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Gallipolis journal. [volume] (Gallipolis, Ohio) 1837-1919, November 28, 1850, Image 1

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OURS
J.
Jll
JLJo
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Published by James IXarper.
"Truth and Justice."
At ft ao in Advance
Volume XV. Number 52.
GALLIPOLIS, OHIO, NOVEMBER 28, 1850.
Whole Number 780.
OA.
THE JOURNAL,
ro
la published every Thursday morning
-T1T JAWES HARPER.
1 Telegraph Building, Tublie Square.
il. .
Tiims:
I copy one yenr.paid in advance, tl 60
1 if paid wi'hin the year, ; 8 00
tot CtvBS, Four copies, , . f 5 60
Six " 8 00
, Ten " ; IS 00
" The person getting ud a club of txh
win be entided to one copy gratis. o
long as the cluh continues by his exer
tions. The cash, in these cases, must
Invariably accompany the names.
$1 00
Adtertisiko:.
One square 3 insertions.
Each subsequent insertion,
One square 8 months, 4 01
? " 1 year. (01
-"To those who advertise largftr a Iibe
ral reduction will be made.
November.
BY P. C. SHANNON
Oh'. November, bleak November,
. -Thou saddesc month of all.
Thou m archest on with solemn step,
And bearest summer's pall!
At midnight hour on Hallow'en,
'As old October dies.
And graves pour forth their mystic
iruups, y-
-We hear thy plaintive criesr
Ok I I J t- XT ClT.. I
Where now the golderhours.
I L- 1 1 . . .
That laughingly danced o'er the meads,
Or dallied with the flowerst
The budding sweets of May and June,
aay whither have they flownT
And where are now the hopes that
.-awell'd
- Bright August'a bursting rone!
Oh! November, lone Noember,':
- Al sombre is thy brow!
No voices of merry birds
Float through the forests now.
The winds sport with thfallen leaves
Or rush athwart the mountains top
Where storms unfold their wrath.
Yet November, brief November,
f A warning voice thou hast!
Thou speakest of those mysteries,
' The Future and the Past;
And ever as thou swer pest on
w no moaning on thy wings.
'Alidst
Its shadow o'er us flings
bnghtest joys, the thought ol
BY P. C. SHANNON Imaginary Evils.
Let to-morrow take care of to-morrew;
Lave things or the future to fate:
What's the use to anticipate aorrowt
" Like'g troubles come never too late!
If to hope overmuch be an error.
"Tis one that the wise have preferred; I
And how often have hearts been In ter-
' Of evils that never occurred!
Have faith and thy faith shall sustain
:t ; thee ;. .
Permit not suspicion and. rare
With invisible bonds to enchain thee.
But bear what God gives thee to bear
By his spirit supported and gladdened.
Be ne er by "forbodines" deterred)
But think how oft hearts have been sad-
' - dened -
By fear of what never occurred!
I
LXsi io-orrow take care ol to morrow: I
Short and dark as our life may an-
Pear- 1
t - , , , . i
ma, mue u sun aarxer hy aor-
Still shorter fcv lnll ,nA f.,i
Half our trouble, .m half
- j i . . ' . 'I
"no onen irom D esines eonrerred I
Have weahmnk tn th ;M
., . rr
7 sinn i
( Of evils that never occurred! '
' :
. Udiaic Kemaihs. In mak nff an
I
xcavat on for a lar. tnr. .nJ
, .
warehouw tor our friend Geo. Wal-
I Tl . ... .- . O
C,JSH, tne worxmen
came, upon a number of skeletons.
evidently of Indians. The skulls of
most ol them were perforated nn.
rently with arrows, or fractured by
the blow ot a tomahawk. One of
the skeletonsmust have been tW P .
distinguished character, as there were
on the finger bones of
. , . "
Sfetw) fifttr inn rt L;i . i I .1
Wlllo Ine
taaWSr- WW
" - were
also found.: Near neofthe skeletons. l.Z
a coppei- kettle of some two or three gal
Ions capacity, fii'ed with tobacco and
knif. fr,nA h t.
lacco was f course In a state of decern-
position. Near another skeleton was!
found a brass kettle, weighing three I
J. V.J , A
pouuuo, wmtu una inn a quantity on ii
meal made of parched corn or maize, in
mw:an"1"' P"" rvn hod. rrom the
tl-.. The bon.of on- .Ve!.i
Mrftrf, heinU r ,u v.
about seven act. We, htm m our non.
tessioa aersrtl f tie trinket referred
to above. Ilhnou Organ, -..t -M . ,, I
From the Ladies' Companion.
ANGELINA'S FAINTED.
of
was of
'Don't speak oi 'em,' cried Miss
Angelina Daffy. 'I'm certain of it
If 1 were only to look at a Hotten
tot. I should faint I must taint.'
'Fiddlededee,said Miss Lillywhite:
and there was a hush a pause in the
cnnveriation; for when Miss Lilly
white exclaimed 'Fiddlededee,' it be
hoved thoughtless young ladies to
look to themselves. Now.Miss Daf
fy had a great talent for fainting.-
rerhaps the talent was originally a
natural gilt; nevertheless it could not
be denied that a frequent and earn
est cultivation of the endowment
had brought it to perfection. Miss
Daffy, at one minute's notice, could
faint at any time, and upon any sub
ject. She could faint at either ex
ireme oi me day isini a. oreaxiasi,
or faint at supper; could faint with
equal beauty and truthfulness, wheth
er the matter to be fainted upon were
Klflrlr KaaiIa np . KlnftL kirt m twll
or a bullfinch. She had wonderful hd
. r .u u :. . l the
ed
as
her
can
as
I
.tuj :u in..k-....j :.u
one
beerr
a despotic sensa of their own genius,
she now and then employed it a lit
tle out of place. Vanity, however,
is a human weakness. For a philos
opher, to his own satisfaction, has
proved, that' the peacock takes no
pride in its own effulgent glories,
but all unconscious of their beauty,
spreads them because it was ordain
ed to do so; and, after all, had Miss
DaflV been philosophically examined .
:, I f:. -L - I n
uPn ner proneness to faint, she
would have attributed the habit to no
self-complacency, but to the simple
nut inevitable truth that she was
made to faint. She would not have
recognized any beauty in the art of
fainting, but merely the natural con
sequence that to faint was feminine.
Eve, she thought, was made lor tal
volatile.
Miss Lillywhite was a spinster of
seven-and-lorty ! am six seven
eight-and-forty, next Birth-day,'
Miss Lillywhite would blithely ob
serve, as the year might be. And
this gay veracity was the mors pleas
ing in Miss Lillywhite inasmuch as
she might have passed for forty; nay
had she stickled ever so little for it,
she might have got off with six-and-
thirty at most, a happy, blooming
six-and-thirty; for Miss Lillywhite,
r.nv
,ike a truo Engiish woman, carried
111 ner umaning oeauiy ine assertion
of her British race. How much tri
umphant beauty all over the world
lades and yields as teens blow into
twenties, and twenties wrinkle into
thirties! Now, your truly beautiful
English woman, with her carnations
and lilies will carry her colors ud
o two score and-teti. Nav, we have
known some veterans, bloomin
whh a sprinkling of years overtyran
nous filtr. And Miss Lillywhite was
as jocund as she was handsome. It is
said there is no better preservative
against the melancholy changes
wrought by time than honey. We
know not whether Miss Lillywhite
was acquainted with the Egvptain
truth: it nothe had unconsciously nc
ted upon the unknown recipe.and had
preserved hersell in the sweetness v
I: -- - . 1 t .
nor uiyposmoifr in me nonev 01 ner
goodness.' She was a oattern nld
maid. Yet a nattern. u urnnM
hone, never to he followed fr it
cnh mrmmn mkk .L I
"vi t. nvj iimBc luo real
w-,Ve and mothers. Kf; r -.11..
T"". ' renasoe weaic.s,
5,'ou,u . rcmain a s,ng' perleclion:
alone in sweetnee anrl tu.ir t
. ...
show what celibacy and ait can do:
i .. . , .
w auuiocu as lampies, dui never
dded to,
Miss Lillywhite was an old school
,c,,uw mrs- uanys ana was
nacfo.n Ik. a . I
f",u6"rau" ume wan ner
eany inena and am v. Now An-
naff. JJ'
. J " rB". vicaiuio,
with more goodness in her than she
dreaml of had, as we have indica-
'ed, this weakness: she must faint;
and carrying out this will, as a first
principle, she had duly fainted,
through the whole round of holidays.
She haJ fainted at snan-rlmtrnna on
Christmas-eve fainted.verv emphat
found iuiimvui livyii qui m ocu uiiuci
. . . . . r .
memistioloeon Uhnstmasdar faio
whlB" the bells rang in IS50-.nd
--, j ,.j i
" prev.neo upon
. .c . " ,oon, 00 lwellth
n,ght- 'Angelina's faintedr had be
pontaininir come household woids in the home.
8tea(1 r lh Daffy's.
And So, can it. be wondered at.
that the iniren nous Mis. TJIIwhitm
.... . . . . "j
mis last threat ol Angelina's to
faint at a Hottentot should . rebuke
maiden with more than ordinary
wn,te en mHcn. provoked;
eveaoa the previous Sunday, when
Angelina had rnanaced to faint at the
clergyman a yery handsome, meek
young man, who preached a maiden
who,
with
orbs,
with
and
her
and
of
would
taint
side
ment
white,
it's
you
solved
so
a
in
her
suffer
might
worst.
smd
dear,
used
very
my
little
general
were,
too
joy
To
don't
hear,
did
and
you
na
she
less,
Ivwhite,
'I can
joy
went
there
ting
faintedl'
my
cruel
maid
looking
sweeny
faint
should
own
existing
fore
such
withal
looks,
elderly
gradually
sermon with great promise of prefer
mentMiss Lilly white rouIJ only
scold the maiden into firmness, by
threatening to give her op, unatten
ded, to the care of the beadle.
Wherefore, when Angelina, return
ing to her weakness, expressed her
self ready logo off at the very Iiok
a Httentot therefore, all previ
ous provocation considered, can it be
wondered at that the patience of
nM SP ,
new and paint
'Fiddlededeef We think not; and
take up the stich of our little story.
Fiddiedodee.'said Miss Lilly white.
Miss Angelina looked surprised
amazed and gradually became very
deeply wounded. At first, she rais
her eyes towards Miss Lilly white
though doubtful of the truth of
impressions: but the set, stern
features of Miss Lillywhite if vou
couple the expression of stern
ness with tr thought of a clear,
bright, open iace, bright and clear
Dresden China convinced Ange
lina that it was the ladv visitor who
What, under
pamtul circumstance,
11 . 1. , . f trt
couu Angelina ooi nv. sne leu
upon mo sirengui ui ner wean
ness: she instantly made an ostenta
preperation to faint. Her
eyelids were slightly tremulous she
swallowed one sob her neck took
swan-like curve, and and, in
another second, there would have
the old, old cry of the house of
Daffy 'Angelina a fainted!'
rim-
Mis Lillywhite fairly exploded with
Miss Lillywhite jumped from her
and resolutely passing Mrs,
made direct to the sufferer.
half conscious of the attempted
rescue, was minting all the faster.
'Angelina,' cried MUs Lillywhite,
a restorative shake, 'this is af
fectation folly hypocrisy n on-
Miss Angelina Daffv opened her
and in a moment sat upright,
her pretty cut nostril dilated,
the tear that was coming into
astonished eyes almost frozen,
indeed, altogether, in such a state
amazement that she must no, she
not faint; it was not a time to
when so cruelly offended.
Miss Lillywhite drew her chair be
Angelina, who was every mo
hardening in dignity.
'My dear child, said Miss Lilly-
'you must give up fainting
gone rut ol fashion.'
'Fashion, Miss Lillywhite! Do
think that feeling
riddlededee, again repeated Miss
Lillywhite; and Angelina sternly re
not to say another word to
strange a person to so unpolite
visitor. Angelina crossed her arms
resignation, determining since
mamma would not interfere to
in silence. Miss Lillywhite
bo rude might say her
:
When I was eighteen, your age,'
Miss Lillywhite, 'and that, my
is nearly thirty years ago, I
to faint too. I enjoyed fainting
much; indeed, my dear, I ques
tion if ever you take greater pleas
ure in fainting than I did.
PlcasureP exclaimed Miss Ange
lina. 'Who could remain dumb un
der such an imputation?
O, I know nil about it pleasure,
dear,' said the remorse'ess Miss
Lillywhite. 'You see it gave me a
cousequence; it drew upon me
notice; it made me, as it
the center of a picture; and it
a pleasure not a healthful one,
certainly, but still a pleasure to en
so much sympathy about one,
hear, whilst I was in the fit I
know, my dear, whether you
when tainting, qutte as well as I
to hear expressions of concern,
pitty, and admiration, and do
hear them, distinctly Angeli
could not answer such a question;
could only look lightning harm
summer lightning at Miss Lil
who inexorably continued
confess it now I used to en
the excitement, and therefore
off upon every reasonable op
portunity. It was lery wrong, but
was something pleasant, exci
in the words, 'Miss Liliy white's
O, I can remember them.
dear, as though it was only yes
terday. But, my love,' said the
spinster, taking the young
s nana between her own. and
so benignly and speaking so
'dm, my love, we may
once too often.'
Angelina was very much offended
deeply hart that Miss Lillywhite
for a moment associate her
past affectation with the real
weakness then and there be
her. Nevertheless, there was
quietness, such truthfulness, and
such art air of whim in the
and words, and manner of the
spinster, that the young one
resigned herself to ber
I
ol
aw
the
the
to
ger,
my
a-dozen
but
flew
the
it
they
ing
in
ried
idol,
still
time
were
ed
fys.
were
New
"
1 am
aie
sugar.
dred
juui,
utes
and
ing
a
say
dred
I about
I
e'oths.
A
years
Finney
a
at
he
To
not;
prayer.
We may faint once too often, re
peated Miss Lilly white, and she sigh
ed; and then her customary tmile
beamed about her. Of this dreary
truth am I a sad example.
'You! Miss Dllywhiter said An
gelina. .
'Listen, said the old maid. Tis
a t hortatory; but worth your hear-
When I was nineteen, I
sav? Whr, the dav was fixed; I was
in my. bridal dress; at the altar;
ing. 7 when 1 was nineteen, I was !
ahnnt fn hm marriArl Ahnnt AA
the
ring, the wedding-ring, at the verv
tip of my finger, when
Mercy mel cried Angelina, 'what
happened.
'I fainted, said Miss Lillywhite,
and she shook her head, and a wan
smile played about her lips.
'And you were not married, be
cause vou faintedr said Angelina.
much awakened to the subject.
'As I have confessed, it was my
weakness to taint uoon all occasions.
enjoyed the interest that, as I
thought, fainting cast about me.
My lover olten looked coldly sus
piciously; but love conquered his
doubts, and led him triumphantly
before the parson. Well the mar
riage service was begun, and'
'Do go on,' cried Angelina.
'And in a few minutes I should
have been a wife, when I thought I
must laint. It would seem very boIJ
me in such a situation not to
faint. I who had fainted o.so many
occasions notto swoon at the
alter
sen
thought, I felt myself fainting rap.
idly; and jiw as 'the bridegroom
had touched my finger with the ring
1 went off; ye, my dear, swooned
with all the honors,
Difgo on,' again cried Angelina
As I swooned the ring slipt from
bridegrooms fingers, fell
stove, and was rolling rolling
drop through the aperture of the
stove that, from below, admitted
heat to the church, when though
swooning I somehow saw the dan
and, to stop the ring, put forth
loot
WellP exclaimed Angelina.
. T. , .. . ...
j no inie ine ring roiirrf on dis
appeared down the chimney of the
siove and then I fainted with the
greatest fidelity. Hartshorn and tal
volitile rnme to my aid, I was re
stored but where was the ring?
'Twas hopeless to seek for it. Hall
other rings were proflered;
no it would be an evil omen
there would he no harpine?, if I
were not wedded with inv own ring
Well, search was made nnd time
and, we were late al church to
begin with and the ring wai not
lound when the church clock struck
twelve.
Welir said Angelina.
Weill sighed Miss Lulywhi'e,
clergyman, closing his book.ssiid,
is passed the canonical hour; the
parties cannot be married to-dav;
must come again to-morrow.'
'Dreadful!' exHnimed Angelina.
We returned home; my lover up
braided I retorted: we had a shock
quarrel, and and he left the
house to write me a farewell letter,
n week he was on his voyage to
India; in a twelve month he had mar
an Itr.lian !ndv, as rich as an
and after thirty years am
Caroline Lillywhite, spinster.'
It is very strange. From the
of the above narrative there
two words never again breath
beneath the roof-tree of the Dif-
And these unutlered words
etr wouU have been a want of L
,t.ment-f proper tee ing on so
u 'A.aiiuii. "iui uns
nPon
j
or
anv
not
Bui
why
.
lion,
to
the
.i
inn
"Angelina's fainted!"
T7 . , I"
.usoij,rt isvEirnow-1 ne
York correspondent of the Phila-
delphia Inquirer has the following. be
I saw a machine to-day, which, if to
not mistaken, is designed to ere- oselul
a revolution in me preperation on
In my presence, some two him.
weight of sugar, of the dirtiest haps
character imaginable and as black as as
win uikcu in luanain six min.
by m watch it came out white, drv i.
perfectly clean and sweet. Kn JZ.
ivnnw.
nothing of mechanics, I cannot give
good description of it. All that I can
is, that the sugar is put into a hollow
cylinder lined with wire cloth, which
revolves at the rate of about three hun
times a minute, and after making
slight
some
and
told
fifteen hundred revolutions, the that
. uiu U7 nci
uemniugai motion Cleanses it. Th
... t:.J .. j .
' . -17' -cu "Ting vated
admirably suited for clar-
who,
machine was
but it is
:i..;,. f j . .
is;;alBiS,. Ma" ?J?
. , r r
western writer says that a few
ago, a hoosier lecturer of the
stamp persuaded him to get up
meeting for him, and. as was the custom
inai ume the lecturer was asked if
wouia open the meeting with prayer.
which the boosier replied, "I reckon
I'm mighty unhandy at public
- .
be
gree.
on
For the Gallipolis Journal.
For the Gallipolis Journal. Female Education.
. . .
ine sunieci upon which we are
about to offer a few observations, is a
delicate one, and one which we con
fess wt approach with unaflVcted dif-
fidenrr; but wo have long been in
clined to touch upn it; and, should
we, like some naturalist about to em-
,rk nn.,n .n .-nlrnnu,r, :
fir .
return safely, with having found here
a shell and I here a pebble, our object
will have been accomplished. We
do not he-diate in the leant, to say
that this important subject has been
very much neglected, more so, every
thing considered, than that of the op
posite sex; and the reasons why it
has been so neglected may not per
haps, at first view, be perceptible to
every one. We are the objects of
circumstances, with our feelings
swayed by passion, our reason cloud-
led with prejudice, and our minds ob
scured, too often, by pernicious cus
toms; the philosophy of this state of
things, then.mav, we think, be traced
to some principle, having its origin j
in some or all of these sources. We
are told that the female mind is not
i
so vigorous as that of the opposite
sex; now we do not assent to this
proposition as a rule, although we
admit that as a general thing, it re
quires a healthy and strong physical
constitution to undergo severe con
tinued mental application. and males.
course, are possessed generally of
stronger constitution than females,
But becaus0 hey have es!er
! cfr-,u ,k.
w.i iiiii, 1111 OIJU6 llltH
they have also greater ment.-il
strength or vigor. We know from
observation and experience that
these two qualities are r re I v com
U:.J .. . .
uiueu in ine same mniviiiuai, i. a..
great mental and phvsical vigor, and
we olten find that '.he one comnen-
sntes the other; a person with a vig
orous mind encased in a weakly con
stitution, will often overcome Ih
!. ...
same oiiiiciiities with greater ease,
and much less labor, than a person
wiih a robust and strong constitution
with a weak mind. Persons can no
tice this principle illustrated in stn
.
aenis even oi ir.e same sex in pur
suing meir srunies, where the one
will in many cases get his or her re
citation in half the time the othtr
will, when nt the same time they are
very differently constructed as to
plivsicil strength. 1 he minds of fe
males are of course influenced hv
taste, whether in a more or less re
fined degree in the studies which
they pursue; hut even that is nocr
lest ol the strength of mind, for
ndivi.'uals have olten a can.-ichy to
accomplish many things in the arqm
.siiion of knowledge, and in the de
vel.tpmerit f truths in art and
science, in the vast economy of n;i
lure, in whim he or she takes lit lie
no delight. i hev are said to be
incapable of pursuing the more ob
sirn.ie orancnes oi science on an,
count of this supposed mental in'eri-
oriiy, and this supposition more thn
other h the reason whv thev do
in more instances study them.
suppose it true, that ihe t'emal
mind is not so vigorous as the male:
this, instead of being an nbieo
L ilt
snouid oe one ol the grentesl
reasons why it should be cultivated
should be deciplined in 'obstruse
studies, even in the higher branches of
mathematics; what so well calculates
stiengthen the mind anddevelope
streng h of its latent powers ns
severe decipline and painful applica
tions! like the functions of the body,
. .... J
more ii is exercises, within a
proper limit, the stronger and more
vigorous it becomes. . It makes but
rlifTri.n?e. in nur Aninu.n
.
through what meins the m nd is d-
ciplined, so it be accomolished: so it
accomplished in a manner, so as
PTorur the greatest amount of
inlormation, whether it be by
means oi studying the languages
natural science, urmnthemtiin.n.r.
the whole combined, would be
judicious a course as anv; there
M u. I i. .
..- M . .
CD ?r,a.Cl,ca. gene 'y, in the
.
ne
I
L
and
ger,
and
not
in
ly
go
and
the
of
wi'l
in
then
male
erlv
will
have
may
is
who
me
be,
in a
vou
posit
ject,
be
give
sex
t
ihe
proper
is
which
mitted
education of females, to give them a
and superficial knowledge of
of the elementary branches,
then they are onceremoniouslv
that they have gotten all that is
necessary to transact the business
they will be require! to trans
in me, as inougn Knowledge were
.hnrH.n j ..i.:
'"'
mind a superfluity,
Now what -u t tha, J,
taken together, constitute the
iow what is it that constitutes so
of individuals.
h1"68"16' and. ?r ""V
different qualities and accomplish
ments of each one, ol the same mut
the whole in a greater or I de-
. a
It does not then aepenu up
numbers or ioded, opoo locali
ty, in order that a society may be in
telligent and refined, it depends up
on the culture of the head and the
of
ing
a
when
ton
a
river,
v
ne
boats.
nr
snag
fifteen
110
a total
(louse
just
peas,
those
This
oaps
heart. Without intending to make
c i s 1 1 ncuons, why. we
wo.,ia asx, la ,t, ,htt the Eastern
Klaf. m.nw ArvM.nA..J . t I -. . i .
....., .ihijsibcu oi nine eie
man barren rocks and sterile hills.
re celebrated so universally for
'heir rehnprf n.?ti- th.;. .k,. .j I
-w... .iibii oiii c: Li i
nm :.ii: i. , . . I
....cniKniu:ci ii la necause I
their femnlesartwell educated, u-itk
.. i . ,. " . I
out regard to conditio in life. In
the proper cast and mould of the
minds of the vomh of this paneiatmn
depends the destiny ot generations
first influence, and who is It. in tr,
that st.mo.th. fir., tm " ' " J
a
-C.J-
tial
rMr.A i
kind, and correctly .ormed: for
this Doint there U dnKU ,.t. "
involved-duty to self, and
w w nun
society. ,
Tru v hath the noet uT.. tt 1 .7
many a nower is born to
ine mind in its earlier sta e, when
impressions are made that are dura
Die, and hx the character in a'ter
life, and indeed that last forever
he answer is obvious to everv one,
It is then important that those im
pressions should be of the
,. . i
blUsh Un-
seen and spend it, fragrance upon U
the desert air" How more trulv
to
Could the neglect of earlv iii.9t;nn
P. - - - v - "lis
exnresea in hiirni v. Nnnn..i t.
We often hnd, yea, too ofien. tl
who possess, and have possessed all
. 1 J I
: ". , ." --"-"
...... u .nni.uiiuW U UUIV. ..
l.ri j . ... .. '
oormani ana uncultivated. .nn.
those Intent now.r. f .h- m; A , "
. . - ,
wh.ch, had they been properly de- try
veloped and cultivated, might have da.
neen an ornament, and a blessing to once
,n7kir P '""."""'nechanicBIled
hallowed influence like the of
l K J...:...!..
remain in ohsror.tr, perhaps lorever, how
whilst the possessor remains uncn fires
scious of iheir strength and a stran- ew
perhaps, even to .heir -x.tence. rtry
to those rational enjoyments and
n i
ii occurs to us t
source,
h , I '
ere Would men.
he so many artificial distinctions u-ure
sonety, were there a more wide- ha
disseminated system of education,
w knowledge more generally ed
....,u0r.-; ana m ofuor.o .mswemus. never
back io the origin of knowledge, their
ere the first lessons are given, as
see thai th.e that give them are re
proper mentors.-are possessed
that d.sr.pl.ne and training which study
hrnld he imparted to others tha
origin is the female sex
When we commence here, there
be the greatt-r probability of the
nuence extending tobnihsexe; it
is a urer way to gel both th
and ultimately the lemale stxes
eduraled. When ler.inles are prop.
educated in tiie first place, for
where no yoij find a properly am
thoroughly educated mother that
'nd hv so-ne means or other to
her children educated. Some
tell us trvit Ihe influence ot ed
nr.ated femiles is but limited; that it
not much more il" any than those
have but little education. Sho
one ihat is educated as she should
and who exerci es her influence
proper direclion, and 1 will show
one who exe-cises a greater in
fluence than even a person of the op
e sex, under the same circum
stances, to say nothing of one of less
education. I3ut why discuss a sub
the importance of which must
evident to every one. Need we
examples of the influence the
exert upon society; thev are a
, . i . " .
nunaan1, oui prominent. Among
rest we would .Tiention a Martha
Washington, to whose influence and
training ol her son the world
indebted for a true votary of Lib
erty, and happy America for a deliv
er from bondage; and cou'd she le
withdrawn from tho apothesis by
she is surrounded, and be per
again to speak. I fancy her
language to the fair daughters ol
America, would be "so plurk th
well-in
the
of
lions
have
ore
hall
be
ren
ne
plant
round
have
heir
Creator
humble
them,
me,
hat
and
A
ticle
the
have
same
cation
vantages
lime
business
the
see
ORION.
Mail Brevities.
fO"Gov. Haines has fixed the 12th
December as a day of thanksgiv
in Iew Jersey.
rjC7Jenny Lind will shortly give
series of concerts in Baltimore,
she will proceed to Washing
City.
rfThe body of Frederick Myer.
German, was founJ floating In the
at Louisville, on Wedne"day
J L L . J -. . r .
was a aeca. uiuu uu one Ol ine
1 no eamrr cm sirurk a
on the 2.5th ult., in Red River,
miles above Campe. She had
bales of Cotton on board. Boat
loss. ro uvea lost.
rf7The proprietor of the Llchl
Garden, in Milwaukee, has
obtained a first rate crop ol green
equal in quality and flavor to
grown in July or A 1 'gust.
may be called to tarty, or per-
wi, crop. .
counting
-Pray,
this
and I
you
prominent
are the
are
good
who
tirlee
the man
An
Jones
While
veers
him
ni
Just
braying,
ed to
gantlemen,
Mail Brevities. Mechanics and Lawyers.
true place in public esteem:
.
-r w n .
" oar is do longer the report or
tk. . o .
Th9mhT' "'J7
mechanical H,n,rim.ni. ...
The New York Mirror has th. fol.
towing, which shows that anlioht-
ened constructiveness is rising to ita
,3 . ?. n'l. arpHiters, dtc
'ew 7n W foiled
mechanical departments are ba.
ng pralerred; there are now th.rtw
young gentlemen in ti l. -n .i..'.
have received liberal education's. wl a
are serving their t,m." .k:. .
v W. .1 .11 U.
Si..
will have the most accomnli.h.ri
U :. .i . . F
mines in ine world. , A new clan
ringing up Who Will put the
yicscm race Oi niechan ea In
rr. . r"-r- "W
annuo. ine union or
education with mechanical skill
" iiiuccu. aireanv w.
ii -
. "wn.iirwBi, nd ac
T" .w".n f fe?cn. nd uan.
biiim in biikih Sn. .
-'"7 m mose
f .. -""u'"-lc" wuii meir voca
tlr.ni. i r .
""ui wiiu miners were
wnr.t tr. j.. . .u . . "
n or lawver. t i C
"Jf."' to their re-.
... wU cucsi. inaiaar
na nr.. i .
pasi. luecnanira tinm lL.
j .. "a
Federal T;.l....
.... o i
We hope that parents and guar.
pui s,
Ih.( ..... L... r
--, ius uui proief lonal
....h .. i :
"" "'"". lawyers ai d
uivmes, can ever arrive n thiscoun.
to great distio-.inn , rTt -
and witness the self-taugM. "he
illiterate boy. now a tnn..:A.
with the ardent tl I it
in,m. . i....m L i
. Ve- "'tuner oi
3CetV UOOR at fiur comma. n.t
many are there now filling of.
ol honor and profit, who rut a
years ago. were apprenticed to
respectable trades, and take the
portion of the mechanics, to your ve"
lenrnea ana murn m.i
lnrflllaKa1
' IIIKUI4IIBU
mnA mn k. t -
eminence. Look at our de.
tin .nrieii.. I-,, m. ,
whence comes the ebuliti'on ofmark
or natural talent from those who
had anv other stimulant but
own amhii inn til llAPoma itdkf..l
wall n. nm.m.nl.i v. ... j '
devoted to hard work, and every
hour passed in the prope'r
to render them respectable .n
. www
iornied.
The following is an extract front
w ill of the late John McDonogh,
New Orleans. After devoting mil.
to founding free schools", he thus
concludes:
And (I was near forgetting that) I
still one m.ill request to make,
little favor still to a5k, and il
be the last. Ii is, that it' may
permitted annually, to the child".
of the free schools, situate the
irest to my place of interment, to
and water a few flowers a
my grave. This litile net will
a double tendency; it will open
young and suacep-ib'e heart, to
gratitude and love to their divine
for having raised up, as the
instrument ol his bounty to
a poor frail worm of eanh like
and tench them at the sam time,
they are, whence they came,
whither they mest return.
Word to tiie WisE.-The ar
below, we c'ip from the col urns of
Madison Banner, and frankly con
fess that it contains more trjth than we
ever before seen embodied in the
space. vye copy it for the edifi-
of our home readers, of course:
NewsriFESs. Among the many ad
of newspapers, that of Mvinff
is not the least. One man of
inquires ot another, ""hat'e
news?" "Nothing but what yoo.
in the papers." is the rep'y; and
spending more time on the gos
the day, they are ready to pro
to business. A friend enters the
room of a man of business with
where is the beat place to pur
chase goods?" "Where shall I m t
work done?" "Just tak
will hand you the paper, where
will find the advertisements of our
and energetic men. ni
men who advertise, and they
the men who can afford m i
bargains; and they are the persons
will be most likely to have the r.
you want." This said and don.
of business is at liberty to re
sume his vocation.
anecdote is told of Governor
which is too good to ba lrwt
making a speech, some two.
since, a rowdy hissed him; torn
out. arose from vanous paru of
crowo,
at the time an ass ranm.iUJ
when the"Governnr rm..i.
the audience "Let him alone,
his father ia ctlCoff him

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