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The public ledger. [volume] (Maysville, Ky.) 1913-1968, December 30, 1922, AFTERNOON EDITION, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85038022/1922-12-30/ed-1/seq-2/

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' 4 I r
tf- 1 1 ' r
yOL LESSON bfore Tnl,,B of
is ItiJiViMrnl 1 KJ r
Ul ww.......... . d
a ' In
MsH!
tttx MAViVHtfe mti(J Lit)titJU-PAGt two.
f H. RATI)
Hory comprises data
(ho preparation ot the
fvlor's work at well as
Idly concerning the Sa-
and thirdly concerning
plan to expand and per-
fwork.
fst I
, class of data belong the,
ftiniBtry ot John the Baptist,
rand boyhood and baptism
Ration of Jesus himself.
prratives covering theao mat-
not only means of satisfying
xl human interest in the human
illty of the Savior, but also
' helps to the correct under-
ing and interpretation of His
His message, and His mission.
link Him with the world of
i life all about Him. They show
identification with mankind to be
real and complete experience. They
Uicate that He became subject not
inly to the law in the technical sense
attached to the term among the Jews,
fnor merely fo the moral law as the
J expression of the will of His Father,
Fbut to the laws of nature as well. "It
behooved Him," as the author of the
Hebrews puts it, "In all things to be
made like unto His brethren."
H'stcrical and literary investiga
tions of the lust few years have great
ly enlarged the knowledge of men re
garding the preparation of the world
for Christ They have brought into
view a vast array of facts of exactly
the same type and meaning as the gos
pel narrative of the birth of John the
I baptist and his ministry. John was a
forerunner of Jesus. The language to
be used by Jesus had been introduced
among the Jews, the political condi
tions to confront him and constitute a
part of His problem had been molded
the world of thought to serve as the
vehicle and auxiliary of His ideas had
grown up in the years immediately
preceding His coming, the knowledge
of these matters helps men today to
i affiliate Jesus with His environment
' and therefore to understand Him all
the better.
The gospel of Mary begins with a
bare mention in a single sentence of
this preparation. It illustrates what is
utely Indispensable to know of
avior. But the gospels of Mathew
Luke not only fill the gap left
cant by Mark, but also add vastly.
et not too much, to our understand-1
His life before the
work.
Regarding thaTarts of the gospol
story which portray the Savior ut work
it is unnecessary to sny anything more
than that they show the universality
of His Interest and the comprehensive
ness of His saving work. He minis
tered to the body by healing the dis
eases of men. He mingled with the
poor and by Bharing their poverty he
Instilled the conviction that poverty
might be made a means of good". Ho
ministered to the minds ot men by
training Ihem to see God their heaven
ly Father In the world of nature about
them as well as in the events of human
history. His interest ns a teacher did
not lie In the facts he used as illustra
tions, but In the one great truth they
illustrated, namely, the fatherly love
and care of God.
Then Jesus ministered to the souls
of men. Ha preached the gospel of the
kingdom. He persuaded men to accept
God as their heavenly fatherly ruler
and live in peace with their fellowmcn
Finally the gospel story shows the
Savior as a far-seeing leader who had
a viBion or the worm saved rrom sin
and brought back to the knowledge
and fellowship of God. 1 Jesus therefore
made his call for workers. He saw
the harvest great The need Intense
He called for laborers and enjoined
them to pray that the Lord of Harvests
should send forth laborers into His
harvest
(.in - w. t
COLORED CITIZEJi'S.
"The Five" entertained with a din
ner party and dance Thursday eve,
December 28. The guests danced at the
home of Mr. L. B. Henderson and were
served at the Melrose Tea Room. The
party was chaperoned by Prof. W. H.
Humphroy, Mrs. Katie Wood, of Chi
cago, and Mrs. L. S. Henderson.
Prof, and Mrs. E. M. Gentry, of
Portsmouth, Ohio, are the holiday
guests of Mrs. Gentry's parents, Mr.
and Mrs. Arthur Whaley.
Misses Elizabeth Anderson, of Chi
cago, and Allene Gray and Gwendoline
Overly, of Dayton, Ohio, are visiting
relatives in this city ,
Miss Ambrosia Beckatt has returned
to Dayton, Ohio, after spending Christ
mas with her brothers,
Mrs. Katie V,rood, of Chicago, is vis
iting her daughter. Miss Ashby George
and Mrs. Charles Harris. .
Messrs. Henry and Porter Jackson
have returned to Portsmouth, Ohio,
after spending Christmas with their
parents.
Miss Bessie HIggins is visiting in
ng of Christ by prefixing accounts of Lexington and Woodford county.
A good New Year's resolution is to
road the Dally Public Ledger every
ovening before retiring. It's not the
biggest nowspaper but It- Is the best
local home-towu paper. Any local
news ot general Importance will be
found in its columns.
x
The Public Ledger donates Its space
each Friday to the publication of the
church announcements. If the publish
ers of this paper are liberal enough to
donate this space, the pastors ot the
various churches, should be consid
erate enough to have their notices in
this office on time. In the future only
such notices as arc in this office by
noon Friday will be published. This is
final. Notices reaching here after Fri
day noon will be consigned to the
waste basket
x
The announcement of the Watch
Night service at the Third Street M. E.
church reminds us of the night at such
a service when the boys stopped the
town clock and a certain pious old
sister prayed for more than an hour
waiting for the clock to strike twelve
and announce the end of the old year
and tho birth of the new.
x
Progressive farmers of the Aberdeen
neighborhood are to have a Farmers
Institute in our neighbor town within
a few' days and some of the leaders in
agriculture of the great state of Ohio
are to address tnem. mis snows r
progressive spirit among our neigh
boring Ohio farmers and we congrat
ulate them upon their efforts to im
prove themselves in their life's work.
They tell ns that Maysville lawyers
before other bars are always anxious
to get into trial and get their cases
finally disposed of but they have cer
tainly been acting altogether different
at their home bar for the past two or
three terms of Circuit Court There
have been fewer cases tried in the local
court during the past two years than
in any other court in this section. Many
of the cases have been compromised.
It is true, but te most of them went
over for continuance.
Bargain Nigh-Lights in s Our Inter-Holiday
tock Taki
' i m.i i m ip trnUi in i ilit -:' "
Sal ! ;
moi iwmiiju Bivta n a ARE AiSO BUST FI
uaix, ntLj uttKLUUhEl) AJiD LISES THAT ABE 8(11 OUT AND WHICH
m iwiujs muuus twu STAl'LKS ASD SEASONAL THINGS AHH
7.-f A 1 J"'0 JlITL. DAT TO DAT CtflOD THINGS ABE lllRE WHILE OCR STOCK
TARING IS IN PROGRESS. COME TOMORROW OB lgXT DAT OB COME CH DAT FOB A SUA EE
i.i ma srii.ai;ii SATIVUM.
DEPLORE NOT THESE SHATTERED FBICES-Jf AKE ADVANTAGE k THEJt
White Lily Diaper Cloth, 19c & 23c Yd
24 and 27 Inches wide, regulnrlv sold at 23c and
30e yard. Fine quality. J
29c Huck Towels, 3 for 69c
Large sizes; extra good qi'nllty; bleached.
35c Pillow SI Is, 3 for 69c
FING BARGAINS THAT
ILL BE DISCONTINUED.
FEELING THE KEEN
Limit of six to ea
avy quality.
19c Unbleached
Heavy quality,
Superfine values.
cloav spun and full width
DAILY SALES at
UBEflTY
WAREHOUSE
Our average since the opening has been
.45. Highest dollar paid in CASH for
pound of tobacco sold. Let Jones sell
tobacco for you.
.e Liberty
Warehouse
JOIfXl, Sales Manager.
DAN HARDY, Auctioneer
uy a Phonograph
ig heard and seen the new STRAND CONSOLE would
j Our Daily Poem
A NATURAL COWARD.
1 01' Mistah Trouble, he come Broun' one
day
An' say, "I's gwineter git you, so you
better run away!
I likes to see you hustle. Dafs the way
I has my fun.
I knows I kin ketch up to you, no mat
ter how you run!
I says, "Mistah Trouble, you has been
a-chasin' me
Ever since I kin remember, an' I's tired
as I kin be.
So I's gwineter stop right her an' turn
aroun', a-facln' you,
An' lick you If I kin an' fin' out Jus'
what you kin do."
Mistah Trouble, he looked mightily
ashamed,
He acted like a buckln' hoss dat's sud
denly ben tamed.
An' den he turned an' traveled off,
a-hollerin' "Good-day;
I ain't got time to fool aroun' wlf folks
dat acts dat way."
Washington Star.
COLOBED CITIZENS.
The following officers were Installed
Tuesday afternoon. Burns Chapter, O.
EL 8.:
W. M. Mrs. M. J. Patton.
A. M. Mrs. M. El Howe.
Cond. Mrs. Elizabeth Fields.
A. C. Mrs. Jessie Turner.
SecMrs. H. L. Anderson.
W. P. C. N. Braxton.
Adah Mrs. E. D. Owens.
Ruth Mrs. C. B. Owens.
Esther Mrs. Sudle Morton.
Martha C. B. Humphrey.
Electa Mrs. Samanthc Thomas
$40 and $45 Silk Lined
BOLIVIA COATS
customer. Full sixes.
luslin, 14c Yd
Six wonderful Fur trimmed, imported Bolivia Cloth Coat have been marked down)
materials. The styles are bran' new, the colors in much wanted browns and reindeer. 1
dous values and sure to be taken quickly.
to bare cost of
icse are tremen-
Lcdger Win Arts Tr
Lien plays all makes of records perfectly. We
i 0. K. RED SEAL liEPfllilW . Tftn h TM.
jany machine. Just received a fresh ahipiuent of
im, a exclusive u. jv. recora. ve will reserve
lr Christmas delivery. W introduced the first
i.. f. iii-
worlds, best maki'S. I'LAYKR PDANOH.
ired by Factory frunrantees, l'lavere, Uepro-
m $289.00 Y, 0. B. Faotory to 12300.00.
V orr Banrtientitlva A iu tiifr...
KOT DUE TO SEX ALOE
Maysville Women Have Learned The
Cause of Jinny Mysterious l'alus
an Acnes.
Many women have coma to know
that sex Isn't the reason for all buck.
aches, dirty headaches and urinary
Jisorders; Hen bavt these troubles,
too, and often tbey coma from kidney
wsaauess. to live simply, eat spar
ingly. take better care of one's self
and tO us Doan'i uldney pills, is
bound to help bad kidneys get better.
There la no other remed yso well-rec
ommended by Maysville people. Ask
your neighbor!
Mrs. U. U Mattloalr. 207. West Bee
ond street, Maysville, says: "I was in
oaa condition wiu my tack and kid
neys. 1 couldn't set my orousr rest
at night owing to the dull misery in
my back. I waa fuellug so miserable 1
o(ien bad to let my boueework go un
dou. I waa dltsy by spells and auf
ferial from rueumatlo pains. 1 waa so
bfyl auluVt walk without pushing
a V in front or m and my lower
ore painful. My kldneya were
'edition owing lo lb sir lrru-
Auoiiier o niif fsmiiy bi
Muusy nils eu n ruil
mil i.
have t
tf 'imu. .
me to and t 0 Wood &
re for couple ot Luim
m I aa all irlahi I
uc u.m Ixttit s aud
NwllllllMly," I
all awaUra- Dual
rue4ysi
'''t j"M ii
FIXD Tora SIZE ASD
TOC FIXD A BARGAIN
The holiday crowds bought and bought In our
dress section and we've a limited quantity In
broken lines and sizes. They've all been reduced
in price for quick disposal. Save to H on
dresses NOW! It's a glorious chance.
Children's pm
$3.98 to $10.45
More good news for parent of girls. Unheard
of low prices are cow in ordrl of children's Coats
of Chinchilla, Velour, Wool cloth and Bolivia.
Sizes ranpe from 4 to 12 yeaq4.
SILK FIBRE HOSE
48c
Regular 65c quality in black or
brown; all sizes.
MEN'S DUESS HOSE
10c 12c 23c
Seamless and stainless. Cotton
and lisle thread.
LADIES' HATS
Choice of all remaining velvet or
silk hats
GIRLS' BEATER II ATS
' $2.29
Regularly sold up to $4.00.
vell
SILK WAISTS
Lovel silk Waists worth up
J5.00 for S2.9S. New shades
styles. 'Each a barcaln.
' PLAITED SKIRTS .
XJS fl
MaWy bere worth twice the p).
Limited quantity; no two allkt,
WMk
MEN'S
Men's $6 Chain Stitch
SWEATERS
PIXL-OTEB STYLE. DABK COLOBS AjiD COLLEGE STBIPES.
Pure unadulterated wool pull-ovci Sweaters. The big roomy
kind. In all sizes up to 46. Nothing Uko hem ever shown at the price.
Boys' Jersey Sweaters
Blue and dark red, with contrasting collar. Quantities limited.
sizes rrom zs to Z4.
; .
1 May:
I son.
Cnni
I
1
BflsMBC IHHsHBaBHBSlBB
SARGArxS
loth Capa 48e
press ShlrU Ke
ktte Gowns ..L..IU3
ork Shirts ..L...tS
hnelette Pet Vi Me
EB ASD Fl'LLT I i f
pJfTEED J yfJ
Wartment In I I
Aot good rea- f 1
apartment In
tor good rea-
Ais the secret
Boy'a all wool Jerseys f 1.79.
The greatest Clothing values in all-wool wof sted Men's Suits you'ever
saw. Men's and young men's models, tailorefl to perfection and guaran
teed all wool. These are all of trood weight mnh cnmP hflVP ivuf noire nl
pants. Pencil stripes, two-tone and mixed pjlttein effects all shown, also
a ap enuiu 101 oi neavy aii-wooi serges, bee them for real values.
you ii save a live dollar bill easily.
MEN'5 -PANTS
All-wool and Worsted Pants in now
styles aud patterns, cut correctly and well
made. 300 pairs to select from at
$2.98 and
$3.98
it
7lannel Shirts
Ufeavy Shirts, with one and two pock
eta, infftan, gray or blue.
; 1 .89, $1.98
did s". worth regular $5 the pair.
Cord'lui. Calf, rubber hla.
Sielette
Work Shirts, grey or navy
98c
u secret.
terjnbvosAf vsmar-
Hil In quality and rnl style, splen-
h regula
, rubber
$3.69
Will's Radio Oxford $2.98
1 In Black Only. I
of Black Calf wliA patent
leathel'Radlo" trimmed topknd tip.
6 Shiynd clever in style.
Wren's Black Yici M
ice Shoes $3.98
Eloeait quality, made on Oooiear
welt, nirn In stylo. An exceaent
value.
Ms Leather-Lined
Dress Shoes $3.98
Either black or brown. Nobby stjl
and a roal welt shoe. The best vak
-In Maysvll'e-
Men'sfress Shoes $2.98
Tan ol black; medium toes; all
lenlliL-r Jf and oak solos. Rubber
heols. I'
irome Elk Nigh-Top
hoes $4.98
nlar f!JU0 Value.
iwn HiPh-Ton Shoes
I w
h; all leather.
$2.98
an Lace Shoes $1.98
ela. Special at .'
Men's ( Boys' Rubhcots
Ounrsnilf' Pure rubber and abso-
lutoly flii l
Men's u
ft
Rnv's n
Buckle!
Misses ti
Rubber! i
otmsuf
Pay Caoh and Pay lLoao" Got Moro For "STou
ft a
Xlonoy
f dCk XTTry t fSnr' Lmm. JS tVL-.-J. Trm.ri.lt 0. i f I In Out
W W I mi .ki ft J & iLI 17 1 r 1 i ITT'f 1 1 IT " " - ' w 1 . "
w r ssF essj. a w air W - - aaasassV Bfaasai mm n U amss. UX
Ohoe gepayfrn
V
A
I i
paai

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