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Perth Amboy evening news. [volume] (Perth Amboy, N.J.) 1903-1959, June 15, 1923, FINAL EDITION, Image 2

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Freeholders Award 3
Paving lob Contracts
NEW BRUNSWICK. Tune J5 —
The Board of Freeholders at theh
weekly session yesterday awarded
contracts wh h will add sllghtl)
over three mile to the permanently
Improved highway system of the
county. The municipalities in which
the improvements are to be made
will be notified to provide for proper
detours as the work is to be got
ten under way at once.
Two of the roads are to he o(
eight Inch reinforced concrete and
the other is to have a wearing sur
face of three inches of sheet as
phalt laid over a seven inch con
creted foundation.
The largest of the three jobs,
Main street. Milltown, was awarded
to the Utility Construction Company
of New Brunswick, the bid for the
work totaling $39,692 l'or about one
mile of pavement. The detailed bids
show that the asphaltic surface of
this road will cost $1.75 a square
yard while the seven Inch concrete
bast will cost $1.90 per yard.
The only other bid receiwd on
this job was from the Standard Bit
ulithic Company of New York which
submitted a figure about $5,000 over
the low bid. The entire cost of this
road will not be borne by the county
as the borough will pay approxi
mately twenty-five per cent of the
cost.
Harry N. Scott of Cranbury was
the successful bidder on the one
and one eighth mile or concrete roat
to be laid from the county line on
the Jamesburg-Englishtovvn road,
his estimate being $49,757.
The other bids submitted were
Graham & McKeon, Perth Amboy,
$56,611; New Jersey Construction
Companv of Hackensack, $34,123:
Riddle A Pfeiffer. Perth Amboy,
$33,479; Mercer Construction Com
pany Trenton, $53,975; Utility Con
struction Company, $51,107.
A firm from the southern end of
the state the Hill Construction Com
pany of Mt. Holly outbid the local
bidders on the smaller of the three
Jobs and was awarded the contract
of building the one and an eighth
mile of concrete road in the tovvn
ebip of Plainsboro for $38,723.
The other bidders on the Plains
boro project were as follows: Gra
ham & McKeon, $14,213; Utility
Construction Company, $39,594; H.
N. Scott, $39,113; Andrew Keys,
VVoodbridge, $49,664 ; New Jersey
Construction Company, $41,062, and
Liddle & Pfeiffer, $42,669.
A joint delegation representing
the North Raritan Improvement
Association and the Middlesex Coun
ty Farmers' Association, asked foi
the cooppratlo and assistance of the
county fathers in obtaining a "re
lief highway” from Metuchen to
Newark by the way of Roselle, in
stead of through Rahway and Eliz
abeth.
The delegation Informed the free
holders that the mnttter was taken!
up with the Edwards highway com-1
mission last, year, which promised j
to pay two thirds of the cost of j
building the road providing the j
counties through which the road i
passed would finance the remaining
third, though no action was taken j
wttMKmmmmamKmsMsmMHmmk
STEERING POST CONTROL
|
!
on YCMOfrmt i
wheels
Save your front tires. RTvrtf
Bate 7 5 ijfc of wear on steering
knuckle bushings. EXLO assures
aafirty and perfect control on
rough roads. No danger of a
•kid or turnover from '‘wiggly”
atecring. No jerking ami buck
ling of the front wheels. "A
norm gear feel, tn year it erring
tehee. "
j EXLO j
, |
J2.50 deposit with order,
balance after 10 day trial If
not pleased return end de
poalt gladly refunded.
Exlo Mfg. & Distributing
Company
lfl-I West 44th St., N. Y. C.
AGENTS WANTED
Vi i iiTiiiwiililnimirriiiN-'
■K——» -“ — .—-- ■
_
by the counties at the time.
No action was taken in the nif
ter by the freeholders yesterday, the
members of the board feeling that
it was a matter to be taken up with
the present highway commission, be
fore any kind was voiced on the sub
ject by the county authorities.
Improvements were also asked for
on the Pumptown-Oak tree mad by
the same delegation, and they wrere
assured by Road Supervisor John
Liesen that the road would receive
attention just as soon as the re
pairs now underway on Park ave
nue are completed.
A supplemental contract providing
for the rebuilding of catch basins on
tlie Perth Amboy Sewaren road was
authorized at a cost of $280.
Another effort is to be made ny
the freeholders to convince the
state road authorities of the need of
officers on the Albany street bridge
at New Brunswick empowered to en- ;
force the traffic laws and make ar- ,
rests if necessary. This action fol
lows the many traffic jams and minor
accidents that have occurred there
during the past few months.
The freeholders took the same
question up with the old highway
commission but were never able to
get results, but the feeling now’ pre- 1
vails that Commissioner Abraham
Jelin of this city will realize the
importance of the request and will
see to it that the bridge tenders are
given the pow’er as well as the orders
to properly regulate traffic.
Applications has been made to the
war department for the widening of
this structure by building on a four
teen foot addition to the downsream
side of the bridge, and the freehold
ers were formally notified yesterday
that objections to the project will
he heard on June 25 at which time
a decision on the matter will be ren
dered by the federal body.
Arthur Deter of Woodbridge was
named as the county inspector on the
Avenel road that will soon be under
| construction, at a salary of $6 a day.
The following report received from
the Raritan arsenal for the month
ending June 10 show’s the following
explosive materials to be in stor
age: Black powder. 2.300 pounds;
pyro cotton, 1,370.519 pounds;
smokeless powder. 5,458,885 pounds;
high explosive shells. 2,247.959; low
explosive shells. 307.209; shrapnel,
1.414.808; and loaded grenades, 3,
779,975.
WASHINGTON, June 15:—The
conference called by the American
Legion to consider the adoption of
a definite code for civilian usage of
the American flag met today for ac
tion on the report of a committee
appointed at the opening session yes- s
terday to formulate such a code.
Delegates from a number of patriotic j
and civic organizations are attend- *
ing the conference, which was ex- ’
pected to complete Its work today 1
by adopting, along with education
plans for its general observance, a ;
definite set of rules for flag usage :
to supplant the varied codes being :
advocated by patriotic and other or-1 r
ganizatlons.
OH. GIRLS!
b
tl
Meet “Shiner” Beggs of Glen
Ridge, N. J., voted the handsomest *,
man in Dartmouth College. Not 11
only is he the college’s Adonis, but Jl
also one of its best all-around ath- e
letes, being captain of the college 1
gym team. 11
0
V
- t;
r
d
- - f
* ■ 1
jf
Special For Saturday !;
Voiles - 15c Per Yard jj
1000 Imported i
Gingham Dresses
$2.37
20cPerYd. Amoskeog23cPerYd.
Gingham Shop
St., Between C. R. R. Depot and
Maple St.
ELKS FLAG DAY |
Ceremony Last Night at City
h'ali Park Most impressive—
Martin Is Speaker. I
|
Impressive, indeed, were the Flag
Day Exercises held under the aus
pices of the Perth Amboy Lodge 784.
Benevolent and Protective Order of
Elks, at the city hall park last night,
it which time Thomas F. Martin,
lecretary of state of New Jersey, was
he main speaker.
The complete program started
with a short parade from Elks rooms
m Madison avenue to the park, in
which the drum corp of the Third
Battalion Naval Militia, Boy Scouts
tnd members of the local lodge par
icipated. At the park the Elks took
heir places on the platform, while
he Boy Scouts formed a circle about
he front of the stand.
The first number of the program,
which was one of the best ever pre
lented in an event of its kind here,
were the introductory exercises by
Exalted Ruler A. F. Greiner and the
pfficers of the local lodge, who told
hose present in a few wards from
?ach the purpose of the gathering
ind what the American Flag meant
:o everyone attending.
This was followed by the prayer by
Rev. Wilbert Westeott, a selection by
Lhe Third Battalion Naval Militia
band, and the history of th. Ameri
can Flag, which was read by Past
[Exalted Ruler Emil Stremlau,
A feature of the evening’s affair
was the altar service conducted by
[Esquire Harry Ford and officers,
which consisted of four of the mem
bers erecting a Liberty Bell of
flowers in the center of the platform.
Bach member of the quartet carried
bis section to the table and with the
red base covered with roses, the Con
or nf white lillioy tliA ilnniA nf vln.
lets, and a cross piece of gold stars,
formed a beautiful flower-covered
tell. As each member added his sec
;ion to the construction of the bell,
he significance of that part was told
ty the one presenting it. This ser
vice was followed by "Auld Lang
3yne,” sang by the officers.
The Elks tribute to the flag was
hen given by Charles Simmen, past
sxalted ruler, who told the signlfi
ance of the flag, the meaning of
laeh colored section, and the flag
rom the Elks point of view. In his
tirrlng address the past exalted
uler told of the origin of the flag,
ts being the first to represent a peo
>le, rather than a monarch, and its
ong conflict and heroic struggle en
ountered until it expanded and gave
o this country a new life of Liberty.
Following Mr. Simmon's address,
liss Elsie Schrimpf recited "Old
Tag,’’ after which the Third Bat
alion Naval Militia band rendered a
election.
Secretary Martin, was the next
peaker of the affair, and in a very
aspiring talk told those present the
bjecta of the meeting and the Elks
impose of holding the exercises,
In the beginning of his remarks,
he secretary of state told of the 1,
00 Elks lodges who were fostering
Tag Lay exercises in all parts of
he country last night, saying that
he main purpose was to gather the
eople to hear the things to he said
bout the flag in order that the cit
enship of everyone attending might
s elevated to the stand from which
le highest of respect and honor
ould be given to "Old Glory.”
In further remarks he flaved the 1
American citizen or the body of 1
American people who belong to a •
class or who are In sympathy with 1
a class who use the American flag
in carrying out their non-American
ends, and who by their false doc
trines and teaching tend to destroy
this great country of ours.
"The American flag is for true '
Americans only" he said, "and its ‘
use in anything that is not wholly f
American is only intended by those '
scoundrels bearing it to destroy the 1
principals of our government.”
He then told of the love of the ■
flag by those who died for it in ]
Prance, and said that they died
with the idea and thought in mind
that their supreme sacrifice was the
compensation paid for the stopping •
of the war and the prevention of an
other. 1
The speaker then talked on the 1
help and support'to be given to the I
younger generation, as prescribed by ’
President H-rding, and added that !
the first lesson in the lives of Amer- '
icans in regard to their love and re
spect for the flag should be given in
icii jruui.ll.
Mr. Martin concluded by saying
tat he wished those present would
ave the meeting with the hope that
le story told him by an old In
ianian was rue, and that they keep
in their hearts and memories for
cer. The story he said was that of
te creation of the World by God.
i which he took seven days to cra
te the trees, water and land, and
n the seventh day he rested. "It
as on this day,’’ the speaker said,
that God came to the balcony of
le Heavens and looking down srail
ti, and where this smlie lighted, is
ur country."
The next number of the program
as the prsentation of $2,246.26 by
ast Exalted Ruler Harold E. Pick
rsgiil to the local Boy Scouts as the
esult of the recent campaign oon
ucted by the local order of Elka.
In presenting the money the Re
order told the boys that to raise
he money was like "taking candy
rom a child.” and that if more was
eeded the Elks would only be too
lad to come forth and lend another
elping hand.
The past exalted ruler then in a
ew added words told of the work of
lie Elks organization at the present
Ime. He said that in former years
he Elks were recognized as a body
pho were organized for a good time,
mt now they have become an organ
zation of serious responsibility, and
te pointed out the work done for
he crippled children and the Boy
Icouts of late.
He then reversed his words to the
Irive for the support of the Boy
Icout movement, and said that he
lad three reasons for taking a place
n the committee appointed to do
his work. “First, to show that the
day of the Elks organization is
hadowed by the great charitable
cork now being done in the commu
lities in all parts of the country,
lecond, because after looking at the
vay the local Boy Scouts have pro
fressed, and what they have accom
illshed in spite of their being held
town, I believe they will do great
hlngs with a lithe assistance, and
hlrd. because remembering that the
leople of Pe^th Amboy have always
[one over the top in assisting the |
Jnited States government during the
var, aurely they will come forth
vith helping hands for a movement
hat will develop good, honest Amer
can citizens.” the judge said.
"America.” was sung by the audi
.* ‘
_i_
BUSY BRIDESMAID J
Lady May Cambridge, who was
a bridesmaid at Princess Mary's
wedding and also at that of the
Duke of York, to Lady Bowes-Lyon.
has decided that she is quite grown
up and should wear her hear up.
too. This is the first picture of the
busy bridesmaid with her ne whair
mode.
I
ence after Mr. Fiekersgill's talk, and
the affair closed.
Much credit is to be given the
committee in charge of the arrange
ments for last night’s affair for the
smooth running order in which the i
program was presented. The follow
ing Is the committee in charge. ,T.
Alfred Compton, esteemed leading
knight, as chairman; Benjamin Jost,
esteemed loyal Knight, and Charles
Wiheralski, esteemed lecturing
knight.
CIVIL ACTIONS
ARE STARTED
Perth Ambqy Parties Figure inj
Circuit and Supreme Court
Suits
NEW BRUNSWICK, June 15 —A
series of court actions have been
started today against Perth Amboy
parties in the Circuit and Supreme
courts:
M. Trying Demarest, of Sewaren,
has instituted a. circuit court action
ngainst the Spa Spring Ice Company,
Fred Klllenberger, of Perth Am
boy, Hans M. K. Hanson, of Perth
Amboy, and Paul D. Kingherry of
Woodbridge, to recover $5,270, said
to be due for a foundation laid for
the leo company plant at Spa
Spring and also for the sum of
$2,725 for tho erection of a wall.
Morris Feldman, of the Madison
hotel, Perth Amboy, is the defend
ant In a supreme court action start
ed by the Bronx Provision Corpora
tion of New York for $726.98 with
Intorest from March 4. 1923, alleged
to he due for meats delivered.
The Oommerical Casulty Inaurance
Company is suing Alexander Sit- i
nicky of Florida grove road, for
543.12 said to he premium due on
nsuranre of car for year beginning _
December 21, 1921.
John A. Bullwinkle, of Pertli Am- .
>oy is sued by Severus A. Hagedorn, *
if Paterson to recover $303.85 said
o be duo on loan made September
, 1921.
Will Is Probated
NEW BRUNSWICK, .Tune 15. —
Tie will of Thomas Wade, of 309
Washington street Perth Amboy who
ied April 10 was probated at the
urrogates office today. It was
rawrt by Wade on a small sheet of
writing paper on May 26, 1921 leav
ng the entire estate to his widow
.ana. W. A. Clooney and Katherine
leppenstill were the witnesses.
i ounrv sear rnm'e in « rasn
NEW BRUNSWICK, .Tune 15, —
oseph Curran, John Coleman and
isher Van Dorn, three officers of the
ocal police force while riding in the
lurran car last night were slightly
njured when another car collided
pith the automobile occupied by the
lollcemen. In spite of the accident
he men who were on their way to
pork, occupied their posts as usual.
T letters of Administration
NEW BRUNSWICK, June 15. —
lurrogate Forman today issued let
ers of administration to Frank
<ovacs, Jr., of Fords on the estate of
tis mother Verona who left him a
egacy of $600.
DIVORCED
William Astor Drayton, grandson
of William Astor, has been granted
an interlocutory decree of divorce
from Mrs. Helen Fargo Drayton
above according to announcement
made by his lawyers in New York.
Another Oasts Dry
NEW YORK. June 15:—Another
New York oasis today went dry.
Continuing the government's war on
alleged wet cafes along the gay
White Way, Assistant United States
Attorney Cohen obtained from Fed
eral Judge Hough an order padlock
ing the Three Kings restaurant for y
a year.
Cool Ties
Four-in-hands, and bows in
the bright, cheerful colors of
summer 1923. Some of cool
foulard, others knit. All made
to the snug and true, and stay
there.
65c 75c $1
$1.25 $1.50 $2
*
Cool
* Underwear
Just the sight b£ a Rocking
chair union suit makes you feel
cool. It gives you all the com
fort that very light absorbent
fabric, perfectly fashioned, can
give.
Unlon $1
Suits.4> I I «.p 1 ,tj\J
Silky Mull CA
Union Suits ...... iPm.DU
ALSO B. V. 1)., COOPER’S
AND REIS UNDERWEAR
i
V* . '
COOL SUITS
Comfortable, Stylish
—for Summer
Comfort in their cool fabrics; comfort
in their trim lines and perfect fit; comfort
in their fine tailoring that assures lasting
shapeliness.
For young men, Sport Norfolks; snug
fitting, full chested, trim waisted sacks.
For older men dignified easy-fitting suits.
For every man, our guarantee of ab
solute satisfaction that's back of every
thing we sell.
$28.50 $30 $35 $38
BRIEGS-BUILT
PALM BEACH SUITS
FINELY TAILORED
$15.50
BRIEGS
SMITH AND KING STREETS
% __

Cool Straws
Every good shape, style,
weave and color—stepping In
for one of these cool straws Ir
the first step towards keeping
cool.
$2 $2.85 $3.85
KNOX,
ALL EXCLUSIVE STYLES
Cool Shirts
Cool weaves that wear well.
Cool colors that wash well.
Shirts that will give both pleas. W
ure and comfort because they JP
look good and fit perfectly. ^
BOTH COLLAR BAND AND
COLLAR ATTACHED
$1.50 $2.00
$2.50 $3.00
Truhu ^ O C fl
Silks./ > aPO.OU
Talk About
Stretching
Your Money
You’d never dream a
dollar would ‘ ‘ Cover so much
ground” as it does when it
helps purchase a
PALM BEACH
Arctic Breeze Suit
AT
$13
Correct, tasteful style,
fine tailoring and the recom
mendation of the label in
side!
IMPORTED MOHAIRS
at
$14 $15 $16,50
“Buy Dad a Tie”
FATHER'S DAY
JUNE 17th
We have them in Palm
Beach and Grays to match
your shirts and suits; at
65c
MEN’S BALBRIGGAN
SHIRTS AND DRAWERS
In All Sizes
At Each
45c_
Shangold’s
Toggery Shop
For Man and Boy
79 Smith St.
Opposite Strand
j
_
PAVLOVSKY’S MARKET
HIGH GRADE MEATS AT LOW PRICES
316 State Street Phone 27
Special This Friday and Saturday
___
Special 4 ft 1
CALI HAMS 111
Nice and leai; I
Large Size, Pound..
SPECIAL 4 BBS |
PORK LOINS I L I
by half or whole; I ■! A
Rib or tenderloin end; lb.. £
SPECIAL m p
FRESH PLATE BEEF
10 pounds; price • • • * • •
SPECIAL ft
CHUCK 1*U
For roasting;
5 lbs. for • USSU * l*Ui # "• MM • MXMWBM
SPECIAL 4 ft 1
POT ROAST I J 1
I Boston Roll; I €\
All solid meat; lb.. * ^
SPECIAL Of) l
LEGS OF LAMB # M
Yearling, Pound .
SPECIAL 4 f% | I
FRESH SHOULDERS | J |
OF PORK I / 0
Cali style; lb. . ■ £
SPECIAL 4*
FRESH HAMS ■■ ■■
City dressed stoek; g g
Small, lean; ^F ^F
Whole; lb... I
CHICKENS flTn
Fresh killed g 1%
For Soup or Fricassee g ■!
lb • ,••••••• • •taiej • i»xsj • ie.*AeA*. • ia*e ns
Special mm MM ±
LAMB FOR STEW J *
3 pounds g . I
for .. fcW
BACON
Gem Brand;
Dixey Style; lb
VEAL OR LAMB
CHOPS
Pound ..
PLATE |
CORNED BEEP n
Pound ..w 2
BEEF 4 ft
LIVER
Fresh; lb. I"
SPECIAL 4 ft
SKIRT STEAK I II
Pound ■ W
CHOP MEAT J
Fresh and pure; I /I
Pound .
SAUSAGE A r
Home Made; m
Pure Pork; lb. . » W
HAMS 4 fl <1
Skin Back; | U
Large size; lb... I
Whole or Half ■
PORK CHOPS a
Ready tat; M t
Nice and lean; lb fcfci
Would You Like To Take A Room In The Office Of ■
Some Larger Concern? Read The “Offices and Desk ^
Room” Column In The ews Classified Section
'

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