Doyle, 2b.
Snodgrass, cf.
Murray, If.
Merkle, lb.
Herzog, 3b.
Meyers, c.
Fletcher, ss.
Tesreau, p
errors, none left.
Boston—Hooper fanned. Yerkes
walked but was left when Speaker
filed to Murray and Lewis went out,
Herzog to Merkle. No runs, no hits,
no errors, one left.
Second Inning.
Giants—Hall relieved Wood. De
vore walked and stole. Doyle walk
ed. Devore was caught napping,
Hall to Wagner. Snodgrass singled,
Doyle scoring on Hall's wild 'hrow
to Wagner, "Snod" 011 third. Mur
ray filed to Wagner. Merkle ground
ed to Wagner, to Stahl. One run,
one bit, one error, one left.
Boston—Gardner hit a home run.
Stahl fouled to Meyers. Fletcher
threw out Wagner. Cady fanned.
One run, one hit, no err >rs, none
left.
Third Inning.
Giants—Herzog Bingled. Meyers
singled. Fletcher forced Herzog.
Stall! put out Tesreau. Devore -lied
to Hooper. No runs, two hits, no er
rors, two left.
Boston—Hall singled, and took
second on Merkle'a error Hooper
singled. Yerkes fanned. Speaker
filed to Devore and Hall was caught
at the plate, Devore to Meyers. No
runs, two hits, one error, two left.
Fourth Inning.
Giants—Doyle was out, to Stahl, j
unassisted. Snodgrass flied to Wag-1
ner. Yerkes threw out Murray. No
runs, no hits, no errors, nont l"ft.
Boston—Lewis filed to Devore.
Gardner hit by pitched ball. Stahl
singled. Wagner forced Stahl, Doyle
NOTICE.
Mr. H. A Bowne, who has been en- {
papeil in t^e furniture trade for the
past seven years, is now connected
with Stern Sc Co., Smith St., at Madi
son Ave., where he wouJd be pleased
to welcome his friends.
ST^RN & CO.
11772-10-15-11*
THE WARREN
has a few handsomely furnished
rooms with board. Aiso table
boarder wanted. Apply at Warren
House, 228 High strer .
to Fletcher. Cady was out, Tesreau
to Merklt. No runs, one lilt, no er»
rors, one left.
Fifth Inning.
Giants—Cady threw out Merkla.
Herzog fanned. Meyers singled.
Fletcher forced Meyers, Wagner to
Yerkes No runs, one hit, no errors,
one left.
Boston—Hall doubled. Hooper
walked. Yerkes forced Hooper,
Doyle to Fletcher. Speaker walked.
Lewis fouled to Merkle. Gardner
popped to Tesreau. No inns, one hit,
no errors, three left.
Sixth Inning.
Giants—Yerkes threw out Tesreau,
Devore walked. Doyle hit a home
run, scoring Devore ahead of him.
Snodgrass filed to Lewis. Hall threw
out Murray. Two runs, one hit, no
errors, none left.
Boston—Stahl flied to Devore.
Wagner singled. Wagner went to
third 011 a wild pilch. Tesreau threw
out Cady. Hall walked. Hooper
fanned. No runs, one hit, no errors,
two left.
Seventh Inning.
Giants—Merkle singled Herzog
died to Lewis. Meyers grounded to
Wagner, whose throw to Yerkes was
too late to get Merkle at second.
Fletcher filed to Speaker. Tesreau
singled, scoring Merkle. Devore
filed to Lewis. One run, two hits,
n<v-grrj£N, one Left.
*'« ' "Tpp-y the hefu) aced Meyers
helium J*1'■- *rhrr niV.y*
Yerkes. Speaker singled. Lewis
doubled. Gardner out, Fletcher to
Merkle, Speaker scoring. Hall was
safe on Doyle's fumble, Lewis scor
ing. Wagner fanned. Two run.", two
hits, one error, one left.
Eighth Inning.
Giants—Doyle singled. Snodgrass
out, to Stahl. Murray flied to
Speaker. Merkle grounded to Wag
ner. No runs, i,ne hit, no errors, one
left.
Boston—Doyle dropped Cady'a
high fly. Hall singled, Gady taking
third. Cady scored on Hooper's sac
rifice to Snodgrass. Yerkes forced
Hall, Fletcher to Dovle. Yerkes took
second on wild pitch. Speaker out,
Doyle to Merkle. One run, one hit,
one error, i ne left.
Ninth Inning.
Giants—Herzog walked. Wilson
singled. Herzog scored on Speaker's
wild throw. Fletcher lined to Speak
er, who doubled Wilson at second.
Tesreau walked. Devore out, Yerkes
to Stahl. One run, one hit, one
error.
Boston—Lewis walked. Gardner
fanned. Stahl forced Lewis, Herzog
to Doyle. Wagner out. Tesreau to
Merkle. No runs, cue hit, r.o errors,
one left.
CAMPAIGN FOR
FUNDS STARTS
Campaign captains will soon be
named by the directors • . the Hebrew
Institute to raise a fund for the erec
tion of the proposed Hebrew Institute
building at Jefferson street and Mad
ison avenue. The directors held a
busy session last night at the home
of Sigmund Hpilzer in State street.
It was decided at this meeting that
fifty men, fifty boys, and fifty girls,
be appointed to help procuring
money and that the campaign to
raise the amount required be started
In the next few weeks. Dr. Feldman,
chairman, Miss Tina Friedman, and
Samuel Levine were chosen as the
campaign committee.
Those present at last night's ses
sion were: Miss Tina Friedman, Her
man Ellis, Sigmund Spltzer, Bernard
Streiff, Bernard Goldman, Edward
Gluck, Lawyer Leo Goldberger, Ilr.
B. Eeldman, llymar Friedman, Na
than Jacobson and David Dobbs
BULL MOOSERS
AT JAMESBURG
All the legislative candidates on
the Bull Moose ticket addressed a
big meeting last night in borough
hall, Jamesburg, which town is the
home of former Mayor Frank Jen
nings, who is candidate for assembly
honors on the Progressive ticket.
Mr. Jennings received a cordial re
ception when he stepped to the plat
form to address his fellow citizens.
Other speakers were: Adrian Lyon,
of this city; Henry Seldler, of Roose
velt, and James A. Edgar, of New
Brunswick. The Jamesburg Pro
gressives have not organized a club,
as yet.
Mr. and Mrs. William MacDonald,
of Paterson street, spent Sunday
with friends in Rahway.
tors from out of town Saturday,

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