OCR Interpretation


Gallipolis journal. [volume] (Gallipolis, Ohio) 1837-1919, May 18, 1876, Image 1

Image and text provided by Ohio Historical Society, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85038121/1876-05-18/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

W31. NASH, .Editor
ll r0 in Advance
OLUHE ILL
- Tx-ixtli and .Tnstice."
', ,--rl GALLIPOLIS, OHIO, THURSDAY, MAY 18, 1876. NUMBER 27
BANKING.
BANK,
GALLIPOLIS.
EDWARD DELETOMBE,
President
JOSEPH HUNT,
Vice-President
JNO. A. HAMILTON,
Cashier.
Capital Stock, - - $100,000.
DIRECTORS:
Edward Deletombe, Jno. A. Hamilton,
Reuben Aleshire, Jos. Hunt,
John Hutainpiller, J. S. Blackaller.
TT. S. Bonds. Cou
pons, and Government Securities of all
kinds."
Bank open from 9 A. M. to 3 P. M.
JNO. A. HAMILTON", Cashier.
May 7, 1874.
OHIO VALLEY
BANK,
GALLIPOLIS, OHIO.
Cash Capital,SIOO.OOO.
Individual Liability, $800,000.
A. Kknkino, President.
J. T . Halliday, Vine President.
W. T. Minturn, Cashier.
DIRECTORS:
A. Hbnking, C. D. Bailky,
A. W. Allemong,
J. T. Halliday, Wm. SnonRR.
B3PBuys Gold, Silver, Coupons and
Bonds at hiehest prices.
Makes collections on all points and
locnoe Ttrnfta nn nrlnfiinal Cities in
the United States and Europe ireo. of
charge to regular uepositors. solicits
deposits of private as well as corporate
funds, and allows liberal interest on all
monies left on specineu time.
November 7. 1874.
L. M. BEJIAN S. G KELLER,
Pres't Vice Pres't.
e. p. porter, Cashier.
CENTREVILLE
National Bank
OP TIIURMAN, OHIO.
AUTHORIZED CAPITAL, 100,000.
BANK OP CIRCULATION, Dis
count and Exchange. Interest
paid on Time Deposits. Good paper
purchased. Drafts on New York, Cin
cinnati and other cities for sale.
Banking-Qnm.lO tn.l2and from i
L IQ a,
"DIRECTORS:
S.&.KelUr,
Permtltd Wood, J- O. Grow,
R. P. Porter.
Nov. 26, 1874,
MEDICAL.
RATHBURN & NORTHUP
H
AVING united In the practice of.
'MFmniNF AND SURGERY,
will attend calls in city or cntryday
"omcE-BATHBCRN'srug Store,
Dec. 9, 1875. 6m
W. S. NEWTON, M. D.,
HAVING resigned the Post-offlce,
will devote Ms whole time to the
practice of
Medicine and Surgery.
Office, adjoining Post-offlce; resldenoe,
on 3d St., tvo doors above State,
(7ALLIPOLIS, OniO.
July 15, 1875.
J. R. SAFF0RD.
O jrjrjp 2d st., over J. H. Weil's Store.
p S. Preserving the Natural Teeth,
a specialty.
March 19, 1874.
ATTORNEYS.
C W. WHITE. C. M. UOLCOMB
WHITE & HOLCOMB,
Attorneys at Law,
Special attention given to Collections.
OFFICE near the Court House.
E. N. HARPER,
Attorney at Law,
GALLIPOLIS, OHIO,
Pensions obtained and" Government
Claims prosecuted.
Office on Second street, one door above
Vanden 4 Bon.
March 14, 1B72.
C. W. BIRD.
W. It. C. ECKER.
BIRD &. ECKER,
Attorneys-at-Law,
Gallipolis, - - - Ohio,
WILL attend to all business entrusted
to their care In Gallia and adjoin
ing counties, also In Mason county,
WestVa.
Special attention given to Collections,
Probate business, etc.
Office oh Second Street, five doors be
low Locust.
Nov. 12, 1874. ti
Cincinnati
CARRIAGE WORKS.
Wm, Aufderhoido & Co.
PROPRIETORS,
Manufacture, for the Trade
Carriages, Spring Wagons,
Nos. 407, and 409 John St, Cincin
nati, O.
.rebil0.1870.-ly-
HARDWARE.
JVM. Kerr fe Co.
WHOLESALE DEALERS IN
GENERAL
Upper corner Public Square,
GALLIPOLIS, -X).7'-
j.u.kerr. j. w. cnranrcrroN.
January 22, 1874. .--
SADDLES AND SADDLERY.
Manufacturer and Dealer in
SA8DLES, BRIDLES,
Harness, Collars,
Trace-Chains, Curry-Coinbs
Horse-Brushes, &c.
COURT ST., - - GALLIPOLIS, O.
t3&Repalrlug promptly attended to.
trices to suit tue times.
July 18, 1874.
MILLING.
a ALESHIRE & CO.,
DSAUZB ia
Flour, Wheat,;
Mill-Feed, Sec.
CASH FOR WHEAT
ElIREKi MILLS,
GALLIPOLIS. OHIO.
MARBLE WORKS.
MILES & KERR,
flt&BBM CUTTB&8
AND MANUFAOTUREBS'o?
jHOIV UMEJXT S,
Tomb-Stones, &c.
SECOND STREET, ABOVE PUB)
LIC SQUARE,
GalliDolis - Qhlai
WE do ererythine in the' lineP Msxbl
Outtine on short notice, and refer
those who desire reference as to onr skill and
ability, to our work.
1875,
FALL AND WINTER
paarssif.-
OUT
Millinery and Fancy
GOODS,
MISS HATTIE A. ANDREWS
PUBLIC SQUARE, 3d door from Court
street, uaiiipous, umo.
A COMPLETE STOCK OF
Millinery Goods,
Corsets, Kid Gloves,
Dress Trimmings, Cloaks, 'Furs, Real
and Imitation Hair Goods, Chenilles,
Embroideries and Laces, Braids, Zephyr
Worsteds, Floss and Canvas always on
hand.
Stamping for Embroidery or Braid
ing, and Pinking done to order on short
notice.
Agent, In Galllpolls, for the sale of
E. BUTTERICK & CO.'S PATTERNS
OP GARMENTS, and their celebrated
SHEARS AND SCISSORS.
Miss HATTIE A. ANDREWS,
Public Square, 3d door from Court St.,
Galllpolls, Ohio.
MILLII3-BE.T,
MRS. J. HOWELL,
DEALER IN
MILLINERY GOODS,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL.
"Orders solicited and promply and
Carefully filled.
COURT STREET.
Between 2d and 3d, - - Galllpolls, O.
May 7th, 1874.
MILLINERY
Miss ALICE HILL,
Has removed hr MILLINERY estabi
Ushment to
CREDZET BLOCK, '
on SECOND STREET, a few doors east
of Court, where her friends are invited,
to can. j
October 22,1874.
INSURANCE 1
Against Loss or Damage
from Fire and Lightning.
A. P. MOORE,
GENERAL FIRE, LIFE, AND AC-;
(JIDENT INSURANCE AGENT,
GALLIPOLIS, - - - OHIO.
Office over Wasson's Book Store.
N0T.25,1875.-Gaj
-si V
Gitizm and Grangers:
Ztew Spring Stockr.o'f t
DR Y GOODS,
Just RecervecTby
r Consisting of, -..
t DRESS GOODS, .
JPLAIN, JiLAID. ANDMIjCryRE,
; DAMASSEE, ','M f-f
The newest thing out;
SUMMER SILKS, rP
STRIPES & CHECKS,
BLACK SILKS:
White Goods, Linens and Embroi
deries, Laces and Embroidered -Linens-
for Trimmings, Rib
bons; Gros-grain for
Sashes, ifcc.
CASSIMERES and SUITINGS,
for Men 'and Boys.
JEANS and COTTONADES, &c.,' Sfcc.,
Which we offer at the lowest possible
prices.
April C, 187C.
Eagle Drugstore
Dr. J. C. RATHBURN
IN HIS NEW STAND.
A NEW AND FULL LINE
OF
DJUGS,
PAINTS,
6ILS,
' -i
Varnishes,
.: Dye Stuffs,
Patent Medicines.
PJ&E.UMERY,
feombs, "Jirusnes, VTnaow-
Glass, Fancy Goods, &c
A general falling off in Prices
along the whole line, to suit the times.
REMEMBER
The sign of the EAGLE between
John Dages' and H. P. Ellas'.
March 30, 1876.
LOOK 8EBE &ND BE&Dt
Just brought on, and on hand,
Here at my old stand,
Where you will find the Goods to please,
Everybody in country, and Galllpolls;
1 therefore Invite you all
Let me have a friendly call.
As I am prepared to offer the public
Select Stock of
CLOTHING,
FURNISHING GOODS,
Hats,, paps,,,.,,
TRUNKS, VALISES,
Cigars, Tobacco and' Pipes,
at lower figures than any house iu this
city,
BUT CASH ONLY5 WILL BUY THEM
CHEAP.
I can prove, having been here twelve
years in business, that I never misrep
resented my goods, but have given to all
the full value.fortlieiMnoney.- -
Orders for Custom Suits, Dusters, Ul
sters and Summer Capes, promptly filled.
J. H WEIL.
April .13, 1876.
(Successors to W. C. Mili.ek,)
Have received their
DIRECT 3JB0JI "NEW YORK.
HAVING carefully selected
Stock at greatly reduced.
we- are nowTeadyi'twoffeMto the.
the most dbmpleu Stock Stiring Goods.
In the market. -i-T r - T
April 6, 1878.' . j.
Spring Stock
ISLE AND THE STAR.
BY GEO. D. PRENTICE.
In the tropical seas
There's a beautiful Isle, (i'
Where storms never darken'
The sunlight's sof'smllei-l
There the hymn of thVbrc'ezc
And the hymn of the stream
Are mingled in one,
Like sweet sounds in a dream.
There the song-birds at more.v
Prom thick shallows start,
Like musical thoughts ,
From the poet's full heart;
ThPn1. the song-birds at noon
Sit in silence unbroken. :
Like an exquisite dream ,
Iu the bosom unppoketi. ,
There thetlowers Iiayg like rainbows,
vn me wuu wnou aim lea
OJi sav, will thou dwell
In thntsweet Isle with me?
In the depth of the sky
- -There's a beautiful star,
Where no cloud casts a shadow,
The bright scene to mar.
There the rainbows ne'er fade,
And the dews are ne er dry,
And a circlet of moons
Ever shines in the sky,
There the songs of the blest
And tliesongs of the spheres
Are unceasinglv heard
Through the infinite years.
There the soft airs float down
From the amarynth bowers,
AH fresh with the perfume
Of Eden's own flowers,
There truth, love, and beauty
Immortal will be
Oil say, wilt thou dwell
In that sweet star with me
A Massachusetts Village Haunted
by the Ghost of a Mother
and Her Babe.
and Her Babe. [From the Boston Globe.]
The village of East Falmouth, four
or five miles from Falmouth, revels
in a ghostly sensation. It is uo or
dinary ghost that walks in the twi
light, or appears at midnight to the
terrified beholder. Broad daylight
and clear sunshine are the conditions
of its appearance. Several weeks
ago the wife of Eleazer Fish, while
calling on a neighbor looked toward
her house and saw a woman sitting
at the window. Knowing that she
had left the house empty, she imme
diately returned home, but to find it
still empty. In a few days the bame
thing happened again. A witness
was called and plainly saw the wo
man. On approaching the house the"
shape vanished and did not again ap
pear. Shortly after the apparition
was asraiu seen at the window, this'
time with a baby in her arms; and
since there have been many appear
ances of the ghostly lady, sometimes
with and sometimes without the in
fant Site gencrallV appears on a
from the house. Within this dis
tance no shape is visible. The spir
itual visitor is suuposcd to be the
fiisUwife of Mr. Fish, who died some
years since, and the mlnnt is set
down as the present Mrs. bisli s
child, who died last winter. Mr.
Fish's family are, not in the least dis
turbed by the apparition, but rather
enjoy the novelty of the situation. In
fact, some ot the members of the
family take pride in saying that, in
addition to the spectacle at the win
dow, -ghostly noises are frequently
heard within the house. Hut there
are scoffers at all this, and although
every one admits that at times the
window in question shows a singular
appearance, the skeptics say it is
merely a reflection from some object
near by, and that its sudden appear
ance is due alone to its never having
been' noticed before. Our lady re
marks tliat nobody but weak-minded
persons can sec ghosts, and that the
village clergyman, on being invited
to inspect the spectacle, said after a
minute's observation that some folks
could see a great deal more than he
could, whereat the believers are
greatly incensed.
A House Full of Bad Luck.
[Wash. Letter to N. Y. Graphic.]
The Seward House has seemed to
bring misfortune on all in ofllcial life
who have dwelled therein. Commo
dore Rodgers, U. S. N., built it and
lived in it for some time, and after
his' deatli it became a fashionable
boarding-house. John C. Spencer
lived there at the time his son, only
nineteen years old, was hung for mu
tiny. Two of the members of the
Cabinet, who were brought home
dead after the explosion of a gun had
turned a pleasure party on the Poto
mac into a company of mourners
over the remains of eleven of their
number, had resided in the tragic
.house-earlier in their ofllcial career.
The Barton Key tragedy and the
Seward tragedy are still too recent
events to be recalled to the minds of
the readers ot the Graphic as having
entitled the house to its gloomy
reputation.
It will be remembered that the late
Secsetary of War, General Ilclknap,
began his ofllcial life here as a resi
il eh Co Ft Hat bouse, and though none
of his misfortunes actually occurred
there still it seems as if the shadow
thcliiuse has thrown over all con
nected with the Government who
have resided therein lias pursued
him. It was there, I think, Marsh
first came to ask the influence of Mrs.
Carrie Belknap and her sister, Mrs.
Bower, in his behalf. I think so, be
cause Mrs. Bower came to see her
sister in that house in May, 1870, and
remained with her there until they
left thecity for their Northern trip.
It is a singular coincidence, to any
the' least, that of the members of the
Cabinetof different Administrations
.who have passed more or less time in
the tragic house four have been
brought face to face with tragedies in
their ofllcial career, snd a fifth has
terminated his official life in dire
trouble: '
New York Sun (Ind.)L All the
signs continue to point to the nomi
nation of Governor Hayes, of Ohio,
as the Republican candidate tor
Prslitent, I
From Kansas.
FT. SCOTT, KANSAS, May 9. 1876.
Mr. Editor: Thinking some of
yonr many readers whp hnve been
contemplating a trip to the West
would be pleased to have a little in
formation concerning this beautiful
western country, I will give yon - a
few items.
Although I am not a resident here,
yet I have traveled over a considera
ble portion of Eastern and Southern
Kansas, and central and Southwest
ern Missouri, and have gained con
siderable information relative to the
climate, products, health, &c, aud
the country in genpral.
There is yet an abundance of corn
through this portion of the west, va
rying in price from 20 to 30 cts. per
bu. Wheat, as a general thing, looks
fine, although in some places on low
prairie, it is pretty much drowned out
by the exceedingly heavy rains in
the past week or two. In fact some
of these western storms are now very
high.
As I came along the banks of the
Missouri river (by rail,) I noticed in
many places where, the river was out
of its banks, and in Bates and
Vernon counties. Mo., the Marmaton
and the Marias desCygnes (pro. Ma
rydesseen,) rivers are out of their
banks, and backwnter to the depth of
from 20 to 2o feet is over the prairie
and main road leading north from
here. It is also over the R. R. track
in many places, and in one place the
car-wheels were some 0 inches in the
water. Indeed it looked like any
thing else but safe to travel over it.
There arc some lives reported lost
Although this looks like one of the
drawbacks to this section of country,
3'ct it is said that the like has not
been known lor many years ueiore,
and one who intended purchasing
land, here, of course should ascertain
first if it is low land.
The price of land varies here from
$2.50 to $8.00 for the unimproved,
and improved at, say from $8.00 to
,$30.00 per acre. (25 per cent dis
count for cash on R. R. lands are
given.) In regard to the general
face of the country, the statistical re
ports are as follows, viz: Bottom
lands, 15 per cent; upland, 85 per
cent; forest or timbered, 8 percent,
and prairie, 92 per cent- Average
width of timber belts one mile; vari
eties coltonwood, oak; walnnt, burr
oak; sj-camnre, hackberry and hick
ory.
In almost all instances the public
"school buildings are better than those
east
All religious denominations seem to
&c, seem to compare well with east
em prices. Prints from b to 10 cts.
coffee 24 to 30 cts.; sugar 8 to 12
cts., and everything else in propor
tion.
The grass is growing finely and
stock have been Hying well on it for
the past three weeks or more. Cattle
are still somewhat scarce and will
command a pretty good price. Hogs
are very scarce, and ponies: horses
and mules vary in prices from $15 to
$40 for ponies, and horses and mules
from $35 to $100.
There are hundreds
of emigrants
travelliHg yet in all directions, al
though at the present writing" many
arc "camped out on account of high
water. Among these are many In
dians and half-breed?. I took a lit
tie stroll just after dinner to-day anil
visited some of their camps; the
squaws seem to be doing more work
than their male companions. Some
of them are working hair-work,
stringing beads, tc, and making into
small balls, (about the size of a small
hen egg), the tin and silver polish
that is often sold by peddlers with
us. They are however a low, filthy,
dirty class of human beings.-
Lvery passenger train on the K. R.
seems to be well loaded with passen
gers and emigrants, and the freight
trains are heavily laden generally
with stock, agricultural implements,
sundry merchandise and. coal the
latter is in great abundance along the
line of the R. R., but not so good I
tli ink, as a general rule, as ours
along the Ohio river.
Hivorytlnng in nature that can,
seems to be doing its utmost to add to
the beauties of Spring. Although I
will not attempt to describe the
beautiful scenery, landscapes, &c,
one sees in even a small trip like this,
tor l Know i wouiu iau.
Yours, &c,
C. I. BUSH.
For the Gallipolis Journal.
Arlington Items.
-
all planted. The wheat and grass
crops look health.
Some tan-bark being peeled in the
Arlington District; we hear it is for
the new Tannery of Mr. Jos. Blickle,
of your city.
Mr. John Watson is still very sick.
Mrs. Wilson Swisher, daughter of
Mr. William Roush, is suffering from
lung disease.
Health, though, in this vicinity is
jeneraly good.
We omitted in our last, in speak
ing of coal, to say that Mr. C. A
Carl, who-works the Cheshire, mines,
does 'quite a good business, mining,
as we have it from Mr. J. Conghen
our about one' hundred andr twen
ty1 thoU'sah'd biishels'i'ea'rly. 'r
One of qui Arlington men, Mr.'
Levi Ilj'sell, received a check froih
Mr. WmvSymmes on the Middleport
Bank for $170.00 one day last week,
got it cashed at the bank, went to
GalHpolis, and some one stoldit, leav
ing him only four dollars, in change.
The Journal 'is a 'great "favorite in
this section. Some''wanttdkn6w'the,
terms upon -which you .will; send ''it
from now until after the Presldentialj
campaign. ' " '
Some potato bugs here.
LIVE OAK.
Correspondence Gallipolis Journal.
Exposition Topics.
PHILADELPHIA, May 10th, 1876.
WORK IN MACHINERY HALL.
One of the most interesting cases
opened last week in Machinery Hall
contained a collection of models of
Massachusetts Water Craft, and ar
ticles which take part iu their con
struction and use.
Capt H. W. Hunt, an enthusiast in
everything pertaining to the sea and
well known in the naval and boating
circles of New England, conceived
the idea of making the collection,
but, failing to get an appropriation
from the State to meet the expenses,
he has pushed the matter himself,
and has formed by borrowing aud
birying the largest collection of ma
rine models to be found anywhere.
It contains models or 135 rigged
crafts, and a large number of small
boats and curiosities, numbering in
all about 1500 separate pieces.
The exhibit is to be arranged so
that crafts of similar character, but
built at different times within the last
century inaj' bo contrasted and com
pared, and to show still better the
progress in the art of ship building
there is a very complete collection of
pictures of boats built hettween the
eleventh and cightceth centuries.
The largest model, about eight feet
long, is that of a modern foil rigged
American ship, and the oldest is that
of the first fishing boats used in Bos
ton Harbor. A steam propeller about
five feet long, and capable of running
four miles an hour, will make daily
excursions upon the lake near the
northern entrance of the hall.
Among the most interesting pieces
in the collection are models of Dan
iel Webster's fishing boat, which he
built himself, a hinge masted river
boat, portable aud folding boats,
sloops of war, and the redoubtable
"Kearsarge," old "dog bodied" boats,
and a complete collection of modern
yachts. Besides these, there are oars,
canvas, tackle and gearing of every
quality and description. The Mack
erel fisher, with miniature men on
duty, attracts particular attention.
THE REVERBERATORY FURNACE.
The fire was lighted on the 28th
ult in the Reverberator' Furnace of
Gillinder & Son's Glass Works. The
stack is 7G feet high; and has a di
ameter of 14 feet at its base, and has
a capacity of melting nine tons of
glass per week.
. About .fifty hands, are to be em
ployed about the furnace, and an
nealing apparatus, and in blowing,
pressing, cutting and engraving the
product of the factory, from which
made.- Many novelties in glassware
will also be produced, such as busts
of Washington, Franklin anil other
notable characters, and many not so
prominent will be represented by
medalions and engravings and Bo
hemian glass blowing and spinning
will form a very attractive feature.
The glass factory stands directly
west of the Machinery Hall, near the
environs of the grounds, and is
adorned with globes and colored glnss
ornaments blown in various forms, in
such .a tasty manner as to make the
exterior quite invitiug.
Inside the attractions will not be
great until they have commenced the
fabrication of their goblets, lamp
ware and fancy articles, but they will
be ready to commence their work
even before the furnace becomes
promptly heated, which will take
about two weeks.
JOTTINGS HERE AND THERE.
In the Machinery Hall and. Main
Building, work is being pushed as
fast as possible, so that the chiefs of
these departments and their clerks
say that they arc really not given the
time.necessary for the three requisites
of life, eating, drinking aud sleep
ing.
The Spaniards and proprietors of
the soda founts are prosecuting thei
work at night as well as during the
da'. The goods of the Argentine
Republic have just arrived by sail
ing vessel, and will soon be in exhi
bition order.
At the Installation Office com
plaints are made that many persons
to whom spaces have been allotted.
have given up all idea of exhibiting
their goods but have not politeness
enough to inform the Centennial an
thorities of their change of minds.
A patriotic citizen has sent scaled
proposals to the Centennial Commis
sion to exhibit the fifty ugliest men
in the United States. It has not yet
known what part of the country is
supposed to provide the largest num
ber of this class of exhibits, or wheth
er the Commission has seen fit to al
lot standing room to them, but we
faiu would ask a reprieve from any
such torture. Ugly men and ugly
women too will undoubtedly be there
in abundance, but a collection of men
made from this standpoint would, we
fear, make the best men doubt the
fact as related in Genesis, that man
is made in his maker's image, and,
after examination, was pronounced
good.
The United States Centennial Com
mission have been in session here for
a week past, but have accomplished
jiutlittle of public importance soVar.
The .Sunday question has been at
length definitely decided. On Fri
day they voted to'leave the grounds
open, leaving the buildings closed,
but 'by; Saturday they began to fear
inatmany would just visii. "--grounds,
and get peeps here and there
when they could, and be so well con
tented therewith, that. they would
nnv nn littontinn tO tllC buildingS-
during the week-days, and thus not
help the (jentenniai aioug uuauviauy,
so they decided to close them en
tirely. Thh'lldnor aue3tion has also been
discussed quite at length, and will re
rfnlre&hh' ihbst careful attention to
deal forth-satisfaction to the public
and-jaatlce to the rwtanraata with
the understanding that the sale of
liquors would be allowed. No de
cision has as yet been arrived at
The city is beginning to put on a
gala day appearance already; flags of
all nations are hanging from thou
sands of windows; the new lines of
street cars have commenced running,
hundreds of hacks and carriages
have been imported from New York,
Brooklyn and Baltimore, and every
one carries around with him an air of
excited joy and expectancy.
Thomas' concert hall is to be opened
ou the eleventh of the month, aud
the Centennial chorus will there re
peat the opening clay musical pro
gramme which consists of 1. The
Centennial Grand March of Vienna,
by Wagner. 2. The Centeunial
Hymn; the words of which are by
Whittier, and the music by Eayue.
3. The Centennial Meditation of
Columbia, a cantata by Dudley Buck
and Sidney Lanier, and 4. The Hal
lelujah Chorus of Handel. Whittiers
Hymn, which has just been completed
for the use of the chorus is so good
that I enclose it
CENTENNIAL HYMN.
from out hand,
The centuries fall like grains of sand,
Wc meet to-day united, free,
Aud loyal to our laud and thee,
To thank Thee for the era done,
And trust Thee for the opening one.
Here where of old. by thy design,
The fathers spake that word of Thine,
Whose echo is the glad refrain.
Of rtMidcd bolt and fallen chain.
To grace our festal time, from all
The zones of earth onr guests we call. .
Be with us while the New World greets
The Old World, thronging all Its streets,'
Unveiling all the triumphs won
By art or toil beneath the sun;
And unto common good ordain
This rivalship of hand and brain.
Thou, who hast here iu concord furled
The war nags of a gathered world,
Beneath our western skies fulfill
The Orient's mission of good will.
And freighted with love's golden fleece,
Send back the Argonauts of peace.
For art and labor met In truce,
For beauty made the bride of use,
We thank Thee, while withal we crave
The austere virtues strong to save,
The honor proof to place or gold.
The manhood niiver bought or sold I
O! make Thou us, through centuries
long,
In peace secure, in justice strong;
Around our gift of freedom draw
Tin; safeguards of Thy righteous law;
And cast in some diviner mould,
Let the new cycle shame the old!
A Baby's May Day Party.
Westboro (Mass.) Correspondence, Boston
Globe.
Westboro Babies arc exceedingly
prcCuClutia -ana-original, their laf.ct
departure beiug an independent,ob-
servancc of May day at the home of
one ot their number, imss Florence
A. Walker, of Blake street a little
maid who has reached the mature ago
of six months. This affable maiden
had previously enclosed her card with
an invitation to the festival to forty
six young ladies and gentlemen all
under one year of age, and of this
number thirty-four appeared in per
son; others, who were detained by
domestic cares, recognized the com
pliment by forwarding their cards
and "regrets." With commendable
forethought and a spirit of unselfish
ness, each guest hud aisp extended a
special invitation to "mamma," well
knowing that the occasion was sure
to afford her much pleasure, aud in
uo instance did mamma lail to ac
company her little one. The com
puny .gathered early in the afternoon
and until thu supper hour the time
was occupied iu a social and informal
manner. The little folks were in
their brightest mood, and every moth
er s face was wreathed in smiles, for
each was confident that she had the
handsomest child and as the types of
beauty were various, the claim was
in every case admitted. Much con
fusion was occasioned by the prom is
cuous transfer of babies, aud a con
spicuous label seemed to some a nc
cessity, but the result of the final
search was satisfactory to all partici
pating. An agreeable absence of all
discordant sounds was remarked, the
vocal notes being of a pleasing char
acter, and covering a wide range in
the musical scale, as may be inferred
from the fact that the youngest vo
calist was but two weeks of age.
Presumably intended as a merited re
buke to the dissipation of their el
ders at similar gatherings, the com
pany by common consent disbanded
at a seasonable hour, each returning
home by private carriage. Special
invitations "as lookers on" had been
extended to a favored few, including
well-known representatives of the
medical profession, who. seemed es
pecially to enter heartily into the
spirit of the occasion, and all who
had the rare privilege of "being pres
ent will not readily forget the "Ba
bies' May Day Party."
How She was Fooled.
nnr iinsnnnu was in mc
incrJCitv. the cook, and . resolved to
.lotoft. him in the act After watch
ing for days, she heard him come in
one evening u" 4uicwj m
through into the" kitchen. Now
Katy was out that evening, and the
kitchen was dark. Burning with
jealousy, the wife took some matches
in her hand and nasuiy placed ner
shaw! ovdr her head, as Katy some
times did; entered the kitchen by the
back door, ad was almost immedi
ately seized and embraced in the
most ardent manner. With her
heart almost bursting with rage and
jealousy, the injured wife prepared
to administer a most terrible rebuke
to her faithless. spouse. Tearing her
self from his foul embrace,, she
struck a match, and stood, face to face
with the hired man. Her husband
says his wife has never treated him
so well since the first month tbey
were, married as she has for the past
few daya.
ly
For the Gallipolis Journal.
True Christians everywhere feel a
longing desire to see the cause of the
Redeemer prosper and triumph, to
see all the people lifted up, civilized,
christianized and saved and are wil
ling to labor for this grand end.
While many Christians are fired
with zeal and long to go to the dark
reions where Christ is not known to
tell the story of the iross, and point
the perishing thousands to the bleed
ing lamb of God there are many
souls for whom Christ died, even in
this beautiful land of ours, this laud
of Churches and Gospel privileges',
who are perishing for lack of Chris
tian effort and sympathy.
ineiu arc auoui two score ot in
digent, unfortunate (many of them
degraded) human beings nt our coun
ty Infirmary who are provided by
the State with no educational privi
leges or religious training, bo, if
there is any such privilege or train
ing for them, it must be through vol
untary Christian effort. Who will
come to the rescuer Jesus left the
glory that he had with the Father,
before the world was came to earth,
lived.a life of poverty, suffered, bled
and died, that these. unfortunate be
ings might be enlightened, repent,
believe and be saved. But they are
incarcerated in the Poor-house the
very name is repulsive to many 'tis
not a pleasant place to visit. Shall
they therefore be left to linger out
their days in this uninviting place
their earstbeinggrceted each Sabbath
day with the chime of the church
bells of the city and no kind Chris
tian friend to visit them, and speak a
word of cheer, or point them to the
bleeding laihb of God. AVill they be
left here to linger out their three
score years without a ray of hope or
beacon light to guide them to that
world unknown?
In that day, when the earth and
the sea shall give up their dead
some one will be pronounced lost, be
cause others, even Christians, were
not willing to stoop to lift them from
the depths to which they liad fallen.
It would require no great sacrifice,
talent or effort on the part of many
of our good brothers or sisters, to
visit these people occasionally, and
talk to them individually, and pray a
little with them. They would feel
that some one cared for them and felt
an interest in their eternal welfare.
And even should there be no fruit of
all your toil, you will never be any
the worse off" for having done what
you considered to be your duty.
.
"Children and Fools, etc."
From the Leavenworth (Ks.) Times.
During the height of the excite
incut iu w.
..i
I II If T I
western part of the city one evening
last week.a little child about fouryears
old, was noticed to leave its mother,
aud iu a noisy manner to perambu
late the various aisles, as jf in search
of some one. At last, giving a loud
cry of "Oil, mamma, here's papal"
rushed into the Jap of a young, un
married gentleman, whose fccelings,
it is to be presumed, can ha better
imagined than described, when it is
known that the mother of the child
was well known to many of those
present as a dashing widow, to whom
the young man had lieen for some
time past paying considerable atten
tion. He did not remain until the
close of the services, at any rate, and
for a while, more laughter than tears
agitated the congregation.
TnE sentiments of Mr. Coke, the
new Senator from Texas, if there
port of a speech which he.matle in
Austin, Texas, ou the 29th of April,
is correct, will not produce confidence
cither in his judgment or his patri
otism. During his discourse, which
was understood to be a bid for the
United States Senatorship, Governor
Coke reviewed at length his career as
a Confederate soldier, and declared
he would repeat it should the oppor
tunity offer. So rash were his utter
ances that it is feared by his friends
that they will he published and cir
culated at the North as a campaign
document
"Young ladies have the privilege
of saying anything they please during
leap year," she said, eyeing him
out of the corner of her eyes with a
sweet look. His heart gave a great
bound, and, while he wondered if she
was going to ask the question which
he had so long desired and fear
ed to do, he answered, "Yes." "And
the young men must not refuse,"
said sue. "No, no: now couiu
they?' sighed he. "Well, then,"
said she, "will you" He fell on his
knees and said, "Anything yon ask,
darling." "Wait till 1 get through.
Will you take a walk, and not hang
around our house so much?" And
he walked.
An ingtmius bummer has invented
new way of getting his liquor. He
puts two pint bottles in his coat-
pocket, one full of water, the other
empty. Then he goes into a'saioon
and asks for a pint of gin, handing
out the empty bottle. When he gets
the gin he puts the bottle in his
pocket and tells the barkeeper to
"Hang it up." Barkeeper naturally
objects, and demands cash or the gin;.
Bummer reluctantly hands him the
bottle of water, and goes out mutttff
ng about "some folks being so con
founded pertickuler." r
Quincy fill-) Whig: Who will be
the next President? That is a ques
tion the solution of which may now
be said to have advanced close upon.
the verge or certainty, and the terms
of the problem make him out to bo
both a positive quantity, and a Re
publican. Further, the cool mathe
matician of the time is enabled to
eliminate this and that quantity frdta
the different sides of his. equation',
until he finds 'the answer.ttdieja&itbr
moral certainty, betweei?!
Blaine and Baistow,, pS"1

xml | txt