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Perth Amboy evening news. [volume] (Perth Amboy, N.J.) 1903-1959, February 28, 1917, LAST EDITION, Image 1

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!--- Perth Amboy Evening news. .as.
VOLUME XXXVII. No. 172. PERTH AMBOY, N. J. WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1917. TEN PAGES—TWO CENTS
THREATEN FILIBUSTER AGAINST PRESIDENT'S PLEA .
FOR POWER DESPITE FACT GERMAN SITUATION
IS AT CRUCIAL POINT; LONDON SEES "OVERT ACT"
m. REV. O'GQNKELL
CALLED 10 REWARD
Former Pastor of St. Mary's
Church Here for 16 Years,
Dies at Home of His Brother
in Phillipsburg.
IU. Rev. Monslgnor Bernard T.
O'Connell. pastor of St. Mary's church
for sixteen years, died last night at
the home of his brother In Phillips
burg, where he had been since tender
ing his resignation In April, 1915.
Monslgnor O'Connell was in the six
tieth year of lile age. He was or
dained a priest in July, 1882, by the
Rt. Rev. Michael J. O'Farrell, at St.
Mary's Cathedral, Trenton, in the
same class with Rev. Dr. William P.
Cantwell, vyho succeeded him as pas
tor of the local church In 1915. Mon
slgnor O'Connell's first appointment
was at Bound Brook, where he built
up a thriving parish.
Γ
1
Ht. Rev. Monsignor O'Connell
He was an assistant at the Church
of the Sacred Heart in Trenton, after
being ordained and from there was
sent to Bound Brook. He came from
the latter place to this city, where he
set to work In the erection of the pre»
fr.t church whluli elands as a mon·
unjtnt to the good work, that he ac
complished during hts pastorate here.
Jionllsuor (l'CnniVlL «s^ficctdedi ihe
Rey. Fatfiev Peter I.. Connelly. In
recognition of bis efficient service the
priest was notified In November, 1906,
that he had been appointed α prelate
by Pope Pius X. with the title of
monsignor. His appointment to the
Papal household at the time came as
a surprise, but it was one that was
merited by effective work and was
due to Bishop McFaul's recognition of
Monsignor O'Connell's ability.
During his pastorate of sixteen years
Monsignor O'Connell made many
warm friends, not only among hid
parishioners but in every part of the
city.
Monsignor O'Connell had been in ill
health for the past ten years. When
he felt that he could no longer retain
the responsibilities as head of the loc
al church his resignation was sent to
the head of the diocese. He had been
given a leave of absence in 1914 and
was at the home of his brother In
Phllllpsburg for some time. He came
back and labored for α time among
his people but he again suffered an
other breakdown which forced him to
give up the pastorate of the church.
Dr. Cantwell received word of the
death of the former priest here this
morning. This afternoon he received
word of the completion of. the ar
rangements for the funeral which
jwlli be held on Monday morning
Ρ from the home of his brother, fol
lowed by a solemn requiem high
mass at St. Phillip's and James
church, Phllllpsburg. at 10 o'clock.
Through Dr. Cantwell and Richard
A. Bolger, of St. Mary's parish, a
special train will be chartered for
those wishing to attend the funeral.
Applications for tickets on the train
may be made to Mr. Bolger, who will
be in charge.
AMERICAN BUSINESS MEN
"HASTENING TO COLORS"
Special by United Pies» Wire.
Cleveland, O., Feb. 28:—With the
German-American· crisis seemingly
approaching the final break, Ameri
ca's businessmen and manufacturers
are "hastening to the colors tffday,"
prepared to back Uncle Sam from
first to last. Bascom Little, chairman
of the National Defense Committee
of the United States Chamber of
Commerce, announced that several
of the businessmen's committees des
tined to cooperate with the govern
ment quartermasters in buying sup
plies for the army and navy have
been appointed.
2H HELD HERE
ON FORGERY CHARGE
Try to Pass Alleged Worthless
Check on Charles E. Moore
and Land in Lockup—Oper
ations Appear Extensive.
ι One man charged with forgery and
I another accused of being an accom
plice, are in jail here as a result of
an attempt made last night to pass an
alleged worthless check on Charles F.
Moore, of Moore Brothers. John J.
Condon, alias J. A. Berry and Jack
I J.. Lenahan, thirty-one years old, and
declaring himself to be a New York
newspaper man, is charged with for
gery. Harry Daly, alias Harry G.
Callahan, who says he is a machinist
and lives in New York, is being held
on suspicion. Word was given Mr.
Moore by a man whose name Condon
had given for reference Indicates that
Condon has been working extensively
of late as a forger about certain parts
of the state.
While Daly stood across the str^el
Condon entered Moore's news store
, about 8 o'clock last night. He pre
| sented a check for $10 drawn on a
; Matawan bank and signed "Wilner."
Being unable to casTi the paper, Con
don asked Mr. Moore to advance a
loan on it. When Mr. Moore hesitat
ed, Condon suggested that he call up
a newspaper man in Elizabeth. Upon
doing so Mr. Mooro says ne was ad
vised to have Condon arrested be
cause he was working an extensive
forgery game. Condoa did not re
ceive any moii»v anrt£ lie and Γαΐ>
were ineçf if un<Wr~ arrest by i-atrol
man Toolan.
When arraigned before Recorder
Pickersgill this morning Condon said
he had visited In Matawan and had
gambled on a train. He declared a
man purporting to be Wilner, of Mat
awan, gave him the check, and he
tried to borrow enough moijey on It
to pay carfare to New York city.
I While the police here were examin
ing Condon and Daly today, Mr. Moore
was in New York investigating their
records. He reports finding that Con
don is accused of forgery in various
parts of the s'ate and is wanted in
Newark for extensive operations. In
dications are that the prisoners will
be turned over to the Newark author
ities for prosecution.
When apprehended last night Con
don had destroyed the check, which
he had used in the Moore store.
AIR RAID 0N6ERMAN PUNT
Special by Unitea Prent Wire.
London, Feb. 28:—An air raid on
Sunday over the iron works at Bre
bach, Germany, was announced by
the British Admiralty today. There
were several air encounters In which
one hostile machine was destroyed.
APPEALS TO PEOPLE
Spcclul by United Prvsa Wire.
Washington, Feb. 28—Appeals to
the American people to forbear from
any act of suspicion or aggression
against aliens In event of war, was
made today by the Council of Na
tional Defense.
SUFFRAGISTS HERE
PLAN ACTIVITY
Mrs. Brearley Speaks to Local
Women at Warren House
Yesterday — Plans Acted
Upon for Organization.
A meeting of the Equal Suffrage
League of the Amboys was held yes
terday afternoon in the Warren house
in High street for the purpose of re
organizing to increase the member
ship preparatory to an active cam
paign. There were about fifteen wo
men present at the meeting including
Mrs. A. D. Brearley of Hahway, state
chairman of enrollment for the New
Jersey Woman's Suffrage Association,
who addressed the women on the pro
gress being made by the women
throughout the country in securing
the vote. The women were told that
the suffragists would not wait until
1920 to renew their efforts to secure
the vote, but were starting now so
that in four years the voters will feel
that there is something in "votes for
women" and will vote in favor of it at
the election at that time.
Mrs. Brearley was given the floor as
soon as the meeting had been called
to order by Mrs. O. W. Ramsay,
chairman of the local league. She
gave a brief outline of women's suf
frage from the beginning, 1869, di
rectly after the Civil War, telling of
the two divisions of suffragists which
formed, one being organized for fed
eral purposes only and the other for
both federal and state. Mrs. Brearley
told of the great influence of the 4,
000,000 women voters at the recent
election and how tho women had se
cured the vote In North Dakota
through the "Farmer Legislature."
The fact was emphasized that
stronger sentiment must be shown by
the women. The speaker stated that
many women were in favor of suf
frage principles, but so far have re
fused to declare themselves as suffra
gists. It Is these women, it was point
ed out, that should be reached and
persuaded to Join a suffrage league.
In order to reach a woman Inter
ested In woman's suffrage in every
part of the city, a list was compiled
naming one woman In every ward of
the city, certain ones of those present j
having offered to approach thfee wo
men and tell them what Is wanted,
ι Mr·. Brearley toli^of "state wide cen
sus weelc" which ▼ill be conducted In
Aj-ril IjA New. Jersey suffragists Tar
the purpose of finding just who are
for and against "Ballots for Both,"
the new suffrage slogan. This cam- I
palgn will not be conducted for the j
purpose of enrolling new members,
although those Interested when ap
proached may join a league, but
merely to see what the opinion of res
idents of this city Is with regard te
women's suffrage.
Mrs. Brearley told of the work
which was being done by the New
Jersey Association in forming Red
Cross chapters In places where there
are none situated. As there is already
a Red Cross chapter In this city It Is
not necessary to organize one but the
speaker told of the successful meeting
called for this purpose in Woodbrldge
Monday. Those present at the meet
ing were told that any woman Joining
one of these chapters would In no way
be connected with the suffrage league
although this league Is forming the
chapters. In event of war, all suf
frage Interests will be put aside and
the members of the suffrage league
Will devote their entire time to the
work needed from them by the coun
try. said Mrs. Brearley. Such action,
however, will not be taken unless war
is declared, It was said.
It was decided to hold another
meeting of all of the women Interested
In suffrage, whether members of the
local league or not, next Tuesday
nlglit In the Westminster In Kearny
avenue, at which further definite plans
of organization will be made.
GERARD SAILS FROM SPAIN
Washington, Feb. 28—Ambassador
Gerard sailed from Corunna, Spain,
today, a dispatch to the State Depart
ment said.
NOTICE
The Hotel Madison, on and
after March ist, will be under the
proprietorship and management of
Mr. Sigmund Mahler
The house has been cleaned up,
painted up and furnished up, with
brand new furniture. In other
words it has been fixed up to the
"Queen's Taste." We will be
pleased to have you come and
inspect the results of our efforts to
make the Hotel Madison second
to none.
The service will be the BEST,
The price» more reasonable than
you would expect during these
days of High Cost Living.
We have employed a chef Mr.
Welter who, for the past six years
has been employed by Hohn the
famous restaurant man of New
York City.
Taking all in a!l we think we
have made a mighty big improve
ment' in the Hotel Madison and
we want you to see it and cordial,
ly invite you.
Hotel Madison
Opp. Ma J est Ic Theatre
SIGMUND MAULER, Mgr. and Prop.
,1
Nelson's Drug Store
Telephone 1563
State and Center Streets
(Out of the high Rent District)
Compare Our Prices
NO GOODS SOLD TO DEALERS
IIORLHK MALTED MILK
50c size. 88c; $1.00 elze, 75c;
$3.75 size $2.08
SCOTT'S EMULSION
$1.20 size, 84c; 60c size 44c
FATHER JOHN'S MEDICINE
$1.00 size, 80c; 50c elze 42c
SAL HEPATICA
25c bot., 17cj 60c size, 84c;
$1.00 size 67c
1*111IJP MILK MAGNESIA
60c size, 38c ; 25c ·1ζβ 18c
LYDIA P1NKHAM
$1.00 size
.69o
IMPERIAL GRANUM
25c size, 10c; 76c aise, 52c;
$1.00 size 80c
POWDERED ALUM
Lb
CASCARA TABLETS
100 for
10«
LISTERINE
26c size, 17c; 60c elze, 84cJ
$1.00 elze 07c
CUTICURA SALVE
60c size . . 40c
CUTICURA SOAP
25c size 20c
SLOAN'S LINIMENT
25c size, 17c; 60c size
C ASTORIA
35c alze .
FELLOW'S SYRUP
$1.50 size
SWAMP ROOT
60c size, 84c; $1.00 aise
BEECH AM'S PILLS
At
GUDE'S PEPTOMANGAN
At
84c
22c
00c
.67c
17c
78c
BROMO-S ELTZER
At 8c; 18cj 88c and
EPSOM SALT
Lb
BICARB. SODA
Lb
10c
ltc
We Are Prepared For The Big Spring Drive!
KLEIN'S AUTO WRECKING SHOP
Parts To Nearly All Make ol CARS
■■■■ÏÉËÉËiÉiÉÉËiÉÎiÈP^ÉeÉei^^
HOGS AT $13.55 PER HUNDRED
AT CHICAGO MARKET TODAY
Special by United Press Wire.
Chicago, Feb. 28—Hogs sold for
$3 8.53 per hundred on the local mar
kets today. This is an advance of
twenty cents per hundred over yester
day's top notch and the highest price
ever paid on the Chicago markets.
Foodstuffs—potatoes, butter, eggs
and some vegetables—continued to
go lower today, following the boycott
inaugurated this week. Retailers
unable to determine just to what ex
tent the housewives would carry their
warfare, were reluctant to buy
heavily.
NO VICTORY SEEN
IN U-BOAT MOVE
Large Amount of Tonnage is
Sunk, but Nothing to Indi
cate that Germany Will
Compel England to Submit.
Total Tonnage Sunk
By U-Boats In Feb.
Special by United Press Wire.
New York, Feb. 28.—The total
tonnage sunk by German U-boats
since the ruthless warfare began
Feb. 1, 456,817 tons.
British ships sunk, 110.
Other belligerent ships sunk,
twenty.
American ships sunk, two.
Other neutral ships sunk, fifty
one.
Total ships stinky 183.
(Berlin press bureau reports of
Feb. 26 estimated January sinkings
by submarines and mines at 228
ships, total tonnage 439,500—nine
ty-one British, seventy-nine other
belligerents end fifty-eight neu
trals. Hostage ships 6unk since be
ginning of war 4,357,500 tons. Neu
tral ships sunk or condemned 469
ships, 641,000 tons.)
By J. W. T. MASON
(Written for the United Press)
New Yoriv, Feb. 28:—Germany's
campaign of unrestricted^fcbmarln
lng has been Jn^ojMfàTîaJHf—SWfiik
without <remonstra«Bgf its effective
ness for bringing the Allies to terms.
Serious damage has been done to
Allied and neutral shipping·, but not
sufficient to give real hope of victory
to the German government.
More than twice as much destruc
tion of shipping as has occurred dur
ing February must fall to the sub
marines i&oaUiiy .before a real dan
ger line of defeat may become visi
ble tô thè Allies: If the Germans
have put foriii their, best efforts dur
ing the past month, as is probable,
the February record cannot be seri
ously surpassed while the submarine
campaign proceeds. On the con
trary, the increase of precaution by
the Allies, including chiefly new mine
fields off the German coast, the more
effective arming of merchantmen and
the hastened construction of new
ships ought to give a slowly increas
ing advantage to the Allies.
Germany's largest total of victims
occurred during the early days of
February before the British govern
ment had made fully ready to meet the
U-boat menace. The rapid Improve
ment of the defensive methods have
been shown by the frequent falling off
In submarine victims during the last
days of the month. The restrictions
upon Imports into the United King
dom, announced by Premier Lloyd
George on Feb. 23, are in themselves
more than sufficient to counteract the
additional effect of the new submar
ine campaign beyond the average ship
ping losses that occured before the in
discriminate sinkings began.
If Germany's attack upon the ves
sels of neutral countries was to cease,
any unusual Importance of the sub
marine campaign would vanish. In
proportion to their numbers, merch
antmen of the Allied powers can take
care of themselves. It is the unarmed
neutral shipping that proportionately
has contributed most seriously to the
increased sinkings since the submarines
began to Are on all vessels at sight. If
neutral vessels arm themselves and de
fend their rights to traverse the seas
there will be a still further drop in
the number of submarine victims.
WHEN YOU
THINK OF
THINK OF
US
John W. Olsen Co.
Bertrand Ave.
At car barn. Phone 336
*~r
!
AUSTRIA BENIES
SINKING U S. SHIP
Ambassador Penfield at Vienna
Sends Austria's Official De
nial That One of Her Sub
marines Sank the Law.
Special by United Press ïFïre
Washington, Feb. 28:—Austria has
officially denied that one of her sub
marines sank the American schooner
Lyman M. Law, Ambassador Penfield
at Vienna, cabled the State Depart
ment today.
I The captain of the Law. in report
ing the sinking, explained that the
submarine bore neither flag nor
number. This fact coupled with the
fact that the attack occurred in the
Mediterranean, led to official belief
that the warship was Austrian, and
was looked upon as a grave compli
cation of Austrian-American rela
tions. The message to the State De
partment today while relieving some
what Austrian tension, tended to
tighten the German-American strain,
since it is believed if the attacking
submarine was not Austrian, it prob
ably was German. The Law's cap
tain, it was remembered, reported
(that several of the submarine's crew
j were Germans.
The Austrian situation remains a
puzzle though the government per
mitted sufficient news to leak as to
show that It Is preparing for a break,
and that Ambassador Penfield Is
quietly paving the way to get Amer
ican consuls and citizens out of
j Austria In case of a break.
Y. M. H. A. DEBATING TEAM
TO HAVE TRYOIIT SUNDAY

The members of the Perth Amboj
Y. M. H. A. debating team will hold
a tryout Sunday afternoon with ε
"pick-up" team in preparation for tb<
debate which will be held In Marci
against the Bayonne team. The local
men will take the affirmative of th<
subject, "Resolved, That Universal
Military Training be Made Compul
sory In the United States." The de
bate will be one of the several being
conductcd In the Inter-Associatlor
State Y. M. H. A. Debating League
The elimination method will be used
In this league.
"COPPER WORKS NIGHT"
AT THE Y. M. G. Α. T0NI6HT
Tonight will be "Raritan Copper
Works Night" at the local T. M. C.
Α., at which time employes of that
plant will have the full use of the
building. More than 500 men are
expected to take advantage of this
offer to enjoy a night at the associa
tion building. There will be bowling
matches, basketball games, pool and
billiard matches, swimming meets,
roller skating exhibitions, boxing,
wrestling and other sports. An elab
orate program is being arranged for
the entertainment which will be
given in the "gym." Refreshments
will be served by the women. The Y.
M. C. A. orchestra will play.
big si Bargains at
STORES HERE SATURDAY
Perth Amboy merchants are al
ready making preparations for the
unusual values which they will offer
to the public on Saturday—Dollar
Day. To say that all purchasers on
that day will get their money's worth
would be putting It mildly, for in
many instances great values will be
offered owing to the coming of spring
and with it large quantities of stock.
The Dollar Days which have been
conducted in Perth Amboy during
the past two or three years linger in
the minds of those who have taken
advantage of them as money saving
days. Although practically every
thing has gone up in price, the local
merchants will make special efforts
to give purchasers unusual bargains
PASS BILLToR $400,000 TE
INVESTIGATE FOOD PRICES
Rpec.al to the BYΚ S lit Ο KEWS.
Washington, Feb. 28.—The Housi
today passed the Borland amendmen
to the sundry civil bill, praviding fo
$400,000 wherewith the federal tradi
commission shall investigate enormou
food prices.
TURKS HMD PRESSED
Special 63/ United Press Wire.
London, Feb. 28:—British tWcpf
are giving the retreating Turks be
yond Kut-el-Amara no chance to re
form their columns, the pursuit Is
continuing and the retreating enemy
forces are being engaged on three
sides.
Guaranteed Bewtnff Machines at
Jensen's. ·"! Stats Ct All makes.
«57-10-26-oew-tf-W·
SMOBd Hand β Cylinder Everett
SEXTON'S GARAGE 1 STREET
Telephone 181
NOTICE!
THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK
OF PERTH AMBOY. N. J.
A eemi annual dividend of (6) six per
cent, has been declared, payable March
1, 1917, to etockholders of record Feb
ruary 26. 1917.
^^^JOHgJjO^OLRCaehler.
in Automobiles ForHire in
flh C. Johnson Qn
"U TAXI SERVICE Ίυ
591
ι ^
VAN SYCKLE
Limousins Tourtiur Cars
and Tula tar or Nttkt
EXPECT CONGRESS
TO GIVE PRESIDENT
POWER HE WANTS
Special hy t/nited Press Wire.
Washington, Feb. 28.—The House foreign affairs committer to
day upheld President Wilson's request for power to meet the in·
ternational situation—but with two important restrictions.
.As the House bill now stands it provides for granting Presi
dent Wilson, guns, gunners and $100,000,000—the guns and gunners
to be used to "proteet shijts and citizens of the United States againat
unlawful attack in their lawful and peaceful pursuits on the high
seas." The three proposed amendments to strip Wilson of power
to arm munitions ships were voted down as a sop to the entire
munitions ships crowd.
The committee report provided against using the federal war
insurance bureau in insuring ships carrying munitions. The next
step toward passage of the measure in the House is to get a rule
for expeditious action. The House may Avait, however, upon senate
action which is not due before late tonight or tomorrow.
The House will, doubtless, pass the bill in view of the fact ι hat
it makes use of the "other instrumentalities," that vague power
which congress felt might encroach upon its war making rights and
give the President too great power.
Representative Shackelford's minority report—practically a
peace at any price plea, closing with a prayer—said in part: "In my
judgment my interest counsels that we should forego our rights to
navigate the high seas, embraced in the war zones declared by Great
Britain and Germany rather than to wage war to enforce such rights.
However, if a majority shall hold a different view and our country
shall be plunged into that insane war. then I shall of course, stand by
my country to the last dollar and the last man. · · * May a merciful
God guide us in this hour of peril." j
A filibuster was brewing in the senate today threatening the bill
giving the President authority wherewith to protect Americans and
their rights. House members also were still gTudging as to the extent
to which they should grant him power. It is expected finally, how
ever, congress will give the President what he wants.
The Berlin report that Germany still holds the Yarrowdale
Americans prisoners, after weeks of misinformation on the subjeet;
the apparent imminence of a break with Austria: Chancellor Betbr
mann-IIollweg's belligerently interpreted speech against Americana,
and above all, the clear-cut "overt act" in the Laconia case, all eery*
to make Teuton-American relations more dangerous than for a long
time.
President Wilson, it was stated today, does not intend to caC
an extra session at this time. Twq delegations of pacifists
scheduled to see the President this afternoon. ]
BRITISH EXPECT U, S, TO |
iGT TO PROTECT RM&
Special by Vnitei Press HVe.
London, Feb. :8.—England expects
America to act. Editorial comment In
all newspapers reflected the attitude
of the general public today that the
Laconla cannot be construed other
wise than an "overt act."
With two Americans known to be
among: the dead, the American em
bassy was directing Its energy today
to obtaining definite information
whether the other sir Americans list
ed In the Laconla's crew, were among
the mleeing.
Jap Ship Arrive* Safe.
Special by UnlicJ Press Wire.
New York, Feb. 28.—The Hudson
Maru, Japanese steamship, which was]
captured In the South Atlantic by a
German commerce raider, arrived
here today from Pernarabuco. Her
captain declared stories Identifying the
raider as the cruiser Vineta were un
founded. He said he knew little of
her but was positive she was a com
merce vessel of about 5,000 tons.
Berlin Justifies Sinking.
Special by United Press Wire.
Berlin, Feb. 28.—First editorial
comment of German newspapers on
the sinking of the Laconia. justified
this latest example of the German au
marliT^^^rfare^b^Bu^^^pg^n^
torpedoed.
το report turn au. mil
MILITARY ΤΜΜΙΜί GUUSE
Special bu United Press IVlr·.
Washington, Feb. 28.—The seuatl
military committee today agreed to re.
port the army bill, carry in* an amend·
ment, providing for universal military
training.
STATE SUM MEET
A meeting· of the State Strert
Property Owners' Association wu
held last night In the offices of Jacob
Goldberger In State street. The mem
bers were enthusiastic over the
growth of the association, several neiw
members being added last night, with
the expectancy of many more in th·
near future.
The meetings In the director's room
of the Raritan Trust Company, which
has been offered to the association
will be put off until the work on that
building and the furnishing of th·
room Is complete. The next meetm®
will be held next Tuesday night.

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