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The Highland weekly news. [volume] (Hillsborough [Hillsboro], Highland County, Ohio) 1853-1886, March 17, 1881, Image 1

Image and text provided by Ohio History Connection, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85038158/1881-03-17/ed-1/seq-1/

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-X . 'V,. ' 1
Devoted to News, Politics, Literature, Agriculture, Manufactures, and the Ceneral Interests of Highland County.
VOL. 41-NO. 52.
HILLSBOROUGH, HIGHLAND COUNTY, OHIO, THURSDAY, MARCH 17, 1881.
WHOLE NO. 23-3S.
0' -vr -s.
J
Published Every Thursday.
J. L. DOARDMAM,
EDITOR AND PROPRIETOR.
OFFICE Corner of Main and Short Street, Op
posite Made Ball.
Business Directory.
Cardnnaentd under thif bead at tb following
rstoo: f or 1 inch .pace, $10 a year; X inch, $6 a
jmT ; V inch, M a year.
WTwelre line o Itai. type make 1 Inch.
IRWIN & IIAEES,
ATTOUNEY8 AT LAW.
OREirNflED ASX HlUf OBO.
GaraxrrcLD Orrica fcw.rt'. Block. .
Hiujxhi) Orpicr Merchants' Nat 'I Bank Block.
W. H. Ibwik, GreenleW, O.
novlltl i. E. Miu, Hiiiboro, O.
LIADDOX BEOS.
Saddles. Harness, Collars,
Also, Rope Halters and Whip
AT WHOLESALE.
At the Old Stand, High Street,
South of Main, Hiilsboro.
j.r.i.Dur.:Er:iL,
A.TTOB1TET JT X.-fVW.
Office Stransa Buildir.p.Main 8t, Hlllsboro.O
nov"l
Dr. S. J. SPEES
V r ILL now give hit entire time to the practice
4 of hie Profession. He has had extenelye
experience and will give special attention to the
Treatment ot Chronic Dieeanea.
Ovnca In McKibben'a New Block, op itaira,
Hiph Street. Residence, West Wainot bt., near
the Pnhllc bchool House, Eiiiaboro, Ohio.
)nlyl
C. H. Collins. f- B. Wori.it.
COLLINS & VTORLEY,
Attorneys at Law,
0ce In Smith's new Block, Sd atory, corner Main
and Hsph Streets, Hlllfooro, uhto. )anlVyt
I) ft. A. EYAXS,
SUEGSOIT JDEOSTTIST,
Office Smith's Block, M sin Street, over Calvert's
DrvGoods Store. ALL WOitK WARRANTED.
t ebrnary t, 1871. febyl'
ALPE0N80 HART.
K. T. HOUOB.
EAET & HOUGH,
Attorneys at Law.
Office Bank Building, corner of Main & High St.
HILLBORO, O. jyiot
J. R. Callahan, D. D. S.
DENTIST!
Office In STRAUSS BUILDING, Ma'.o Street,
first door to rirht, np glairs.
marl3ii
a. HAnr.iAn,
ATTOE1TEY -A-T LAW.
Office, Southeast Corner Main and tllgh St room
np alaini. aogljl
EIILBY stiitii,
ATTOItXET AT LAW
Office over Smith'! Drn? Store, Hiilsboro, O.
decUU
JOHN T. EIRE,
irTOIiSET AT LAW,
HILLSBOItO, OHIO.
Office in Smith's New Building, Id story.
autyl
11. C. ItXSS, 21. O-,
Phyaioian. Burgeon and Aooouotiaur
HILLSBORO. OHIO.
Office Main 8treet, next door weat of Newa Office.
es:denc Sooth High 8t Booth of South Streot.
myiyl
J. K. PICKEUIXG,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
Xotary Public and Land Surveyor.
Office removed to corner of Main and High
streets, over Hay nee A Co. 'a itore marlutf
W. W. SHEPHERD, M. D.,
Phrilelan and Snrgeon,
ElLLSBOnO, - - OHIO
Office on Short Street, two doors west of Hieh St.
OF r ICE HOURS From 8 to A, M 1 to P. V.
to 8 P. M. and all day Saturday. dectyl
A.O.Matthews. D. M. Huygius. H. E. Qulnn.
Matthews, Huggins&Quinn
ATTOBNEYS AT LAW,
Office corner of High and Short Sts np ataira.
marflma
CYRUG riEVVBY,
ATTOKXEY AT L4U',
Office In Smith's New Building, 2d story, fcblyl
HILLSBOEO, O.
Col. A. T. COOH, - Proprietor.
Haviuj? leased this well-known Hotel, I would
aj to the public that ! will spare no pain or ex
pun to mttke it Brut-claw iu ever respect. Give
tut cull.
fiiUUro October 1 l73. oct3tf
Daily r.leat r.larket !
CHAS. 1NGEBRAND,
SUCCKSSOK TO r. ZANE.
High St 2 doors South of Smith Block,
Will suduIt the public dally with
ITresIi Beef,
VEAL, MtTTON, PORK.
SAL'S AGK-MK AT, HAMS, tc
Ot the very oest qnallty, and at price, as low as
any ot'jer etabiihment.
Store, and families snpplied with fresh Bo
logna. A continuance of the public patronage solicited.
CASH paid for GOOD CATTLE AND HOGS.
January 1, lsu. jaulvl
TTiuunT E. Patke,
Late CoTHittMontr of IatenUt.
Besj. F. GBArro. Stobt B. Ladu.
ip j. x m isi re m ,
PAI5E, GR1FT0X k LADD,
AUornoji at Lav, and SoUclun t of A n-eriAax
and Foreign Patent,
12 Firm Street, WASBINQTON. D. C.
Practice patent law In all Its brn' dies iu tue
Patent i)il!ce, and the Supreme and Circuit Court,
the United Slate.. Pampiilet sent free.
noviftfwN
OLD PAPERO
Bale
AT T1TI3 OFFICE
a 151) cent, a hundred. Storekeeper! will tealfc
a uvir.e by using them a. wraypuig paer.
uar.iU
Horse and Cattle Powders !
THE BEST IN THE MARKET,
AT
Per Package, Done up In Lbs. TRY THEM!
iix3A.X3C?xj.xi.ti:xx6 port
DENIG'S COUGH BALSAM
25
AT
Per Bottle The Best Couh Remedy In Use Try
Or. "W". BARRERE,
jani3 The Druggist
Family Groceries and Produce.
The Firm of STKOUP & BAYLESS, Family Groceries, Las been dis
solved by mutual consent, and the
Stand, in
LILLEY'S BLOCK, NORTH HIGH STREET,
Under the Firm name of
The Thanks of the old Firm ure
heretofore extended, and a continuance of the same is respectfully solicited.
TTE WILL SELL
GOOD GOODS A T THE Z0 WES1 PRICES.
And can make it your interest to give us your patronage.
Highest Market Price Paid for
JQTGoods delivered free to any
dec23m6
All the FasMciiaWe Fall and 7inter Styles of
-n::"
'hi.
L
AT II R. ORE'S OLD STAND,
October 21, ISM).
1 Li OJ.
tlrrll!
FALL, REMOVAL. 1880.
TUE OLD .RELIABLE
Stevenson & Young,
FASHIONABLE CLOTHIERS
Have removed to the room formerly occupied by Capt. John Matthews, 3d door
east of Merchant National Bank.
With our increased facilities we are prepared to offer
UNSURPASSED ATTRACTIONS IN CLOTHING,
BOTH AS TO QUALITY,
A LARGE STOCK of EEADY-MADE constantly on hand to (select from.
CLOTHING MADE TO ORDER, and a -plendid assortment of gooda to choose
from. vIIATS. CAPS. AND GENT'S FURNISHING GOODS in IMMENSE
VARIETY.
PLEASE GIVE TJS -A. CALL.
sepoOtf
NEW
IIABBLE AND GRAHITE WORKS
-M
Foreign
AT VEST LOW PEICES.
Call and sec us before purchasiun. 8 w Satisfaction guaranteed.
Haul on & Lemon.
Mr. JAMES STOCK WELL is unrTravelinp
Head this, Every iDocly!
IT WILL INTEREST YOU!
The late Grocery Firm of MILLER & LOYD having Dissolved, the Subscriber will continue the Busi
ness at the Old Stand,
1STO. 17 SOUTH HIGH STEEET, HILLSBOEO,
Keeping on band at all times the choicest
FAMILY GROCERIES & PROVISIONS !
You can wait for the Wagon, as we make
FEEE UELIVEUTT
Of goods to every part of the city.
FLOUR AND FEED A SPECIALTY.
Wxtx. XX. LOYD,
fubl(hu3
25
m CTS.
CTS.
It!
business will be coctined at the Old
returned for the Liberal Patronuge
all Kinds of Country Produce
part of Town. Stcabt Batless,
John Baylesb.
CLOAKS,
HATS,
BONNETS,
m re ran n o
FLOWERS,
FANCY GOODS
U EXE It ALLY,
1IAS0SIC BLOCK, HIGH STREET
niTjZtBBOHO, O.
STYLE AND PRICES.
We retnrn oar thanks to thepablic for their Hberitl patronsge
in the laM year, and ak contJDaance of the name.
We oiler at greatly reduced price all kiude of
American and Italian Marble
MONUMENTS
And Cemetery Work.
ALSO
and American Granites
Salesman.
febJOvl
Successor to MILLER & LOYD.
cj,
To Western Emigrants.
For maps, railroad time tables, laud circulars,
land exploring tickets, low rates on household
t?oola aud Block, and reliable lutormatiou relative
"""WEST,
Call on or address
JOHN II. KELLEY,
General Emigration Agent, northwest corner
Fourth and Vine atreeis, directly opposite the
Post Office, Cincinnati, Ohio.
To Land Buyers a Free Ride
Over land-grant roads.
I am the only agent eaat of the MiMtftippl Riv
er acting under appointment received from Uot
eruora of Western titatea. My dotiea are to tee
that yna get reliable information and the beat
possible rates on transportation.
Ixjn't fail to call on or write me before making
any arranomccts relative to moving your people
or property.
tW I make no charge for my services.
THE UICKFOBD
Automatic Family Knitter.
K
5 B
3 0 C
IT,
2 "
g-S Z
c "3
III!
I
Z4
Knit, all size, of work, narrow, and widens It
shapci all sues complete. Knits over io different
trsrnicnu, focka, Stockings, Mittens. Levins,
Wristlets, Gloves, etc. 15 per cent, profit in man
factnrlDg knit good.. Farmer, can treble the
rain of their wool, by converting it Into knit
goods.
Agent, wanted in every 8tate, County, City and
Town, to whom very low price, will be made.
For full particular, ana lowest price, for U)
Bkkt Kimilt MiCHiJt .end to
BICKPOBD KMTTISGHACniNEMFOCO,
decl6ai6 lirsttiebora, Vt
one
Yon
all
to
.r, lit
I 1
viUL-LiijU
Jwajra Care and never Diaappoints
The- world's great Pain-Reliever
for Man and Beast. Cheap, quick
and reliable.
PITCHER'S CASTOEIA is not
Xarcotic. Children grow fat
upon, Mothers like, and Physi
cians recommend CASTOHIA.
It regulates the Bowels, cures
Wind Colic, allays Feverislmess,
and destroys "Worms.
WEI DE MEYER'S CATARRH
Cure, a Constitutional Antidote for
this terrible malady, by Absorption.
The moat Important Discovery sinco
Vaccination. Other remedies may
relieve Catarrh, this cures at any
stage before Consumption sets In.
fuoluwtfcugn
11
tss
LYDIA E. FiaKHAM.
CF LYNN, MASS.
DISCOVERER Or
LYDIA E. P.?.I.Ar.T3
COMPOUND..
For all Temale Complaints.
This preparation, as its name tifrnifipi, consists of
VecetabSt Properties that are hormlc&j to the most dei
tcatetnTmiid. Upon one trial the merits of this Com
P0OB4 will be rocotfnlxod, as relief is immediate j and
when Its use Is continued, in ninety-nine cases In a hun
sired, a permaacntenre is effecto13 thousands will tes
tify, Ob account of Its proven merits, It Is to-day rt
mmwitritf aad prescribed by the best physicians la
the country.
It will ear entirely the worst form of f ailing
of the uterus, Leacorrhoua, irregular and painful
Menstruation, all Ovarian Troubles, Inflammation and
Ulceration, Flooding, all Displacements and the con
aequsnt spinal weakness, and is esiecialjy adapted to
lbs Cnantrs of Life. It will dissolve and expel tumors
from ah sterns In an early st&ee of development. The
tendency to cancerous humors there Is checked very
Speedily by its use.
In fact It has proved to bo the (Treat
est and best remedy that has ever bced discover
ed. It permeates every portion of the syntem, and (rives
new life and vigor. It removes f aintness.flataleney , de
stroys all eravinjr for stimulants, and relieves weakness
of the stomach
It eores Bloati&ir, Headaches, Nervous Prostration,
General Debility, Sleeplessness, Depression and Indl
yastlon. That feeling1 of bearing down, causing pain,
weight and backache. Is always permanently cured by
Its use. It will at all times, and under all cirtrunistan
esa, act in harmony with the law taut governs the
female system.
For Kidney Complaint- of either Bex this compound
Is tinsurpasaed.
Lydia E. Pinkham's Vegetable Compound
Is prepared at 233 and 235 Western Avenue, Lynn, llasa.
Price $1.00. Six bottiea f or $i.00. Strut by mail in the
form of pills, also in the form of Lozenges, on receipt
of price. $1.00, per box, for ei-her. Mrs. PINK HAM
freely answers all letters of inquiry. Send for pam
phlet. AddrenH oj obovo Mention thi paper.
ho family ebould be without LYDIA E. PINKHAJT
LIVER PILLS. They euro ConipAtion, DdioutUicaia,
and Torpidity of the Liver. ST cents per hoz.
JOHN D. PARK A SON. tien. Ats, Clncinnatf.O
&oia ny ax.iBt.HL iiuicDoro, u,
jyiylHPU
ROBINSON WAGON CO.
MANUFACTURERS Of
FARM &
SPRING
BUGGIES & PHAETONS.
WE OFFER orit
Standard Trads Vehicles
TO THE TRADE.
Work that has an established rrrmtatinn. n1
that can be hanilied with satisfaction, both to
buyer and seller.
5cna tor oesi;ns and prices to
H. C. WRICHT,
North High St., Hiilsboro, Ohio.
Agent for Highland Co.,
decl6yl
Examinations cf Teachers.
THE Board of School Examiners of Highland
countv clve notice, that examinations of An.
plicants for Certificates will take place in the Hille
boro Union School building on the first Saturday of
every uiomn, ana on me inira saruruay ot enrua
marcn, Apru, August, September and uctoher.
1 he ii.xainination fee prescribed by law is 50 cts
By order of the Board.
auS4rl II. S. DOGGETT. Clerk.
IIPI J) Tonreelves by making mrn.y wiien a
ilLLl Blden chance is ottered, thereby al
ways keeping poverty fruui vour door.
Those who take advantage of the good chances for
making money that are offered, generally become
wealthy, wnile tnose who do not improve such
uauted, rt-iuitin m poveriy. v e want many men,
lomen, boys and sriris to work for ns ru'lit in
their own localities. The business will pay more
than ten times ordinary wages. We furnish an
expensive outfit, and all that you need, free. No
who eugages fails to make money rapidly.
can devote yonr whole time to the work, or
onlyyonr spare moments. Full information and
that is needed sent free. Address
dec23yl SijKaojt 4; Co., Portland, Maine.
OXX1MOH.B fJh CO..
Law and Collection House,
629 P Street, - WASHINGTON, D. C.
Make Collections. Netrot late Loans and attend
all business confided to them. Laud .Scrip.
Soldier's Additional Homestead Rights, and Laud
Warrants bought and sold. uov25tf wna
WANTED! giSoJiE
Steady work all Spring aud
Snmmer. For Particulars addreBS
)
r
cm
-vrf..
Vagons
aiarl0w4D4co. J. C. McCcbdy
4 Co. Tliilad '.
3
IIILIABOROrCIf, OIUO.
THURSDAY, MARCH 17, 1 881.
Subscription Terms.
Wall Subscribers Postage Free.
Siaglecopy, one year
' 4 A M.n,),.
1
" , mouths..... 4 T
" 4 mouths 5
' S months 4
nrPayment inrariably in advaneo. No paper
cnt hy mail iougcr than the time paid for.c.j
I"-An extra copy will be sent gratia, tor every
clnbof 10 snbscribers at the above rates.
" The above rates include poalait prepaid
his office on all papers aunt to subscriber outside
of Highland county.
j BnoncriDers woo receive moir papers 9 7
either on the margin Of the paper or on i
the outside wrapper, will understand that m
the term of anhscrlption paid for has expired.
4T All postmasters are authorised to act as
Agents for the News, to receive and forward sub
scriptions. WMaii Biibscrlbers whose time ha9 expired,
can renew their subscriptions conveniently by
handing the money to their postmaster.
Town and Hiilsboro 'P. O. Sub
scribers. To Subscribers in Hiilsboro aud vicinity, the
Niws will be promptly delivered by Carrier, or at
the Post Office ot office of publication, on the fol
lowing terms :
in advance, or within 1 month $1 50
At the end of 6 months '.. 1 75
At the end of the year 8 00
ts"An advance payment preferred in all cases.
Subscribers will be notitied of the exp'ration of their
time by a cross on their papers, or by bills enclosed.
N. B. We do sot discontiuue papers sent to
Town Subscribers uuleps specially ordered to do bo,
until all arrearages are paid, as a general rule. A
failure to order a discontinuance is considered as
equivalent to ordering the paper continued.
ADVERTISING RATES.
1 w.;3 w.
$0 501 1 00
4 w. 3 m.ift m.iG m
1 y'r
H inch...
1 inch....
8 inches..
3 inches..
4 inches...
1 S.V 1 75 g 50
3 50! 3 501 5 00
4 00: 6 50 7 00
3 if: 6 00
1 00
3 00
3 75
4 75
50;1000
9 0011500
3 00
3 00
3 50
6 50 7 00 9 00
12 00 19 00
5 50 C 50! S 50110 50 14 00 S2 00
00 8 00 10 00' 12 00 16 00' 25 00
S SOllOOOilSBOIlSOOiaOOOjSOOO
10 00 11 50 15 00:1 6 00 j25 00i 40 00
5 inches.... 4 00
H col 5 50
col 7 00
tcol...
t col
. 6 00;1300ll400il750 20 00 33 00 ; 50 00
.10 00! 17 00,21) tO. 30 00, MS 00, 50 00; SO 00
The above scale of prices is for ordinary single
column display advertising. Solid Legal, Official
and Tabular advertisement, will be charged at the
legal rate for space occupied. Rule and Figure
work 50 per cent, extra.
Special Notices, advertisements in other than
single column measure, and those in a prescribed
location, 24 per cent additional.
Local Notices 10 cents per line for first, and
cents per line for each additional insertion.
Cards in BasinesB Directorv One inch,l year
$10: months, $6; 3 months, $3. One-half inch
year, $5 00; nios. S3; 3 mos. $3.
Obituary Notices (otherthan simple announce
ments of deaths,! Tributes of Respect, Cards of
Thanks, and announcements by Societies 6 cents
per line.
Notices of Marriages, Births and Deaths when
furnished by properauthority free.
Attachment, Divorce, Admlnistrators'and Execn
tors' Notices, must he paid for before insertion
as also Foreign and Transient Advertising gener
ally.
.
SPECIAL NOTICES.
tw Tho entrance to the new Editorial Room of
the News is on Main street, one door west of Ciias,
cock, Qnion A Co.'s hardware store, by the stair.
wav leading to Dr. Russ's office.
ttf Extra copies of the News can be fonnd cv
ery week at George Bowers' Neivs Depot, and also
at tnis omce. rriceo cents.
t3f Correspondence solicited from all Darts o
the connty. Send n tho facti, in few words, and
we win pnt mem in snape tor pnoitcation. in
writer's real name must be given iu all cases, as
guaranty of good faith.
The Nkws having s mnch larger circulation !
Highland coauty than any other paper, and anion
the best class of readerB, Is the best advertui
medium. Business meu will please note the
fact, ana act accordingly.
!Totiii "Em,
From the dawn of spi ins till the years grow
hoary,
Nothing is new that Is dune or said.
The leaves are to ling the i:ime o'iI story
"Btuliling, bursting, 1U in. de:i'l."
And ever anil nlv.-nvs the wild wind's chorus
Is "coming. l'tiiMhig. lUti'g, lied."
Never the r.nut'l e.'in h roams or ranges
Out of lief civrrit Ml obi. ooM,
And the sinl:e o' the bun Lnows but these
changes
Beftniing, bin nlnr, tender, roUl,
As spring lime ekifions or winter estranges
The mighty heart ot' this orb of gold.
From the great tire's birth to the last mom's
breaking
There were tempest, sunshine, fruit and
frost.
And the sea was calm or the sea was shaking
His mighty main like the lion crossed,
And ever this cry the heart was making
Longing, loving, losing, lost.
Forever the wild w ind wanders, crying.
Southerly, easterly, north and west.
And one worn song the fields are 6ighlng,
1 Sowing, growing, harvest, rest,"
And tho tired thought of the world, replying
Like an echo to what ia last and lest,
Murmurs ''Rest."
A COSTLY BARGAIN.
Two lovely women, sitting in a room
that, in its luxurious adornments and
furnishings, ils cheery sunshine and
delicious faint perfume, was a fitting
surrounding for its fair occupants, little
Mrs. Deluiiiiue, dark and bewitching as
a gipsy princess, in her pink cashmere
dressing-gown, with its big square but
tons of solid gold, and stately Myra
Bellairs, fair as a blushing rose, with
her haughty red mouth and bewilder
ing violet bine-eyes that to everyone in
the world were cold and serene, except
10 Ariuur lorrens, the only man in tho
world who had ever won her love, and
who had won it and held it, and made
her absolutely hapiiv.
But Myra and her chief friend, Lucy
jjeituaine, were not uisctis-ung her lov
er just at this niomeut, Jjtit the object
01 iiieir aniiuateti conversation lay care
fully displayed on the rose silken couch.
a marvellously magnificent dress of
foamy lace.
"And only thirty pounds! It seems
incredible."
Mrs. Delmaine caressed it with, her
fair diamond hand.
"It wast lie oreatest bargain I ever
hean.1 of," Mvrasaid, in her low. exnuis-
ite voice. "I havo always wanted a
real lace dress, but 1 certainly never ex
pected to fiiul one so cheap and so mag-
miiccnt as this, it is worth a hundred
and fifty pounds."
"I think so," Mrs. Delmaine return
ed. "How did you happen to secure
such a wonderful" bargain, dear?"
"I saw an advertisement in tho
Queen, saying that a real lace dress
must be disposed of at a groat sacrifice.
So I went to tho address a very re
spectable lodging house, in Blooms
bury, and found the dress and the own
er a pale, miserable-looking creature,
but a lady born aud bred and she had
been very beautiful once, I think."
Mrs. Delmaine listened attentively.
"What a charming story! Do con
tinue, Myra, dear."
"There is really very little to tell,"
she said. "I asked to be shown the dress,
and she opened tho square cedar box,
lined with satiu, that contained it, and I
at oneo fell in love with it, although I
took care not to let her know that.'
Mrs. Delmaine laughed softly.
"Of course not."
"She told me it was the sole remain
ing relic of former wealth. She said
she had parted with everything. They
had been wealthy French people, it
seemed and really she was most re
fined and ladylike but so ill and weak
she could not speak much without
coughing. This," and Myra laid her
dainty, pearl kidded hand on the dress,
"was her wedding-dress, and never
worn but once; cost two hundred pounds
when lace was not so expensive as
now."
"And yourgot it for less than a quar
ter of its proper value. Mvra. how did
you do it?'' 1
0"
at
5
1
Myra lifted her eyebrows ia ft cofil
posed way. ..
"I simply told her what I would givo
her, and although I knew she would
think it a terrible sacrifice, she would
also know that thirty pounda in cash
was better than the useless garment in
the box."
"Of course she was not foolish
enough to refuse it, but Myra it was a
tremendous bargain for vou.
"Of course," Miss Btllairs said, com
placently, "but people in reduced cir
cumstances must expect to make sacri
fices. I could have given her a hundred
pounds and still secured the dress cheap
ly; but I preferred to do tho best J
could."
Her blue eyes rested in loving prido
on the dress.
'And only' thirty pounds!" sighed
ill's. Delmaine. "1 am afraiul am en
vious, alyra: hv, the box alone is a
treasure it is .worth five pounds at the
least.
"I rather admire it," Myra said, com
placently. "Did you see the name on
the inner lid? ' u-i-aceuse L)e L,tslai.
Avec amour. Dieu vous garde? Just
atnilo romantic, isn t it.'' '
A look of womanly sadness was tern
porarily in Mrs. Delmaine's bright dark
eyes.
And pitiful Mvra
Miss Bellairs arose to finish her call,
while Mrs. Delmaine's deft-fingered
maid returned the dress to its box.
"I certainly feel very sorry for the
poor thing, she saul, cokily, "but
tlare say the money will do her a great
oeai 01 goou. 1 nope Arthur will like
it."
She went down to her carriage, beau
tiful, stately, high-bred as some young
princess, and Arthur Torren's who was
as much. at homo in Mrs. Delmaine's
house as in his mother's, by virtue of
cou3inship, took himself up from the
lounge in the room adjoining that in
which his cousin ana his betrothed,
both profoundly unaware of his prox
imity, had discussed the purchase.
"Can it be possible, can it bo possi
ble, that of all women in tho world, the
woman 1 love is a grasping, unscrupu
lous bargain-maker and that, too,
towara a sister woman, sick ana in
want? Can it bo possible?-'
Ho went up and down, up and down
the room, his rapid, emphatic steps at
tracting Mrs. Delmaine's attention.
"Arthur! Why, I did not hear you
como in."
"Nevertheless, I came in as I usually
come, and havo had the pleasure of
hearing the report ol islyra s success in
cheating Madame Gracieuse De Lesley
on the lace dress question. And you
"Were either not brave enough or not
honorable enough to brand the tran
saction, the swindle it was."
Mrs. Delmaine looked at him in sur
prise. "Arthur! what do you mean? Why
you are; "
"Yes, I am if you mean astonished
and indignant beyond measure. I
would not havo thought Mvra could be
guilty of such well, we won't speak of
Twenty-four hours lator Mr. Toirens,
reading his morning paper, uttered an
exclamation of almost horror, for
amongst tho news was a paragraph to
the effect that a Madame Gracieuse Do
Lesley, a most estimable lady of reduc
ed circumstances, had committed sui
cide, leaving as her reason a noto writ
ten to her daughter, that she had paid
away her last penny, received for the
disposal of her wedding dres3, to satis
fy her creditors that death was prefer
able tQ starvation. And that the daugh
ter etching home to her dead motEer
was nearly heart-broken with grief and
horror, and had not a friend or relative
in the world.
Arthur Ton-ens read it over with in
tense interest. Then he ordered a han
som, and drove to where fair littie Vi
vian De Lesley met him, her bonnie
blue eyes all disfigured with weeping,
her rosebud of a mouth quivering like
a baby's.
"You must let mo bo your friend," he
said so earnestly, so gravely, that she
believed him and trusted him at once,
and told him all her sorrowful story.
And that same hour, Myra Bellairs
wondered why her lover did not come
to escort her "to select her antique jew
elry. And again- -not many weeks after
wards Myra learned that Arthur Tor
rens wi.ul.l never escort her anywhere
a :;n as !,er lover, for in binding up. a
v.i.wiid her own fair, cruel hands had
helped to make, he had found a truer,
higher, womanhood, and gave his hon
or and love into Vivian De Lesley's gen
tle keeping. H lulo the lace dress, with
the satin-lined box, whose inscription
reads, "Avee amour. Dieu vous garde,"
never sees tho light of day, and a fair
faced, haughty woman often cries over
it as she thinks its price was Arthur
Torrens and his love.
The Eyesight of Readers.
A writer in the Library Journal calls
attention to the dangers which readers
run of injuring their eyesight by the
use of a bad light. He remarks that
engravers, watchmakers, and all othera
who use the eyes constantly in their
work, take extra care to preserve them
by getting the best possiblo light by
dav, and using the best artificial light
at night. The great army, of readers
are careless, and have, sooner or later,
to pay the penalty of their carelessness
by giving up night work entirely, and
sometimes reading, except at short
intervals and under the best conditions,
All departures from common type,
making the matter more difficult for
the eye to take in, increase the danger.
Ihe magnitude of the physical labor of
reading is not appreciated. A book of
500 pages, forty lines to tho page and
fifty letters, to the line, contains 1,000,
000 of letters, all of which tho eye has
to take in, identify and combine each
with its neighbor. Yet many readers
will go through such a book in a day.
The task is one he would shrink from if
he should stop to measure it before
hand. Tho best position and best
lights, clear type, plain inks, with the
best paper of yellowish tints and abund
ant space between the lines, atlord the
best safeguards against harm.
a3
Origin of "Boycotting."
"In his lecture, James Redpath relat
ed how the term 'Boycotting' first came
to be coined and applied, lie had been
breakfasting with Rev. John O'Mally,
parish priest of the Lough Mask district
at the time that Captain Boycott and
the tenants of the estate of which he
was agent were at daggers' points. 'I
am troubled,' said Kedpath to Father
O'Mally, 'to find an apt word by which
to call this Land League, and I can't
get at it. bupposo you try your hand at
it, irather John.-" ' hy not can it
Boycotting? replied t ather O Mally,
promptly. That's tho idea, Father
John!' said Kedpath, 'you have hit the
nail on the head; soshall it be baptized.
Now, Father John, you give the cue to
our parishioners and I U post the
chiefs of the Land League, and the
thing is done. '
Ayer's Sarsaparilla is the proper remedy
to take in the spring of the year to purify
the blood, invigorate the system, .excite the
lver to actiou, and restore the healthy
one and vigor of the whole physical rne-
hauisiii, which olten becomes impaired
tiring the winter, by lack of open air ex
ercise, and the want of sufficient care in
the matter of diet. marlw2
say
do
[Correspondence of the News.
INAUGURATION NOTES.
BY ONE WHO WAS THERE.
The great stand erected for the
inauguration ceremonies was direct
ly east of the east front of the Cap
itol building. We watched the
crowd gather, and at noon the
mounted police coming up Pennsyl
vania Avenue, through, tho Capitol
grounds, rounding the curve of the
hill and coming into view, were the
forerunners of greater things. The
nodding yellow crests of the mili
tary guard of honor, from Ohio, were
caught by the late sunshine, and
looked beautiful, as they defiled in
front of the great length of the snow
white Capitol.
Shouts went up from thousands,
as the carriage, drawn by four bay
horses, cama over the hill, in which
were seated the President-elect and
President Hayes. Next came the
carriage with the Vice-President
elect and Hon. Geo. H. Pendleton,
and then the trim ship from the
Navy-Yard. Sailors reclined on its
deck, and stood aloft in the rigging.
After the ship, soldiers in blue, sol
diers in gray, scldiers in white and
blue, soldiers in abundance, until
they extended in rows of blue, red
and gray from the central stand
far out into the streets around. Mo
tionless these soldier-boys stood,
with their bayonets flashing like
" siver threads," along tho continu
ous file.
When the venerable Fred Doug
lass came out of the Senate Cham
ber and ascended the main stand,
erected over the steps of the central
portion of the Capitol, followed by
the President-elect, the waiting
crowd cheered wildly. Gen. Gar
field advanced to the front of the
flag-draped elevation, where he was
introduced by Senator Pendleton, and
there was a little group around him
that was the center of the gaze of
many thousand anxious eyes.
On the President's right were the
Chief Justice and his associates, in
gowns of black. Near by sat Gen.
Hancock, and at his side could be
distinguished the silvery hair and
white cap frills of Gan. Garfield's
aged mother. It is said that she is
about eighty years old. I could not
help thinking that any mother who
had raised as good a son as she had,
must be a grand, good woman, and
that James A. ought to be proud of
the old lady who wore the plain cot
tage bonnet, and take pleasure in at
tributing to his mother's influence
and guidance all his success if? life,
and that she ought to feel proud to
see her son standing on the highest
pinnacle of worldly greatness, as
President of the United States of
America.
Mrs. Hayes' white bonnet shone
like a star, a3 serenely as ever. Her
true womanly face inspired respect,
and seemed to light the way of the
new comers to the White Housa I
hope that we will all feel as proud of
Mrs. Garfield on the 4th dav of
March, lSSo, as we are of Mrs.
Hayes to-day.
After the oath was administered.
President Garfield kissed the Bible,
and then turned and kissed his
mother and wife. We pitied poor
Chester Arthur, as he had no wife to
kiss.
William English was not in attend
ance. I suppose Mr. English
couldn't get a free pass, and . there
was no emigrant train goiDg direct
to Washington, D. C. Or perhaps
he was unable to foreclose a mort
gage, in order to pay tho regular
fare on the B. & O. E. R. Besides,
he lost five cents down a crack in the
floor. ''Who is there to mourn" for
poor Bill English ? "Not one !"
We saw a great many distinguish
ed men during our three days' so
journ, and in our strolling around
we saw enough to convince us that
some of them devote a great deal of
time to the importunities of "John
Barleycorn." There are somo very
heavy drinkers in both Houses of
Congress, men who are as straight
a dart at home. I was credibly
informed that some Congressmen
were unable to leave their beds for
weeks at a time on account of
"malaria!" It seems as if the mem
bers are like some of our folks at
home they drink until their stom
achs are all gone and they are un
able to eat or drink anything, and
have to lay by for a week or two.
Thoy account for their condition
with the general explanation, "mala
laria." Malaria fiddlesticks ! It is
more like -Mt-atics ! Our people
ought not to countenance this fash
ionable drinking.
Tho physicians of Washington un
derstand their business.- When they
find an honorable Senator or Repre
sentative suffering from too much
rum, they tell him he has the "mala
ria.'' They charge him an extra ten
dollars, but he is willing to pay it to
deceive his constituents, his family
and friends. But we don't mean to
that all Congressmen drink whis
ky doubtless at least half of them
not. We are proud to know that
neither of our Ohio Senators drinks
a
of
and Pendleton
representative,
of commanding
influence.
The administration of President
Garfield starts out under very favor
able circumstances.
No American citizen should fail to
see the Capitol of his country. Like
the Capitol of ancient Rome, it
stands upon a hill, commanding a
view westward, one of the most beau
tiful my eyes have ever seen. The
Capitol is 751 feet in leDgtb, the
greatest breadth 324 feet. The whole
covers an area of three and one-half
acres, or 153,112 square feet
The next place that I saw, that
was of special interest,was the little
frame "Christian," or Campbellite
Church, on Vermont Avenue, be
tween N and O streets N. W., where
President Garfield and family have
heretofore attended divine services.
Long may our new and trusted
President livo to go to meeting at
the little church aforesaid !
liquors. Sherman
j are both sober,
i brainy men men
A. D. W.
We come to you with no uncertainty,
dui can say positively, that Den!g a tough
isalsam is the best thing ever ottered lor
coughs, colds, whooping couh. soreness of
the chest, and all throat and lung troub
les. It cures when other remedies fail.
marl7w2
Damascus(Penn.) Correspondence Phlis Times.
Sudden and Surprising Cure.
Miss. Lilhe Tyler, a relative of
Mr. William Tyler, the Postmaster
at this place, has been an invalid for
upward of six years. Doctors have
termed her complaint heart disease.
She has been treated by some of the
most noted medical men in the coun
try and has used all kinds of medi
cines she could hear of, with no re
lief. About a month ago Miss Tyler
heard of a lady living in Connecti
cut, who cured long standing dis
eases by prayer. A letter was sent
to this lady, and an answer received
from the worker of miracles, appoint
ing the day and the hour when Lil-
lie and her friends should engage in
prayer for her restoration to health.
The lady came at lust, and the in
valid's friends gathered at her bed
side. This was about a week 8go.
Miss Tyler was, at the time, too
weak to raise her head from the
pillow, and the company present in
cluded her uncle and aunt, Mr. and
and Mrs. Nathan Tyler, and her
pastor, the Rev. Thomas Westcott
At the appointed time the young
lady and her assembled relatives en
gaged in prayer. As remarkable as
it may seem, before the hour had
elapsed the young lady was suffi
ciently recovered to sit up in bed,
and has been rapidly improving ever
since. She is to-day in such an im
proved condition that she is able to
ride out, and her relatives are con
vinced that her complete cure will
result
"Facts are stubborn things," aud so are
coughs and colds, bnt the lutter will in
variably yield to Dr. Bull's Cough Syrup,
which costs but 25 cents.
His Solemn Warning.
Tall Street Dally Sews..
"Yaas, there's money made in stocks,
no doubt," said the old man, as, ha
removed his hat and ran his fingers
through his gray hair locks, "but it's a
reesky bizness; it's suthia' like betting
on whar lightning's going to strike,
with the odds in favor of hitting the
tree you stand under."
"Then you never speculate?"
"Never. I dig along the old farm,
takin' one crop with another, and pull
ing out stumps when I've nothing else
to do; and if I don't make any great
shakes, I haven't anything to worry
over. I hed a puity solemn warning
during the coal He excitement, and it
cured ma o' speculaiin."'
"How was that?"
"Waal, I was a widower then; wife
fell down the well and was drawed out
as stiff as a poker. I had a big farm,
lots of stock, and was called purty
solid. We all got excited about ile, and
all of less boles in search
us dug more or
of the stuff. All of a sudden a widder
living about two miles from me found
ile in a dozen.plaees on her farm. She
was a widder with a bad nose, freckles
all over her face, eyes on the squint,
and built up like a camel. But when
she struck ile that was a different thing.
Old Deacon Spooner, who was a wid
ower, got mashed right awav. Our
preacher, who had lost his third wife,
saw the spec. I thought it over and
concluded she was an angel. I guess
some six or seven of us begun courtin'
that widder within sixteen hours after
the first sight of ile. I know the pro
cession reached from the gate to the
house."
"And you got her?1'
"Not much I didn't, and that's what
I'm thankful for. Somehow or other
I couldn't work up the p'int That
nose kinder stood in tho way every time
was ready to pop the question. She
acted like she wanted me, but Deacon
Spooner got the best of all of us and
they made a hitch."
"And what?"
"Nothing, except she had dosed that
farm with a barrel of ile, and thus got
a husband for herself and a home for
her five children. When the news came
out I was so cold along the backbone
that they had to kiver me up with a
boss blanket, and since that time I
haven't had the nerve to buy eggs at
seven cent a dozen and hoUt'cm for a
rise."
A gentleman residing in New York,
jeweler by occupation, recently sent a
needy friend in Bridgeport, Con., a
second-nand suit oi ciotues. nen ine
Bridgeport man had worn them a day
or two he elt something like a small
button or a piece of a match inside the
linin of the vest pocket. Examination
revealed the presence of a handsome
diamond. Ho notified the New York
man, who was pleased to hear of the
recovery of the stone as it was valued
at something over foOO. It had been
loosened from a ring carried in the
pocket, and was thought to have been
lost bythe owner.
The combined capital in the national
bank3 in the State of Vermont i3
201.000. and the deposits in the savings
banks $9,075,314.
The Pennsvlvania Railroad Company
control thirty-five telegraph ofiices be
tween Altoona and Fitfcsburg, a distance
116 miles.
CHEAP READING!
READ THIS SPLENDID OFFER!
THE NEWS AND CINCINNATI COMMERCIAL.
BOTH ONE YEAR FOR ONLY $3.40
WITH TWO PREMIUM BOOK
WORTH $1!
Haviu made arrauieuieuts to club tbe New
and Cisci.i.nati WEtKLr ComienciAL, we an
nounce that we will furnish the News and Cixcts
kati Weeklt Coxni;nciAL, a larre, 8-pa?e, -column,
Family Newspaper, one year fur 3.10, and
will give as a free prize to each yearly subscriber
ander this clubbing arrangement any ono book he
may select from the following famous works
postage pai 1 and free of ali cost the books being
Harper's Editions, anabridged.beaiitifully printed
on good paper, ia covers, in addition to a copy of
our valuable Premium Book "The Home Guide,"
described in another columD, and a copy of which
can be seen at this office, or at any Post Office in
the connty :
1. "Jane Eyre," the celebrated novel which
made Cnarlotte Broute's fame.
2. "Theast Days ot I'Oinpeii'dnhver's hisl.wira
romance of onivera! popularity, ;tne most tasci
natinir of his productions.
a. "John Halifax, (ie'itleman." Miss Mulork's
uiiuiieriiiece; a story of the sorrow, and triumphs
"!'"'Ml birth aud iron fortune,
r-i i. ,, rosthnmon. Papers of the Pickwick
Club, the work that gave Charles Dickons his
celebrity: the moat humorous aud always the most
popular of his books.
5. "The History of a Crime," hy Victor lfuco
The terr.hle narrative hv the creat Feuch i.-t'
novelist and histnnarr, of the Crime of Lowis Nal
poleon. in strangling the liberties of his ooontrv.
6. Henry Lsmoud," a novel hy Wm. M TnaVk
eray the most artistic, popular and ebarscrenstic
of the works of the wisest novelist of his time
7. "Eothen." By Alexander William Kin-'iikp.
, u"" iiiaruuni; narratives ever writtro;
i. vi p.ju-pti.mre3 ot me in tue t.
st, including
aamirauie accounts of personal
E;:ypt and in the Holy Land.
experiences ia
o. Journal of the Pi -.jne ia London " By
Daniel Defoe, author of '-Itooinson Crusoe " Tne
true history, by one of the most d:-intifhel
writers in onr lanirusm-, of che mvsferious and
awtm visitation of the Plague to En-'and.
9. . "Poems of Wordsworth." t'hosen and edited
by Matthew Arnold. The most p.)pol:ir and se
lect edition of the works of one of Knanrt.
greatest poets, whose writing owe their own
celebrity largely to the excellent nnd.-rsiandin"
they display of the sentiment and scenerv oi
Country life. '
10. Three volumes "English Men of Letter"
(;n one) 1. Robert Burns. 2. Oliver Goldsmith,
I. Joun Bunyan. Of these vommes the tt is hy
Principal stiairp, the second hy William Black,
the brilliant novelist, and the third by James A.
ronrle, the (listinjpisned historian. No more
charming book than these three marvlous h ,."
raphies make up has been issned in modern time.
It. "tmlymion." hy Loan Bp leovsrirm
the latest literary sensation in England and Amer
lea a novel for whicri it ia said a larsrersum was
paid than was ever known, the late Premier net
ting $75,000 for the .MS. It is sparkling and pic
turesque a veritable historic romance.
It will be seeu that these books comprise a
wide range and striking diversity of tae moct
brilliant and pleasing productions of modern
authors, including Nov!, Poetry, Biosratihy aud
History-so that all tastes may be consulted and
each subscriber wi. I lie embarrassed omv by the
riches of the variety selecting his orite Vjok
for a FKEii PP.1ZK.
SLibscrijKions payable In advance, and the Free
Prize Hook must be ordered at the time Ihe papers
are subscriiied for.
Free specimen copies of the CisrtxtATi Week
ly CoxxERciALniay be obtaiued bv a-Jdress'ii"
M. HALsTEAD Js CO., Proprietors lommtrr-.l,
l inciiinati.Ohio. and tree specimen copies of tile
News can he churned --
J. L. BOARDMAN,
Nov. M.isse. iiiltsboro.Ouio.
Kidney Diseases.
Kidney diseased afliict the greater part
of the human race, aud they are constant
ly on the increase, but where the virtues of
Kidney-Wort have become known, they are
held in check and speedily cured. ' Let
those who have had to constantly dose
spirits of nitre and such stuff, give this
great remedy a trial and be cured. In the
dry form it is most economical, in the lip
oid the most convenient. Phila. Pre.-s.
A Large Piano Manufactory.
While it was well known that the Jlen
delssohn Piano was really an excellent
instrument, it was hardly suspected by the
other manufacturers that the demand for
it had increased to such au extent as to
warrant the makers ia erecting the larg
est piano manufactory in the world as a
centennial memorial of the success of the
instrument: but such was the case, and to
day the Mendelssohn Piano Manufactory,
eight stories in height, covering 73,0'X)
square feet of ground, from its location on
the corner of Tenth Avenue and 57th street
overlooks the Hudson river and the great
er part of Manhattan Islands. Chicago
Times.
The large factorv of the Mendelssohn
Piano Company, corner of Fiftv-seventh
street and Tenth Avenue, is well' worth a
visit. Une can here witness the various
and interesting steps iu the progress of
transforming the rough lumber and metal
into highly finished instruments. In. the
sale of thes Pianos; the Company have un
dertaken to treat the people with factory
prices, employing no agents. Instrument.
are sent on tnaj, and a verr intelligent
idea of what they are, and what musical
people think about them, can be obtained
hy sending for an illustrative and descrip
tive catalgue. With no expensive agents
and commissions, the Company decline to
give any discounts, thinking the lewnesa
of their prices and the merit of their coodn
will receive a liberel recognition from Pi
ano buyers. Morris Phillips, in Hume
Journal, July 4, 1877.
Young Folks' Corner.
PRIZES FOR ORIGINAL CONTRIBUTIONS.
Now, boy? and girls, heir ' fan for yon. For
the best Enigma, CharatU. Won. Square or Dia -nioiid.
Hidden V. on., Annrim, or Aril time? IcaI
'Problem, composed for the " "onier" hy a boy or
jirl nnder If, the eJimrwiil i?ive the i-hoice of
"The Youth's Companion, "Wide Awake" or
"Harper's Young People"ior tfu prttnt year, and
tor the second best, ''Our Yon.:g Foil:" for thi
present year. The contribution must he entirely
original, must b accompanied by the writer's real
name and P. O. address, and mn.-t be sent in by the
Imh;of April. Now let see who w ai pot ihe prize
March 10, 1SS1. tf
NO. 1—ENIGMA.
My .V 6 ,12, 4, a mineral.
My II, 4, 7, a man"? nanif.
My 1, :i, 7,4, an elevation of land.
Mr 12, 3, 7, to atfect with nnen.-inepf.
My 9, 2, 4, 7. a lanre wooden beetle.
My 1, S, lu, the cave of a wheel.
My , 11, 4, 7, to stamp coin.
The whole is the name of a very old sviz.
aiuautha, O. ii .
NO. 2—SQUARE WORD.
First, a very small particle.
Second, by the mouth.
Thiui, the end.
Fourth, a girl's name.
Hsniantha, O. Ot..
NO. 3—POETICAL ENIGMA.
Without a base the 1 to 3
Js whtTc the snides eventually
Must dwell to all eternity.
They must.
At 3 to 5 some peop?mcet
For friendly "smile," or friends to sreet,
It Hiio lies beneath the feet,
The 5 to 7 is apropos.
A guide stroke, or friendly blow,
Also some lriandert you kuow,
I trust.
I akeu my love if she would wed.
She frowned ami "thank voa, nor she said ;
My heart b.-at total as 1'tled.
"barf." On. Tiine-S'ar.
NO. 4—CHARADE.
Youui; people all.
Attend my call.
And heed this ood ad ice ;
WouNlft happy be?
Ttie way wnuidst see ?
I'll tell you in a trice,
Girl?, do not PitisiK
A siuu'le time;
Of totai. yon will ee;
Boys, threb, two, one,
It this is done.
Total can never be. Ib.
Answers in two weeks.
Answers to Young Folks' Corner of March 3 :
To No. 1 Daddy's Onty Sonn!e.
To No. 2 CiQ-cin-nst-1.
To No. 3 H
CON
COLO Tt
II O L I D AY
N O D n Y
R A Y
Y
To No, 4 Hood-man -blind.

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