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Perth Amboy evening news. [volume] (Perth Amboy, N.J.) 1903-1959, December 31, 1924, FINAL EDITION, Image 2

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WOMAN'S WORK
\ LAW NOTICE
N'.vv Law Passed by 1923
Legislature in Effect To
morrow—Question Raised
TRENTON, Dec. 31.—At midnight
tonight the much discussed law
l mi seed by the 1923 legislature pro
hibiting the employment of women
In factories, bakeries or laundries
between the hours of ten In the
evening and six the r.ex; morning
becomes effective. The practical
operation of the law remains to be
determined. Today the question as
to whether or not the act carries a
penalty for the punishment of those
employers who may disobey it re
mained somewhat of a question
pending the final formal ruling of
the attorney general's department.
Unofficially the opinion seems to
prevail that the law fails in this re
spect and the question arose today
as to its effectiveness in view of this
situation. The “No night work law"
as It has been commonly termed is
a supplement to the act of 1912 reg
ulating the hours of employment of
females in industry. This pro
vided for a fine of from $25 to $50
for the first violation and for $50
to $200 for second and subsequent
offenses. In 1920 the original act
waa amended to provide for a $50
penalty for the first offense and not
more than $200 for others.
The law which becomes operative
today carries no specific provision
as to this phase of its enforcement.
It is a supplement to the 1912
statute. Whether it should have
definitely stated the penalty again Is
the question which has been raised.
It will be recalled that this is the
act which was the cause of several
aharp legislative battles. It was
originated by the Consumers League
of New Jersey and that organization
enlisted the New Jersey Women's
Republican Club In Its behalf as a
measure to conserve the health of
woman workers and possible moth
ers by preventing their employment
In manufacturing establishments
between ten at night and six in the I
morning, when vitality Is believed to
be at the lowest ebb.
F. Feickert, vice'
chairman of the Republican State i
Committee, as head of the woman's'
e>ul»-tha fight for the enactment
or the statute on humanitarian
grounds. The contest became a very
bitter one. William W. Evans, of
Passaic, as Republican floor leader
of the House In 1922. wa^ one of its
strongest protagonists. The next
year as speaker he was found array
ed solidly with its opponents. This
change of position caused a breach
between the speaker and Mrs. Feick
ert which became so wide that it
culminated In the speaker ordering
ths woman leader of his party off
tho floor of the Houae one night
during the session, when she was
there in the interest of the measure.
The act waa drawn to become ef
fective at this time in order to give
the manufacturers an opportunity
to adjust their working conditions
to meet the new situation thus creat
ed. W. C. Billman, secretary of the
New Jersey Manufacturers Associa
tion, when interviewed here, said
that he did not believe any elaborate
plans had been made by the heads of
Industry to meet the requirements
of the law. Inasmuch as business at
this time did not warrant night
shifts working anyhow.
State Commissioner of Labor An.
drew F. McBride said that all his
factory Inspectors had been notified
to see that the new law is obeyed.
He is now waiting the formal ruling
of the attorney general as to the
penalty phase of the enforcement
end of the act.
“We expect no trouble as to com
pliance with this act," said the com
missioner here. “That is the law
and It Is our Job to see that It is
carried out.”
When interviewed at her home In 1
Plainfield Mrs. Feickert, whose ef
forts were such a factor In the enact
ment of the statute, declared that she
imagined the labor department could
enforce the same kind of a penalty
as is imposed where It finds viola
tions of the nine hour day law. She
explained that in a week or ten days
inquiries may be mads by the Wo
men’s Republican Club of the New
Jersey Consumer’s League as to
whether the act is being obeyed and
if it Is not a move to see that iti
provisions are met may be started.
No one connected with the enact
ment or enforcement of the law
seeme to know Just how many wo
men workers and manufacturing
plants are affected by its becoming
operative. The department of labor
ha« not compiled any statistics on
the subject, but a rough guess plac
ed the workers at 2,090. Most of tho
plants where women have been em
ployed on night shifts are understood
to be In the silk and woolen Indus
try in Passaic county. However, it
is bellsvsd not many thsrs wjll be
affected at this time, beoause orders
are not so great as to call for night
work.
Glass workers in South Jersey are \
another class In Industrial occupa- |
tion which the act may hit. It Is
reported here that several such es- ■
tabllshments In the vicinity of Mill- ,
vllle and Bridgeton In Cumberland :
county have made plans to meet the i
new act. Slmiliar industry in Salem
county will be affected. The act
specifically exempts employees In
canneries throughout the state en
tMted In packing perishable food
products, such as fruit and vege
tables.
ENDORSE M'CRAN AS BEST
GUBERNATORIAL CANDIDITE
TRENTON, Dec. 31.—Former At
torney General Thomas F. MeCran,
of Paterson was endorsed today by
Republican State Senator Emerson
L. Richards, of Atlantic City. aa the
ideal O. O. P. candidate for gover
nor next year. MeCran. according
to Richards, would make such a cam
paign for governor that the Re
publicans could overcome the un
doubted advantage now enjoyed by
City Commissioner A. Harry Moore,
of Jersey City, who is assured of the
Democratic nomination.
When asked if MeCran would be
a candidate for the Republican nom
ination, Senator Richards at the state
house said: “I do not believe that Mr.
MeCran will make any personal ef
fort to obtain the nomination. I
know he would not enter a primary
' fight to obtain It. He has had all
the glory that goes with public of
fice. I do believe he could be In
duced to aocept the nomination It
the responsible leaders of all fac
tions would insist upon his becoming
ths candidate. MeCran ha# no per
sonal axes to grind; is not the eandl
If
date of any leader or would-bs lead
er and could bo depended upon to
give every Republican a square deal
and the people of New Jersey a
real governor."
Speaking of McCran’s availability,
Senator Richards said: "The only
man who can win In the Republican
party or for that matter who de
serves to win la former Attorney Gen
I eral Thomas F. McCran. It would be
foolish for any other Republican to I
even try for the nomination. Mc
! Oran is the only man who is well
| enough known and well enough re
spected and who has personality
enough to gain the attention of the
people of New Jersey. The Demo
I crats have been booming A. Harry
| Moore for the past three years. They
iare thoroughly entrenched and have
made unbelievable progress. It
would take a campaigner of th*
forceful personality of McCran and
with an absolutely unblemished pub
lic record to make any headway
against the Democratic nominee.”
TYPHOID FEVER NOT DUE
TO NEW JERSEY OYSTERS
TRENTON. Dec. 31—After thor
ough studies, the Stats Department
of Health today announced that the
Increase of typhoid fever In the met
ropolitan area of New Jersey cannot
be connected with the consumption
of oysters.
"The habit of the bivalve Is such
that when the ttmperature of the
water approaches freeslng point, the
oyster does not feed but hibernates
or sleeps, only opening Its shell
rather Infrequently to obtain a sup
ply of oxygen." said the department.
“Due to slowing-up of biological ac
tivities. therefore, the oyster has
little opportunity to Inject disease
producing organisms, and the possi
bilities of shellfish causing typhoid
fever during the cold weather
months is rather remote. Such out
breaks In the past, which have been
traced to oysters, usually occurred
during the warmer fall and spring
months.
“It is rather significant, even
though the sale of shellfish haa been
prohibited In New York City and
certain northern New Jersey cities
and the public repeatedly warned
against their consumption In the raw
state, that the typhoid continues to
increase in that secton. While In
New Jersey, outside of the metro
politan area, there is no increase In
the typhoid rate, not even in that
area within which the largest oyster
industry in the world is conducted.
This seems to afford an alibi for the
oyster.
“The State Department of Health
has made careful sanitary surveys
and bacteriological examinations o*
the important snellflsh areas of the
state, and as a result of this work
only those oysters from approved
areas are permitted to be gathered
and sold The badly polluted grounds
from which It would be dangerous to
take oysters have been condemned,
and the removal of shellfish there
from is punishable by fine and Im
prisonment. The department exer
cises continuous supervision' over
the sanitary conditions of the ap
proved areas, and. judging from a
survey of the state’s oyster beds. It
believes the oysters removed from
such sections may be safely con
sumed by the public without fear of
contracting typhoid fever.”
CHRISTMAS PARTY AT -
THE SALVATION ARMY
The annual Christmas party of the
local Salvation Army Sunday achool
waa held last night in the headquar
ters, on Madison avenue. More than
eighty children were present.
Following the singing of Christ
mas carols and a program of music,
the gueets were assembled about the
Chrlstmaa tree and Santa Claus dis
tributed gifts. Major John Allen,
divisional commander of the Salva
tion Army, was present and spoke a
tew words to the children.
Tonight a watch night service will
be held at the Salvation Army head
quarters. beginning at 11 o’clock
until midnight. Captain and Mrs.
R. Walker will be In charge of the
service, and the public Is Invited.
Sheriff Attaches Stock
NEW BRUNSWICK. Dec. *1.—
The sheriff’s office today attached
the stock of the Industrial Loan So
ciety. of 176 Smith street, Perth
Amboy, which is the property of the
National Equitable Investment Com
pany, of West Virginia and also
moneye due that company from the
Perth Amboy society In an action
brought by fifty-two plaintiffs and
Involving a arim of $77,430.
Ayres Will Probated
NEW BRUNSWICK, Deo. $1.—
The will of Kathryn Ayres, of Me
tuchen who died December 16 waa
probated by Surrogate Forman to
day. Adelle H. Ayres la named
executrix. Thg entire estate Is left
to a grandson Nathan H. Ayres.
The will waa drawn August $2,
1913 in the presence of Charles C.
Campbell and Mary J. Mundy.
METUCHEN WILL OPEN
BUILDING OFFICIALLY
METUCHEN, Dec. 31.—Promptly
at 8 o'clock tomorrow night, the ex
ercises in connection with the for
mal acceptance of the new municipal
building by the borough officials will
be started and It Is expected that a
large number of citizens of the bor
ough will be In attendance.
In accordance with the plans made
by councilman Luther E. Riddle, Jr.,:
chairman of the committee which
has supervised the building and fur
nishing of the new building, the
mayor and council will be escorted
to the council chamber by chief of
police Willard B. Hutchinson. A
prayer will be offered by Rev. John
Fenton, after which the meeting will
be called to order by Mayor Clark
son.
•'The Star Spangled Banner" will
be played by the orchestra and then
the address of welcome by Mayor
Clarkson. C. W. Fairweather, the
architect who designed the building
will also spenk. and David Ross tho
general contractor will then formally
turn over the keys of the building.
The ex-mayors and councllmen of
the town have been Invited to par
ticipate in the ceremonies and a
number of them are expected to ad
dress the gathering. The building
will then be thrown open to public
inspection. Bruns of New Bruns
wick will cater and the music for the
occasion will he furnished by the
Metuchen Club orchestra.
DENY MORGAN TERMINAL i
PLEA FOR INJUNCTION
NEWARK, Dec. 31:—The plea of
the Morgan Terminal Company of
Sayreville for a temporary injunction
against the Morgan Wrecking Com
pany for what the plaintiff alleges to
be unfair competition was denied by
Vice Chancellor Backes yesterday.
The court held that there was not
sufficient proof to issue the injunc
tion pending a final hearing.
The two companies have been
rivals for quite some time in the sale
of government materials at Camp
Morgan. Abraham Jelin, a member
of the State Highway Commission, Is
president of the plaintiff company,
which concern bought land and ma
terial at Morgan. The other com
pany, owned by Joseph Lehrer, is in
the wrecking business and also
bought ’and and material at the
Morgan camp.
The wrecking company, It is al
leged, leased ground right next to
tho terminal company and began op
erations. It is said that Lehrer used
signs made up in the same way as
those ol the terminal company’s so
that they would confuse buyers, and
also that the wrecking company’s |
salesmen In talking to customers
would mislead them from buying
from the terminal company.
Robert H. McCarter, of Newark,
counsel for the defendar.t company,
denied these charges. Frederick M.
P. Pears.:, of Metuchen, appeared foi
the Morgan Terminal Company.
Foley Will Probated
NEW BRUNSWICK, Dec. 31.—
Surrogate Forman today Issued let
ters of administration to Martha E.
Foley, of Perth Amboy, on the es
tate of her brother, John H. Toom
ey, who died at Perth Amboy, De
cember 19, of this year. The estate
Is valued at $576.
Substitutionary letters of admin
istration were issued to Andrew J.
Wight, of Perth Amboy, on the es
tate of Caroline French, who died
in April 1920, leaving an estate es
timated at $750.
WHAT IS PLAYING!
IN THE THEATRES
RCade’s Majestic—“Her Tempo
rary Husband” and vaudeville.
Readc’s Strand—Eleanor Board
| man and tlio Wonder Dog In “The J
i Silent Accuser.”
Ditinos—Buster Keaton in “The
Navigator.”
Crescent—Photoplays and vaude.
vllle.
At Reade’s Strand
The absurdity of claims that ani
mals In motion pictures are beaten
and abused In order to get them to
perform is pointed out by Edward
Faust, the owner and trainer of
Peter the Great the famous German
police dog appearing in the Metro
Goldwyn-Mayer production. "The
Silent Accuser," which comes to
Reade's Strand today.
Faust Illustrated his point by
striking at the dog with a club. The
dog did not cringe, or move.
“If I had beaten that dog In train
ing him he would have cringed
when I struck at him.” he said.
"Peter has never been struck with
a club, and has not even learned to
fear it.”
Faust also points out that the dog
would have killed him long ago if
he had abused it. for one of Peter’s
tricks is to leap at his trainer’e
throat. Faust also lays flat on the
ground, and permits the dog to
fasten his teeth In Ills throat. The
dog has been trained to do this
without leaving even a mark.
Peter has proved the value of the
right kind of training by his work
in "The Silent Accuser." which
Chester M. Franklin directed, and
adapted to the screen with the aa
sitsance of Frank O’Connor from
Jack Boyle's story. Eleanor Board
man. Raymond McKee and Earle
Metcalfe lead the cast.
At the DUmas
In “The Navigator," his latest
Metro-Goldwyn comedy. Buster
Keaton is : "en today at the Dltmas
theatre as Bailor who doesn't
know a jlboom from a epanker-gafr,
and as a deep sea (liver who thinks
he's an envelope and that swordfish
are over-size letter openers. Buster
has played a remarkable variety of
roles In his career.
"In "Sherlock, Junior.” he was a
detective-projectionist. In “Our Hos
pitality” he was the storm center
of a Kentucky feud. In “Three
Ages” he was a caveman, gladiator
and football warrior.
In "The Balloonatic” he was a
sky-hound and in “The Frozen
North" the companion of Eskimos
and other frozen faces. He was
a farm hand and mechanical genius
in “The Scarecrow” and a bunolog
ist among the Indians In "The Pale
face.” "The Electric House” re
vealed him as a bungling electrician.
In each comedy he makes. Buster
has played from one to seven or
eight different roles, and since his
film career started he has appeared
In more than a hundred different
characterizations.
"The Navigator” was written by
Jean Havez. Clydo Bruekman and
Joseph Mitchell and directed by Don
aid Crisp and Buster Keaton. Kath
ryn McGuire plays the heroine. It
is presented by Joseph M. Schenck.
Pass Bond Issue
CARTERET, Dec. 31:—A resolu
tion authorizing the issuance of
1125,000 bonds to cover the con
struction cost of the new memorial
municipal building, which is nearing
completion, was passed by the bor
ough council at the last 1924 session
held last night. Mayor Thomas J.
Mulvlhlll presided.
TTTE wish to extend to all
* * our friends our greet
ings and sincere good wishes
for a Happy and Joyous
New Year.
\
L. Kreielsheimer
128 Smith St. Perth Amboy
j Hotel Madison
j Extends
HEARTY GREETINGS
For
THE NEW YEAR
TO FRIENDS, PATRONS—We take this opportunity to express our
thanks and appreciation to the public who have so generously supported us
since the inception of the Hotel Madison under our ownership.
We have reoently negotiated the sale of this establishment. The new owner
Mr. Louis Vogel, takes possession at onoe. Mr. Vogel well known in thiB
city, has had a wide experience in the hotel business, and the success of the
Madison is assured with his fcuidanoe. We gladly recommend him to our
friends and patrons who have made the Madison their rendezvous, home and
dining place. We hope for Mr. Vogel’s success.
SOL. R. KELSEY, Manager.
DAVID 8NAPER, PHILLIP KLIVAN, Associates.
. i
i
MOVE FOR RECEIVER
NEWARK. Dec. 81—The Rosana
line Product Corporation In an order
issued by Vice Chancellor Backes
yesterday has been summoned to
show cause on next Tuesday why a
receiver should not be appointed.
The application was signed by Ernst
Zobel Company, Inc., which claims
to be the creditor in the sum o<
$29,000.
According to the papers filed in
the case, the Rosanaline Company’s
plant at Matawan has suspended op
erations in the manufacture of
chemicals. The amount of assets and
liabilities were not mentioned.
, ——i. ■
Do You Dread
to Shave?
s'
AValat AotoStrop Raaoa
makes shaving a pleascrsh
Blades are always sharp.
Complete outfits, $1.00
and op
Wet
Razor ^
Boynton Brothers .
and Company
Now At
2C0 Jefferson St.
WOODBRIDGE
THEATRE
Jan. 1, New Year’s Day
JACKIE COOGAN IN
“LONG LIVE THE KING’’
And a Comedy
v - *
DITMAS THEATRE
JL-/ JL JL lfl i & k/ Perth Amboy—Tel. 2796
TODAY—LAST TIMES
It'll Twist You Into
Sailors' Knots of Laughter!
THE JOLLIEST COMEDY
EVER SCREENED
JOSEPH M. SCHENCK Presents
BUSTER KEATON
THE NAVIGATOR
b
Jean Haver, Clyde Bruckman and Joseph Mitchell
Directed if
— BUSTER KEATON DONALD CRISP
THURSDAY—FRIDAY—SATURDAY
EMERSON HOUGH’S
“North Of 36”
Proclaimed by Press and Public as being better than “The
Covered Wagon.”
The All-Star Oast Includes
JACK HOLT, LQIS WILSON, ERNEST TORRENOE,
NOAH BEERY
Matinee Twice Daily at 2:15 and 8:80
S V
t
MajestiC ]
PERTH AMBOY TEL. 60
THURSDAY—FRIDAY—SATURDAY
BIG HOLIDAY SHOW J
5 GREAT ACTS OF £ «
VAUDEVILLE J
FEATURE PHOTOPLAY
“Her Temporary Husband” r
WITH . I
SIDNEY CHAPLIN, OWEN MOORE AND
SYLVIA BREAMER
You’ll laugh at the mix-up—'til you shout at the fix-up.
What a roaring comedy. Don’t miss it.
A First National Picture
(stasss&K
PERTH AMBOY TEL. PERTH AMBOY 361 1
— TODAY — U
RICHARD TALMADGE 1
“Stepping Lively” I
A Thrill-o-Drama with the World’s Best Stuntster M
THE FIGHT AND WIN SERIES fl
JACK DEMPSEY IN “TOWN HALL TONIGHT”
m* STANDARD ACTS OF m* IJ
\Q VAUDEVILLE I
1 PAVLOVSKY’S MARKET
Phone 27 316 State Street Phone 27
\ i
Holiday Poultry and Meat Sale—Best
Quality—Gut Prices
NOTICE
Through an error our advertisement was published in
yesterday’b issue without having the correct prices. The
following items bear the correct prices for this sale:
HAPPY NEW YEAR
I :
Free Souvenirs given to everybody with a 50c purchase
or over. j
=—== , '
I TURKEYS
j Fresh Killed Jerseys; lb.
29c
Others at higher prices
Fresh Hams
By w lole; lb.
25c
i
Fresh Pork
Shoulders
i Cali style; lb.
14%c
Beef Liver
Pound
_ 12c
Fresh Chopped
Meat v
Pound
: _12V2C _
Veal Stew
Pound
9c_
CHICKENS I
Fresh killed; IB ,
For Soup or Fricassee; lb. Y
_23c_I
Cali Hams
Fresh smoked; lb.
14V2C
Jersey Pork
Loins
Bib Ends; lb.
19V2C
Sirloin Steak jJ
_23c_ “
Breast of Veal
Pound
9c _
Fresh
Pigs Heads
Pound
I 5c
Also a lot of fresh killed Geese and w
Ducks at lowest market prices
‘I1 't
5 . tl

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