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The Fremont weekly journal. [volume] (Fremont, Sandusky County, Ohio) 1867-1877, June 14, 1872, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85038229/1872-06-14/ed-1/seq-1/

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fre::qnt weekly journal
rUBUSHED EYEUT FRIDAY,' '
BY A. H. BALSLEY.
TERMS OF THE JOURNAL:
One year, in advance, - j00
Sixniouths, ----- 1,00
Thrflft months. - - - - - 60
, VKKV VAKIKTT CF
JOB FEINTING
NEATLY AND QUICKLY DONE.
Business Directory.
.... -;- m ..... .
i. 'TleTZm. a. B. FRKKCH.
LEUUON & FEE'CH,
ATM8XET3 AT LAW AND GENEBAL
AtSli-ViS, CLVllE, OHIO. '
Mr. Umasonwiil iw m ) unws at Fremont, . o
Thursday .feae week. Prompt attention given
to all tiuioc. . :- ' -
JOSEPH Iw BARTLETT,
TTORXEY AT LAW, 'White' Block, eorner
A of front and Cropuan streets. tromP
tiii K-n to toe collection ol clainisand all busi
ness pert.simncr t the eeicral law practice,
prcuxint, jalarci 1, 1.
., .. J. T. OARTEB, .
V1TOR.VEY AT LAW, Fremont, Ohio, offers
hi. iimw-w:. '1 rri.vf ail requiring legal
bub!L.Mi,eraoy ! tus (.uarta of bnu-Jiuisy
Countv; w U aio attend U ir collection of ttumi.
Qlfceaiilytoliio'oaCiOtehaustrcet, r
J. L. G RE EXE, Sen.
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR AT LAW,
will ut:end to Leal Business in baau.ua
ky and iAomureounties,Oflice,coruerEooni .up
stairs, '1 Tier's block,
' ' EBEMOKT.O.
B P.BUCKLAKD. H. SVKRKTT. J A3. H. FOWLZE
BUCKXAXO.EVEKETT & FOWLEE,
ATTOEKET6 COUNSELLORS AT LAW1
and boiicitwrs in Chancery; will attend to pro
ioi ouMOoaa in SandusAyand adioinm Man
ias Omcseeona storr, Bucaland'sNew Block
D. H. BFUNKERHOFF, M.D
PHYSICIAN & SUAQEGS,
OFFICE IN BCCKXAXD'B OLD BLOCK,
on Front St. Residence on Birchard Avenue,
eorner of Wood Street. Omcs hours from 10 to
1J A. M., 1 tc 4 P. M. and 7 to 9 P. M.
; DB. A. F. FBJCE,
SURGICAL MECHANICAL DEXT15T, Of
n je over Bankof r'remont, White'Bblock,wiU
b found in his otnce.at all times.
HOTELS.
K.ESSLER HOUSE,
n r .BKr.DTNG.Pronrieior. Passentrers carried
ri-- to and from the House free ol charge, fcittu-
atedcornerof Front and fc-tat St.,
FKEMONT. :
- NICHOLS -HOUSE,- -
ACCOMMODATIONS FIEST-CLASS. O Ko
rea A- Ells, Proprietors, Clyde, Ohio. Popu
lation of Clyde, 2,iut. Livery Stable in connection
with ihe House -
LLVDSEY HOUSE,
IINDSEY. Sandusky Co. Ohio, E. S. Bowursox,
j Proprietor. The proprietor takes pleasure in
announcing that he is prepared to accommodate
the traveling public Every attention paid to the
comfort of guests of the House. s lHyl
EXCHANGE HOTEL,
BELLEVTTE, O. John Ford, Proprietor. Be.
ecntiy refitted and furnished.
BLBCH HOUSE,
CLEVELAND, O., 124 Water Btieet, near the
Bailroad Depot, and in the center of business.
COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
L . Q . Eawson, J as. Moore, Joseph L. Bawson
' J. L. R.AWS0U A CO.,
nTim ins. FOEWAEDIXfl COMMISSION
?5 Merchants, Dealers in Coarse Salt, Fine Salt,
Dairy bait, Land Plaster. Calcined Plaster, Water
Lime etc. Having purchased the entire property
known as the Fremont Warehouse and Bteain Ele
vators at the head of navigation on the bandueky
Kiver, we are prcpr-vi w , --
ijnmoer, jnemiuuun uu wkuwyAvwwtwi
Othce.at Fremont Elevators.
FBEMONT. 1-1
. A. D. WILES'
rjHOTOGBAPH GALLEEY,r(rGarvin'sStor
MISOELLA-NEOPS .
HO! FOR THE WEST!!
The uuderaiuned would notify all persons who de
sign traveling westward that he is prepared to sell
THROUGH TICKETS
TO alXi the LEADING poists in Indiana. Illinois
Missouri, ivansae. ntfi"" -11
tSyl
Office in Birchard's Block, Fremont, 0.
LEEK, DOEBIXG & CO.,
THPOBTEBB AND I OBBEBEOI
YANKEE NOTIONS,
Joys Janct pooDS,
No.133s.nd 133 Water St.,
C LEVELAND, OHIO.
t.W.LEE, l.O. W. B: DOCBIKS, a. H. STII.SOM.
vl. C. JOHNSON,
ARCaiTSCT AND DESIGNER,
Offlwin Moore nd Bawson's Block, Corner of
Front and Garrison fctreets, Fremont, Ohio. All
orders promptly attended to; S2yl
FOSTER & BECK.
Garnenteis, Joiners and Builders,
. KKFMONT. OHIO,
Docs sllkin.ls of fn tract Building, and all man
ner of Jobbing Work. Shop on corner of Wayne
and Ewlng streets. Moving and Baasing of Build
ings, and all kinds of Tackle work specially at
tended to. Orders solicited, lsyl
MEAT MARKET-
rA OS STATE STKEET.
Ir A MTHRS Ukes pleasure In
R 7 inviting the public U call at his
atand on State Street, in
sssS222& t rcntiePl Block,
when they want Fiss Siiaju or EiCtLLZirr
Boasts. The best quality of
BEEF, PORK MUTTON and VEAL
can be found on bis counter, and the public will
b eerred always at
BBABONABLE PRICES,
CALL AND TRY ME.
46 A. LUHRB.
E. F. HAFFORD.
CARRIAGE
Ta,otory.
Corner Froal and Market Stresti.
fAEEIAGEH.orEN AND TOP BUGGIESoon.
i stantiy on hand, or made to order in any style.
dT'Paricular attention paid to repairing. All
work done at my la .tury warranieu.
8yl E. F. HAFFORD.
J. P. r.lOORE,
MAN UF ACTTJB-EB OF
CA5RIAGES,BIGGIES & WAGONS
T r)F.Rli?Eto call the attention of alltothead-
y cutioue i- -
;l"JIAGE FACTORV.
I have so enlarged and remedied ray shop, as to
give me liferp"""" . . . . -
ecuting, in a superior manner.every description of
Carriaees and Wagon work. My workmen are
MWemd competent. All material is selected
with special care , and throughly seasoned before it
is manufactured. My aim i to turaish work
which shall have s merited reputation for superior
ouality and stvle. 1 have titter up a Urge store
10om and shall keep always on nanu,
Cvtrr variety ol Carriage Bug
Kics, Lumber, KprinK and
" market Wussns,
With these newly acquired fscilitiesmy prices wlU
be below competition.
Carriage Factors.cor., Garrison and Water Stl
.m.lciTOHS AHD ATTORNEYS FOB
U.S. Afl3F0S13N PATENTS.
BURHIDGE &. CO .,
Saperior St., opposite Amerl
catt House, Cleveland, O.
With Associated Offices in Washington sndFor.
'w4j ,j eignCountries.
PUTNAM MANUFACTURING CO.
MAKCl'ACTl BEM or
PATENT CLOTHES WRINGERS,
Ironists: Jlanglcs, Ac.
jH K1SB8 WBISiiEltS JlEfALREV.
H. II. H AMLEX. Agent, 66 Bank St-(
j;ml CLEVELAND, HI0.
j
!
h lie
Established 1839. Vol.XL.HI. New Series Vol. XX. No. 24.
" FREMONT; SANDUSKY COUNTY, OHIO ; FRIDAY, JUNE 11 1872. : - ? '' :
-b re
HI
0HL
ee
My
J
ourna
"TI
It is of the greatest advantage, to the consumer, beneGtting him who
" buys more than the one who sells.
mi
Will on the 1st
hAba.
BUY AND SELL FOR
Thn raAit cicfom ia o-rnonaivp
duces our expenses more than one-half, and will enable us to sell BETTER GOODS AT LOWER PRICES
than can possibly be sold under the eystem of credit
We shall convince our friends that we
STOVBS! TINW-AJRE!
AGEIGULTURAL IMPLEMENS
And do aU kinds of ROOFING, EAVB
TROUGH and JOBBING at LOWER
PRICES generally, than any credit
store in Fremont.
Franklin says:
SAVE
PHILOSOPHERS STONE" PAY AS YOU GO.
iLiswr li ,iwjl
lUJW LALA X--ar "W"
hty of Inly, 182, adopt the
SYSTEM!
One JE2?c&
nnfprLiin ami (lQne-erous wav of doiii
"ECOHrOlTOr IS WEAIiTH.
YOUR MONEY"
CASH!
for .i&JLl-
- T business.
Its abandonment re-
can and will sell
5?
25r XU- JO. XKl ED 31 JDl 3S2T
MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO., NEW XORK.
o
ANDREW W. GILL, President.
Lucics McAdam, Sec'y and Act'y.
5
HOOD, HAND k MUNGER, General Agents for
Headquarters, 197 Superior Street, Cleveland, Ohio.
DRS.RICE, Medical Examiners.
c
n
r
c
H
C
r
O
CO
o
o
j
cv
5"
EVERETT CLAPP, Secretary.
II. C. Clench, Asst. Sec'y.
Ohio,
51-51
THE
Fremont Weekly Journal
PUBLISHED EVEBY FRIDAY MOUSING,
IH BDCKLAND'S OLD BLOCK,
(CP-STAIKS),
FREMONT, OHIO.
The Fremont Weekly Journal
Is Republican in Principle,
And will be devoted 'to Politics, Local Mat
ters, Literature and General News.
The aim of the Publisher is to make the
Joubkal a first-class Family Newspaper.
AS AX ADVERTISING IUEDM !T
THE FREMONT JOURNAL!
i
i
t
It the best in the County.
THE JOURNAL JOB OFFICE!
Is well supplied with
NEW TYPE AND GOOD PRESSES,
JOB WORK,
In all its branches, promptly done and neatly
executed. Ererything from a Triple Sheet
Poster to the smallest Visiting Card, will be
furnished in the shortest possible time, and
SATISFACTION GUABANTEED.
Persons wanting Job Work done, either
riJUN K OHNAMKNTAL,
Are invited to call, or address
A. H. BALSLEY,
Publisher Journal, Fremont, Ohio.
P. DORR & soiy
HaTejustreceivedalargeHocrot
m
b
0
0
FOR THE
SPRING & SUMMER
TRADE!
FOB SALE AX THE
LOWEST CASHPRICES
A8 FOLLOWS:
Hen's K IF Moots, - - Si'Zfl
Tlen's CalfBooU, - - - K,ao
Wealsokeepthe celabrstecBnffalo Workcoo
itautl;unaand .
RepairingdonelnN'eatestStjle.
Our CustosnShopdoeethe finest worsatlow
ciicesiatisfactiosguaranteeuiBeTerycase
41t f DORR ION
ThprnrmntomsoiLiverCom-
S plaint aje uneasiness and pain
a the side. Sometimes the
aiMiB.ua o; aPai" is the shoulder, and is
S nistakenforrheumatism. The
U itoinaeh is ettected with loss ol
Si anC .iknAiu. bowels
fuicoave,uuietimesalternatingwith lax.
lb. head is troubled with pain, and dull, heavy
sensation .considerable loss of memory.accompa-
airiwitnapainluisensaiiuuuiu5'""------
eendone. uitencouipiamiug
,f weakness, debility and low
spirits. Sometimes many ol
a LIVEE
Mcae abovesymptomsaiieuu w-c ,
ilisease, and other times very
Qiew of them, buthe liveris
".neraUy the organ mostin-
Oure tne liiver with
DR. SIMMONS'
Liver Segulator,
i r,rnrationofrootssndherbs,warrantedtobe
slrictlyvegetable.andcandonoinjurytoanyone.
It Has oeen usea uj mu.,
the last 40 years as one ot the mostreUable.em
eaciousaadharmless preparations everolfered to
ties ui-jring. Itta ken regularly and persistently,
itiss'ii to cure dvspepsia, headache, jaundice.
mBSSsV sssstsssss1sssss?' uJB u V C v o 9jOii,a ucstuatUQ)
Ihronic diarrhoea, aifeo
fliions of the bladuer, camp
B lyseatery, affections of the
.R-p.finT.ATOE.Bkiduev. fever nervousness,
a '.bills, diseases of the skin,
! a.mpurity oi tne Diooa,mei-
isi awis ym ss, MSB. """ly, or depression ol
.,r, ,....n t.ui u. tu,iic. or Dains in tne Dowels.
paininthe head, fsver and ague, dropsy, boils,
pain in tne uaca. cku.
Prepared only by J. II. ieEIliIJf ic CO.,
Drng"ists,M.acon,Ga., and 82S Archstreetnil
adelpliia,Pa. 2S
Pricei; by maill.iS.
Atwholesaleby BENOE8TUB & CO., Toledo
Forsale by S.BUCKLAND &S0N, Fremont.
llj ical Institute, established in lsej, lor the cure
of all forms nt private diseases and cases of secret
disorders. When a lady is in trouble she should
oonsu.t the Doctor about her troubles. Suppress
ion of the Menses will receive the Doctor's most
particular attention. Office 71 olichigaa street,
Cleveland, Ohio. 4M1 '
WW- o
or
C
all
ot
I. M. KEELEH'B
A C E N C Y,
2d Story Backland's Old Block,
FREMONT, OHIO.
Fire and Life Insurance,
Real Estate,
Notary Public,
Collections Made,
Taxes Paid la Sandusky County,
Anchor Line of Trans-Atlantic Steam
Packet Ship.
General Information Given by Letter.
Any person desiring Insurance on any descrip
tion of property, or on their Uvea, wiU do weU to
call at this Agency. The companies represented
by me are unsurpassed by any in America.
Home, New York, $4,672,013.50
Phoenix, Hartford, 1,373,594.04
Phenix, New York, 1,862,660.22
International, New York, 1,065,111.72
Andes, Cincinnati, 1,628,215.11
Home, Columbus, 871,452.81
Merchants, Providence, 380,982.00
Imperial, London, gold 10,000,000.00
New Engl'd Liie.Boston, 9,858,953.38
Chicago Eire Losses aU adjusted, and the
amount of Available Assets to pay loss that
may occur at this Agency amounts to over
THIRTY HIJLLIOX DOLLARS.
All descriptions of property Insured and Losses
promply paid-
Less Paid E. II. Underbill, Feb
ruary 7iH 1872:
Phoenix. Hartford 1.500 00
Home. New York 4A0 00
International, New York ISO 00
BUSINESS SOLICITED.
AKCH02 LIKE OCEAN STEAMERS,
Leaving New York every Wednesday and Satur
day. Pss-jage Tickets can be had on application.
GSXEBAL INTELLIGENCE. Persons at a
distance desiring information from this point, can
addresh me. It the subject does not require much
investigation a few postage stumps will be suih
cient remuneration.
Bcisident of Iremont Since 1840.
BxruuROKs: IT. 8. White, Bank fremont,
A. n.Mjuer, rirst nationamanx,
B. P.Buckland.
FOR SALE.
p( k&bl J? KUaM oy ax i 2 leet
UU deeo. on Crophan street, suitable fox btures
FRONT
other business buiidiogtt, $7d per foot.
2L STORY AND BASEMENT
2 BRICK, 40 feet front, on corner of Croghan
and Arch streets, now occupied as a boarding
house.
STORY FRAME DWELLING
(Won Birchard Avenue, lot 132 feet front, 82 i feet
deep, plenty tine fruit, on the hnebt atreH in the
city, only two minutes Talk from pobtoiiice, $2,500
SEVERAL CITY LOTS, eligibly
situated. One-fifth cash, balance in four au-
ments.
F:
OR SALE. In the village of
Norwalk.onAIainStreet, one mile east from
tne Court House. Seven ( t ) acres of land , in high
state of cultivation. House, Barn, sheds and
Hennery, WellandCistern. A fine Orchard with
kinds of Fruit, Berries , Grapes, Ac. Sandy
Soil. Justthe placetora (iardener, with ready
marketforallonecanraiBe. Price,:5,000. Term.
tosuitpurchaser.
2 STORY BRICK, open front,
dwelling above, tin roof, on State street; a first
rate location tor a family grocery. Price
Will give ample time lor payments.
2 ACRES, beautiful sandy soil, lot
No. 5 in Thad Ball's addition. WiU be sold
cheap. Possession given immediately.
A SPLENDID FARM of 117 acres
in Madison township, belonging to the estate
Geo. Beck, deceased, 75 acres weU imDroved,
the balance the best of timber: tine orchard of
choice fruit. It is but a short distance lrom the
line of the new Bailroad from Toledo to Timn.
Possession given at once. WiU be sold at a bar
gain. Call on LM.K.EELEK.
1 L0TS, more or less, in
A 5 VUVJ Oak Wood Cemetery, ranging in
pripe from $6 to $100. Plat of Cemetery grounds
can be seen at my office.
Call at ISAAC M. KEELEB'S Agency.
TO COLONISTS.
IF YOU ARE GOING WEST,
Buy your tickets over the "old reliable" Mis
socbi Pacific Bailboad, the popular route from
St.LouistoSedaUa, Ft. Scott, Lawrence, Kansas
City.Atchison, St. Joseph, Omaha, Denver, and
aU points in Missouri Kansas, Nebraska and Col
orado, to which people are moving. This line has
an un excelled equipment in tine day coachea, Pull
man's palace sleepers. Millers safelif platform
and the patent feat brukf, snd its reputation
for prompt time and sure connectionais proverbial.
For valuable information and assistance, and to
make spra-wl n, raf n( ut lowest rates of
fered by any line, call upon or address S. H.
Thompson Agent Missouri Pacific K. B., Colum
bus, Ohio; or E. A. Fobd, General Passenger
Agent, St. Louis, Mo.
Ao (reticle (oiiNairer hc((os.
Poetry
OLD MUSIC.
Back from the niiaty realms of time,
Back from the years agone,
Faintly we catch the ringing rhyme,
And hear the melody and chime,
Of oldpn songs, of strains sublime,
Liku carol of birds at dawn.
And ever we hear them, soft and low,
TT-tins their music Bweot
Sun,;' i'1 lt we loved in the Ion? ago,
Rippling their liquid ebb and flow,
Drifting their cadence to and fro,
Like the tall of fairy feet.
Some faces our hearU will ever hold,
Some smiles we remember yet,
There were flowing locks like sunset's gold,
There were parted lips of Cupid's mould
And the songs they sang can ne'er grow old.
For our hearts can ne'er forget
The tune that the voice of girlhood sung,
The chords that we loved full well
When hopes were buoyant, hoarts were
young,
When fairy bells in the flower cup rung,
And over from a maiden s tongue
The words of witching spell.
Ah, well-a-day! 'tis a story past,
Which I may not tell again,
Twas a happiness too sweet to last;
The heavy clods on her graves are cast, .
And her voice is stilled, and above her, fast,
Falls the cold wintry rain.
Miscellaneous Selections.
THE END OF AN EXPERIMENT.
"It's a very convenient house."
said Squire Northall. "Water filter-
ng cisterns, asparasus bed. drv
basement icverything in" apple pie
order, bucli an opportunity don't
occur every day."
"les, said Miss Grace Pennv-
backer, eyeing the premises . in a
keen, business sort of way. "What
do you think. Gerty, my dearV"
"1 tuinK as you trunk, auntv."
said Gertrude, who was the most
docile little white lamb of a damsel
that the imagination could conceive.
'Then we'll take it," said Miss
Grace, "I'll pay a quarter's rent in
advance, and sign the. papers to
morrow night."
The 'Squire took snurr in an em
barrassed sort of way and said:
"Excuse me ma'am, but is it true
that you're one of those woman's
rights people?"
"What difference does it make
whether I am xr not?" shortly de
manded Miss Pennvbacker.
"Because I don't believe in that
sort of thing," answered the 'Squire,
"and I won't let my house to one of
'em."
"Well then," said Miss Grace,
1 1 v . .
Draveiy, "i ao oeiieve in a woman s
right to vote if she chooses, to lec
ture if she chooses, to stay at home
and make puddings if she chooses,
and to be just as independent as she
chooses. If that's being a woman's
advocate, I'm one."
"Then," said the 'Squire, thrusting
his hands deeply into hi9 trowsers
pockets, "I'd rather not let my house
to you."
"Then you can let it alone," said
Miss Grace, tipping her round hat
defiantly on her nose. "Come,
Gerty."
And the obedient niece dutifully
followed in her warlike aunt's foot
steps. "What shall we do, aunty?" Ger
trude asked, when they had walked
on a little way.
"There are houses enough," said
aunt Grace; "and I won't be dicta
ted to! I tell you what, Gerty, the
more one sees of men the more one
gets disgusted. I wish I knew of an
island inhabited solely by women !"
"So do 1, aunty, said Gerty. cling-
lng to Miss Graces protectin
skirts.
Miss Pennybacker selected the
next most eligible house on her list
a Swiss cottage on the hill, owned
by au apathetic old lady, who would
let her house to Mepbistopheless
himself if he had come with a dress
coat, French boots, and suitable rec-
ommeudation from the red estate
agent.
"What kind of a neighborhood is
it?" asked Miss Pennybacker.
"Well" drawled out old Mrs. Hall,
'"taint- re Klrali- Tim A,.irT
who lives in the big house an ec
centric sort of a man, that won't
have a woman nowhere atound, and
there ain't no society, and "
"I don t want society, interrup
ted Miss Pennybacker. "Give me
the keys, and I'll take possession
at once!'-' ,
Great was Mis9 Penny backer's
gleeful self-congratulation, when she
found herself safely installed in
"Laurel ' Lodge,." which was the
name of the Swiss cottage on the
hill.
"Roses, daffodils, honeysuckles,
and plenty of currant bushes," she
chuckled. "I'll send for a load of
books at once, and get your easel
up in the north room, Gerty."
"It will be so nice, aunt," said
Gertrude, who was one of those hu
man mirrors who reflect the
thoughts, ideas and propensities, of
those who surround them.
Miss Grace Pennybacker was fat,
fair and thirty-five a smooth-browed,
merry-eyed old maid; and Gerty.
at sixteen was just like a daisy
fresh, innocent and blushing.
Miss Pennybacker believed in the
independence of women, and had a
store of theories which she ventila
ted on every possible occasion.
Gerty believed just what her aunt
did.
"And now," said aunt Grace, "I'll
show that old blockhead Northall
whether two women can be indepen
dent or not. I won't have a man
about the premises, for I always be
lieved that whatever man can do wo
men can do much better, if she only
chooses to turn her whole mind upon
it."
So aunt Grace had the walls white
washed by an Irish female, the gar
den hoed by a stout German frau,
and her piazza columns painted by a
sharpfaced daughter of the soil who
"worked round the neighborhood"
for ten shillings a day and her
board.
"Doesn't this suit you, my dear?"
said Miss Grace, coming in from the
llower borders with an apron full of
gladiolus bulbs, and a trowel under
her ami.
"Yes, aunty, dear," said Gerty,
descending from her chamber with
a purple velvet bound prayer-book
in her hand, and a white muslin
dress, and a round hat to match.
Miss Graco demurred somewhat.
"I'm only goin to church, aunty,"
said Gerty.
"To hear a man preach?"
"Buf, what shall I do, aunty?"
"Better stay at home and read a
sermon."
"We haven't any sermons, auntj'."
"I could preach one myself, I dare
say," said aunt Grace, ambitiously.
"Well, go just for to-day. Next
week nil order down Blair, Chan
ning and Spurgeon."
"They are men, too, I suppose,
auntj", saiil Gertrude, a little mis
cliievously. .
But Miss Pennybacker thought
proper not to answer her, and went
gently on her way. '
"My birth-da3', she tuougut as
she leaned back in the rooker, as
Gerty's departing footsteps died
away on the ear. "Well, well, how
the time passes to be sure. It seems
but a day since I was as young as
Gertrude there, with Harry Ames
drawing my picture, in a rustic dres9
and a wreath of corn flowers and
wheat as Flora. I believe I should
have married Harry Ames if it had
not been for the meddling of Sarah
Clifford. He did love me and
yes, I do think 1 loved him. Well,
perhaps it is better so, and yet
"Hallo-o : ' shouted a deep gruff
voice over the hedge of arbor-vitie
that separated Miss Pennybacker's
domain from the eccentric disciple
of Galen, who kept houso with a se
lect corps of men ; 'I wish you would
keep j'our hens at home, scratching
up my strawberry beds."
"Hens j-ourself," somewhat ironic
ally responded Miss Grace. "How
can they when I don't keep any."
"Whose are they then r
"How should I know! Who are
you?'
"I'm Doctor Ames : And! wisu
you'd tell your servant girl to leave
off flirting over the fence with my
stable man, at least until he gets the
wagon wheels washed."
"If you are Doctor Ames," philo
sophically responded Miss Penny-
backer, "I think you might be better
in making pills and powders, than
quarreling over the fence with your
neighbors."
There was a moment's silence then
a rustling among the leaves of the
arbor-vita; hedge, and a round,good
humored face appeared above the
green luxuriance.
"I do belive you areGrace Penny
backer," said the adjurer of woman
kind. "Of course I am, said Miss Grace;
"and you are Harry Ames, grown
older and not half so handsome!
"Shake hands," said Doctor
Ames.
"I would if I could reach, said
Miss Grace.
"Hold on a minute, I'll come round
by the gite," exclaimed the doctor.
And this was the unromantic way
in whic'j the two lovers, separated
for eighteen years, met again.
"As brisk as ever, eh Grace?" said
the Doctor, "and not married yet!"
"I should think not!" Mi83 Grace
announced emphatically.
"And why not?"
"That's my business!"
7.'he Doctor looked roguishly up.
Miss Pennybacker laughed; she
could not help it.
When Gerty came home, casting
about in her mind how to tell her
aunt that she had promised the Rev.
Carlos Canterbury to take charge of
a class m the bund ay School, she
found aunt Grace chatting familiar
ly with the ferocious medical man
who was the terror of'half the coun
try. "I needn't tell her just yet,"
thought Gertrude.
But the catastrophe couldn't be
put off forever.
"Aunty: gasped uerty, running
in to Miss Pen-backer's room the
next day, "the Rev. Mr. Canterbury
is trying to open the garden gate.
May I go and unlock it?"
"Yes,child, yes,' said Miss Grace,
scratching her nose. These men
will somehow work their way'in, and
I don't see any use to struggle
against fate."
So while Gerty and the Rev. Car
los Canterbury mingled romance and
theology together in the front garden
Harry Ames and his sweatheart
talked a melody of auld lang syne
and asparagus, rhubarb plants and
reproach, over the hedge in the kit
chen garden.
"It's all nonsense, I know," said
Miss Pennybacker to herself, "but he
certainly has improved !"
"Aunty, dear," said Gertrude, one
day in October, "I wish you would
tell me what you really think of mat
rimony; am I too young for it?"
"Am I too old?" demanded aunt
urace, turning witn a iook ol comi
cal perplexity to her neice.
"I dont't know what you mean,
aunty t
"What do you mean, Gerty?"
"Mr. Canterbury has asked me to
marry him," faltered Gerty, growing
pinK.
"And I've promised to be Doctor
Ames' wife," said Miss Penybacker
striving resolutely not to be embar
rassed ; "so wile we are about it we
may as well have two weddings."
"Oh, aunty?" whispered Gertrude,
nestling close up to Grace, "I'm so
glad! because I really don't think
I should have dared to get married
unless you did too."
"Child," said Miss Grace, smooth
ing the girl's golden hair, here's an
end to our independence."
"No, aunty, said Gerty, coming
boldly out with her first original
opinion; "it s oniy tne Beginning w
it"
And Miss Pennybacker did not
contradict her niece.
The True Man.
Nine-tenths of the alleged inhu
manity of mankind is owing to their
being'deccived. If people are sure
of au accident or a calamity, erowds
hasten to relieve it. By veracity we
charm in conversation; by sincerity
we influence opinion; by trust
worthiness we render friends
loving and secure, add to the gener
al confidence of men in men, and by
thus strengthening the foundations
of society, acquire the right to an
anlagous personal sense of worth
and firmness. Truth gives sense of
security lo the feeble man, as lying
does of insecurity to the strongest
The true man has but one answer to
give to interrogators, one story to
tell them, nobody's face to fear.
Do'nt do it unless it
morally and pecuniarily.
will
pay
The Eight Hour Truce.
The surrender of the eight hour
strike is but a hollow and short
lived truce. They have all given un
der protest written or oral, and with
no expectation that the arrangement
will last long. Those who have
yielded most submissively have
frankly tola their Lands that the
new terms are only an experiment,
and that it would be sure to fail;
and the next fall or winter, or when
ever slack work or hard times come,
the concession would have to be re
considered. The strikers themselves
begin to realize this and are already
anxious for the future. The success
of the strike, so far as it has been a
success, has depended wholly on
the present advantage the men en-
ioy. Building wors ana worK or
many other kinds is in good demand
at this particular season; and the
employers, being taken by surprise,
and not being able to stand a loss
from suspension of their business,
have been forced to surrender. It
It is a fair question whether they
will not all lose money by the
abridgment of the labor period and
the increase in wages; but had they
suspended, they would undoubtedly
have lost . more. The moment a
tight pinch comes there will be a
perfect certainty of large loss by
keeping the shop9 open, and of less
loss by closing them, and the latter
will be done unless the workmen
will stand a lengthening of hours or
a decrease ot wages, inen it win
be the employers' turn to make
these peremptory "demands,', which
at present emanate only from the
hands at the instigation or the
union. This will not be retaliation,
nor anything looking like it; but it
will be a return to a more normal
state of things than the present It
will be forced upon the employers to
save themselves the only alterna
tive being to suspend work and let
the consequences fall on those who
have inyited them. Probably the
latter will theu be glad enough to
make some compromise on matters
where they now refuse to do so. The
collapse of the union power will al
so be hastened, as we remarked the
other day, by the resistance among
the workingmen themselves to the
intolerable rule that no union man
shall earn money more than eight
hours a day. We predicted, from
theory alone, the failure of that ty
rannical regulation, and it is the
opinion of sagacious employers that
it will cause the downfall of tne un
ion if there were no destructive agen
cy within its bosom. Threats and
violence may coerce men to observe
it for the time being, but in the long
run they will surely refuse to do so,
jy. T. Journal of Commerce
"Couldn't Get the Right Flop."
In the year 1813, during the Mil-
lerite excitement in the unusually
quiet town of Durham, "Aunt Sally
" who would weigh nigh unto
200 pounds, came to the conclusion
that she was bound "to go up," and
one evening in the meeting, in the
midst of a warm season ot exhorta
tion, she arose and said :
"Oh? brethren and sisters, bless
the Lord? I'll soon get away from
this wicked world; I'm going to meet
the Lord in a few days. My faith is
powerful strong. Oh yes, powerful
strong it is. So strong," continued
the lady extending her arms and
motioning them like a bird on the
win sr. "that it does seem if I could
fly right away now and meet the
Lord in the air."
The minister, who was a great en
thusiast, on going up to her encour
aged her by exclaiming:
"Try, sister, try; perhaps you can
fly if your faith is only strong
enough."
She was standing near a window
which was raised on account of the
oppressive heat, for it was summer.
With her handkerchief in one haad
and her fan in the other, she mount
ed the seat and then to the top of
the pew, anil gave a leap iuto the
air, expecting to ascend heavenward,
Rnt the law of gravitation was too
much for her faith and the gravity
of the audience. Down she came
with an enormous and not very an
gelic grunt, shaking the whole house
with the concussion.
She arose, folded her wings, and
with en-eat meekness sneaked back
into the seat evidently disappointed
The next evening some of the
vouns folks asked her:
"Aunt Sailv, way tuun t you uy
last night when you tried so hard?"
I couldn't get the right flop:
was the meek and conclusive an
swer.
0
Scene at an Auction.
A writer in the Spirit of (he Times
thus sketches a scene in an auction
room that he witnessed a few days
since. The articles offered he said
were "damaged gooas auu
that
women doat on them as they do
on
curly-headed babies.
The first articles put up were a
pair of blankets for which more than
a dozen bids were immediately of
fered. The puzzled auctioneer,how
ever, caught up the highest which
was a dollar, from a female who
seemed determined to have them at
any price, when ere he could say
"o-oin" a male cried out "dollar
fifty" from the opposite side of the
room.
"Two dollars!" echoed the woman
elbowing her way through the dense
mass of females, who were seperatcd
from the male3 by a long counter
upon which the glib-tongued auc
tioneer walked to and fro with his
goods.
"Two fifty," nodded the man.
"Thank ye, sir; going at two tif-
t , cried the auctioneer.
"Three: screametr tne woman.
"Gin the fifty !" said the auction
eer, turning to the . woman, with a
half suppressed smile on his small,
sober visage.
A nod from the woman.
"Three fifty I'm offered; give me
four: Home don't be afraid, they're
worth double the monev."
" Yes, and that's all. " i
"Sold!" cried the dealer in ham-1
mer almost bursting with laughter,
"to Captain
m;thr.r.t. John for
four dollars."
"Smith!" cried the woman, "what
my husband?'' rsising herseii on tip
toe to catch a glimpse of him.
"Why you god-tor-nothmg man;
you've been bidding against your
own wife! Oh! you impudence! but
I won't have them about the house,"
"Sorry He Did not Learn a Trade."
A young man, well dressed and of
prepossensing appearance, called at
our office recently and inquired in
great earnestness if we had employ
ment of any kind to give him for
but a few days, if no longer, as he
twa3 a stranger in the city, out of
money, and unable to pay for a few
days' board and lodging. He fur
ther stated that he was a book-keeper,
but after a dilligent search, he
had found no one who wanted any
help in that line, nor could he obtain
employment at anything that he felt
competent to perform in a satisfac
tory manner. The positions of
clerk and book-keoper. he remarked,
were all filled, and applicants for
them far io excess of the demand.
"I am sorry," said he, "that I did
not learn a trade."
The appeals of the young man ex
cited our sympathy, but, requiring
no farther assistance in the office,
we were compelled to reply to his
eager questioning that we could not
employ him.
The door closed after him, and he
again went out to continue what, in
all probability, proved to ba a fruit
less search for employment But
his words lingered behind and, as we
sat musing on them, recalled to mind
the oft repeated expressions of the
mechanic, in which ho reproves him
self for want of foresight in selecting
an occupation. Here I am doomed,
he says, to toil in a shop, at work
which is hard, affording but poor
pay. Like a dog, I must come at
the call of a whistle, or like a ser
vant obey the summons of a bell;
had I studied book-keeping or en
tered a store as a clerk, 1 might have
been leading a much easier and more
pleasurable life.
In the cases cited, we find one dis
satisfied with hi3 selection, and wish
ing to exchange places. And the
difficulty at once presents itself, as
to how we shall decide for them and
the classes they represent, so that
the seeming mistakes in selection
may be remedied. We acknowledge
we are unequal to the task.
Food, clothing, tools, machinery.
houses, ships, and an almost endless
variety of other thing3 are contin
ually in demand, which require the
labor of farmers and mechanics;
while that clas8 which makes ex
changes (merchants) is of necessity
comparatively few in number, and,
therefore, needs but a small force of
assistants. The necessities of the
millions of earth require by far the
largesr number of persons to be em
ployed in agriculture and manufac
tures. Whenever then, through
pride or any other motive, parents
disregard the law and encourage
thir sons in seeking after situations
as clerks, book-keepers, etc., rather
than to engage in those pursuits lor
which there, is always a natural de
mand, there must be a correspond
ing amount of suffering as a penal
ty. Hence we find the so called re
spectable occupations are giuttered,
while the mechanical branches are
suffering through the lack of skilled
laDors. An advertisement for a
clerk will quickly bring to the office
door a small army of applicants of
ail sizes and ages, while the want
column may plead several days for a
good mechanic, and fail to meet with
a response.
Sorry he did not learn a trade."
Let apprentices and journeymen,
who may be bewailing their lot at
once resolve to thus repine no lon
ger, but by hard study and close
application master their trades, and
having done so, demand a fair com
pensation. Then by adding to skill,
honesty, punctuality and economy
in expenditures, there need be no
fear that they shall be compelled at
any time to beg for sufficient em
ployment to pay for a day's board
and lodging. Coach Jfdker,n Jour.
Saturday Night.
How many a kiss has been given
how many a curse how many a ca
ress how many a Iook how many a
kind word how many a soul lost
how many a loved one lowered into
a narrow chamber now many a babe
has gone from earth to heaven how
many a little crib or cradle stands
silent now which last Saturday night
held the rarest treasure of the heart
- A week is a life. A week is a his
tory. It makes events of sorrow and
gladness, of which people' never
heard. Go home to your family,
man of business! Go home to your
family erring wanderer! Go home
to the chair that awaits you, wrong
ed waif on life's breakers ! Go home
to those you love man of toil, and
give one night to the joys and com
forts fast flying by.
Leave your books oi complex fig
ares your dingy office your busy
shop: Rest with those you love,
for heaven only knows what the next
Saturday night may bring you!
Forget the world of care and battles
of life which have lurrowed the
week ! Draw close around the fam
ily hearth! Saturday night has
awaited your coming sadness, in
tears and in silence. Oo home to
those you love, and as you ba3k in
the loved presence and meet to re
turn the embrace of your hearts
pets, strive to be a better man and
bless heaven forgiving his children
so dear a stepping-stone in the river
to the eternal, as Saturday night
A Beautiful Sentiment.
Life bears us on like the stream of
a niichtv river. Our boat at first
glides down a narrow cnannei
through the playful murmurings of
O a . a
the little brook and the windings of
of the grassy borders. The trees
shed their young blossoms over our
heads; the flowers on the brink
seem to oiler themselves to our young
hands; we arc happy in hope and
rrasi) eagerly as tue oeauues
around; but the stream hurries on
and still our hands are empty. Our
course in youth and manhood is
along a wider and deeper flood,
amid ejects more striking and mag
nificent We are animated at the
moviDg picture of enjoyment and
inuusujr pas 'uu" ""
exciteu as souie suoniiveu uiSp-
pointment The stream bears us on,
and our joys and gnels are alike left
beuirid us. ..we may oe au.p-
wrecseu we cauuou uu uci,,
cannot be
whether rough or smooth, the river
hastens to its home till the roar of
the ocean is in our ears, and the
floods are lifted up around us; and
we take our leave of earth and its
inhabitants, until of our , further
voyage there is no witness save the
Infinite and Eternal
1
PRIVATE HABITS OF GREELEY.
Observed in 1867 by Marked Twain.
An intimate acquaintance with a
distant relative of the editor ot tie
Tribune puts it into my power to
furnish the public " with the last
positively the very last link neces
sary to perfect the ccaia oi Knowl
edge already, in its possession con
cerning" Mr. Greeley: ;I mean his
private habits. We know all about
it as regards every other department
of his life and services. Because,
whenever a magazinist or a book
maker is employed to write, and can
not think of a subject, he writes
about Horace Greeley.- Even the
boys in the schools have quit build
ing inspired "compositions about
Ihe Horse," and have gone to do
ing Horace Greeley instead; ana
when declamation day comes around,
their voices are no longer "still for
war" and Patrick Henry, but for
peace and Horace Greeley. Now, the
natural result of all this i3 that the
public have come at last to think
that this man has no life but public
life, no nature but a public nature,
no habits but public habits. This is
all wrong. Mr. Greeley has a pri
vate life. Mr. Greeley has private
habits.
Mr. Greeley gets up at three
o'clock in the morning; for it is one
of his favorite maxims that only ear
ly rising can keep the health unim
paired and the brain vigorous. He
then wakes up all the household and
assembles them in the library by
candle light; and, after quoting the
beautiful lines;
Early to bed and early to rise.
Makes a man healthy, wealthy, and wise,
he appoints each individual's task for
the day, sets him at it with encour
aging words, and goes back to bed
again.
At half-past eleven o'clock Mr.
Greeley rises again. He shaves
himself. He considers that there is
great virtue and economy in shaving
himself. He does it with a dull ra
zor, sometimes humming part of a
tune (ne Knows partxif a tuna, and
takes an innocent delight in regard
ing it as the first half of Old Hun
dred, but parties familiar with that
hymn have felt obliged to confess
that they could not recognize it, and,
therefore, the noise he makes is
doubtless an unconscious original
composition of Mr. Greeley's), and
sometimes, when the razor is espec
pecially dull, he accompanies him
self with a formula like this : u
the razor, and the outcast
who made it" H. G.
He then goes out into his model
garden, and applies his vast store of
agricultural knowledge to the amek
ioration of his cabbages; after which
he writes an able agricultural article
for the instruction of American
farmers, his soul cheered the while
with the reflection that if cabbages
were worth $11 apiece, his model
farm would pay.
He next goes to breakfast, which
is a frugal, abstemious meal with
him, and consists of nothing but
such things as the mirket affords,
nothing more. ' He drinks nothing
but water nothing whatever but
water and coffee and tea and Scotch
ale and lager beer and lemonade with
a fly in it sometimes a hou3e fly and
sometimes a horse fly, according to
the amount of inspiration required "
to warm him up to his daily duties.
During breakfast he reads the Trib
une ail through, and enjoys the sat
isfaction of knowing that all the bril
liant things in it written by Young
and Cooke and Hazard and myself,
are attributed to him by a confiding
and ignorant public
After breakfast he writes a short
editorial, and puts a large da3h at
the beginning of it, thin ( .),
which is the same as if he put H. G.
after it, and takes a savage pleasure
in reflecting that none of us under
strappers can use the dash, except
in profane conversation when chaf
ing over the outrage. He write3 this
editorial in hia own handwriting.
He does it because he is so vain of
his penmanship. He always ' did
take an inordinate pride in penman
ship. He hired out once in his
young days, as a writing master, but
the enterprise failed. The pupils
could not translate hi marks with
any certainty. His first copy was
"Virtue is its own reward and they
got it "Washing with soap is low
and absurd," and so the trustees dis
charged him for attempting to con
vey bad morals through the medium
of worse penmanship. But, as I
was saying, he writes his morning
editorial. Then he tries to read it .
over, and can't do it, and so sends i t
to the printers, and they try to read
it and can t do it; and so they set it
up at random, as you may say, put
ting in what words they can make
and when they get aground on a
long word they put it "protection"
or "universal suffrage," and spar oft
and paddle ahead, and next morn-
ing, if the degraded public can tell
what it is all about they say H, G.
wrote it, and if they can't they say
it i3 one of those imbecile under
strappers, and that is the end of it
On Sundays Mr. Greeley sits in a
prominent pew in Mr. Chapin'a
church and lets on that he is asleep,
and the congregation regard it is an
eccentricity of genius.
When be is going to appear in
public, Mr. Greeley spends two
hours on his toilet He is the most
painstaking and elaborate man about
getting up his dress that lives in
America. This is his chiefest and
his pleasantest foible. He puts on
his old white overcoat and turns np
the collar. He puts on a soiled
shirt, saved from the wash, and
leaves one end of the collar unbut
toned. He puts on his most dilapi
dated hat, turns its wrong side be
fore, cants it onto the back of his
head, and jams an extra dent in the
side of it He puts on his most at
rocious boots, and spends tea min
utes tucking the left leg of his pants
into his boot-top in what shall seem
the most careless and unstained way.
But his cravat it is into the ar
rangement of his cravat that he
throws all his soul, all the powers
of his great mind. After fixing at
it for forty minutes before the glass
it is perfect it is askew in every
way it overflows his coat collar on
one side and sinks into oblivion on
the other it climbs and it delves
around about his neck the knot ia
conspicuously displayed under his
left ear, and it stretches one of its
long emls straight out horizontally,
and the other goes after his eye, in
the good of Toodleg fashion and
then, completely and marvellously
apparelled, Mr. Greeley strides forth,
rolling like a sailor, a miracle of as
tounding costumery, the awe and
wonder of the nations!
But I haven't time to tell the rest '
of his' private habits. Safaceisthat
he is an upright and an honest man
a practical, great grained man a
useful man to his nation and his gen
eration a famous man who has
justly earned, his celebrity rand
withal the worst dressed man in thu
or any other country, even though
he does take so much pains and trafc
on so many frilla about It

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