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The Highland weekly news. [volume] (Hillsborough [Hillsboro], Highland County, Ohio) 1853-1886, March 04, 1885, Image 7

Image and text provided by Ohio History Connection, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85038158/1885-03-04/ed-1/seq-7/

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A STRANGE STORY.
It Reads Like One of the Novels of Alex
Dumas, the Elder.
LhhI work Ilorr IVs.!, postmaster f.f
Nmioii, , .small locality in tlio district
of Mn liad to take a sum of 4,0(10
florins, toircthcr with sum,, impels of
value, to tliu town of Stcjr. In tho
traiu lie rntoreil into conversation with
a respectably dressed individual, who
pave himself out to bo nn insurance
broker, nn,l w:ls evidently well no
qiiuintod with Stovr mid the surround
inj; country, They traveled torothet- ns
fur a.s Lin., when tlio m ranker, an
nouiioinjf liis intention of putting up nt,
tlio same hotel as lii.sroinpa.uinn, snjr.
jested ' that they should drive, thitlior
from tlio station together. To thi.s tlio
postmaster nreed, and accord inlv
they both got into two-horse, closed
conveyanen that was waiting outside,.
.Shortly after (itarting tho pseudo-insurance
broker otlerod the unsuspecting
Postmaster his snulT-hox, but no sooner
li.nl llerr IVszl partaken of its contents
than lie lost consciousness. When ho
began to recover his senses he wiav being
driven at a furious speed across the open
country. While still in a confused state
llerr l'eszel asked his companion
whither they were hound, but instead of
replying the latter applied a damp
cloth to llerr Peszl's face, which caused
thu post master to relapse into his former
unconscious condition.
He hna no recollection of what oc
curred for some time afterward, but in
tin! morning he once more revived and
found himself in a small open trap,
seated next to a man lie had never seen
before. Another man, in peasant'
lrcs,wiw leading the horse, llerr l'es1
at once remarked that his bag of valu
ables had disappeared, together with
his fur coat, which had been replaced
hy a thinner one made of a kind of
T role- home-pun cloth. They wero
driving along a valley unknown to llerr
lVs.l. In the .course! of half an hour
they stopped in front of a dilapidated
peasant house, built of rough, grav
stone. The post master was bidden to
nlight, and M as conducted to a large,
bare room on the ground floor, where
he was kept prisoner for four days.
Food was brought to him by the man
dressed as a peasant.
Last Tuesday, toward three o'clock in
the morning. llerr Tes.l was Aroused
from his sleep by the same individual,
and after dressing himself, was led
about two hundred paces from the
house, where a sledge was waiting for
Them. It was snowing hard, and almost
nitch dark. As they drove along llerr
Tcszl pressed his jailer with questions;
but all the answer he could get was
that he was being driven home. Abou'
an hour and a half from tho tirr., of
"then start they pulled up with'ii forty
yards of a small railw ay station. On
aligliiing llerr lYs.l found himself face
to face with the man who had traveled
with him to Litis. That mysterious indi- I
vidual handed to llerr lVszl his fur coat I
r.nd money hag. together with a ticket !
for Slcyr. whither he urged him to re
turn at once, as he was wanted by the I
police. All this was the work "of aj
couple of minutes; the train was in the '
station, and Heir IVszl had only ju-ti
time to take his seat without asking!
further questions. On examining his1
money 'bag lie found it empty, which I
can not have caused him milch surprise.
On reaching home he was shown the!
following telegram received it the I
Xeuzeug pos'ohU'c during his absence: j
"Thank (hid! 1 am alive, and hope to i
return in two days. Let them know in '
Steyr. A thousand greetings. Signed, j
I'eszl." The hero of this extraordinary j
adventure is a man of such excellent I
charact -r that, so fur. his narrative docs !
not seem to have excit"d anv suspicion I
on (he part of the local authorities. --;
''". Vienna London Daily Tdeyraptu j
A RELIC DISCOVERED.
A Parchment Which Possesses Much Historic
Interest.
-A v abiablc addition to Nj-w ,llamp'
shire's history, lias' just been unearthed
inthe simp " of (Jeorge II.'s writ ol
privy seal settling the old boundary (lis
pute between Massachusetts and New
Hampshire. This parchment, dating
back 'to 1787, which, has lain iiinlis
turlHsd iu an old chest in the Portsmouth
A thennmnrovcr. sixty years, wum .recently
found by an antiquarian of the HoRt-eii-:ian
soe'el.y, and wdl be soon put iif its
proper phi 'c among the Slate archives.
'The document is cluelly imtriaiit as
marking the first great step toward the
several!. ( of f,he two provinces of
Massii diiisetis and New Hampshire, and
a well 'ttotVard the establishment -of I
New Hampshire as a separate provincial 1
government, lu this latter respect it is !
more in tore ling to (Jr.iuito State folks
than to us of Massachusetts, for it re-'
culls the fact that in the linal decision
in the boundary matter in England, de- !
spite much wire-pulling on this aide of
the ociuiii in the curly stages f the:
manor, iew 1 lam psn ire nail lieeii given
several untuned tuoiisiud acre more1
lhati flic had even claimed. In it-elf, J
too, 1h; old paper is .of interwt s an
example of engraver uud scrivener work
on ollieSiil records .in those davs,' '-The' i
wcll-pre ;rvcd slate in which it ha re
mained leaves l he text clear and legible.
Jt. is engrossed in old English in" the
neatest manner, a mwrvel of pati-ent
execution. The salutation: "(i -orce
the Second, by the (jra 'e of Jod," ex
tends acrosn the top in letters an inch
in diam'tfl-r, except the initial letter,
"(I," an example of intricate scroll
work. elaUmte iu (lie evtreme, encir
cling a line (mpper-plate engraving of
Oeorg.' H. in v-iya! rohes mhT decorated
witli the ordenof St. (ieoie. "l't,e full
size 01 I lie pan hment is thirty four bv
twenty-six iiu-t s, and evetv inch of
surface not otherwise occupied has been
msed by, the engraver to depict lions
'.rampant, bird of prey, serpents.
.Towns
roses, thutles. and a "reatham
U Ireland.
Hjiriiitjjirt't llipiiu-Urttn.
i
j
I
j
j
a-becn
it.
to
The Fat in the Fire.
Wrs. Miller is a very stout woman.
Air fi distance she looks like a water
lank .at a railroad xtution. She m tho
biggtibi woman in Waco. She U y;rv
M-uili.(! aliiiut her corpulence. At. a
social gatheringshe im-ulioimd inci.lt-11 1
ally tha.1 she had Iwea suH'ering from
rhi-iniiati.,m, but, thanks to the skill ,t
Ir. IWisty, li,. was eulindy cured of iL
'Ir. Ulster is a very popular duo
nr. rcnirtCKed iM'anU (oi.iieiv
i
(loo L think .In
uis a lai-gu ii;ud-
tice," .-aid Mrs. Miller
"If you are his p itioiit he is hound to
have a . tremendous practice," said
Frank.
iien ens. Hiiu. r guos nekl so
rial
J iJa
il gatlienii'r, it f, :.f,. fo il, ,f
ik w,l! .-d.jiie )Vr ,U absence. Il.i
will be tiie .iu,., t 'uh.-u'iil man n the
who!,! town. Mrs. .Mi.'.'. r is so Uvm
hliii it that sin, in J:i.iL'g. ff nt
rauioi iventy 'ouict.-, a day fJ'
:i -it
she
vou
it's
law,
r-Loslui
AN AUSTRIAN SPECULATOR.
How a Swindling Sharper Played It On
An Unsuspecting Land Owner.
One of tho most expert speculators in
Vienna is a ninli named Hcinrich Kulllcr.
Over there, however, they with brutal
frankness, call such men swindlers.
Some of his late tricks are so good that
even Jny (iould might take lessons frftni
him. The Austrian ((peculator is fully
lip to Mr. Ward, on a smaller scale
however.
Not long since, Kufller appeared in
the ollico of a wealthy lumber dealer
who owned an immense lumber yard in
the heart of the city. At this time there
was a perfect mania for building houses
in Vienna, and availublo lots commanded
fancy prices.
"i want to buy the land you have got
your lumber yard on. I want to put up
a big hotel on it." said Kulllcr.
'f don't care to sell."
"Hut I have got to hare it. It is the
only suitable place in this part of the
city. I'll give you half a million.
"I don't want to soil, I would not
sell for a npiilion.
'1 will give you a million."
The lot was not worth a million, but
as thi merchant had his lumber on it,
and was wealthy, he did not care to ac
cept the oll'er.
"No, I would rather not."
"I'll give,you a million and a quarter,
and to show vou that I am in earnest,
I'll put up lity thousand marks forfeit.
1 must have a big lot on which to put
up my new hotel," said he, placing that
amount in thousand mark notes on the
table.
The poor lumber dealer beeamo nerv
ous and excited, (ircal beads of per
spiration stood on his brow. He asked
for twenty-four hours to think about it.
The trade was then concluded. The
lumber was to be cleared away before
two months. The lift v thousand marks
forfeit were to be paid over at the end
of a week. The lumber dealer was sat
isfied on that point. Ho knew that
Kulllcr hail the money.
The lumber man then proceeded to
hunt for another lumber yard. Suitable
vacant lots wero extremely scarce. A
land agent, however, who had heard that
the lumber dealer was looking for a lot.
ollered him one for six hundred thousand
marks, but only gave him the refusal of
it for twenty-four hours. He said he
could get that amount from another
party. In his anxiety to sell the place
to Kufller for a million and a quarter,
the lumber merchant paid down six
hundred thousand francs hi (lie agent.
Next day Kulllcr notified the lumber
dealer that he would pay over the fifty
thousand marks forfeit as he was unable
to raise the million and a quarter, the
purchase money for his lot.
With the aid' of a skillful agent, the
speculator had sold to the lumbt'i mer
chant for six hundred thousand ii'iuUm
a lot only worth tour hundred thousand
marks, thereby profiting, n'fter paving
the fifty thousand marks, a cool loO.OOD
marks.
The lumber merchants has now two
lots on his hands, and is also in posses
sion of considerable experience.- -E.r-rhaiujc.
SOME SNOW.
The Device Designed by an Intelligent
Railroad Man to Relieve a Blockaded
Train.
"This little snow snap doesn't amount
to anything," remarked an old railroad
man. "If you want to see snow that's
snow, just go out to tiu Sierra Nevada
on the Central I'acilic. If a train gets
stuck in a drift here for half an llour
people think it an awful thing, but I re
member once where a whole train was
buried in the snow for a week. An ava
lanche came down the mountain side
and buried 'em under some hundred feel
of snow. There wa'u't. much use of
(Jigging for 'cm, 'cause the snow would
pile in. as fast us it could be dug out.
lint tin; passengers were starving to
death and something lutd to be done.
The relief party got a survevor to locate
the train, as nearly as possible, and it
was designed to put a party on the top
of tin; slide with a drill to out a hole
down through to the train iu which some
food and drink could lie poured. Hut it
was soot found that the slide was shift-
mg all the tune near the top, and the
tubing which was put iu the drill hole
was broken off. That scheme had to be
abandoned. Then I suggested a plan
that was,, immediately 'adopted. We
rigged up. a little iron concern to tit one
of the rails, attached a rubher hose to
it, and (iiished it in by uieaus of iron
rods. Hutting on one rod after another
we succeeded in shoving it clear in so
that it reached the (rain. Using tin
rubber hose for a speaking tube we told
the prisoners what they should do- At
taching the air- pump on, the engine to
this hose (hey, punjped in hot soup and
bits of meat And bread, vegetables, etc.,
every time .they, wanted a meal. He
tween meals they pumped in whisky,
beer, kerosene-nil, and stuff like that'-
all through the same tube. Then I had
another idea. Jy supplying- the hose
wijh plenty of Jiot-w:iter, niid by keep
ing tjie' pump going, we succeeded it
thawing enough of the snow along tin
rail to hit the pa-sseng irs crawl out after
they had been in there a week. Hut
hat air pump saved their lives. I tell
oiran uir pump is a line thing."
"O, certainly," said an incredulous
listener, "but will you please tell me
how they managed to keep lire in the
locomotive and work the pump under
the snow?"
"Don't know anything about, thai.
They did it, that's all. Hope no one
doubts my t rut h and veracity. If I'd
in there I'd have known nil about
Hut ' I was on the outside. Von
can't ask a man to lie in fwo places it
once and know everyltiing, can vou?'' -1'eck's
Sun.
CVin necl icut has a latv, passed in
lHG'.t, which is without u parallel iu the
statutes of any other state, being an act
protect wild, as well as cultivated,
plants from pillage. 'This law makes it
offense punishable by a line not ex
ceeding 5-100, or imprisonment not ex
ceeding three 'mouths, or both, wil
fully tout, break, or destroy or remove
from the Lind of another pe rson, crau
berries, creeping fern, crops, shrubs,
fruit or othef vegetable productions,
without, tho consent of the owner
Jiitrlonl IVtitrant.
lii'iuij ueggeo ins iiiiiuima to buy
him a drum. "I am afraid,' Hobby,"
replied, "that if 1 ' were to buy a
drum grandpa might not like , it very
well." "That n-oiildn't make any ilif
fcrence, liiamiua," Hobby argued, "cos,
see, the drum ain't for. grand
for me." This conversation oc
curred a good many years ago, and
Hobby, w ho is now a man, i practicing
Micce.ssfully in I'hiladelpliiu.--1'hilivli
IjJiiii I'n-im.
o .i.e.. i. . i i ,
It is mippos( il that out of eighty pet
cent, who ri mcmbero I the poor, about
eight per ('f lit, gave soillelbiiiglo them
Tr'twci'iiil.
eu
A.
THE BRITISH ARMY.
Its Strength and Stations-Disposition of
182,000 Men.
The following interesting details
showing in what portions of the globe
Hritish troops are now stationed, with
their approximate force in garrison and
on active service, have just been pre
pared from ollichil sources. '1 lie last
returns showed, it is understood, an
effective strength of about ls-,0ti0 of all
arms--viz; thirty-one regiments of cav
alry, tweiilj-four batteries of roynl
horse artillery, seventy-six batteries of
fii-M artillery, ninety-si batteries of
garrison artillery, seventy-two regiipetits
of infantry (or 14S battalions), two di
visions, one troop, and forty companies
of engineers, besides commissariat and
transports, medical stall' corps, ete.
Dealing first with tho home commands
it appears that the northern command,
the largest in the Kingdom, which in
cludes nearly 7.",000 volunteers, besides
yeomanry and militia, has two regi
ments of regular cavalry; two divisions
of the coast brigade, and six batteries
of field artillery, besides depots, and
five battalions of infantry, The eastern
command (Ma jor ( icneral White, C. H.)
Willi headquarters at Colche.-ter, has
one cavalry regiment and two de
pots of that arm, three batteries
and a depot of ai'lilli'ry, a section
of the commissariat and transport
corps, and three infantry battalions.
The wesicrn command (.Major (icneral
Sa ver. '. H. ) has in proportion to
others a large force of artillery -two
batlericsoflior.se, three of Held, and
seven of garri-on - besides a division of
t lie coast brigade and depots, a com
pany of the commissariat and transport
corps, and four battalions of infantry.
The southern command has altogether
one division and twelve batteries of
artillery, two companies and a section
of engineers, a section of commissariat
and transport corps, and six battalions
of infantry. The force of the Chatham
district consi-ts of eleven companies of
engineers, a division and live batteries
of artillery, one company of the com
missariat and transport corps, and t'wo
battalions o'f infantry, hi the south
eastern command there are two regi
ments of cavalry and nine depots
(Canterbury. ) one division and seven
batteries of artillery, a company each of
engineers and of the commissariat and
transport corps, and four battalions of
the line. The home-district command
has t hree regiments of household cavalry
and one of cavalry of the line, a battery
of royal hore, and a division of coast
brigade artillery, one company each of
engineers and of the commissariat :fnd
transport corps, and six battalions of
the guards. At Woolwich the force is
made up of a large body of artillery,
two batteries of horse, besides depots
and the riding establishments, and
seven batteries of field ami g:rri on.
Tho Ahlershot command, whic h com
pletes those of England and W ales, has
three regiments of cavalry, ighl bat
teries of artillery, a division, troop, and
depot of royal engineers, three com
panies and two depots of the commis
sariat ami transport corps, and seven
line Initiations.
Taken altogether, there are thus in
tlie nine military districts of England
and Wales twelve regiments of cavalfv,
sixty-five bat teries and seven divisionsof
artillery, a dixision, troop, and fourteen
companies of engineers, about a dozen
companies ot the commissariat and
transport corps, and thirty -eight bat
talions of infantry, or a'.Hjtit sixty thou
sand of all ranks!
The average strength of the army in
Scotland was last year only a little over
three thousand, and there is reason to
believe that Major (icneral Macdonald's
North Hritish command -docs not now
even come up to that number, the force
being represented by one cavalry regi
iinent, one battery, and a division of ar
tillery, and two infantry battalions.
In the three military districts of Ire
land, commanded respectively by Major
(icneral Knight, Major (icneral Lord
f'larina. and Major (icneral Young, tho
force shows a decrease in strength com
pared with last year, when the average
was about twenty-four thousand. The
force now distributed over the island
comprises six regiments of cavalry,
thirteen batteries and two divisions of
artillery, two companies of engineers,
four of commissariat and transport
corps, and twenty-six infantry bat
talions, or four battalions less than last
year.
The channel islands possess ihreo
batteries of artillery and two battalions
of infantry, about two thousand ollicers
and men. India absorbs a very large
portion of the. Hritish army, nearly
sixty-nine thousand of all arms viz.",
Hengal. seven regiments of cavalry,
forty-two batteries of artillery, a com
pany of engineers, and thirty-one
battalions of infantry : Madras, two
cavalry corps, sixteen batteries of artil
lery, a company of engineers and nine
oaiiauons or miantry; Jioniliav, unit
cavalry corps, nineteen batteries of
artillery, a company of engineers, and
nine battalions of infantry; total caval
ry, icn corps; ariiiierv, seventv -scvea
batteries; engineers, (luce companies;
liiiantry. Joi ly-nine liattalions.
in uic ni'si iiiiues i.ngland has a
couple of batteries of garris in artillery
aim, ncsiiics a line mutation, some
colonial corps. Canada has three bat
teries, a company and section of cici
liccrs, and a line battalion; and
Hernmda two batteries, live eiieincer
companies, and a liattul on of infantry.
Malta has si eti batteries (if British
artillery, two companies of engineers
four line battalions and the fencible ar
tillery; and (iiliraltar, seven batteries,
four engineer companies and lour line
battalions;- while Cyprus is garrisoned
by the headquarters of the First Wet
Kent and a company of engineers.
lrrespe live of the force of irregulars
organized iu England for special
service in Hechiiaii.iland there are at
the cape and Natal two cavalry corps
(the Sixth dragoons and the Thirteenth
hussars), four batteries of artillery, two
companies and a section of engineers,
nearly ' fivu battalions of infantry and
some detachments of the commissariat
and transport corps. At St. Helena
there are a battery of artillery and some
engineers' infantry.
The West Africaiiscttlcmcnts and tho
(iold Coast colony are garrisoned by
coioiiial corps, but iu the Mauritius
there are a battery of nrl llcry, some
engineers and three companies of line
regiment. Cc Ion takes wo batterieri
of artillery, a detachment of engineers
and a battalion of infantry; and Hong
Kong and the St-aits, settlements three
batteries of artillery, a detachment of
engineers and two line liattalions, Lon
don Time.
Yseult is prjnoiiuced E.'-senll tho
the Mime as in dude if the ti I hern
hud an e before it. The name f;iiuil
iar iu letters from its idcnlilieation itli
the rnniaiilio legend of Sir Tristram
and the fair Isolde.; the letter being tba
Normi ii l reneh form of Uie luiniii.
1'. tin, i.
S. MERRILL.
Stories Told of the Lately Deceased Manager
of the Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway
Illustrating His Characteristics.
Some ten or twelve years ago there
was employed in Mr. Merrill's office a
clerk in whom complete conlidenoo wan
reposed. 'lie Was intrusted with many
of the corporation's secrets and given
tho handling of funds in large amounts.
Unfortunately, the young man com
menced sowing his wild oats, found his
salary insufllcient to support his ex
travagance, ami frequently abstracted
kmall amounts from the railway com
pany's funds to meet the delicieiiey.
These amounts gradually increased in
size until the young man, realizing the
position he was in, made one grand
haul and left for parts unknown. II in
departure led to a discovery of all his
peculations. The information was rum.
muniealcd to Mr. Merrill, who, after a
moment's reflection, sent for the com
pany's special agent, and ordered that
ollieial to institute a searcli for the ab
sent clerk.
"l'ollow him," said Mr. Merrill, "to
China if necessary, and bring him back.
Keep this mutter quiet and spare no
expense in bringing the young man
back to this office."
The few other persons who knew of
theeinbez.Ienient were enjoined district
secrecy, and Very few ever learned ol
the f:i"ts. Any inquiry which might be
made regarding the young man's ab
sense was met by tin; reply thai he was
taking his summer vacation, but just
where was not known.
In the meantime a diiigent hunt for
the young man was in progress. He
was traced to Detroit, and from (hero
through Canada to tho Atlantic coast,
where he sailed for Europe just twelve
hours in advance of the special agent's
arrival. Authorities on the other side
of the Atlantic w.-re cabled, and the
young man's arrest ordered. This was
successfully a 'eoniplishcd, the clerk
was returned l i America and trans
ferred to Iheciisioilv of the railway com
pany's agent. To"that ollieial a full
confession was made, and, linding him
self completely in the company's power,
theyouug man calmly contemplated his
fate, expecting nothing less than a Statu
prison sentence.
He was quietly taken before Mr. Mer
rill, who, to his complete surprise, ap
proached him pleasantly, took him
warmly by the hand, and 'said: "Well,
back again I see. Sorry vou staid so
long, as we needed you. ' Mad a goo I
time, though,! hope. Now. (i ,
your desk is just as you left it. No one
has disturbed a paper, and you can get
to work at once. Here, look over these
accounts, and see that they are properly
cheeked."
The young man. dumbfounded at the
reception, us in fact war) the special
agent, burst into tears, and could not
fully r alic the situation, until Mr.
Merrill again broke in with: "Come,
what are yen doing there? (iet into
that chair as quick as you can and
cheek those accounts. And, by the
way, I don't want to ever hear a 'word
regarding certain events of recent date,
which you perhaps know of."
The young man did go to work, be
gan a new life, at'ended lo his duties
as In; never hd before, advanced him
self in rank as a railway employe, made
good to the company the amount he
had stolen, and .several years later left
the company with as good a letter of
recommendation as any man ever re
ceived. He to-day occupies a promi
nent position with one of the leading
railways of the country, and for it thank
his old employer. S. S. Merrill.
Manager Merrill's regard for faithful
employes is well illustrated in the fol
lowing incident: A colored boy, who
had some time previous served as a por
ter on Mr. Merrill's private car. and
who had rendered excellent service in
that capacity, was accidentally killed.
Upon learning of the accident Mr. Mer
rill immediately gave orders that every
necessary arrangement for the funeral
service and burial of tlie young man be
made, his own purse contributing to that
purpose. The day of the funeral
chanced to be an unusually busy one at
the (icneral Manager's office, and from
early morning the place was fairly
besieged with callers desirous of making
contracts for rail, tio.s. spikes and
other supplies, representatives of vari
ous corporations, and individuals having
personal matters to at lend to. Mr. Mer-'
rill disp ised of them as fast as he could,
but as the day moved on into the after
noon there was yet more than a haif
do.en in waiting. Asccrtiiniii"- the
wants of each, he granted an audience
to those with whom a meeting could not
lie conveniently postponed, and then,
glancing into tlie waiting-room, he said:
"( ientlemen, you must excuse me to-day.
I have not time to consider your cases t his
afternoo' s I must, attend a funeral."
And iu the midst of the lowly but
honvst-henrteii people who were present
at the faithful porter's funeral was Man
ager S. S. Merrill.
The purse of Mr. Merrill has scores of
times been quietly opened to the relief
of poor and n -edy persons, and it will
never be known what amount he has
distributed in this quiet manner. Sev
eral years ago a subscription paper was
circulated in the Milvvauk -e iv St. Haul
general offices to raise a few hundred
dollars for the relief of a deserving per
son. It chance I that Mr. Merrill was
out of the city at the time, and before
lie had returned the required amount
had been raised and turned over to the
person for whom it was intended. A
short time after that Mr. Merrill h 'ard
of the transaction; and ' immediately
summoned the person who ha I circii
'ated the subscription paper.
"How much did ou jail me down
for?" inquired Mr. Merrill, drawing his
pocket-book. "Nothing! I o yon mean
to say that you permitted that list to be
clos.tl niihoiit my name on it? V:ov
never let that thing occur again, if vou
wish to be friendly with, me," and tlie
circulator readily 'saw tlpit, Mr. .Merrill
felt injured that he had not been per
milled to contribute his portion to tho
charitable fund which had been raised.
and turned over. -Miwaul-rr Snttuitl.
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The Dress of Great Men.
Daniel Webster usually wore a nil of
siiull'-biowu color, with a large iol't
neck-tic. - Martin Van liuren was very
fastidious about his clothes, and ahvavs
af..inf.'l during the summer iu ti,o
w hitest of white (ineii duck. His clothes
were cut in the latest sly les, and he
wore Very high slock ucckties, out of
which peeped his standing collar. An
drevv .Ja'. k.sjm nl.so dresseil well, though
he did not make his clothes a great,
matter. Henry Clay wore a swallow
tail, afid'R standing collar exl rav:i"ant-
ly high. James Hiielianau was always
very precisii iu his clothes, always up
scaring in lull dress, - - U'usl.iuatou Cor.
Cti I'l iiind l.vndcr.
--Lithographic stone has been discov
ered in considerable quant d c s iu California.
--Wanted A man. Handsome tot
ugly; old or young; rich or poorj
J 'reseller or layman; pparkling with
ewels, or wrapped up in patches and
rags only let him be a man w ho can do
one single act that Is purely unselfish.
Where is hep Who knows lump Header,
cati you fill the bill? Try, yourself, for
a week, and let us know. UUhmond
(I'd.) Jhliijinus Herald.
A tramp stopped nt. a house In the
suburbs oi 1 louston and paid to the lady
of the house, "Please give a poor man
who is traveling anil w ho is far away
from home, a ,rilleto help pny his ex
penses." "If you haven t got money
to pay your expenses why do you
travel?" she asked, iu astonishment.
7V.i-.is S liiftinys.
Money never made a man happy
yet, nor will it; there is nothing iu ltd
nature to produce happiness; the moro
a man has the more he wants; instead
of its tilling a vacuum it makes one; if
it satislics one want it doubles and
trebles that want another way. Frank
lin. Raisin-Making was first attempted
in California nineteen years ago. Tho
following year about l',.ViO boxes wero
made, and the industry has rapidly pro
gressed. Ten years ago tho crop
amounted to about 10,000 boxes. This
year thu crop is estimated at L'OO.OoO
boxes.
On opening n big cabbage grown
at Sodns, N. Y., it was found that with
in an outside covering of large, thick
leaves werctightly embedded thirty-live
small and almost' perfectly round" cab
bages. Another one contained twenty
seven small cabbages. -A'. V. Sun.
Miss Fi.ohA.xck Aixiott, !;'." Mnssnchn
Ketts Ave., Washington. L). C., w rites: "I
hnv snll'eroil ionj.: from nn nstlniintiecouh
and painful paroxysms. The lied Star
t'oiiE;h Cure iinvp nio wonderful relief. I
have not beeu troubled with paroxysms
sinco."
A wickkd milk-dcalcr shudders wlu'ui'v
er liis wip'ssks him if lio would liko to
have some pumpkin pie.
A New Way to Pay Old Debts.
Shakespeare tells how this can bene?oin
plished in one of his immortal plays; but
debts to nature must ho paid eu ileiimnd
unless days of grace be obtained through
the use of Dr. Pierce's "liohlen Meili.-ul
Discovery." It is not u " cure-all," but in
valunblo for sore throat, bronchitis, asthma,
catarrh, consumption, niid all discuses of
the pulmonic y and other organs, caused by
arret ula or " bad blood." Scrofulous ulcers,
swellings and tumors are cured by its won
derful alterative auliuu. Hy druggists.
TllK prentest liinsh on record Truth
crushed to earth. A'. Y. Journal.
lont XVeur Cnmliernii,e TrutNe
when our new method without use of kn'fe
is tfiinranteed to permanent 1 y cure t he worst
case of rupture, tsend two letter stampj
for references and pamphlet. World's
l)isj';:isnrjr Medical Ass'u, Huffalo, N. Y.
-
In Knulund it taken pound to purchuso
hammered silver. .V. 1'. Journal.
l)it. I'navK's Comn.-.und Kx tract of
Bmart-Wcud combines French Hnindv, Jn
liaiea (iint;er, Smart -Weed and Camphor
Water, tlio best possible agents for thu euro
3f dinrrhipa, cholera morbus, dysentery or
bloody llux and colic, or to break up colds,
fevers and inlhumuuiory attacks.
A boy in a rural sji.-lliu B.'liool sat down
on n word of oii,-;sv liable. It was proba
bly patch. .V. 1".' Tribune.
Sudden Chances of AVeathkr are pro
ductive of Throat Discnscs, Coughs, Colds,
etc. KtTectuul relief is lonnd iu thu use of
BhOWN'B liHONCUlAI. Tkocuks.
When clothes-pins are only a cent a
dozen there is no excusu for snoriug in
church. A'. Y. Journal.
Pike's Toothache Diioes cure In t nilniite.2.',e.
it 'lc mi's Sui'tmr Simp lieu Is inul beuu titles. "."c.
German Coiin Keviovlh kills Coriisa Hunkms.
" Si.kp.p on a pillow-sham is not npt to
ba real,1 observes a philosopher. 2io, nut
if your wile cuU-UtK y.ni ut it.
THE MARKETS.
CINCINNATI, February 28, 1885.
tlVK STOCK ( itl( -Ci,iniii(,ii2 ()
Vt : mi
('. 5 (Kl
lit. 4 iVI
l:i. 4 ("I
ti'j 4 L5
(t. 4 mi
dr. us
t hole,' Kin, -hers
H )( IS ( (111 1 tin 11 1
do, id juu'kers
SH I K.t'-ti, Kid Id choice
l-l.dl It Kiinnlv
Ult.MN Wheal l.oni,'liei ry i-eil
N(l. - felt
I (it'll No. ' lllixeil
tints No. 2 IlUACit
Itye-No.
4
o IS!
4 t"i
;) iiu
(,', H4
i',
4:i
ttl'j
Ut. VI
U.'.lll Kl
or 11 H'i
in. -Ti
Hi K ' i
HA V Timothy No. 1
TOH. CCI-Medium I.utfs...
Mediiilil' l.cut
I'UO I S I II S S-1 'o ik - M cs.-. . .
t.tif'l I'l'.lnc Hleani
IlCTTKIt-l iincv liicry
I'riine I reiiincrc
Flit I I' ASlt Vi:iiKTAIII.K.S-
J'ol nlocs, jicr luirrot
il-is, prune, per t.urrel
H (HI
H IKI
U 7.1
A)
1 811
a ixi
Qi. 2 nn
44 Ml
NEW YORK.
FI.OI' It - Slate 11 ml WcMicru
il, il (M
(ci 5 (Kl
i0 KS
Good to ( lio.ee
GUAIN- W In ul -No. CllicillO
No. - 1 , (t
( 'orn No. 2 111 ixcd
t) tit
Pliti'if. 87'
M
it 11 r:!
f't, 411',
u 1:1 :."i
lib 7 2.1
Oal mixed
muK (
1. A 1(11 VV csierii sU ain
CHICAGO.
Ft.ofi: State and Western...
tilt A I N-Vhel - No. 2 red
No. 2 CtiieiiL'o Spr.ii-
( orn No. 2
( Hits No. 2.
live
POItK -Mc
LAUD Slemil
(1. 4 1.1
7H
71',
to-, (
12 til I
U 7.1
i.i 1:1 411
in u 80
BALTIMORE.
FUlflt- l'amiiv
GUA I.N W heal -No. ::
, ( orn mix d
(mis mixed :
3 87
Nt
47
;;,i
14
H. 4
if
CI
HI,
(li.U
Kt'i
FltOV ISK l.NS I'm - Vless
l.unl - Uelthi'd
INDIANAPOLIS.
Wlieat -No- 2 red
Corn -mixed
Oats mixed
a
si.
III',
ill
LOUISVILLE.
Flour -A No. 1
GUAIN -Wheat-No.
t orn- nil ed ... .
( lal s -mixed
PORK -mess
I. A I' l steam
....14 ti 4 nr. ,
It'i
S8SEW'
iV
i
l
CUKES
Rheumatism, Neuralgia, Sciatica
I.umliattn, lli l, lin, ll,d, L, Tuutharhi.,
Bore '1'liroHt. SlM-eilnv. flri Ina, lsrulaca,
Ittii-ua, Neulila. Fro.l ill.ea,
Ani All Otlier liol: L V lAi N a and. AC1TF8.
Bula by li-iitfto-.,y un.l i't al-m livrt h. r. 1-ill v Lent!
a ,t.. p,r....,,,ia I,, 111 'in,' im-iK.
TllK I II A K l.t a. Vlll.l l.l It CO. ,
(fin,-,., .,, A.v..si.vo. . Bultlmora.aU.. U.S. A.
SCI n!FRNKW-AW,'0m""'cr'rnm
W tJ I i. I J .."Ililh !-,-!,,,; It, . relic V-
,-ii. I'ciiKiviia aJ In, -reuse; ei i.cn.-ncc It, Venn.:
u.. cs .,r .. I. ,-. Wrlic t.r . ,,, Mlien aif i,,v.t
A. W. ilucoKMlct bo.N. Cluciuuml. Oulu.
L1
f PM TPT F0RAPHY. or HnORT-HANI) n
L. Is iil T VHK- W i I I Nil H V k V Siu.,.1 u,.,. f .,r.
nlnlK'lL, A(iJli a UlkMlnLiihuli , Juiu 1 S Isk.
l)A1 P PIITl'PC Ti, no ?l!re. with Prra.
kUlaiil, sou. 1.1IU1V 4 ilui'lit, aji.j,
(
lif
. i M I
' - s '.'. '
'
nirnrn
" -s s"-'- sj
1 tradeVCmaric
t 1 "
JTre from Vpiatmt, imtea mni I'oitons.
A PROf.'.PT, SAFE, SURE CURE
Fop CavjiH, flnr Throat, llniinrncM, InflamcM,
C'ol Hronrkltla, C roup, hooping Cntth
A it h m a. Qnlnan I'ftlna In ( hctl, tirttottaor
irtcetlmn of the Ihrtllt n1 L,nT
Trie no rontt ft bottl fVM hr Prntr'it ti1
r. JSirfir unile lo indue? th- f .Unh-r io firntur t!tf
Qtt ft fur ttism trtll rrene tiro tHittieLxrttUihurytsM
fUikJ, by Mrmioxtf one dollar to
III K imii r a. vntiM.Fft mwrAST.
IMUWUriil M'iiif tnrrT,
ltlwrt Mftrjltnd, C. S A
HA CAN'S
Magnolia Balm
is a secret aid to beauty.
Many a lady owes her fresh
ness to it, who would rather
not tell, andw cant tell.
OATAnnH
What is Catarrh?
i -CUT--' i u'if
"'I,.', Ir.'itli.
ill mi. lucrum
1 ..rt. r.' )ll,li'!l,.
kC1 AV'1 Ve.nn Hnlm I, I
. y& jtfA.,r'.',n".-'.!? Tjliiil;""..?
t-.'te.' tvm imm m u aw-k. I lilt. ilKin-4i' iithI -tr. tut
r - - - -
I liU- ilUi'nti' inul
(I- I'l lllti'.l tllH'M. .rt i f.
hi .Ir iii-.-Ul-. hi ,-iu l,u
Ull"8.. J'lli"k,l!-t-
S.'inip!
NitU.r l.y ii.ull H'cli. b.LV
PIERCE'S IMPROVED CAKOON
BROADCAST
SEED-SOWER!
II- U' K'h l1IU'iVKn f'A-
TI'i,, (tltoATH'AS I" Si
VKT! i W, !l HI HIM) U,l
o'.li''i trr.tin ii'il j.M'ns, cil.
t "iMS III'' Wi'l k l'f Kl ititn.
Si iws m'ii- i--it' f w hfit In
l:. Ii i: .-iLrtii rnils. I.h-s
lii-ttcr u.nk th:m t y any
li! tier lltl' in w lnn iT.
iitHti'iid I'ri. r m.
hi. nd .iuui) fur t-'irv uit.
J. WILDER & CO.,
ft
In I'I1!:a1 ST'IONt;, rnsv lo npclv. fi.nrn
not ru-l or riitllc. Is 1- . A St lls-TITI Ti:
l'OU I'l. VSTI II, nt Hull (In- ., ; mil.
Iicls tlie !nil, '.ii.:;. I'lill'I TSAMI lit liS
lit 1.-U1U.. il'.'ili!" On" vi -.r i. ,ll .-li'ihl. ('.-.;il.i:.io prd
Minpi'ib f". V .11. i-'.i V iV I l.,t'i-.i:iUi'n, N.J.
33,000 YCiatp
EASTMAN GOLLEG
An i.it.Mi il. -Mi n -m --!.! I l.iil,,, nt,.. y I-. n
HTl'HK.Vr Tit AMX.1 -l-H III NIM...S in us
lli"r"ii.'l, inul c..'n.i.-t.. innnii. r us Hie M. r, h;u,t.
1 ,..-, i.r llnnk.T hi ,-v.tv .l.iy nr.'. Fur full intrtlcu
Utb adUiChb ha.-,UI,;l:i L.ill.H''. J'uk.'i'li.sn-, i;w Vurli.
fpiliftrim.a.i Iseil 11 .i,mi.,.;i l,,..,n:,n,lo,.,.-
I l.mt.,l .ik-ii'-. of (lie Nl.vv Y.illk A- HVVN
KI.VK c.MI' .Ni- IIN nd n,iK, ,,l, So.akv
( ''llt" I'i.IiI to tlic rarllt 111,111. For fllrlll. r luu-u.-u-
Ioit and u-rms n.l lr. .s, ,t .in.-,.
THE NEW YORK A HAVANA CICAR CO.
67 bro.idwuy. Now York.
liAIRCMMPERS
' ,fti'11,,:JJ'r- .Beat ever made, sn.
p.i". it lira hit'. 1'ul up in li:iiul-.,Ni tj dri i n ui, , Iiini il
fi'ViT tin tn.vcH, Nu. I for i- rivfa, nr, No. ' f.ii 1,m.(.
iT'tnpn. Tiyalinv, S-iy wlilrii v'll uaiil. Only Oo
! txix. (IrciilniH free. s-n i p. .l i:ln!. iili.s-in
tiill. S. h. N OKI ON li.JJl'fiHiUl Muclc 1U11,. liU':ig.j.
cowsyiiPTfori.
I hniift.i-mvirt iiii'.u im infMih.iutlln-..-ft; ; v a
1)f0 t ll 1 II sq ti -1 h i f ili-ih i t i' ViiPt k 1 in! .111 1 1 (if In),
I Htlltlli;' lllli- O i(tl ( II' fli. I 'l.lpe.l, ' (l Hi ' ..!!! t-. rli . ( ,
111 Um'-liCili'V. Hint I Wi 1 ocii.i V () U L' l -1 ) j; 'K
ti-iiiftliur v 1: .1 u V a l.l A I' l i; i ;:: A l lf-il mi t fi. djBoifca'i
tUMUT "lltli'-ert (ilVilI'V'er.nv,,! ' Cl.i.iM- --i
UH. T. A. M.iK t M . m I'.-arl t-i., Nt w fork.
I liKlTUI Klll.i:. lt: ,' 7TVT!t1uf
l-;d it-llef fri .111 lllhl ll .M'. ,1,1 ,,,, I ..M-. ' 1
4, I , ' HK, , .1 ,1- I ,, H ,,f ,1' HLM.T.I...... I.. , I ... .
iiimiiIhih, el,-
l.i nil lul, I, II. II.
nil I'-Ji i. iUH. II. 11. (.lil l . kt. D.. 53
: t 'hte' , , , I...
! uiu-a Avenue, ACIiuiCo, l.eu, iu.
VV Pr.J.A.
-I,,,
t; now ni nit
fliHa k.-tsi. 1 1 t.jtt 1 Kl V'l 4 Ivl'i
1 .. M .. . I, 1 I M r-
Will ! Ihr iltiriiiif ht-lirnurv. li- -i'li I ki'i.- of
Cuhi-h Wi'i.r" ami ul rnre, t-n ri iit, I'iti ii .! iiH r1,
5.'i( MrnnfiwRv, N. V.. wi. n. 111. ill-he ul li-r Una uiuHi.
m.' wf .4.-. L. A. I- bH 1 1 H Jk I O-VliVuiVi i-iiiua.
PATENTS'-
TrfRtcd ami rnnrt w It Jmit tin1 l.jtlfc.
ii 11 k on 1 n si 1 1 1 c 1 1 1 (icin tree. Ad.l'i'M
I'.L.l'uMl.M.D, Aurt.iii, lvtimM..,Ui.
1 1 ML
II UI1L
r - i0-. 7l,iWm'..'m It ....,, r,ir, i
imtmv.g A ?.!::";;;n;;:!r4!,v.::."i!;r
E
;, . t '
' :: -
..-r J 1 -ft-- - O K It U Ii lOINTIi
w-i.i'-wi; Cincinnati. Ohio.
w EooFmaJJ
;
I
,
I
- .1 Ha,,.. ......
......... ii ri,r: ,1 -
a.d lot SO HIS. IU llo,..u
sh0LR9onw!hS,"?rmi,i,ARM I8
.noma use oni), th Arm and Hammer" brand
lor Cleaning and Keenino Milk Pn. .j
. - : -
-TT't. Han. It la tha Bel 01
1Ui H " il!-' MUy lununillL liir
lrhLQttiSuviiiiilJ
fncltlvoly CI" HICK-lliAllACHK. H,o, ,.,.' nnd Rll i in. , , ,nu.n r. ' ' V"
"In n.T nrw-tk'Q 1 uno ,ia all
Household Purpose..
oranaoacu bou.ut lu Lu.k. Ask ur Uia
Man and Beast.
Mustang Liniment is older tlian
most men, and used more and
more every year.
riCr H"5,''"'l'i Purpce.. Mi, ,th tha animait food. S
H&W "ARM & HAMMER BRAND" f? rv
,i'Hi 1 . i , I' -.t u.i. ...... . ;
.. .. ... .. . .. ......... ....uij.iin. ft-
ikik" 'i. .b.jSllH&X tiu, "BoL'l'oi."
HOO DISESCS.-Th. "Arm ana Hammer
( fcrard Soiia and Saleratii it used H.th ureal
- ., . ... ' " . .VTV
.inni mr io pruvrnuon snu cure ol HOQ
ill rum dai.iLj....... , . - "
i, M, wlth ,h9 a,ma,', ,,.nd. '
Ann tk Hammer" brand SALSODA i'A'ashing SoiaJ.
O
R. U. AWARE
Lcrillard's Climax Plnj ;
ti- aruin u -.-( fm luy ; IxirlHunl
- or I. nil iMii'i'ia ; thai Iat I li )
Nnvr lipD.ni;. inn) i li I Jrl!lat, i SuuUs, aa
tUv Lcst Ulid clii.'.iiM.&t, quality cuitalUi-'rutJ I P
Ul" CCrJTS. M,l,. (ii.li l-v the V T. At
lliiviimi l l.uri .... ..7 Ureiid-I
Pomtivuly the Best, nay, .. v. ami i uu 11'.'
A..N.K-K.
ltilli
""'I K lIITIXfl TO llll l IITMI Ha,
'"'"'' " ' aaiM Uta Miiut,KWal l'
Ukm lMwr.
Thousands Ilastonol to Tli'n
Graves.
Py relylneon (c'diiiioiilr.li written in vivid
glowinif liiimiiiiL'O of some iniriieiiloiin cures
iimde liy mie iHrtrely putli-d up il,K-t,,r or
patent, iiiedietne lias leistened tlionsnwls to
their frrnves; the reudei linviiii; nlinost in
pano faith Unit tlie sunn, miracle will ,i per
formed on llieni, tlint. these te-tiiimniats
UK 11 1 i, 111, while the so culled nie.lirnie Is nil
the t i im liusteiiini; them to their grnves.
AltJiongh wo have
Thousands Upon Thousands 1 1 !
of testimonials
tlio mint fnl c-.ires,
voliiiitiirily sen1 lis, we do not puhllsli them,
as thev do not iinike the cures. It Is oe.r
niedieine. II, i, Kilters, that, nuiko tlie cures.
Jt has neer failed find never mil. We will
trlve reference to any one for any disease
Blinilar to their own If desin'd, or will refer
to nny neirhtMir, ns t'icre is not a iieiulilKir
IkhxI In the known wot Id but enn show its
cures by Hen Hitters.
A Losing Joke.
A prominent piivsteian of I'iMslturirh rntil
Inn l.ty p;,(ient v( l,o was ,-,,i,, plan, nor of her
'eonln. :ed ill health, and ,1 l,,s t,l, Hlv to
'cure her. joktiulv Haul: "Trvllop hidi'i-s!'
'The lady look il in earliest mid ue,l the lilt
ters. tronl which .lie ( d .1 a I,, , I permanent
'health. She now ltntvhe-1 at II," doetor for
'his joke, lull he Is not oiell pa used Willi it,
'lie It cost liuu a if,..d pal lent.
Tees of Doctors.
The fin-, of doctors at ?",.0(a vl -it would
tax 11 man for a eai , ami in m i d of a daily
visit, over M. lino a ear for nie,lic;il atlend
nni't) nlone! And one -iiit;e liotlle of Hop
Jlitteis taken in time would save the 81,000
lind nil the )' ar'.- -id; li"-.-..
Given Up by tlio Doctors.
" Is it possible that Mr. ('.mil rev is up nnd
ut work, and ci,te,l bv sosiinple a leiih'ilv '.'",
' 1 iissute v,,,i it is t rii' that he is entire
ly cured, uud with nothing but Hop Hitters,
nnd only ten days uo his doctors L'uve I im
nil and said he must die, 1 11 mi Kidney ami
Liver trouble !"
Nonf srciuitn. h dheut n l'lmeli of (.Tern
It ops on t he wh ite lal., -1. Mm 11 all 1 lie vi ie.p,nrt.
onousHtult Willi "Hop "(,r' Hops"iii then iiaine,
Healthy Men and Healthy Women.
Life is one eoiistmn buttle nainst
tlmt (li'einl tn, Ulster, " .,!('. "
Miinv suecuinb irein:itnrely to tlii
viei'ius nssailant. vvluise eternal
object is to tear (low n, weur out mid
drstroc. A w ant of ener " , a want
of stamina, ti want of re ll.,iit iiet
ivety on the part of thoughtless in
dividuals causes many to become,
easy nnd apparently vv'iliiio; prey
to this ruin and (lev j-t at i, di of
mankind. A remedy composed of
proper herbs and roots that, will
build up, repair and strengthen tin;
weak portions , f the human system,
should assiili.iu-ly be taken ut U10
approach of disease. Don't wait for
him to obtain a foot-hold, don't wail
until lie I omesyoiir master. Meet
his attack at oice nnd promptly.
1 Io ou d- sire to know a r, inedy ow
wbich vod '.- 'II plaee safe rellivnce is
nch tiuies cinerv.' iicv. "Ao.a r.
metliber Hi:,' I'K- -t Isdi I's IM.l.Ot
I1O1 Ii (Ml Mlt.IMi:il l.l wil! J'TOTS
t-13 I, n friend in need. it
th mfei t nssistnnt of nature in
repelling ,li:',-use. nlvv a v s acting iu liar
inor.y w itti tl'.e ciiti;-e human (..-iniza-tionniid
t.odit y liinel 1011s. It .strength
ens the w i -a 1. pi 11 lo'is, it re .iil.-.les tin
bowels and ki.lni vs, it. oils up, as fc
were, t lie 111:1, liinery ol' life, and cures
when all 01,1. r r. .li.-s have failed,
Sllell dis. -uses as ImiTUC I'.l.o,'!. I'miK
IM0KST10N, Wk..vk Kihm:vs. SnllKS.
.i-k.s, llii i:i m ,v risvi, ivrc. It .piiekly
checks, 1,-ea v ot 1 lie i,ow -Is :i 11 I ki-lnevs.
ami v'lvcs th" H,ilV"l'cr from d. lality uuJ
waslini; diseases a new leas.- ol life.
If. 1 4ill' t let your drlliriiist persuttdd
you to use a remedy ,,r s ene ut le-r name.
Insist on hav Inur Or Cuysott's Yd"
low Dock and Sarsapanlia, L"lJ
talo' no Hiilistilnie.
"fresh flowers.-
tit u! mill :tilnn n t) lilt i- mh; I '.- fur I he
V'mi 11 uit chihi iv 11 in m, n.in !s, m t iih
s-hiIi'ii Im m i N!us. I.im Pitt,
thiMMiiiipilt-r. x- ujii.- v kii.'wn hikI -ii-l'rnirtl
lor Smiu-- iimi 1 1 ii.h- tir .-hili) i in. v htun -ho
thoroughly unili-i-iuidl-. ti!i' ih in n ImiuIh
HIHIL'S MH'll lis " l.i ! 1 .11 nr I iv" " h' v- t!itl.
i -it t lo Siiinui'K" arc l i Inl-h i n i-.''
NothlllMT I'lUiyi-h. .Mi in u ;:t!.. An
Hlminluuco til IMi'l iiii'r ;.'.'i ti ns, ii.in j-r
(iu.iii.
MINSTREL SOKGS OLD & MEW.
Tlie larire sai, s slum' this lo he u pertei t sue
cefs. and 110 wonder: No l.riu-l'.i, r or moro
musical melodies lie v,-r taoiu-M tnpeiher
than those or Die hundred pipiTIT Pt 'HIN-
STHFi, 11,1,1 JilHiLfP ss.llur. here", o.l, ,. led." Ail
tlie World -iiit-s il.em: A : -eon , pan au nts lor
1'iaiKi or I Ii yiin. j : piain. t:.' "n, e!,,l Ii
W ARS OUC S .
For AniilVfTHHrlcn and (i il lie, ,,, of Sol
llifin, iih.ii Sonus and llviiuis lor
.Memorial lii .
Like ihe book aliov e ti.entlonei:, tliis Is a
very treat Fiieees-. ,.n,l ci, rlh I,ms H,o
lirinlil, pairiolie mii,i. A tri al fin orue ,il
the (iraiid Ainu, and illi all who have hei-u
wilda rs. V -ed ex it i,s,-, w ar .sonii Uju
cei ls. uU cts. f4 .Vl per doen.
Mailed for It. l.nl I'riee.
l.TU .V I! i: I, 1. V. I l.lea-o.
C. II. DITSON' : I'll.. s,:t llnmiUuy, Sew York.
GELBEhT 0PG OOS
DRESS LlWSfiCS.
(nil'. M-'.w rAr.iti,:.)
fl.,11 l l,tr.' u-r,-l ,in'l,L'll, is, .,mi, :,.,, win, ,,t
K ,1 lim.ll. II,.)' , , ;,.,, , '
lkti10Uutl1.11. "I, "il., recoil,, ii, 'ail l,.r l,i:.uh-Mlis
Boveeirn Twills,
Koyul i wills,
Impi-ovad Royal Twills,
Cable Twills,
K.vun Merveilleux Twills,
Gros Grain Twills,
butm Classiqua Twills.
Man? sli k iissii...n ,-,i,.,,.,i 1 . t1i i-ocn-
n vim ! hi,:, ,l'L';:' -7 C - " --
BLACK PRINCE TWILLS, '
A , Nil,, w.
M-lli II, IS i.r , I lis 1
I." net hl.l. k. (Ml ' Iiri I-,. ,..
( iiiu.li loeilil, H la SI. II, H I IM
1 ,11 will n, , ,,,, I;, 1, ,,,, ,.Bl I, , irl
and 4 V;i,,1h, , l,,i; , o ...
('oalloili.'r.ll.i'Hf p-iii, b,-,. i 1, ,,.,;,
Iier ,.u It
.i;i:i...
mil 'rr
il . tt,,.l ,g
1..K.K f..r
tt.C 1I.IU IB U.0, .11
O. I". IKJUtM A.N, I', ,..,,lc,.i
s-'-iiilifai.
Tills ailvcrl Is, inent Ih prim, ,1 lu m i-ws papers.

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