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The Highland weekly news. [volume] (Hillsborough [Hillsboro], Highland County, Ohio) 1853-1886, July 21, 1881, Image 1

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Devoted to News, Politics, Literature, Agriculture, Manufactures, and the Ceneral Interests of Highland County.
HILLSBOROUGH, HIGHLAND COUNTY, OHIO,. THURSDAY, JULY 21, 1881.
WHOLE NO. 235G.
VOL io-NO. 18.
Published' Every Thursday.
J. L. BOARDMAH,
tUlTOB AXU 1'HtlPBIEIllH.
OKKh'K '.Vimer t M.1.11 and Short (Streets, dp
posttr Mnslc Hll.
Business Directory.
:rd BMTiediuiil.T thi head at the following
ft: fori inr.li Q a year; .H incn,n
yr , M il'n- W i-hf.
IWTwrrrr 'in- '"i- ne mnke 1 Inch.
irwin & Marks,
ATTORNEYS AT - LAW
f)ntNPiEi.i Ornce-n.ariV TUnrT: -HiMJUOkO
Office Merchants' Nitl'l H"k Work.
W. FT. Iltwis, Oreonflcld. (.
novllyl J. K. Marks, Hilluboro, O.
Maddox Bros.,
Saddles, Harness. Collars,
Also, Rope Halters and Whips
AT WHOLESALE.
'At the Old Stand, R'Rh Street,
South of M'lin, HUlsboro.
j. r.i.DUf.iEniL,
A.TTOE1TEY AT LAW.
Office Stranss Buililimr, Main 81., Hill eboro.O
nov) I
Dr. S. J. SPEES
TTILi,nowrhie,eulil'e tlme 10 the practice
ol his Profession. He has had extensive
.xperience nd will five special attention to the
Treatment of Chronic Diseases.
Omen In Mrkibbeu'a New Block, up stairs,
Hirh Ntret. Hesidence. Wwt Walnut St., near
the Pabiic School Uouse, ilillsboro, Ohio.
iall
C. R. Coixixa.
J. B. V'OBLET.
COLLINS k W0I1LEY,
Attorneys at Law,
Otf.rr Id 8m!th n-vr Block, ii story, corner Main
and Hlfih Streets, Hills"-m. Ohio. jnnlS-yl
IR. A. ETAXS,
s -ens o-:e oust xjesttist,
Offce Smith's Block, Mnln Street, over Calvert's
Drr Ooodn More. ALL WJKIi K'.vuu
February tebiyl
AtPHONSOHAHT.
. K. T. HOCOH.
HART k HOUGH,
' Attorneys at Law.
iMBre Bank Bullding.corner of Main & High Si.
HILLSBOKO. O. i jyt
J. R. Callahan, D. D. S.
DENTIST!
Office in STRAUSS BUILDING, lia'.n Street,
dret door to riirlil, np stairs.
mari5it
A. HARMAN,
A.TTOE1TEY A.T XiAW.
Office, bontiiM Corner Main and High Stx., room
np aiair.. augl)l
3HBBY SMITH,
ATTOKXET AT LAW
office over Smilli'f Dni? Store, nill?boro, O.
JOHN T. HIRE,
ATTOKXEY AT L A U
hii.lb;ro, ouio.
Office In Simthf Nw BuUdinz, Sd atory. .iyl
U. C. KISS, SI. IK,
i-br.ioiu. Bargoou and Aooouohour.
HILLSBORO, OHIO,
oiftce Hain Street, next door wtM c-I News office,
lie-bouth Ua 6u, south of bomb street.
yiyi
J. E. PICKEKICl,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
.Votary 7'W Xarui Surveyor.
Offlc rrao corner of Main and liieh
treei.over Huw Co.'.- .tore marlMt
W. W. SHEPHERD, M. D.,
Fb)K'Uu and Surgeon,
lilLLItaKO, - - OHIO.
( t au Slmt Street, two door wert of Htjh 5t
ti r H E liul KS f i.ui8to A. 1U 1 lo S P. M.,
to S l: M . and all djv Saturday. " decSyl
A.G.Waiihcwa. H. M. EagriuB. H.K. Quinn.
Ucithe-Jis, Huggins & Quinn
ATTORNEYS AT LA"W,
Office corner of and Short Sts., up f"tIrt.
CYRUG "FIEVVBY,
ATTOUXET AT LAW.
Office In Smith1 New Building, 2d atory. feblyl
ST. CHARLES HOTEL,
CORNER hTgh and gay strekts,
(S oqnares north of Capitol,)
Oolunitoua, Ohio.
J, C. DUNN, Proprietor.
House and fornitore entirely new. Rooms
laree. airy, and commodious. Table first-clas-a.
Give us a call when you visit the State Citpital.
martiyl TEKMS-H.o A DAY.
KRAMFR HOUSE.
WBST MAIN STREET,
HltiLSBOBO, O.
PHILIP KRAIIER, Prop.
HaviDC aaiu taken charge of this old aud we!l
inown liotel, no oaina will be spared to make our
.'ueu comfortable.
hearest Hotel to Railroad Depots.
Free Hack to and from Hotel for all Trains.
Good Livery aud Sample Rooms attached,
aplltf
Halbukt l;. Patne,
LeUe Uut)MK.'Mir of Patent.
Bexj. F. Graftoj. STonr B. Lado.
IAT33 3VTS.
PAINE, CRAFTON & LADD
Ailprney at lAtr, and Solicitors of Ameriran
and Foreign Patents,
412 Firm Street, WASHINGTON, D. C.
Practice patent law In all its branches in the
Patent Office, and the Supreme and Circuit Courts
the United States. Famptilet sent free.
OLD PAP tH3
AT THIS OFFICE
ai3rt cents a hundred. Storekeepers will leallire
a a,. vme by usinK tiiern as wrapping paper.
fDiritt
GIIjMOriE to CO.,
Law and Collection House,
29 F Ptrezt, WASHINGTON. D.C.
Mate Collections, Ne-rotiate Loans and attend
to all business confided to them. Land Scrip.
Soldier's Additional Homestead Eiht. andUBd
WaJrMUhuhlasdiOid. ngvttUwx
XJJSTITTJEJ
Doors, Sash, Mouldings,
BRACKETS, BLINDS, NEWELS, BALUSTERS
ON HAND AND MAt TO OKPEH. ALSO
LUMBER AND SHINGLES!
AT THE FACTORY OF
J. W. PENCE,
Cor. Walnut & West Sts.,
ciiiiiNra-E oi? ip x 2?i isjs. i
WM. H. LOYD. J- M- COWMAN
W.-H. LOYD & CO.,
GROCERIES i FAL1ILY PRODUCE
No. 17 South High
FLOUR AUD FEED A SPECIALTY
rCOODS DELIVERED FREE Cash paid for Coun'
try Produce. Cive ma a call.
my2cm3
"OLD RELIABLE !"
GLASSCOCK
Headauarters for
FARMING
Busies and Wagons !
Agents for the
Champion Uord-Binder Harvester
vn .hi j
ii.H U VIlilAI. "A
Reapers and Mowers
Also for Aultman & Taylor's Celebrated
VIBRATOR-SEPARATOR
FARM AND
TRACTION ENGINES !
OLD fi T J- INT 3D r
Cor. Main & Short Sts., - HILLSBORO.
myl9m3
ENLARGEMENT !
Owing to the tremendotia increase in our business during the past year, we have
been compelled to ngr.in make an addition to our room. The rapid growth and the
mmen-e business we are doing, is marveled at by everybody but ourselves, because we
anticipated it.
We now present to our Customers a
fjiircrer mid Finer Line of Goods,
Than ever before.
The most Complete and Stylish
stools, or ciotning,
For SPRING and SUMMER Wear !
The Most Elegant and Fashionable Line of
Gent's Furnishing Goods,
Ever
Our
Hat and Cap Department
Is Excelled by None in Variety and Quality.
Low Prices Rule in Every Department!
tS3- We Extend a Cordial Invitation to Everybody to Examine our Stock-
EAGLE CLOTHING HOUSE !
MOYERS & CO.
EEllloTDOro, O.
HILLSBORO. O
myiatf
Street, Hillsboro, O.
& QUINN,
LBMEBTS !
World-Renowned
ft rf mnv
Offered!
fifai fMj) il
.'...J. ...TT.7T... .l.iMtv
d.DKme tome. A vjc.tloo ot .month did not (rie mo muoh relief, bat oa cuntrp.ry. lollowed br
lncnpro.tration.od.mkiiwch.1 AKhlatiii.e I becun the u ot your I110N Toki, from wuicti I rr
JiSmortiinmediati nd wundertal rerulti. Theoid enerio- returned UDd ? teand th.rf my natural fore
was not DrmaaenUr abated. I buve ued three bottles of the Tunic. Klnce usln it 1 1 have d.no twin the la
bor that 1 .er did in tbe me time di.riOK my illn.. and with double the ewC V, irh tie mnqiil nerve
and. vLror o( bodr. ha. com. al a cleorne-. of thought never before enjoyed. If the Tonic baa not don. tha
Zk-Tkaow not what. 1 a.reit theeredit. J- V. Wams. fmw rtir-.rtl.n Chorrh. Troy. O.
Thm Iron Touie im
itattiUm mf Iron. fra
wian Hark, mud Frtua
fhnfp aerecl
lh trgrlnbtt
iroM.OM. Jt.et-ri
ft- - -
HAIUFACTyiEl It Tn DR. KARTER MEDICINE CO., KO. 1S IUIM MAIN STT, ST. Ui.
J5X4yl
'. i i -i i; ......
us V y -
U
t i
A TRUE
i j
A PERFECT STRENGTKENER.A SURE REVIVER
IRON BITTERS are highly recommended for. U diseases re
quiring it certain and cfiicient toili.' ; esecially Indigestion, Vyep.-"i, I.ikr
viitteiU Feia z, Want cf ApjietiU, Lou of Strength, Lark of EMijn, de. Knriclies
the blood, strengthens tli3 muscles, and gives new life to the nerves. They act
like a chr,rm on the digestive organs, removing all dyspeptic symptoms, such
as Toting the Food, Beichinn, llaii in the Stomach, Ueartburn, ete. Tb(! only-
Iron Preparntion that will not blacken the teeth or v
headache. Sold by all druggists. V'rite for the ABC took, 32 pi. of
nsefij and amusing rcatling sent free.
BEOWJf CHEMICAL CO., Baltimore, 318.
: II I . 3. z
VzJU U L'-lzilI -Lfei)
teblTylNWAuLON
I AH I COr.ir.lERCIAL COLLEGE.
Iks); ton, O. EstablUhed 80 years. Terms moderate. Two weeks' trial free. Please send for circulars.
jy7meitso!) , .
SEND THE SEWS TO YOUR
TWO COPIES FOR $2.50.
ISSl. SPUING OPENING! 1881.
Mr. and Mrs. M. R. ORE,
Rcsd'Ctiullv nimuunre to the Ladies of IIillboro and Surrounding Country, that thej will open their
sriUNG A ND SUMMEH STYLES
On Saturday, April 30, 1881,
Aod pontinne nil the Follmvir.g Week, wl.en i hoy will be pleaded to show their Goods to All who may
Call. Thoir Stock include
ALL THE VERY LATEST NOVELTIES,
IN
HATS, BONNETS, RIBBONS, FLOWERS, THIMMING3, Etc.,
And will he Found Complete in Evury Department.
HATS PKESSEI l.I CLEANED TO ORDEIi.
MASONC TEMPLE, High Street, Hillsboro, 0,
anal
T. T. IIAYDOCK
Has the laigeet and most complete worka for the manufacture of Carriages
IN THE WORLD. Eaggies for the trade a specialty.
CORNER PLUM AND TWELFTH STREETS
CI1TCIK"KATI, O
Glasscock ot Quinn, Hillsboro, Agents for Highland County, Ohio
dertyl
That we have the best Assortment of
BI1AOKET s 3VrOXJXj3DI3JCa- xj.Tri?3zn.2sr&
To lie found in the Town. Also
Models of Doors, Mantels, Verandahs, etc.,
Entirely New and Original in Style, from onrotvn Drawings, together with a Style of
Neuelu, Balusters aud Brackets Tor Stairways,
New in Deeign, from Original Sketches, different from Anything ever Introduced into thia market.
We have the Most Complete Machinery Adapted to our Line of Business, to be
vFnund in this County, Enabling ns to Fill Orders with Bet
ter Satisfaction to oar Customers, anil
more Promptly than
any other Mill in this Vicinity.
We also Keep on Iland a full .psortment of
Lumber, Doors, ash, Blinds, Pvlouldings, etc.,
Propotnnir to sell & low as the fame Quality of Woikmiinship and Material can be furuUhed
Elsewhere.
Bimonson t&: Oo.,
Koa. 4o, 42 & 44 Nrt h West
marlotdK
MARBLE GRANITE WORKS,
( vv r;: And Comotery Work.
V S;l 'S. ... L-1 .-saiss?' ALSO
Siw--Foreign and American Granites
-A.T VEBY LOW PEICES.
Call and see ns before ptuchasing. tB'.-'atii-faction guaranteed.
EC anion & Lemon.
l"Mr, JA.ME3 STOCK WELL Is oarTraveUng
IKnttarmrd anit rssem-1
eai vrteMlra. for I
Itrbtlity. Inuh I Urn
e, H'asf 0 Vitai
itv. .Vert'Oim rof i-n-
rioi. ,,ntf ('.nwife.-
AoeieerM Ffffr,dT.
tn .M.i, un Ujitt m hilwir Vtm T,wdillKlT bur-
TONIC
FRIEND IN. TBE WEST :
St., near Narrow Gauge Depot,
HILLSBORO, OHIO.
7 VJ
We return our thanks to the public for their liberal patronage
In the iat year, and ask a continuance of the same.
We otter at greatJy reduced prices all kinds of
American and Italian Marble
FV n tT. Ml I r a r M mFm f
SaUsman.
tcb20yl
Site igMaml IJetrjs.
niLL.si;oitoi ;ii. oino.
THURSDAY, JULY 21, 188K
THE JOURNALIST.
[Mrs. Mary Clammer's Poem Before the New
York Press Association.]
Mnn of the eeg'r eyes and teeming brain !
- Snittil is the honor that men dole to thee ,
They pnatch the fruitage ot thy jeer of paiu
I devour yet scorn the tree.
What though tlie treasore of thy nervous force,
Thy rich vitality of mind and heart,
Goes swiftly down before thy Moloch's courne
Men cry ; "it is not art 1"
The poet, dallying with his fitful muse.
On latftriuz Petasus. whose haltine Uride
Sometimes given out he scorns the man of
"news'
Cries : "See, we're p.irted wide!"
The noveli?t, elate, from lofty crest
Of tiction'H lovely palace of the air,
Look down and sighs : Only a journalist !
'Mj height is his despair."
, The. jays minute of feebler "literature,"
Who liphtly chatter on its outmost lim
Of caught bntof their small "position'' sure
Point scornfully at him !
The statesman smirched, with pallid malice
grim,
Or red with wrath, doth In the morning read
Of fair faith bartered, of Hue honor dim,
In his recorded deed.
Lo, look for thunder then ! Tlis fierce reply
In House or Senate, as he leads the vau ;
Tirae-server and place-selkr, loud his cry ;
4Lown, cursed newspaper man !"
Who takes the daily journal, cool and damp,
And weighs its ceaseless toll on nerve and
braia ?
Xor morning sun, nor genial evening lamp,
Keveals its birth, of pain.
"Only a newspaper!" Quick read, qnick lost.
Who sums the treasure that it carries hence ?
Torn, trampled under feet, who counts thy cost?
btar-eyed Intelligence I
And ye, the nameless ! Best-beloved host !
Jly heart recalls more than one vaniaiTd
face ,
Stmck from the rank of toilers early lost,
And leaving not a trace.
Martyrs of news ! Yonng martyrs of the press !
Princes of giving from largess of brain ;
One leaf of laurel steeped in tend e mens,
Take ye, 0 early slain I
Though In the authors' pantheon no niche ob
scure Your waniLg names can hold forever fast ;
The seeds of troth ye blew afar are sure
To spring and live at last.
On lonely wastes, within the swarming marts,
In silent dream, in speaking deeds of men ;
Quick with momentum from your deathless
hearts.
Your thoughts will live again.
O, living journalist ! When faith hath fled.
When men crush men; amid the thick of
strife,
Bethink thee of one Man, divine, who said :
"I am the truth, the life !"
Leave science, leave philosophy its crown.
Yet sweeter ever must be that man's sleep.
Who, Btill hia mother's boy," prays, lying
down :
"His Lord his soul to keep."
Whate'er our prixep, or bow fair our crown.
Or deep our IoeSnSS. oniv this is beet
The soul's great peace. Nor sneer, nor smile,
nor iruwu,
Can shake It from its rest.
Exalt thy calling ! On Its spotless shield
Write truth, write honor valor first and last.
Cravens may clutch thy stars, and thou not
yield;
Love them and hold them fast !
Defender of the people, of the State ;
Kindler and qnickener of majestic thought,
Sure of thy final triumph thou canst wait
The crown thy patience wrought.
To serve thy generation, this thy fate,
44 Written in water" swiftly fades thy name ;
But he who loves his kind does first, and late,
A work too great for fame.
[For the News.
THE HUMANITIES OF CHICAGO.
HOW WEALTH AND CHARITY
GO HAND IN HAND.
1. Goingout to Central Park, which
lies on the western limits of Chicago,
I passed a green and beautiful spot,
on which were growing large trees,
abundance of flowers, and grass
kept green by irrigation. There
were also fountains, benches and
rustic seats. The whole was enclos
ed, and seemed to be a delightful re
treat from the sun, with its long
and shaded vistas, but what struck
me with surprise wasa large placard,
bearing the legend :
" This is the People's 1'ark. -Never
Hind the Grass.''
The scores of happy children,
tumliling around in all the abandon
of joy, contrasted strangely with the
wearied and distressed looks
of the same class, sitting on the hot
benches in the Cincinnati parks,
while everywhere they are warned
by little boards stuck up, to "keep
off the grass." What is grass for,
if the children cannot roll on it and
over it, "Like bees all over, in seas
of clover?'' Even in fashionable
Lincoln Park, in Chicago, great
spaces and commons are devoted to
the people,
,2. Jutting out from Lincoln Park
is a pier, running far into the lake,
and fretted and washed by its green
water?, and here a building has been
erected and is kept up at the ex
pense of the city, where all children
may come and get the fresh air, and
feel the glow of health, as it comes
with the waves of the inland sea.
Here the children of the poor are
taken care of, nourished, brought
back to health, and given free of
charge what their more fortunate
fellow-creatures who have wealth ob
tain for money.
3. Drinking Fountains innumera
ble may be found all around the
city, elaborately finished, and al
ways running with pure, sparkling
water, for the dumb creatures who
serve man so faithfully and well.
You see no tired, thirsty, famishing
horses, for they, like man, find every
provision made for their comfort,
and the drinking fountains speak
louder than any words in praise
of our advancing civilization.
There are many other institutions,
such as Free Libraries, Free Con
certs, Free Museums, Art Galleries,
Zoological Gardens, and so forth,
in the interests of the people, to be
found in the great Metropolis of the
Northwest, but the three that I have
above singled out satisfied me that
the love of all the fair humanities of
life, and the most perfect and true
religion, can exist side by sida
with the greatest material pros
perity, and as this great country
grows, during the swift-gliding
years, richer and grander, the peo
ple will share tncre and more in its
strength and glory.
The Pessimist, or the gentleman
who persists in finding something in
tensely lovely in the past, and in
predicting all manner of evil to our
country and to the people thereof by
reason of the growth of immense for
tunes, has but to go to Chicago.
There, he will find that people like
these, who turned a swampy lagoon
into a Venice and Paris combined,
and who, when the labors of years
were destroyed in a single night,
plucked courage, fortune and suc
cess from the ashes of desolation,
do not obtain wealth except to adorn
it, and this wealth and the power it
gives, will be turned into a stream
of blessing for all, and not hoarded
for the gratification of the few.
The miser, hoarding his gold year
by year, for the benefit of spend
thrift heirs, who will make his hard
earned dollars "take unto themselves
the wings of the morning and fly to
the uttermost parts of the earth,"
may contemplate the vast public
works of Chscago t the interests of
the people, and all the people,
and learn a lesson of wisdom, and
he who decries the acquisition of
wealth, and in village obscurity re
tails his profound saws about the
danger to the country from the Jay
Goulds, the Tanderbilts, the Mar
shal Fields, et cetera, has but to vis
it Chicago, and see what men like
these courageous, intellectual,
brainy lords of commerce accomplish,
and his soul, dwarfed by its "pent
up TJtica" surroundings, will leap
into new life, and flow in a channel
as different from its present one as
the once sluggish, creeping Chicago
.River from the great artery this sort
of men have now made it.
The glory-of America is in its
boundless resources, not of rivers or
lakes, or plains, or mountains, or
mines, but of brains, in the men
who control its commerce, and to
see these men Chicago is the place
H. C.
Wyoming Women.
Albany lecturer recently 8poke as
follows concerning elections in Wyom-
The elections, though sometimes
closely contested and very animated,
are entirely peaceful and orderly. A
lady no more hears low language or
meets rough treatment at the polls than
she does in her home. Some ladies
stay about the polls and electioneer for
votes, and no one finds fault with this.
At the election for delegate to Congress
Mrs. Corbett, wife of the successful can
didate, a handsome young bride of a
few months, went from house to house
in Cheyenne and sent out carriages
and wagons many miles into tha coun
try to briDg the women to the polls.
Mr. Corbett owed his election largely
to the efforts of his wife and the women
whose aid she enlisted. No one found
any fault with her; every one felt her
action to be necessary and creditable.
Plucky? Rather. There are no cow
ards among these women. The most
retined and stylish of them can drive
or ride the ranch horses and ponies,
ani are capital shots with pistols or
Winchester rifles. They think nothing
of riding out, carrying a rifle and
shooting a prairie wolf, a bear or a
mountain lion. When the hostile In
dians were roaming the country the
women who lived at lonely ranches,
where they often had to be loft alone
for some time, talked freely about the
matter, but showed no fear. One wo
man that 1 know kept her doors aud
windows fastened and her rifle within
reach, but expressed no dread and
kept on with her usual work. One
night she heard a great noise in her
corral (cattle-pen), and ia the morn
ing found the Indians had been there
and stolen three or four horses and
kine, but they did not go near the
house. They had heard how well she
could shoot. In Cheyenne there are
many colored people, and the colored
servant girls vote the same as their
mistresses, and are often brought to
the polls in the samo carriages. When
I lived at Chtigwatcr Station, on the
road to tha Black Hills, about fifty miles
north of Cheyenne, the poll for that
district was about a mile south of as on
that road. We were all wanted to vote
to help elect Frank Hamilton, from
Baltimore, a horseback reporter from
the Cheyenne papers, justice of the
peace. So they took an old-fashioned
Rocky Mountain stage-coach that was
standing disused at the public ranch
(tavern), loaded in twelve or fifteen
men who worked about the ranch,
three ladies and the colored servant
firl, put to the coach a pair of wild
orses, they wanted to break in, har
nessed two well-broken horses before
them, put the ranch in charge of a
young colored man from Baltimore
who had not lived in the Territory
long enough to bo a voter, and away
we bowled down the road together to
the poll and voted. The wagons were
bringing women to the poll for thirty
miles around, and in the evening the
people from the poll came up to the
public ranch and had a grand supper
and dance in honor of Frank Hamil
ton's election.
Women's pay in Wyoming is as good
as men's, or better.
In Cheyenne tl.e waiter girls and
chambermaids get . -'." to $30 a month,
while men's pav in different employ
ments is $18 to $25.
At Chngwater Station, where I kept
the public ranch, collected the Black
Hills stage fares and acted as postmas
ter, I received $3o to $00 a month, and
the stage drivers, whose work is at
times very hard, as they have to drive
through in the face of wind, rain, hail
or snow, told me they did not get as
much as I.
Stage Terms.
The general terra used to designate
an actor is "fakir," a word which ori
ginally meant a magician. From it is
coined the verb "fake," which means
to imitate or sham. Few actors are
willing to acknowledge that other actors
are good; hence the slang of the theater
abounds in terms used to designate bad
actors. Of these the most frcqueut are
"duffer," "snido actor," and "bum
actor." The "variety" player is looked
down upon by the legitimate actor, and
Some Things About Words.
are queer things in some re
spects. Perhaps you think that they
have always the same meaning. For
instance, that "prevent" and "charity"
and "pitiful," and many others I could
mention, always meant just what they
do nowadays. If you think this, you
greatly mistake.
A word is not like a house, which, if
let alone, stands still and has the same
look yesterday and to-day. It is more
like a landscape, which varies from time
to time. Some words have, in the course
of several hundred years, so changed
meir signincation that they mean the
very opposite of what they used to.
There is the common word "prevent."
It comes from the Latin words venire.
io go, anu pre, rieiore. iow any one
ean go before another for either one of
fo purposes. He may go in front of
him, to help him along; or hs may come
m iront or mm, to push him back.
ow, just think of it; three hundred
years ago, this word "prevent" meant
the loriuer; it now means the latter.
Nowadays you prevent a person by
stopping, hindering him; your forefath
ers used to prevent persons by assisting
the u e., "going before," to lead them
on, as it were, by the hand, not to keep
them back and irapedQ them, as prevent
means in mesa a ays.
"Quick" is another word that ha3
changed its meaning. It used to mean
alive; "quick and dead" means the
living and the deceased. We do not
often use the word nowadays in that
sense.
"Saints" once meant all holy persons:
now. it signifies chiefly dead persons
who are esteemed holy.
"Pitiful," meant showing pity; now,
it means, as you know, something en
tirely different.
"Gossip" is from the two words
"God" and "Sib;" aod did mean God
parent; now, by a gossip, we under
stnd a talkative, tale-telling person.
At the christening of Queen Elizabeth,
in his great play of Henry the Eighth,
Shakespeare makes the king say to the
Godparents:
My noble Gossip, ye have been too prodigal:
I thank ye heartily; so should this lady.
When abe haa so much En hsn."
Another word that has lost its old
sense is sober. Among us of to-day, in
ordinary use, the word means not intox
icated. Some hundreds of years ago,
and in certain uses still, it had the sense
Of sedate only; when we use it in this
way nowadays, we frequently sty "sober-minded,"
in orIer fully to express
our meaning.
"Charity" now usually signifies the
giving of alms to the poor. But not so
in the early life of the word. It then
meant simply love love to God and to
man.
The derivation of words is also a very
interesting study. There is the word
"husband." He is (or ought to be) what
his name indicates the nowe-bond.
"Wife" is another very interesting
word. It originally meant the ono who
wore weaving being a common indus
try of women in other days.
'"Saunter" is from sain't-terre, or holy
laud. When the Crusaders who had
cone in great numbers to rescue the
Holy Land from the Saracen, who had
invaded and conquered it returned to
their respective countries, they had so
long led the lazy life of the soldier that
they had acquired a slow, indolent way
of walking and persons would say of
them: "There is one who has just come
from saint-terre." Hence, saunter to
walk indolently, leisurely.
"Gospel" is God's-pel, or good-tidings.
"Angel" is a messenger; "God,"
the good Being. Dr. Lowrie.
Teaching the Young Idea.
"Attention, children!" said the prin
cipal, entering the class-room, followed
by a stranger; this gentleman will a-sk
you a few questions in arithmetic. Ha
is the superintendent of schools at Mula
Gulch, Nevada, that great Western
Si.at of which you have so often heard."
"Which his name are Dodd Shorty
Dodd." said the visitor, and mounting
the platform he drew a bowie-knife from
his boot-leg and tapped for attention on
the desk. "We will now proceed to do
a sum in simple edition. A gentleman
who had a head on him from last night
met another gentleman in Dew-Drop
Inn, who put a huad on him. How
many heads did that gentleman have on
him? 'ThreeP Now you're talking. We
will next proceed to subtraction. Wall
eyed Bob had live fingers ou his left
hand (including his thumb) when he
injudiciously called Buckskin Joe a
limping mule. Buckskin Joe drawed
his eleven-inch tooth-pick, and the bar
keeper subsequently swept up two fin
gers. Howniany lingers had Wall-eyed
Bob left? 'Three!' You're right, and
I,ve $500 here in this little pocket-book
that says you are."
"We generally do these sums in
apples and other domestic fruit," said
the principal, timidly.
"Quite right, quite risrhl," said the
gentleman from the Far West, "but my
plan is universally admitted to be more
national more patriotic. It was criti
cised soma at our last convention at
Gallows Forks, but a majority favored
it, and the gentleman who opposed it
walks with a crutch yet. Now, then,
kids, hump yourselves for a problem in
multiplication and edition. A gentle
man held a full at a social game of
poker three nines and two sevens.
How many spots was on his cards?
'Forty-one!' Surely! Mister, yonr class
is no slouch of a class at 'rklnnatic. I
will just give the kids one more an
easv one. Five hoss thifves had oper
ated for five days before the Vigilantes
huno' them, and had stolen twenty-eight
heaiTof stock. How many hosses a day
did each hoss-thief steal? K)ne and
tliree-twenty-tifths of a boss!' Right,
and if any man says you ain't, don't
take it from him, if he's as big as a
grain-elevator. Now, mister man, trot
out yourclass in moral philosophyl"
Chic.
m
A Wonderful Lake in Iowa.
Barlington Hawkeye.
The greatest wonder in the State of
Iowa, and perhaps in any other State,
is what is called tho Walled Lake, in
Wright county, twelve miles north of
the Dubuque aud Pcciiic Railway, and
150 miles west of Dubuque City. The
lake is two or three feet higher than the
earth's surface. In some places the
wall is ten feet high, fifteen feet wide at
the bottom and five feet wide at the top.
Another fact is the size of the stone
used in its construction, the whole of
them varying in weight from three tons
down to 100 pounds. There is an
abundance of stones in Wright county,
but surrounding the lake to the extent
of five or ten miles there are none. No
one can form an idea of the means em
ployed to bring them to the spot or who
constructed it. Around the entire lake
is a belt of woodland half a mile in
length, composed of oak. With this
exception the country is a rolling prai
rie. The trees must have been planted
there at the time of the building of the
wall. In the Spring o'. the year 1850
there was a great storm, and the ice on
the lake broke the wall in several
places, and the farmers in tlio vacinity
were obliged to repair the damages to
prevent inundation. The lake occupies
a ground surface of 2,800 acres; depth
of water as great as twenty-five feet.
The water is clear and cold, soil sandy
and loamy. It is singular that no one
has been able to ascertain where the
water comes from or where it goes, yet
it U alwavi clear and fresh.
WAIFS.
A basRet full of onions will not hoU
water, because it is full of leeks.
The Cincinnati Art Club is doing
finely. Six more pork-packers have
joined. Philadelphia Xetcs. '
A "papered" housj may give thund
ers of applause, but it is attended by a
lightning of receipts.
A man should do all his romance and
loveniaking before the rheumatism sets
in. V. 1'. (S'jiiinici cial Advertiser.
Tho demand for planks two inches
thick is now very active. They are to
be sawed into bottoms for strawberry
boxes.
Lots of people are willing to rub Peter
to pay Paul, only they get tired when
tho job is half dune. Ibey neglect to
pay Paul. 1'oakers Gazelle.
Tho small boy thinks it mat be fun
to be a carpenter. It is probably, and
that is the reasou that the carpenter
gets so little pay for Lis work.
BeaconsGcKI didn't d'u because tbe
doctors say he would. It tras on!v af
ter they said lie wouldn't that ho'gave
up the ghost. Detroit Free Press.
Prof. Swift's comet cannot be found
by any other astronomer. - Iuis suspect
ed that some evil disposed boy painted
a comet on the professor's lens.
Tho tirer does not naturally possess,
but easily acquires a love of human
flesh. When he has once ta.ste 1 it the
spell of man's supremacy is broken.
A Nihilistic fiend ia lininaa form is
trying to induco American mowing
machines into Russia in iiopes that t je
Czar will try one to sea how it works.
A Boston clothing firm as an adver
tisement sents up balloons six feet high,
and offers suits of clothes to any boys
who will capture and return the balloons.
Water often gets so bad that people
think themselves compelled to drink
beer, but no one ever heard of beer get
ting so bad that everybody took to wa
ter. Strange!
Reader For "loss of appetite" there
is nothing so efficacious as a cheap
boarding house. None genuine without
the words "God Bless Our Howe" hung
on the walls.
When Ingersoll reads of the doings
chronicled daily in Chicago papers, he
probably murmurs to himself, "There's
no such place but there ought to be."
Philadelphia Xe'ws.
A fashionable married couple, whose
drawing room is adorned with a band
some motto "There's No Place Like
Home," hare just started on a trip to
Europe, to be absent about one year.
Whenever you see a woman talking
straight at a man, and beginning to nod
her head and keep time to it with - her
unpraLsed index finger, it is about time
for somebody to climb a tree. SUh
benville Hero id.
In Chicago the police are ordered to
bounce the "masher" who haunts the
streets promenaded by women. The
authorities are - determined that the
police shall have no such competition.
Philadelphia 2ev.
At a recent prize fight it was pat to a
voto whether the bataio should proceed,
or be deferred one week. Tha ayes had
it and about fifteen minutes later both
the ayes and the noes "had it" aud
pretty badly, too.
Art in Boston Some men have hard
luck. A Boston artist painted a picture
of a bullfrog having a spasm in a pot of
red paint, and the critics pronounced it
a fine copy of Turner's great painting,
"The Slave Ship." Boston Post.
A country debating society has just
decided that tlio quickest way for a
young man to got his portrait ia a lead
ing illustrated paper is to join a profes
sional basebaliclub .Living a life of use
fulness seldom accomplishes the same
result.
A boy alway3 shows a military
promptness of action when there is a
drum of figs iu the pautry. Mining
stocks were not invented ia Banquo's
time, although, he said, "The earth had
bubbles as tho waters hath." Lotion
Courier.
Carlyle's neice has found instructions
forbidding the publication of the
miniscences" without tho strictest edit
ing. It is a good thing that Mr. Froude
printed them just a3 he found them; for
they show exactly how unjust, cross
grained, and ill-mannered an old brute
C'arlyle was. If the "Reminiscences,"
had been carefully edited Carlyle's
name would go down to posterity un
der false colors.
A lawyer stepped up to tho witness
box, and ask tho trembling inmate
what his occupation was. The witness
replied that he was a barber. The law
yer, straightening himself up, and with
a look of sarcasm, said, with a conde
scending: nod: "So you are a barber,
eh?" The tonsorial artist, stretching
out his dexter paw. said: "Yes, we aie
Dota suavers snake.
Good Words from Druggists.
"Malt Bitters are the best 'hitters. "
"They promote sleep and allay nervou.ne..."
"Best Liver and Kidney medicine we eil."
"They knock the 'chilis' every time."
"Consumptive people trnin flesh on them . "
"Mait Bitters have no rivals in this tour.."
"Best thiDg for nursimr mothers we have'
Weiike to recommend Tilt Hitters.
j7ch'inleo
A bright little oirl had successfully
spelled the word "that," and was asked
by her teacher what would remain af
ter the "t" had been taken awav.
"The dirty cups and saucers," was the
reply.
In the Times, of Philadelphia, we ob
serve : Jlr. John ilcOrath. Lhris-
tian street, was cured by St. Jacob's Oil cf
severe rheumatism.
Young Folks' Corner.
No. 1—COMPOUND DOUBLE ACROSTIC.
[7 Matters.]
J. To endure. 2. A Turkish offlcln!. 3. The
greatest quantity or valne attainable lu a jfiven
case. 4. Any herh fined for the t.ihie. .1. A a-ih-atancenaetl
for coloring obtained from inditro, 6.
One who dances. Mariners.
Prim.u. To imagine.
Finals. Lights ou a tree.
Combimd. "Curved timbers. Cin. Times-iar.
No. 2—NUMERICAL ENIGMA.
The 1 S 3
To knit most be;
The 3 to ti ia rare.
The 8 7 8
To steal or take.
Of this let us beware.
In the temple nnd Complete;
Serving near the mercy seat. In.
No. 3—CROSS WORDS.
In trrowlio, in prowfiDe, in bowling,
Not purring, nor stirring, nor cry;
In weaving, in leaving, in grieving
Not knitting, nor ilirting, nor sih;
In dreaming, in teaming, in geemi:i.
Not slumlier, nor luniber, nor trail;
The wholjs a carnivorous brute ia
And dweller in bordering State. lb.
Answers in two weeks.
Answers to Yonng Folks' Comer of Jc!y 7 :
To No. 1 Catch-pennv.
To fin. S
S O 1
T O P E T
SOL OMAN
SUPOBATSD
D S M A R C H
TATCH
N E U
li
To No. 3 SEDEST
K L A T K K
1 A T K K
E T T L E S
S E R E I S
TEES S Y
To No. Sharpio.

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