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The News-Herald. (Hillsboro, Highland Co., Ohio) 1886-1973, December 25, 1913, Image 4

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85038161/1913-12-25/ed-1/seq-4/

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THE NEWS-HERALD, HILLSBORO, OHIO, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 25, 1913
iM&
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CHANEY'S ORPHEUM
llHHI iSii
Christmas Day S Night
Alice Joyce in
"The Riddle of the
Tin Soldier"
A T wo Part Detective
Feature, Very Thrilling
and of Absorbing Interest
Added Features:
John Tobin's Sweetheart.
Vit. Comedy and
The Girl Across the Way
Biograph
JUDGE STEELE PASSES ANY AY
Continued . From First Page.
Big Four Reel Program. Special Matinee at 1:30 p. m,
Saturday, December 27
Mr. G. M. Anderson in
"THE DOCTOR'S DUTY"
A Superb Western Offering
of Merit
i
MR. G. M. ANDERSON
BIG FREE MATINEE FOR CHILDREN FRIDAY, DEO. 26, 1:30 p. m.
MARSHALL.
Dec. 22, 1913.
Mrs. B. E. Wrluhtand wife, of Mara
thon, spent a few days last week with
the latter's parents, Wm. Elliott and
wife, and attended protracted meet
ing. Mrs. Grace Kelley and sister-in-law,
Faye, of Berry vllle, spent Wednesday
with Burch Miller and family.
Harry Boatman and family, of Fall
Creek, John Watts, of Balnsboro,
1'rank Lyleand wire, John Hunter and
wife and Miss Myrta Watts were the
guests of R. L Watts and family
Sunday.
Miss Grace Williams, of Fort Hill,
spent Monday and Tuesday with Ray
JBoyd and famllv.
Miss Nellie Stethem, who has been
teaching school at New London, re
turned home Saturday for a two weeks
vacation with her parents, William
Stethem and wife.
Miss Margaret Cameron called on
Elva Spruance Saturday evening.
Don Lucas and wife took dinner with
Joshua Gall and family Sunday.
Rev. Scarf, of Spring Valley, Rev.
W. E Shriver, Mrs. Josephine Sams
and son, Norval, and Floyd Clyburn,
of Rainsboro, Frank Lucas and wifu
Roberta Lucas, of Lodore, and J a;!-:
Burnett and family were guests of C.
E. Lucas and family Sunday.
Ed Cameron and wife and Misses
Maude and Margaret Cameron, Elsie
Bumgarner, Daisy Davis and Arch
Cameron and Clarence Garen spent
Sunday with Elmer Garen and family.
O. H. Hughes and wife and Miss
Ellle Elliott took dinner with R. R.
Watts and wife Sunday.
Miss Daisy Davis took supper with
Ed Cameron and family Saturday
evening.
Miss Viola Sypherd, of Xenia, is
homo for a few days vacation with her
mother.
WE OFFER THE MOST EXTENSIVE LINE IN
Fountain Pens
In fact, we handle the best which are offered for sale in the
United States and sell them underguaranty at reasonable prices
Frank EmmerlinQ
Jeweler & Optician
UX .-s V I ti ' 'Not the only lime wt with you Well, i V," - y """jY!
VaraV iy (Bui one of ihe many, many llmti VxS' ICn5W
Sv X MERRY CHRISTMAS I" Hjocvi 7
ca
HE SPIRIT OF
this 1913th Christ-
oC mas-time prompts
f?
S
S
us to express our Appre
ciation to the commu
nitycollectivelyand to
each of our friends in
dividually for any part
they have played in mak
ing this a most prosper
ous year for usf
MayJDecember 25th be
numbered amongur
YULET1DE memories
as theHappiest Christmas
of them allis the wish of
i$
ft
Hissed by tow men. And amongst
Judge Steele's friends and acquaint
ances, twosubjpois -were conhtantly
remarked upoi ; o o was his ncntillty
toward and lack of criticism of all and
the other, the universal respect of
others fur him
No man In the community had
fewer harsh words to regret ai d none
po8essed more highly the contidence
and esteem In the county and town
where hts long and active life was
spent.
Judge Steele was u gentleman, not
of the old school alone, but of every
school In every time, newasi.otme
who paraded himself as a gentleman,
but by his conduct and demeanor, he
forced from all who knew blm the
acknowledgement that he wasa gentle
man.
But whatever could bo said of Judge
Steele from a socUl point of view, and
much more could be said, it waB In his
chusen profession of a lawyer that he
proved his greatest usefulness and
value to the community and county In
whlch'he lived. The work of a lawjer
In the discharge of his duties to his
clients and the public may be compar
ed to a dangerous weapon or a high
explosive, In that its use is very val
uable in the bands of one who can and
will properly and Intelligently control
and employ it and very destructive
when ignorantly, carelessly or lmprop
erly used.
Judge Steele had drunk deep of the
fountain of the law and was noted for
his great knowledge of its underlying
principles. And coupled witli this
wide range of knowledge was a ready
and accurate mental perception which
enabled him at a glance to see with
remarkable clearness the complete
legal bearings of a question, all of
which combined to place him at the
bead of the column and give his
advice and judgment on intricate
points of law, the weight of author
ity. And, when there were added to
these qualities, his high ideals of per
sonal and professional integrity, his
strong sense of justice and absolute
and never falling Impartiality of
judgment, he became the Ideal, the
honorable lawyer, who sheds luster
upon and bring to his noble profession
the confidence and respect' of the
people. These qualities Judge Steele
was universally known to posess and
their practice undoubtedly made his
opinions and advice more generally
sought than those of any other mem
ber of the local bar, especially during
the latter half of his professional life,
a position he held at the bar until
falling health removed him from the
rwks.
Judge Steele's mind was naturally
of an analytical and investigative
turn. He was a law scholar and while
none surpassed him in the breadth'
and thoroughness of his professional ,
knowledge, others there were more
adept in the presentation and con
duct of cases to juries, or as is fre
quently expressed, were better trial
lawyers. But the best support that a
trial lawyer could have in the trial of
a case and valuable above his own
brilliancy, however great, would be
the wise, clear headed, sincere sug
gestions of Judge Steele. But in cases
presented to the court alone, Judge
Steele was pre-eminent, not alone be
cause of his great knowledge of the
law, but also because of his known
sincerity and perfect frankness with
courts that he would not urge on the
conrtany proposition of law which
did not have the fair and impartial
endorsement of his own judgment.
But it was as a judge that Judgo
Steele performed his greatest service
and that was the place where he sig
nalized his great power as an ex
pounder of the law and proved the
far-reaching thoroughness of his un
derstanding of the law as well as the
possession of those Invaluable quali
ties of temperament : Patience, jus
tice and impartiality, which form the
indisputable proof of strong moral
character and convictions. Judge
Steele served approximately 10 years
upon the Common Fleas bench of this
district, from Feb. 1872, to Oct , 1881,
and long before the close of his ser
vice, was looked unon as one of the
fairest and most thoroughly equipped
members of the Ohio bench. It was
while serving on the bench that he I
was thrown much with the late Judge
R. A. narrlson, of Columbus, who for
years before his death, was considered
the head of the Ohio bar. Mr. Har
rison was so impressed with Judge's
Steele's legal attainments and his
broad and ready grasp of legal ques
tions that he offered Judge Steele a
partnership with him in the practice
of law in Columbus, which was as
high a compliment to Judge Steele's
ability as is seldom received by any
one.
iiiiitiiliifAiiiiMLiiiliAiiiiiiiiiiML''iiiAiiliiitifiiK
EVERYTHING 1ST GO
We are closing out our entire stock of Mil
linery Goods regardless of cost, as we are go
ing to quit business. We are going to do this
if possible by the first of the year, no matter
how great the sacrifice.
UNEXCELLED OPPORTUNITIES FOR BARGAINS
Hats for Children, Misses and Women, in Velours,
Beavers, Plush and Velvet. Ribbons, silks, velvets, fancy
feathers and wings, veiling of all kinds, large French head
plumes, infanf s underwear, coats and hosiery. Children's
hats, flowers, etc. Everything sold at cost and below.
We give a few prices below which show how heav
ily we have cut our prices:
Children's hats, value $1 to $3, sale price 25c to $1.00
Beautiful Trimmed Hats, 98c, former price $4 and $5
Baby Caps, value 50c to $2.50, sale price 25c to $1.00
Infant's Underwear, coats and hosiery, value 25c to 50c
Your Choice in this SALE for 10c
Cohn's Millinery Store
West Main Street HILLSBORO, OHIO
!VVV',VV1IV,V!ll!i,fVVffVIffVIIfVlli,VfVlV!ftlf!l!ifffl?
Buffets, Rockers, Dav
enports, Parlor Sets,
Mirrors, Divans, Book
cases, Hall Racks and
Costumers
Bed-room Suits All
kinds in newest designs
Mattresses, Springs,
Chiffoneers, Chifarobes
and Dressing Tables.
Save them many steps
by buying a Hoosier
Kitchen Cabinet. It
is so useful that it must
be seen to be under
stood' and used to be
appreciated.
OUR PRICES ARE WITHIN THE REACH OF ALL
WHEN AROUND OUR WAY PLEASE MAKE US A CALL
West Main
Street
KINCA1D & SON
FURNITURE DEALERS AND FUNERAL DIRECTORS
Hillsboro
Ohio
t
The Farmers & Traders National Bank
Judge Steele never sought polltlca
office. On numerous occasions polit
ical preferment was his for asking,
aye, for the acceptance, but he was so
devotedly wedded to his profession
and its duties were so agreeable to
him that he steadfastly refused to
step out of his profession, though only
temporarialy, for political official life.
Though busily engaged with profes
sional duties, Judge Steele's was al
ways ready with a helping hand for
the betterment of the town and the
advancement of It Interests. Ifo
serv ed for a time on two or three oc
casions, I believe as a member of the
village school board, and in other
ways identified himself with the in
terests of the town -and its forward
movements.
Though not active In the member
ship of any church, Judge Steele was
a religious man. But his religion was
not of the kind" that proved Itself only
1 In pretense or even adherence to creed,
it was manifested In action, In con
duct. His religion was positive, not
'negative, ne lived" his Jreligion ac
cording to the Golden Bule, and by
rendeilng unto Ceasar the things
which were Caesar's. He was the up
I right man whose end, the Bcrlptures
(tell us, Is peace. Judge Steele leaves
us after a spotless life covering a span
of nearly fourTcore years. Others may
have passed him In the line of success
which consists In the accumulation of
vast wealth or the attainment of high
political place, but none will leave a
Lang's Smokery
NEXT DOOR TO HILLSBORO BANK
CIGARS, CANDIES, AND PIPES,
DOLLY VARDEN AND LOW
. NEY'S CHOCOLATES, SPAR
ROW'S "8c JOHNSON'S CANDIES
- -
rancy Hfeuy flen! 1
urniture Wj eautiful A other 1
- ,i r K CdS and ' IV I USt I
riendlyI est 1 E ove
i iresides SBF edding j H uch I
rj
richer heritage to those" he lias left
uouiuu. uo passed wjmi ine great
satisfaction that comes from con
sciousness of a life well spent and
duties well performed.
Misses Mildred Morgan aud Bertha
Bell will entertain a number of the
younger set tonight with a dance at
Bell's New Hall.
Mr. and Mrs. Elgar Barrere, of Clr
clevllle, Miss Edith Gardner, of Wash
ington O. n., and Ben B. Nelson, of
Cincinnati, were here to attend tha"
funeral of Col. George W. Barrere.
Agricultural machinery Imported by
Eilypt during the first six .months of
this year has a value of 8530,000 against
8350,000 In 1912 and 8200,000 in 1011,
3
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