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Perth Amboy evening news. [volume] (Perth Amboy, N.J.) 1903-1959, January 10, 1913, Last Edition, SECOND SECTION, Image 18

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PERTH AMBOY EVENING NEWS
Founded 1879 as tha Perth Amboy Republican.
An Independent newspaper published every afternoon,
except Sundays, by
PERTH AMIIOY EVENING NEWS COMPANY,
No. 284 State Street, Perth Amboy, N. J.
BRANCH OFFICES;
New York—F. R. Northrup, 225 Fifth Ave.
Chicago—Suite 1714, Tribune Building.
J. .LOGAN CLEVENGER, Editor.
D. P. OLMSTEAD, Business Manager.
TERMS. OF SUBSCRIPTION:
By Mail:—One month, 40 cents; si* months, $2.25; one
year, $4.50.
Delivered by Carrier:—10 cents a week. $".20 a year.
The EVENING NEWS is a member of the American
Newspaper 1'ublishors' Association and of the United
Press Associations.
Long Distance Telephone • - 400 or 401
Entered at I'ost Office ns Second Class Matter.
No attention paid to unsigned communications.
VOLUME XXXlli <iNO 18(1 J
FRIOAY. JANUARY 10, 1913.
PLRTH AMBOY
r * "t'uiniiuii J«5.»3l
[ 23 m.ies from New York.
► Tax rate 2.02
r On Stnten Island Pound. at
[ the mouth of the Rsrltan river
[ and at the head of Harltan
| Bay
[ Ocean steamers ran <lork In
[ from 35 to 40 feet of water.
Channel 21 feet deep nt low
\ wa'«r. lending up the bay from
[ Sandy Hook.
i Dally steamer service to New
1 Tork
Four railroads—the Pennsyl
( vanla. Central Railroad of New
i Jersey. I,ehl*h Valley and the
fitaton Island Rapid Transit.
Hranche* tinning In all direct
ions. affnrdina almost an un
*!m!t»»d jurot-er nf excellent
factory aid**
Haa two te'errerh and two
telephone comp«nle>a.
Elertrlc light anJ fas com
pffnlea
Two dally newspapers.
Federal poatofflce bulMln*.
Public f.lhrary.
Nine grammar schools and
one hlph school. which !» on
tbe approve*! Hat of all the
lending universities In the
country; four parochial school*
and a business" collea*
Churches of *I1 denomin
ations.
City Hospital.
Municipal water works.
leys to /ill parts of the state.
Highest clay deposits In the <
country In the Immediate vl
clnlty.
Splendid thoatrlcal advan
.* a »-»»•.
Pome of tho ieadln* Indus
tries rt« American Smeltinj; *
Refining Company's smelter;
Itarltan Copper Workj smelter;
ParMr Asphalt Works; United
I„ead Wnrks; United States
Cartrld«e Company; Architect
ural Tile A Faience Co.. C.
Pardee Steel and Tile Works;
At Ian Mr Terra Cotta Co.; Fed
eral Terra Cotta Co.; New
Jersey Terra Cert a Co.; three
plants of the National Flre
prooflnsr Company, and other
similar Industries within the
Immediate vicinity; Ceramlo
Works: Ch^sebrougrh Vaseline i
W-»rka; Marcy Stove Works,
iwo drydock companlee, to
gether with shlpyarns and
marine railways. Standard
I nderground Cable Company;
Roesslor & Hasslncher Chem
ical Works: emery mills, coke
and cigar factories; cement
stone works; coal shipping
piers; handkerchief factory;
cement works; machine shops
and Iron foundries.
For further particulars ad
dresF:
Oeorge St. Andr**«y. Secre
tary of the Board of Trade.
ABOLISH THE SECRET BALLOT.
At the first meeting of tlie new excise board
held Tuesday night, the vote on the renewal
of several licenses was done by ballot. Per
haps it was a little more than we could reas
onably expect for the new board to do its
voting in the open at the very outset so that
every person could know how each man stood,
yet it would have been a popular move on the
part of any one of the members at that first
meeting, Tuesday night, to have at least made
an effort, to have the voting done in the open,
by calling the "yeas" and "nays."
What ever other reform the excise hoard
adopts in the course of the next few months
it is to be.hoped that the first tiling will be
to declare the abolition of the secret ballot.
No harm can come from giving light to every
transaction. Let the public be kept informed
of what is going ou. Every voter has the
right to know just how every public servant
stands on every matter, no matter how great
or insignificant it may be.
Secrecy, especially in such a board as the
excise commission, is the root of all evil.
Start right, gentlemen, and abolish the secret
ballot at the outset.
PROGRESSIVES TRUE COURSE.
"While the Progressive Club of this city
was passing resolutions putting that organiz
ation on record as being absolutely opposed
to any affiliation with the Republican party,
and while Edmund B. Osborne, chairman of
the State Executive Committee was telling the
Essex county Progressives that the members
of that party arc not inerested in any propo
sition to got together in tlie Republican party,
Frank A. Munsey, one of the national leaders
in the new party, and whose newspapers have
been strenuously advocating progressive prin
ciples, was covering the first page of his New
York Press with an editorial advocating the
union of the Republican and Progressive
parties through the medium of a so-called
holding party, whereby neither the Republi
can nor the Progressive party surrenders any
thing to each other, both becoming united
under one name which Mr. Munsey suggests
should be the Liberal party.
Mr. Munsey goes on to argue that with the
Progressives and Republicans antagonsitic to
each other and working along separate lines,
the Democrats are sure of victory for many
years to come. He sees a great similarity
between the Republican and Progressive prin
.v oiples and believes that through the compro
mise that Ire suggests the'two parties can get
together and regain control of the govern
ment.
Coming from such a man as Mr. Munsey,
who is close to Col. Roosevelt and who not
onl\r devoted his publications to the further
ing of the Progressive cause, but has also con
tributed largely of his means to the campaign
fund, the suggestion has attracted consider
able attentoin. Perhaps the most sensible
stand taken in regard to Mr. Munsey's plan
is that of Oscar S. Straus, who was the can
- didate of the Progressives for governor of New
York in the last campaign. In discussing the
subject, Mr. 8traus says:
"I believe there are certainly as manj
Progressives who style themselves Democrat!
as there Progressives who are known or hav<
heretofore been known as Republicans. IJ
the Democratic party under the leadershif
of Mr. Wilson proves to be, as is not unlikely
a progressive party—and of course to do sc
it will have to free itself from boss control—
then Democracy would be another name for
Progressivism and the reactionaries would
leave the party and join the reactionaries of
other parties and the Progressives would nat
urally drift into the liberated Democratic
party.
"Speaking for myself, we are not contend
ing for names, but for principles, and for
that reason the future Progressive party must
unite all progressive forces, just as the re
actionaries or conservatives will unite all re
actionary and conservative forces.
"Whether this natural division will result
in designating the new party the Democratic,
the Progressive or the Liberal party is en
tirely immaterial. That is a matter purely
)f name and not of substance, looking at the
levelopment from a logical and historical
point of view."
The reference to Governor Wilson and the
Democratic party is timely. The EVENING
^EWS pointed out at the beginning of the
campaign last fall, after the Progressives in
;he Democratic ranks had gained control of
;hat party at the Baltimore convention and
lorninated Woodrow Wilson as its candidate
?or President, that the logical thing for those
vho believed in progressive legislation to do
vas to join with the Democrats and
lelp elect Wilson. The Progressive Repub
ieans have always claimed that there is little
lifference between the Progressive element in
;lie two old parties; all that was necessary,
;hey argued, was for them to get together.
Maturally, these Republicans expected to gain
control of their own party and then invite all
lie Progressives within the Democratic party
o unite with them, leaving the reactionary
Republicans to go over with the conservative
Democrats, thereby making a realignment of
; He two political parties, with the Republi
cans as progressives and the Democrats as
;he conservatives.
It seems, however, that under the masterly
leadership of Woodrow Wilson, the Demo
cratic progressives were first to gain control
:>f their party, but the Republican progres
sives, instead of doing what they had expect
ed of their Democratic colleagues, refused to
join the Democratic ranks, but instead, or
ganized a third party, using as an excuse for
not going with the Democrats that the old
bosses were still active in the ranks of the
Democracy.
But, as a matter of fact, the old bosses
were active in the Progressive ranks as much
as they were in any of the other parties.
"Tim" Woodruff was a leading Progressive
in New York, "Bill" Flynn was the Progres
svie leader at Pennsylvania, and so it was in
many sections. The important point was that
these bosses were not in control, just as the
bosses are not in control of the Democratic
party today. We have every confidence in
Woodrow Wilson to advance progressive
principles and, judging from the records of
the men now being summoned to Trenton, we
believe the new administration is to be a
progressive one from top to bottom.
It is evident, as Mr. Munsey declares, that
only two parties can ever hope to count for
anything in this country. Therefore every
man who believes in progressive principles
should, as pointed out by Oscar Straus, ignore
party name and join forces where progressive
principles are being carried out. This, we
believe, is t<4 be accomplished under the lead
ership of Woodrow Wilson. The Progres
sives of all shades can do no better than fall
in behind the Democratic banner. This would
leave the Republican party to the conserva
tives and reactionaries, if they still desire to
continue under that party name.
Realignment of both old parties would thus
be accomplished with the progressives on one
side and the conservatives on the other, only
in the opposite way in which the progressive
Republicans had originally intended. It must
be plain to every man who will give the mat
ter unbiased consideration, that as long as
the Progressives and Republicans remain
apart they crm not hope for victory, especial
ly with the Democratic party in the control
of the progressive element.
But still, it is greatly to be feared thai
Governor Sulzer is not a Governor Wilson,
as much as he may try to imitate the New
Jersey executive.
Once more the name of Thaw is mixed up
in New York court proceedings. How long
must we suffer this!
Your Chance Now
To buy a Winter Suit
or Overcoat at an ex
ceptionally low price.
Our stock is large, our
clothing, the most reli
able made, and our
guarantee to back up
every sale.
Salts 9.75 to 21.50
Overcoats 7.75 to 22.00
I Gannon & Sheelty
J 92 Smith Street.
Tower of Skutla.
In 1806 tlie Servians rose Against
Turkish rule, and 5,(XX> of them were
massacred by the Osmanll. The dead
were beheaded, and as a warning to
others the Turks built the beads Into
the walls of a tower, face outward.
Today a small portion of a wall re
mains with a skull here and there, a
grim rei. inder of what Servla suffered
under Ottoman oppression.
' FIKR ALARM BOlKI
23—Rarltan Copper Work*.
24—Market and Sheridan btf.
ih—Smith St. and C. R. R.
26—Hl*h and Lewis Sta
27—Madison Ave. and Pater»on St.
28—Market and First St®.
35—Smith and Hl*h Sta
Si—N. Brunswick Ave. and New St.
B7—State and Smith Sta
48—Buck'ham Ave A Hartford Si
45—Commeme and Front Sta
46—State and Washington Sta
47—High and Washington &ta.
64—State St. and Buckingham A?a
16—Hall Ave and Charles St.
67—State and Wayne Sts.
68—Near United Lead Work!.
i9—Maurer.
62—Washington and First Sta.
63—N Brunswick Ave. and Elm St.
64—Smith St. and Watson Ava
66—Commerce and State Sta.
72—Front and Smith Sts.
73—Water and Gordon Sts.
74—Kearney Ave. and Gordon St.
82—Smith and Herbert Sts.
83—Amboy Ave & Washington St.
84—Lehtgh Ave. and Stanford Su
85—Near City Hospital.
M—Cleveland ar.d Brace Avea
87—Amboy and Hall Aves.
92—Ambov Ave. and Inslee St.
94—Neville and Johnstone Sta
STATKN ISLAND RAPID TRANSIT,
r IRE TO N EJW YORK.
One Way $ .40
Round Trip 65
50-THp Ticket 13.00
Monthly .ommutatlon 7.00
Timetable In Effect December 13. 1912.
To New York.
Leave Perth Amboy Dally—
6 05. 6:30. 7:00: *7:29. 7:29; *3:00. 8:00,
8:50. 9:50. 11:10 a. m.; 12:15. 1:52, 2:50.
3:40, 4:28. 5:25. 6:10. 7:32. 9:00, 10:25.
11:30 p. m.
Sunday? and Holidays—
6:15. 7:46. 8:46, 9:45. 10:4*, 11:46 a. m.:
12:46. 1:46. 3:05. 4:05. 5:10, 6:15. 7:15.
8:15. 10:00 p. m.. and Holiday Nights
only 11:30 p. m.
From New York.
Leave New York Dally—
6:00. 7:00, 8:00. 9:00. 10:00. 11:20 a. m.J
12:30. 1:30. 2:40. 3:40. 4:40. 5:15. *5:30.
5:45. 6:15. G:30. 7:00. 7:40. 9:00, 10:00.
11:30 p. m. 12:30 a. m.
Sundays and Holidays—
7:30. 9:00. 10:00. 1 1:00 a. m.J 12:00
noon: 1:00. 2:00. 3:00. 4:30. 5:30. 6:30.
7:30. 8.30. 10:00. 11:30 p. m.. and Holiday
Nights only 12:30 a. m.
• Express
GEO. J. BROWN,
General Traffic Agent.
f'OMYVCi F'TW.
Jan. 15—Ball, Perth Amboy Aerie
No. l,58t». Fraternal Order of
Eagles, in the Auditorium.
Jan 22—First Annual Ball of Iro
quois \ G., Auditorium.
January 24, entertainment and
dance of the Socialist party, at Good
will Hall.
Jan. 25—Third annual ball Liber
ty Hook and Ladder Company, Wash
ington Hall.
Feb. 11—Bali, Lincoln Eugine
Company, Auditorium.
Feb. 12—Ball, Liberty Camp. No.
r»5, Woodmen of the World in Wash*
ngton hall.
Feb. 20 — Helnlein Banjo Quartet
and Concert Company. Goodwill hall.
< Y. M. C. A.)
Feb. 22.—Turkey Dinner, T.adiet
Auxiliary of Simpson M. B. church,
lecture room.
Perth Amboy Win
dow Cleaning' Co.
w. clean everything from floor to
celling. No spots on flas* »en we
*ro through. We can make it ♦ lay for
you thl* ^11 'All wnrlc rton# by *»on.>
Office 800 State Street
^ii«hkiii*f« bailor Shop - l*hnne R7-R
l'HKTtl AM BOY TRDST COMPANY.
COMMERCl
BANK
JiP
A DEPOSITOH AT THli
PEKTH AMBOY TEUST CO,
has many advantages beside the safety
of liis money. He can put notes and
drafts in for collection, borrow nionov
on acceptable security, call on the bank
for any advice of a financial nature
You will he entitled to these courte
sies if you have an account there wheth
er it be largo or small. We pay in
terest»on checking accounts.
Perth Amboy Trust Co,
This Company is a. lefril depository
fcr the funds of the State of New Jer
sey, the County of Middlesex and ii
also a depository for the municipal
funds of the City Perth Amboy.
Y
"Friday" - By c. a. voight
~7-\ HATE TO PO "THIS / ^
j BUT I MUST CAT ILL ^
I get Tne boss to advancb
I Me a Few ocans'tiu. >
(tomorrow.'.'/; —
——— AS U3UAt.'!
— now i wotioen
WHSBS I CAW
OAtne* Cnou&K
KAte ^oa. tmb
f ATI N&S —
Shau. i Touch him
OR SHALL I NOT?
- out Nolo henrvm
Gurs* rt> better not.
— THtf BOSS CAVE >
ME A CALL. FOR.
not saving hv //v
MowevAN# LCgC
having To / ^Ir
Borrow —/ v
MUMCROU*
STOPi flAPE
HERE —
-"leS.TUST A
QUART PR ,CASSlt>S
I'll RETURN IT
TOMORROW!' V"
MUNOZ EXI'ilES.^
bTOliAGti
Telephone Cwunectlona.
216-17-1V Brighten Ave.
All kinds of heavy 'rucking—furni
ture and piano moving promptly at
tended to.
J. P. HANSON
PLUMDIMG. GAS. STIC A 31 FITTING
ESTIMATES FUKNISHED.
Jobbinii Promptly AtteudeU to.
so New Brunswick Avenue.
TeL 250-W. Residence 591-R
AETHUR QARBEN
ORl'UGUT
Prescription Work u Specialty
81 HALL AVKNIK
Branch Office— Evening Ne./s
NEW JERSEY CENTRAL.
TRALN* LJUVE PEHTU AMBOT.
For New York. Nawarn, and Elisa
beth. at 4:28, 7:18 *7 :3k. 7:65. *8 22. ! :]«,
9.42. 10.01. 10:52. ll:*t au rn.. 12:07. 12:3).
2:47, 3:14. 4:40. 6:04. Of, 1:14. i«;S4,
*.1:00 p. m.; Sundays: 8:32. 4:21 a. m.; 1:23.
1:08. 4:82. 8:27 i Ok.
iNew York only.
■Saturday only.
For Philadelphia and Trenton. ria
Bound Brook: 6:28. 7:12. 9:42. 10 04. 11:14,
a m.; 12:33 S:47. 6.06, 4:03. 8:14 p. m.;
Sunday®: 8:32. 8:28 a. m.; 1:23. 6:08. 6:62*
8:27 p m.
For Long Bra no*. Aabury Par-v.
Ocean Grove, etc.: 6:10. 8 04 a_ in.; 12 02
•2:05 « 33. 4 03. « 34. 3:64. 12:81 p. m •
Sundays 4 50. 8:37 a. m.: 4:67. 18:01 p, m.
For Freehold: 6:10. 7:02. 8:08 a m.;
12:02. 2:21. 6:33. 4:03. 4:34 p. rn.. Sundays
11 05 a. m.; 4:67. 10:01 p. m.
Good Resolutions
By WALT MASON
At 8 o'clock on New Year's day, I heard Rill Wax, my uoighbor, say:
11US year win see me leave ine llOie 111 wnicn I've
long immersed my soul; that hole la Debt, and from
Its deeps I'll d rag myself, this time for keeps.
My bank accou nt must be enlarged; I'll buy no
goods and have them charged; collectors won't
be on my track, nor bailiffs camped around my
shack. I'll cut out porterhouse and pie, and pay
for everything 1 buy, and when the. year Is grow
ing gray I'll have a bundle put away. This vovr
I surely won't forget—I'm bound to take a fall
from Debt!" For many years on New Year's
day old William Wax has talked this way; he's
asked tile godf to witness vows as rigid as the
law allows, aisd for two weeks or maybe three old
Bill's as right eous as can be. And then he sees a
watch or gun he nppdn so hnHt Mo
i and bo he has
j such weary roads he's walked, he
I gives his note—the same old game;
j merchants clamor for their gold, an
| run down by creditors Alas for B!
against the wall, their noses on the g
j Debt alone!
the blamed thing chalked; and then,
buys a horse to rest his frame, and
rnd when the year is growing old the
d Bill's afraid to go out doors to be
11! Alas for all who have their backs
rinding stone, because they can't let
rtuut nMK i.nii.k..
Cars Leave S'aeD lilan-1 /erry:
For New Brunvwtck—6:10 a. m. and
erery 30 minutes until ¥:40 p. in*, alio
4t 9:40. 10:40 and 11*40 o. m. iSarur
n* m \
n —"-i" » ui. u «.oiy
i» minute until »:40 p. m. Then evury
»0 mlnutt» until 11:40.
For Rahway —-5:50 a. in. and every IB
mlnuten until 11.JO p. m.
For Povntnn B.>»ch—« 00 «. m and
Felix and Fink : The Safe Way to Get Rid of a Christmas
Tree is to Set Fire to it.
r=s : ' -
TWtRt'S A LOT OP POLKS tN ^ '
m KEIGHBORHOOO THKT WOULD
I LIKE TO HAVE SOMEONE OO
VrflTH THE OLD
CHRISTMAS TREES
1 THKT TmrT M/.VS
JH THEIR HOUSES

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